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5x5x5 Audio Works

5x5x5 Audio Works

By The Arts Institute, University of Plymouth
5 x artists. 5 x writers. 5 x researchers. The 5x5x5 is a new art and culture series that brings together diverse voices to open up a critical debate about pressing global concerns.

As part of The Arts Institute Legacies and Futures seasonthe 5x5x5 invites writers and researchers to respond to the provocation “Everything is changing. Nothing has changed. Change is coming.” Their work is presented alongside the artwork of five artists commissioned through The Arts Institute Covid-19 art fund.
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Andy Cluer - Hum

5x5x5 Audio Works

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Zoë James - Gypsies And Travellers: Myths and Realities
Dr Zoë James is Associate Professor in Criminology at the University of Plymouth, UK. Her key research interests lie in examining hate from a critical perspective with a particular focus on the harms experienced by Gypsies, Travellers and Roma. Zoë’s research has explored how mobility, accommodation, policing and planning have impacted on the lived experience of Gypsies, Travellers and Roma. She has presented her work nationally and internationally and is Co-Director of the International Network for Hate Studies. In this podcast Dr Zoë James explores the way that Gypsies and Travellers have been kept apart from wider society via myths about their identities and cultures that rarely conform to their lived realities. Through the use of quotes from empirical research, the voices of Gypsies and Travellers are heard that evidence their social, economic and political exclusion. Romantic notions of nomadism and racialised perceptions of Gypsy and Traveller legitimacy underpin the harms of exclusion they experience in their daily lives.
10:57
October 29, 2020
Anna Somner - Contested Heritage: Statues and Public Memorialisation
Anna recently graduated with a First Class Honours in History with English from the University of Plymouth. Her background is museums and heritage, with a focus on the themes of decolonisation and contested history. Anna’s dissertation, entitled ‘From imperialism to repatriation: the Royal Cornwall Museum as a case study in changing responses to indigenous artefacts in collections’, explored the museum’s collection of Māori taiahas (indigenous New Zealanders wooden spears) and discussed decolonisation and repatriation, comparing the Cornish case with three other museums in the South West. In 2020, she was awarded an IGNITE Micro-Internships, University of Plymouth, becoming a Digital History intern under the supervision of Professor Daniel Maudlin of Cornerstone Heritage. In this role, she has been researching and writing about contested heritage and the statues debate, with a focus on local history. Working from a personal perspective, Anna’s podcast opens up some of the complexities around the statues and public memorialisation debate in Britain. Protests following the tragic death of George Floyd, an African-American who was killed under US police custody, created a wave of global protests steered by the Black Lives Matter movement. In the UK this re-sparked and triggered local, regional and national protests. The podcast focuses on the toppling of slave trader Edward Colston’s statue in Bristol, and the contested heritage in Plymouth, UK, with the renaming of Sir John Hawkins Square, the first English slave trader.
13:21
October 29, 2020
Andy Cluer - Hum
Andy Cluer is a visual artist based in the South West, UK, working predominantly with sculpture and sound. His sonic work investigates place, both real and imagined, through the mapping of memory, sound and perceptual experience. Andy’s work often questions the relationship between auditory and visual awareness, exploring different ways of listening and how sound can be experienced through non audio mediums and similarly how images can be invoked by sound. Drift | Hum is a body of audio works which investigates our immediate environments through the relationship between human and nature in our new, unfamiliar landscapes found during the 2020 global pandemic. By exhibiting sounds and words, the artwork focuses on how sound perception, through listening, can invoke visual perception as a way of interpreting subtle changes in our environment. Through the quietness, intimacy and the return of undisturbed nature, undamaged by human activity in lockdown; to the reappearance of human sounds, the droning of mechanical machineries concealing the emergence of wildlife with the easing of restrictions; and the tensions and anxieties of the long term effects of human habits – these audio works are used to create an auditory visual awareness of the environment and conduct a deeper attentiveness of our relationship with the world. Drift was composed by Field and Foley recordings, with the inclusion of spoken words. This audio performance uses specific locations, sounds and words to detail the relationship between human and nature and capture the visual characteristics and noises of these settings which saw their soundscapes change through the transitioning of phases. The arrangement of Hum was composed through Foley sounds and human vocals and continues the reoccurring theme of the relationship between human and nature introduced in Drift. The act of touch and feel against the surfaces of a single sculptural sound object was performed to compose the Foley sounds – resulting in a droning soundscape. The vocals were used to recreate a human interpretation of this soundscape and engage a conversation between person and nature, reflecting on the sounds and our experiences of the everyday. The vocals on Hum were performed by Pete Last.
07:32
October 28, 2020
Andy Cluer - Drift
