The Moral Science Podcast

The Moral Science Podcast

By Amber Cazzell
A psychologist who is endlessly fascinated with human morality interviews experts who dedicate their careers to understanding it.
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Diversity and Deviance with Jennifer Cole Wright

The Moral Science Podcast

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Deep Pragmatism with Joshua Greene
Dr. Joshua Greene is a Psychology Professor and a faculty member of the Center for Brain Science at Harvard University. His work focuses on the dual-process theory of emotions and reason as it relates to moral judgment. He is perhaps most known for his past neuropsychological work involving the trolley dilemma. Today, he continues his research into strategies for effective altruism and how to apply principles of what he calls “deep pragmatism,” for solving large-scale social challenges. We discuss the principles of deep pragmatism, as outlined in his book Moral Tribes: Emotion, Reason, and the Gap between Us and Them, in today’s episode. Transcript available at: https://www.ambercazzell.com/post/msp-ep34-JoshuaGreene APA citation: Cazzell, A. R. (Host). (2020, May 26). Deep Pragmatism with Joshua Greene [Audio Podcast]. Retrieved from https://www.ambercazzell.com/post/msp-ep34-JoshuaGreene
1:03:14
May 26, 2020
The Stubbornness of Convictions with Linda Skitka
Dr. Linda Skitka is a psychology professor and associate department head at the University of Illinois at Chicago, as well as a professor of political science by courtesy. She has been the president of the Midwestern Psychological Association and the Society for Personality and Social Psychology, and an associate editor of Journal of Personality and Social Psychology: Attitudes and Social Cognition, Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, and Social Justice Research. She has received numerous awards for her service. Her research spans a broad range of topics, but she is perhaps best known for her work on justice, the precursors and outcomes of moral convictions, attitude moralization, and how each of these relate to political ideology. Transcript available at: https://www.ambercazzell.com/post/msp-ep33-LindaSkitka APA citation: Cazzell, A. R. (Host). (2020, March 31). The Stubbornness of Convictions with Linda Skitka [Audio Podcast]. Retrieved from https://www.ambercazzell.com/post/msp-ep33-LindaSkitka
42:20
April 28, 2020
Diversity and Deviance with Jennifer Cole Wright
Dr. Jennifer Cole Wright is an Associate Professor of Psychology at the College of Charleston, where she directs the Moral Lab. There, she researches meta-ethical pluralism and the foundational role of humility in virtue development. Her forthcoming book, Understanding Virtue: Theory and Measurement, written in collaboration with Nancy Snow and Michael Warren, is set for release late this year. In this podcast, we talk about how people tease diversity apart from deviance. We discuss the role of morality in producing conformity, and how perceived social domains, folk metaethical understandings, and social practices aimed at virtue development bear upon the detection of diversity and the moral judgment of deviance. Transcript available at: https://www.ambercazzell.com/post/msp-ep32-JenColeWright APA citation: Cazzell, A. R. (Host). (2020, March 31). Diversity and Deviance with Jennifer Cole Wright [Audio Podcast]. Retrieved from https://www.ambercazzell.com/post/msp-ep32-JenColeWright
1:11:35
March 31, 2020
Moral Sentiments and the Mythical Homo Economicus with Russ Roberts
Dr. Russ Roberts is the John and Jean De Nault Research Fellow at the Hoover Institution. He has taught economics at George Mason University, Washington University in St. Louis, the University of Rochester, Stanford University, and the University of California–Los Angeles. In 2006, he launched the popular podcast, EconTalk, which he continues to host today. He has also authored 5 books, including Gambling with Other People’s Money which was released last year (2019), and How Adam Smith Can Change Your Life. In this episode, we discuss Adam Smith’s Theory of Moral Sentiments, and how character is a priori to the invisible hand. Russ explains that self-interest is distinct from greed. Transcript available at: https://www.ambercazzell.com/post/msp-ep31-RussRoberts APA citation: Cazzell, A. R. (Host). (2020, March 17). Moral Sentiments and the Mythical Homo Economicus with Russ Roberts [Audio Podcast]. Retrieved from https://www.ambercazzell.com/post/msp-ep31-RussRoberts
58:49
March 17, 2020
Dungeons and Dragons and Political Ideology with Stephen Vaisey
