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Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing: The Beat

Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing: The Beat

By Jennifer Miller
Listen to the latest updates and news from the editorial team of the Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing.
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In Their Own Words: Dr. Quin Denfeld
Sympathetic Markers are Different Between Clinical Responders and Nonresponders After Left Ventricular Assist Device Implantation Denfeld, Quin E. PhD, RN; Lee, Christopher S. PhD, RN, FAAN, FAHA, FHFSA; Woodward, William R. PhD; Hiatt, Shirin O. MS, RN, MPH; Mudd, James O. MD; Habecker, Beth A. PhD The Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing: 7/8 2019 - Volume 34 - Issue 4 - p E1-E10 doi: 10.1097/JCN.0000000000000580 https://journals.lww.com/jcnjournal/pages/articleviewer.aspx?year=2019&issue=07000&article=00011&type=Fulltext Abstract Background Clinical response to left ventricular assist devices (LVADs), as measured by health-related quality of life, varies among patients after implantation; however, it is unknown which pathophysiological mechanisms underlie differences in clinical response by health-related quality of life. Objective The purpose of this study was to compare changes in sympathetic markers (β-adrenergic receptor kinase-1 [βARK1], norepinephrine [NE], and 3,4-dihydroxyphenylglycol [DHPG]) between health-related quality of life clinical responders and nonresponders from pre– to post–LVAD implantation. Methods We performed a secondary analysis on a subset of data from a cohort study of patients from pre– to 1, 3, and 6 months after LVAD implantation. Clinical response was defined as an increase of 5 points or higher on the Kansas City Cardiomyopathy Questionnaire Clinical Summary score from pre– to 6 months post–LVAD implantation. We measured plasma βARK1 level with an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and plasma NE and DHPG levels with high-performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection. Latent growth curve modeling was used to compare the trajectories of markers between groups. Results The mean (SD) age of the sample (n = 39) was 52.9 (13.2) years, and most were male (74.4%) and received LVADs as bridge to transplantation (69.2%). Preimplantation plasma βARK1 levels were significantly higher in clinical responders (n = 19) than in nonresponders (n = 20) (P = .001), but change was similar after LVAD (P = .235). Preimplantation plasma DHPG levels were significantly lower in clinical responders than in nonresponders (P = .002), but the change was similar after LVAD (P = .881). There were no significant differences in plasma NE levels. Conclusions Preimplantation βARK1 and DHPG levels are differentiating factors between health-related quality of life clinical responders and nonresponders to LVAD, potentially signaling differing levels of sympathetic stimulation underlying clinical response.
03:25
December 8, 2020
In Their Own Words: Dr. Christopher Lee
Patterns of Heart Failure Dyadic Illness Management: The Important Role of Gender Lee, Christopher S. PhD, RN, FAHA, FAAN, FHFSA; Sethares, Kristen A. PhD, RN, CNE, FAHA; Thompson, Jessica Harman PhD, RN, CCRN-K; Faulkner, Kenneth M. PhD, RN, ANP; Aarons, Emily; Lyons, Karen S. PhD, FGSA https://journals.lww.com/jcnjournal/Fulltext/2020/09000/Patterns_of_Heart_Failure_Dyadic_Illness.2.aspx?context=FeaturedArticles&collectionId=2
02:49
November 15, 2020
Interview with Dr. Christopher Lee and Dr. Karen Lyons Patterns of Heart Failure Dyadic Illness Management The Important Role of Gender