Andy Cluer is a visual artist based in the South West, UK, working predominantly with sculpture and sound. His sonic work investigates place, both real and imagined, through the mapping of memory, sound and perceptual experience. Andy’s work often questions the relationship between auditory and visual awareness, exploring different ways of listening and how sound can be experienced through non audio mediums and similarly how images can be invoked by sound. Drift | Hum is a body of audio works which investigates our immediate environments through the relationship between human and nature in our new, unfamiliar landscapes found during the 2020 global pandemic. By exhibiting sounds and words, the artwork focuses on how sound perception, through listening, can invoke visual perception as a way of interpreting subtle changes in our environment. Through the quietness, intimacy and the return of undisturbed nature, undamaged by human activity in lockdown; to the reappearance of human sounds, the droning of mechanical machineries concealing the emergence of wildlife with the easing of restrictions; and the tensions and anxieties of the long term effects of human habits – these audio works are used to create an auditory visual awareness of the environment and conduct a deeper attentiveness of our relationship with the world. Drift was composed by Field and Foley recordings, with the inclusion of spoken words. This audio performance uses specific locations, sounds and words to detail the relationship between human and nature and capture the visual characteristics and noises of these settings which saw their soundscapes change through the transitioning of phases. The arrangement of Hum was composed through Foley sounds and human vocals and continues the reoccurring theme of the relationship between human and nature introduced in Drift. The act of touch and feel against the surfaces of a single sculptural sound object was performed to compose the Foley sounds – resulting in a droning soundscape. The vocals were used to recreate a human interpretation of this soundscape and engage a conversation between person and nature, reflecting on the sounds and our experiences of the everyday. The vocals on Hum were performed by Pete Last.
05:06
October 28, 2020
Alex Cahill - Compassion in the Community
Dr Alex Cahill is Programme Lead for the BA Directing, and BA Drama and Theatre Practice courses at the University of Plymouth. Her research interests focus on the mental, spiritual and social welfare of performers and integrate Boalian techniques and sustainability education into multiple facets of performer training. In this podcast, Dr Alex Cahill discusses the importance of showing compassion to those in our community who recently have come out of isolation or who may have experienced loss or bereavement during this time. Reflecting on the work she does with St Luke’s Hospice, Dr Cahill explores the need for compassion and suggests that growing our understanding and grace with others would be a welcomed change in our new society.
10:22
October 28, 2020
Tjawangwa Dema - Nothing Begets Nothing
Tjawangwa Dema is the author of two books of poetry, most recently The Careless Seamstress, which won the Sillerman First Book Prize. She is an Honorary Senior Research Associate at the University of Bristol and facilitates writing workshops around the globe. In addition to appearing in various journals and anthologies, selections of her work have been translated into languages including Spanish and German. She co-produces the Africa Writes literary festival in Bristol. what is the heart of nothing but gesture? we collapse meaning when we say sameness everyone knows time is a hummingbird scrumping seconds to hover over hunger and who’s to say what’s worth keeping except keeping itself I mean that it is having that becomes king – old sickness so slow it’s molasses in the blood time moves differently for the oppressed and the oppressor scuttles and flurries sits and shifts and what fury it takes to keep things is matched only by an equal fist not violence or prayer more a toppling the midwife who asks the mother still bleeding – small mouth stuck suckling firmly at her breast her son alive but black – what epitaph she has chosen to call him by makes a warm leaving of this boy’s coming she is echoing an old question though she says she does not know it the new mother searches for new language the colony was there – fecund land is now here – black body she wants to say Methuselah but the midwife writes Abiku muscular time changing nothing again and again the midwife is with not alone in her question she conflates time like a hangman’s riddle asks who is both born alive and is already dead? it is nothing to say the dead cannot resist cannot undo that they revolt but cannot do – what these living do – weighed down and fixed as they are by stone and sand whatever else is consequence snake that it is time eats at itself its petty petty pace nothing changing nothing while the colony shifts shape no lilt here something hisses and hums not even nothing begets nothing.
02:48
October 28, 2020
Arun Sood - How We Remember: Memory Studies, Monuments, and Black Lives Matter
Dr Arun Sood is Lecturer in English at The University of Plymouth who works across Memory Studies, Romanticism, and Postcolonial literatures. He is the author of Robert Burns and The United States of America: Poetry, Print, and Memory, c. 1786-1866, and is currently developing a new project on Global Romanticisms. In June 2020, a statue of Edward Colston, the seventeenth-century transatlantic slave trader, was forcibly removed from the centre of Bristol prompting widespread debate about statues and commemorative symbols across Britain's towns and cities. In this podcast, Dr Arun Sood discusses how does academic scholarship on memory, race, and nationhood can help us to understand this event and its wider repercussions in the wake of Black Lives Matter.
10:09
October 28, 2020