Dr. Stephen Vaisey is a professor of Sociology and Political Science at Duke University. He is the Director of the Worldview Lab at the Kenan Institute for Ethics, where he studies the nature, origins, and effects of moral and political beliefs. Dr. Vaisey was part of the research team for the National Study of Youth and Religion, and is the Principal Investigator of the Measuring Morality Project. In this podcast, we discuss four popular theories of how morality and political ideology are related, the need for a developmental science of moralization, the power of shared communal values for behavioral mobilization, and inter-generational changes in common values. APA citation: Cazzell, A. R. (Host). (2020, March 10). Dungeons and Dragons and Political Ideology with Stephen Vaisey [Audio Podcast]. Retrieved from https://www.ambercazzell.com/post/msp-ep30-SteveVaisey
1:06:01
March 10, 2020
Consciousness, Evolution, and Morality with Robert Wright
Robert Wright is a journalist and the best-selling author of Three Scientists and Their Gods: Looking for Meaning in an Age of Information, The Moral Animal, Nonzero: The Logic of Human Destiny, The Evolution of God, and Why Buddhism is True. He has edited for Time and Slate and has written for The New Yorker, The Huffington Post, and New York Times Magazine, among others. He is a visiting professor of science and religion at Union Theological Seminary and the founder of the Nonzero Foundation, as well as a director of Bloggingheads.tv and MeaningofLife.tv, where you can watch him discuss the big questions with other intellectuals. In this podcast, Bob talks about the trajectory of his interests, as well as the relationships between evolution, morality, and consciousness. Transcript available at: https://www.ambercazzell.com/post/msp-ep29-RobertWright APA citation: Cazzell, A. R. (Host). (2020, March 3). Consciousness, Evolution, and Morality with Robert Wright [Audio Podcast]. Retrieved from https://www.ambercazzell.com/post/msp-ep29-RobertWright
59:01
March 3, 2020
Algorithmic Fairness and Its Discontents with Sharad Goel
Dr. Sharad Goel is a professor of Management Science and Engineering, as well as a professor of Computer Science and Law at Stanford University. He is the founder and executive director of the Stanford Computational Policy Lab, where he uses advanced data science techniques to examine the effects of social and political policies, and how those policies might be improved upon. In this episode, we discuss the intractability of algorithmic fairness. We explore how decision systems are being used and implemented in unsettling ways, and the mathematical reasons that three common goals for achieving algorithmic fairness are mutually-exclusive. Transcript available at: https://www.ambercazzell.com/post/msp-ep28-sharadgoel APA citation: Cazzell, A. R. (Host). (2020, February 15). Algorithmic Fairness and Its Discontents with Sharad Goel [Audio Podcast]. Retrieved from https://www.ambercazzell.com/post/msp-ep28-sharadgoel
59:13
February 25, 2020
Becoming Virtuous with Nancy Snow
Dr. Nancy Snow is a philosophy Professor and the director of the Institute for the Study of Human Flourishing at the University of Oklahoma. She co-directed the Self, Motivation, and Virtue Project, and is the principle investigator of the Self, Virtue, and Public Life Project. She has edited six research volumes, and authored two books, including one written with Jennifer Cole Wright and Michael Warren, titled Understanding Virtue: Theory and Measurement, which is set for publication next year. In this podcast, we discuss Dr. Snow’s account of how people develop virtue through the natural course of their everyday lives. Transcript available at: https://www.ambercazzell.com/post/msp-ep27-nancysnow APA citation: Cazzell, A. R. (Host). (2020, February 18). Becoming Virtuous with Nancy Snow [Audio Podcast]. Retrieved from https://www.ambercazzell.com/post/msp-ep27-nancysnow
51:44
February 18, 2020
Indigenous Wisdom with Darcia Narvaez
Dr. Darcia Narvaez is a professor of psychology at the University of Notre Dame. There, she directs the Evolved Developmental Morality Lab, where her program of research concerns how provision of physical, emotional, and social resources early in life bear upon the development of ethical behavior. In this episode, we discuss her recent book, Indigenous Sustainable Wisdom: First Nation Know-How for Global Flourishing, edited along with Four Arrows, Eugene Halton, Brian Collier, and Georges Enderle. The conversation focuses on indigenous ethical traditions, and how those traditions conceptualize humanity’s relationship with and responsibilities to the natural world. Transcript available at: https://www.ambercazzell.com/post/msp-ep26-darcianarvaez APA citation: Cazzell, A. R. (Host). (2020, February 11). Indigenous Wisdom with Darcia Narvaez [Audio Podcast]. Retrieved from https://www.ambercazzell.com/post/msp-ep26-darcianarvaez Also see: For Life to Continue on Earth, Every Day Must Be Indigenous Peoples’ Day
51:51
February 11, 2020
Game Theory, Evolution, and Morality with Oliver Scott Curry