Patterns of Heart Failure Dyadic Illness Management: The Important Role of Gender Lee, Christopher S. PhD, RN, FAHA, FAAN, FHFSA; Sethares, Kristen A. PhD, RN, CNE, FAHA; Thompson, Jessica Harman PhD, RN, CCRN-K; Faulkner, Kenneth M. PhD, RN, ANP; Aarons, Emily; Lyons, Karen S. PhD, FGSA The Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing: 9/10 2020 - Volume 35 - Issue 5 - p 416-422 doi: 10.1097/JCN.0000000000000695 https://journals.lww.com/jcnjournal/Fulltext/2020/09000/Patterns_of_Heart_Failure_Dyadic_Illness.2.aspx?context=FeaturedArticles&collectionId=2 Abstract Background The ways in which patients with heart failure (HF) and their care partners work together to manage HF are often overlooked. Objective The aim of this study was to identify and compare different patterns of HF dyadic illness management. Methods This was a secondary analysis of data on HF dyads. Heart failure management was measured using patient and care partner versions of the Self-Care of HF Index and European HF Self-care Behavior Scale. Latent class modeling was used to identify patterns of HF dyadic management. Results The mean age of the 62 patients and their care partners was 59.7 ± 11.8 and 58.1 ± 11.9 years, respectively. A majority of patients (71.0%) had class III/IV HF, and a majority of the couples (95.2%) were married. Two distinct dyadic patterns were observed, 1 collaborative management type (n = 42, 67.7%) and 1 autonomous management type (n = 20, 32.3%). Dyads in the autonomous pattern were mostly female patients with male care partners; patients in this pattern also were more anxious and depressed, and reported worse relationship quality compared with collaborative dyads. Conclusion There is an engendered spectrum of collaboration in how HF patient–care partner dyads work together to manage HF that needs to be considered in clinical care and research.
33:49
November 14, 2020
JCN Audio Abstract: Cardiovascular Risk and Outcomes in Women Who Have Experienced Intimate Partner Violence-An Integrative Review
Liu, Xiaoyue BSN, RN; Logan, Jeongok PhD, RN; Alhusen, Jeanne PhD, CRNP, RN, FAAN The Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing: 7/8 2020 - Volume 35 - Issue 4 - p 400-414 doi: 10.1097/JCN.0000000000000654 Abstract Background Cardiovascular disease (CVD) and intimate partner violence (IPV) are 2 major chronic problems that prevalently affect women's health and quality of life in the United States. However, whether female IPV survivors are at risk for developing adverse cardiovascular outcomes has not been clearly understood. Objective This integrative review was conducted to bridge the literature gap by examining cardiovascular health in female adults with a history of IPV experience. Methods Three electronic databases including PubMed, CINAHL, and Web of Science were used to search for studies published between 1998 and 2019. The search process followed the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Review and Meta-Analyses guidelines. Results Of the 229 records retrieved from the literature, 19 met the criteria for review. All included studies were quantitative research. Although the overall findings showed a mixed relationship between IPV and CVD, women who experienced abuse were more likely to engage in unhealthy behaviors, have higher levels of CVD biomarkers, experience cardiovascular symptoms, and exhibit long-term cardiovascular complications when compared with non-abused women. Conclusions Intimate partner violence is a stressor that directly and indirectly influences women's cardiovascular health. Therefore, it is essential for healthcare providers to routinely screen IPV status in clinical practice. Targeted interventions, such as assessing women's coping strategies and evaluating their cardiovascular health using a total risk factor approach, are recommended to prevent or reduce the deleterious effects of violence on this large, vulnerable group of women.