Dr. Oliver Scott Curry is the research director of Kindlab, and a researcher at Oxford’s School of Anthropology and Museum Ethnography as well as the London School of Economics’ Center for Philosophy of Natural and Social Science. His work weaves philosophy, psychology, and anthropology together to tackle questions about the nature of human morality. In this episode, we discuss his theory of morality as cooperation, and the evolutionary and game theory perspectives that underpin it. We also compare and contrast his theory with Moral Foundations Theory, Richard Shweder’s “big three” ethics, and the Relationship Regulation Theory of morality. Transcript available at: https://www.ambercazzell.com/post/msp-ep25-oliverscottcurry APA citation: Cazzell, A. R. (Host). (2020, February 4). Game Theory, Evolution, and Morality with Oliver Scott Curry [Audio Podcast]. Retrieved from https://www.ambercazzell.com/post/msp-ep25-oliverscottcurry
54:31
February 4, 2020
Ethics of Market Efficiency with Jonathan Wight
Dr. Jonathan Wight is a professor of economics in the Robins School of Business at the University of Richmond. He has authored and coauthored four books, including most recently Ethics in Economics: An Introduction to moral frameworks. Much of his work concerns the intersection of ethics and economics pedagogy, including a Templeton Foundation backed project which introduced ethics in economics to several thousand economics teachers. In this podcast, we discuss the ethical underpinnings of differing definitions of market efficiency. Full transcript available at: https://www.ambercazzell.com/post/msp-ep24-jonathanwight APA citation: Cazzell, A. R. (Host). (2020, January 28). Ethics of Market Efficiency with Jonathan Wight [Audio Podcast]. Retrieved from https://www.ambercazzell.com/post/msp-ep24-jonathanwight
59:30
January 28, 2020
Ethics of the East Part 2 with Bradford Cokelet
Dr. Bradford Cokelet is an Assistant Professor of Philosophy at the University of Kansas. His work focuses on Eastern philosophy, the philosophy of religion, and applied ethics. In this podcast, Brad returns to finish discussing Eastern Ethical traditions—how they compare with one another, and how they contrast with Western Ethical traditions. Transcript available at: APA citation: https://www.ambercazzell.com/post/msp-ep23-bradcokelet APA citation: Cazzell, A. R. (Host). (2020, January 21). Ethics of the East Part 2 with Bradford Cokelet [Audio Podcast]. Retrieved from https://www.ambercazzell.com/post/msp-ep23-bradcokelet
1:10:45
January 21, 2020
The Ethics of Batman and Captain America with Mark D. White
Dr. Mark D. White is the chair of the philosophy department at the College of Staten Island CUNY, where he teaches courses on philosophy, economics, and law. He is also a professor of economics at the Graduate Center of CUNY. He has written and edited ten scholarly books on the intersection of these disciplines, including the Oxford Handbook of Ethics and Economics. Additionally, Mark has written eight popular books about the ethical philosophies underpinning pop culture series. Today, we contrast the ethical philosophies of Batman and Captain America, and what these narratives might reveal about popular construals of morality. Transcript available at: https://www.ambercazzell.com/post/msp-ep22-MarkWhite APA citation: Cazzell, A. R. (Host). The Ethics of Batman and Captain America with Mark D. White (2020, January 7).  [Audio Podcast]. Retrieved from https://www.ambercazzell.com/post/msp-ep22-MarkWhite
1:03:28
January 7, 2020
The Moral Muscle with Roy Baumeister
Dr. Roy Baumeister is a social psychologist known for his research in a number of diverse areas, including: self-control, decision-making, the need to belong, human sexuality, self-destructive behaviors, and free will. He has published more than 600 empirical articles and 35 books. His work has been cited more than 187,000 times, landing him on the ISI highly-cited researcher list twice. In this podcast, we discuss his work with self-control, the so-called “moral muscle,” and the challenges put forward against the strength model of self-control. Transcript available at: https://www.ambercazzell.com/post/msp-ep21-RoyBaumeister APA citation: Cazzell, A. R. (Host). The Moral Muscle with Roy Baumeister (2019, December 17).  [Audio Podcast]. Retrieved from https://www.ambercazzell.com/post/msp-ep21-RoyBaumeister
1:08:46
December 17, 2019
Moral Identity Doesn't Fall from the Sky with Tobias Krettenauer
Dr. Tobias Krettenauer is a professor of psychology at Wilfrid Laurier University, where he directs the Morality, Identity, and Environmental Sustainability Research Group. He is also a consulting editor for Child Development and an associate editor of the Journal of Moral Education. Dr. Krettenauer’s current work examines morality and sustainability, the relationship between moral identity and moral emotions, and how moral identity is shaped by culture. He is most known, however, for his focus on how moral identity develops in adolescence and adulthood, which we discuss in this episode. Transcript available at: https://www.ambercazzell.com/post/msp-ep20-TobiasKrettenauer APA citation: Cazzell, A. R. (Host). Moral Identity Doesn't Fall from the Sky with Tobias Krettenauer (2019, December 10).  [Audio Podcast]. Retrieved from https://www.ambercazzell.com/post/msp-ep20-TobiasKrettenauer