02:28
September 2, 2020
Mobile Electrocardiogram Monitoring and Health-Related Quality of Life in Patients With Atrial Fibrillation
Mobile Electrocardiogram Monitoring and Health-Related Quality of Life in Patients With Atrial Fibrillation Findings From the iPhone Helping Evaluate Atrial Fibrillation Rhythm Through Technology (iHEART) Study Caceres, Billy A. PhD, RN, AGPCNP-BC; Hickey, Kathleen T. EdD, FNP, ANP, FAHA, FAAN; Bakken, Suzanne B. PhD, RN, FAAN, FACMI; Biviano, Angelo B. MD, MPH; Garan, Hasan MD; Goldenthal, Isaac L. MS; Koleck, Theresa A. PhD, RN; Masterson-Creber, Ruth PhD, MPH, RN, FAHA; Turchioe, Meghan Reading PhD, MPH, RN; Jia, Haomiao PhD The Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing: 7/8 2020 - Volume 35 - Issue 4 - p 327-336 doi: 10.1097/JCN.0000000000000646 Abstract Background Atrial fibrillation (AF) is associated with high recurrence rates and poor health-related quality of life (HRQOL) but few effective interventions to improve HRQOL exist. Objective The aim of this study was to examine the impact of the “iPhone Helping Evaluate Atrial Fibrillation Rhythm through Technology” (iHEART) intervention on HRQOL in patients with AF. Methods We randomized English- and Spanish-speaking adult patients with AF to receive either the iHEART intervention or usual care for 6 months. The iHEART intervention used smartphone-based electrocardiogram monitoring and motivational text messages. Three instruments were used to measure HRQOL: the Atrial Fibrillation Effect on Quality of Life (AFEQT), the 36-item Short-Form Health survey, and the EuroQol-5D. We used linear mixed models to compare the effect of the iHEART intervention on HRQOL, quality-adjusted life-years, and AF symptom severity. Results A total of 238 participants were randomized to the iHEART intervention (n = 115) or usual care (n = 123). Of the participants, 77% were men and 76% were white. More than half (55%) had an AF recurrence. Both arms had improved scores from baseline to follow-up for AFEQT and AF symptom severity scores. The global AFEQT score improved 18.5 and 11.2 points in the intervention and control arms, respectively (P < .05). There were no statistically significant differences in HRQOL, quality-adjusted life-years, or AF symptom severity between groups. Conclusions We found clinically meaningful improvements in AF-specific HRQOL and AF symptom severity for both groups. Additional research with longer follow-up should examine the influence of smartphone-based interventions for AF management on HRQOL and address the unique needs of patients diagnosed with different subtypes of AF.
04:00
August 3, 2020
Announcement
We know how busy life can be and we would like to introduce a new feature of our podcast. We will be using this platform to record and disseminate manuscript abstracts from our current issues onto our podcasting and social media outlets. 
00:23
July 23, 2020
Nursing Research in the Era of COVID-19
Join us as we discuss nursing research in the era of COVID-19. Dr. Kelly Wierenga and Dr. Scott Emory Moore will be discussing a new project that they have developed and their experience launching a new study about behavioral outcomes related to social distancing during the pandemic.  Dr. Kelly Wierenga is an assistant professor of nursing at Indiana University. Her program of research focuses on improving self-management behaviors and secondary prevention for patients recovery following a major adverse cardiac event. Her research interests lie in how improving abilities to adaptively regulate emotions during a stressful period of recovery can improve symptoms of emotional distress in these individuals. These improvements in psychological symptoms paired with traditional recovery efforts may increase the uptake and sustaining of healthy self-management behaviors long-term. She has developed a treatment using mechanisms of emotion regulation to support recovery in the cardiovascular rehabilitation population. This treatment has demonstrated early efficacy in a small pilot sample and is continuing to be refined by her team.  Dr. Wierenga has been funded as a principle investigator, co-investigator, and trainee through foundation and NIH funded projects. She has published and presented work related to cardiovascular health, health disparities, illness perceptions, symptoms of psychological distress, self-management behaviors, emotion regulation, and intervention development. Scott Emory Moore, Ph.D., APRN, AGPCNP-BC, is an assistant professor at the Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing at Case Western Reserve University. Dr. Moore’s program of research and scholarship focuses on improving quality of life and aging outcomes among marginalized populations particularly sexual and gender minorities and people living with HIV. His clinical background as a Registered Nurse and an Adult-Gerontological Primary Care Nurse Practitioner (AGPCNP) has included serving a range of vulnerable populations in rural and urban community settings for both acute and chronic care needs. His research and practice has focused on providing affirming care for sexual and gender minority adults and other marginalized populations with a specific focus on aging and the psychosocial and behavioral factors that influence health outcomes. Dr. Moore has been PI and Co-PI on foundation and NIH funded projects, and published and presented work related to mHealth, aging, sex-based differences, sexual and gender minority populations, symptoms, biomarkers, HIV, behavioral economics, and decision making.
25:45
May 14, 2020
Welcome to the new Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing Podcast
Introducing the new Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing Podcast
00:33
November 13, 2019