1:00:53
December 10, 2019
Morality is Relationship Regulation with Tage Rai
Dr. Tage Rai is the Associate Editor for social sciences at Science magazine, and is a research associate at MIT’s Sloan School of Management. His research focuses on moral conflict, violence, and personhood, and has been published in top academic journals, including Nature, The Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, and Psychological Review, as well as a trade book titled Virtuous Violence which was published in 2014. In this podcast, we discuss his work with Alan Fiske to develop the relationship regulation theory of morality—a theory that moral judgments and actions stem from our desire to maintain certain types of relationship categories. Transcript available at: https://www.ambercazzell.com/post/msp-ep20-TageRai APA citation: Cazzell, A. R. (Host). Morality is Relationship Regulation with Tage Rai (2019, November 26).  [Audio Podcast]. Retrieved from https://www.ambercazzell.com/post/msp-ep20-TageRai
1:05:15
November 26, 2019
A Brief Overview of the Sociology of Morality with Steven Hitlin
Dr. Steven Hitlin is a Professor of Sociology at the University of Iowa. He has written numerous articles and book chapters on the sociology of morality, and has written and co-edited four books, including the Handbook of Sociology of Morality, as well as a second volume of the handbook to be published in 2021. His work has been supported by multiple grants, including funding from the MINERVA initiative to study “Moral Schemas, Cultural Conflict, and Socio-Political Action.” In this episode, we discuss sociology’s traditional interest in morality, Steven’s hopes for a renewed vigor in the sociology of morality and partnership between moral psychology and moral sociology, as well as comparing and contrasting the approaches these disciplines utilize in their research endeavors. Transcript available at: https://www.ambercazzell.com/post/msp-ep19-stevenhitlin APA citation: Cazzell, A. R. (Host). A Brief Overview of the Sociology of Morality with Steven Hitlin (2019, November 19).  [Audio Podcast]. Retrieved from https://www.ambercazzell.com/post/msp-ep19-stevenhitlin
1:08:37
November 19, 2019
The Value-Laden Nature of Well-Being with Gregg Henriques
Dr. Gregg Henriques is a Professor of Psychology at James Madison University. Over many years, he has been working to develop an integrated way of understanding how psychological sciences are related to other physical and social sciences, and how to coherently approach the study of psychology. He is the author of A New Unified Theory of Psychology, and is a leader of the Unified Psychotherapy Movement and the Theory of Knowledge Society. In this podcast, we discuss his nested model of well-being: a unified approach to understanding well-being that moves beyond subjective judgments in order to account for physical, psychological, and ethical considerations. Transcript available at: https://www.ambercazzell.com/post/msp-ep17-gregghenriques APA citation: Cazzell, A. R. (Host). The Value-Laden Nature of Well-Being with Gregg Henriques (2019, November 11).  [Audio Podcast]. Retrieved from https://www.ambercazzell.com/post/msp-ep17-gregghenriques
1:12:41
November 12, 2019
People are Mixed Bags with Christian Miller
Dr. Christian Miller is the A.C. Reid Professor of Philosophy at Wake Forest University. His research focuses on the philosophy of religion and contemporary ethics. He has co-directed the $3.9 million Beacon Project to examine moral exemplars and, more recently, the $5.6 million Character Project which funded 28 scholars to examine the existence and nature of character and virtue. He has published two academic books, as well as one trade book titled The Character Gap: How Good Are We? In this episode, Dr. Miller and I talk about the emergence, development, and varieties of the situationist challenge—the idea that situations dictate moral action, and that character traits may play little if any role in morality. Full transcript available at: https://www.ambercazzell.com/post/msp-ep16-christianmiller APA citation: Cazzell, A. R. (Host). People are Mixed Bags with Christian Miller (2019, November 5).  [Audio Podcast]. Retrieved from https://www.ambercazzell.com/post/msp-ep16-christianmiller
1:04:15
November 5, 2019
The Good Samaritan and Moral Motivation with Daniel Batson
Dr. Daniel Batson has a PhD in Social Psychology and Theology, and is an emeritus professor in the Psychology Department at the University of Tennessee and the University of Kansas. His distinguished career began in graduate school, in which he and his adviser, John Darley, designed and conducted what is now famously known as the Good Samaritan Study. This study subsequently fueled the so-called “situationist challenge.” He is also renown for defending “empathy-induced altruism” against Robert Cialdini’s selfishly-motivated altruism in a professional debate which played out over many years. In this podcast, we discuss these lines of work, and how they inform his opinions regarding the situationist challenge and his conceptualization of moral motivation. Full transcript available at: https://www.ambercazzell.com/post/msp-ep15-danbatson APA citation: Cazzell, A. R. (Host). The Good Samaritan and Moral Motivation with Daniel Batson (2019, October 29).  [Audio Podcast]. Retrieved from https://www.ambercazzell.com/post/msp-ep15-danbatson
1:06:51
October 29, 2019
Ethics of the East and West with Bradford Cokelet
Dr. Bradford Cokelet is an Assistant Professor of Philosophy at the University of Kansas. He has written and coedited three books, including the Moral Psychology of Guilt, which is to be published this month. He is also the recipient of two Templeton Foundation grants to study character, virtue, and motivation. His work concerns Eastern philosophy, the philosophy of religion, and applied ethics. In this podcast, Brad and I talk about ethical traditions of the East and West, and begin to discuss how to meaningfully compare and contrast traditions. APA citation: Cazzell, A. R. (Host). (2019, October 22). Ethics of the East and West with Bradford Cokelet [Audio Podcast]. Retrieved from https://www.ambercazzell.com/post/msp-ep14-bradcokelet Full transcript available at: https://www.ambercazzell.com/post/msp-ep14-bradcokelet
1:10:51
October 22, 2019
Naturalism and the Convivial Social Life with Owen Flanagan
Dr. Owen Flanagan is the James B Duke professor of philosophy and Neurobiology at Duke University, where he co-directs the Center for Comparative Philosophy. Recently, he was also a Rockefeller Fellow at National Humanities Center, as well as a Berggruen Fellow at the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences at Stanford University. Dr. Flanagan has written and edited 13 books, including The Really Hard Problem: Meaning in a Material World published in 2007, and The Geography of Morals published in 2017. His distinguished work concerns the philosophy of mind, moral psychology, and comparative ethics. In this podcast, we discuss the relationship between naturalism and moral realism. APA Citation: Cazzell, A. R. (Host). (2019, October 15). Naturalism and the Convivial Social Life with Owen Flanagan [Audio Podcast]. Retrieved from https://www.ambercazzell.com/ost/msp-ep13-owenflanagan Full transcripts available at: https://www.ambercazzell.com/post/msp-ep13-owenflanagan
1:02:14
October 15, 2019
Working with Kohlberg and Teaching for Excellence with Anne Colby
Dr. Anne Colby is a consulting professor at Stanford University’s Center on Adolescence. Prior to her appointment at Stanford, she directed the Henry Murray Research Center at Harvard, and was a Senior Scholar at the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching. She has authored and co-authored eleven books, including Rethinking Undergraduate Business Education: Liberal Learning for the Profession, which received the 2013 Frederic W. Ness Book Award. Dr. Colby’s research has focused on moral development, purpose, and the ways in which education can foster excellence through disciplinary practices, each of which we discuss in this episode. Full conversation transcript available at: https://www.ambercazzell.com/post/msp-ep12-annecolby APA citation: Cazzell, A. R. (Host). (2019, October 8). Working with Kohlberg and Teaching for Excellence with Anne Colby [Audio Podcast]. Retrieved from https://www.ambercazzell.com/post/msp-ep12-annecolby
1:05:38
October 8, 2019
Moral Exemplars and Beyond-the-Self Purpose with William Damon
Dr. William Damon is a Professor of Education at Stanford University, where he directs the Center on Adolescence and is a senior fellow at the Hoover Institution. His research has received numerous grants and awards from several Foundations and trusts, including the John Templeton, Andrew Mellon, and Spencer Foundations. He has authored and co-authored fifteen books on the topics of child development, education, morality, and purpose, including Greater Expectations which received the Parent’s Choice book award. Throughout his distinguished career, he has focused on a number of topics related to moral development. In this podcast, we discuss his research with moral exemplars, his interests in the development of purpose and its effects, as well as his forthcoming book on the development of purpose in his own life. Full transcript available at: https://drive.google.com/open?id=1sYYOgNptXnSRXeXbw9sUZb-MGt73WjeE APA citation: Cazzell, A. R. (Host). (2019, October 1). Moral Exemplars and Beyond-the-Self Purpose with William Damon [Audio Podcast]. Retrieved from https://anchor.fm/amber-cazzell0
1:07:55
October 1, 2019
Development of Prosocial Motivations with Gustavo Carlo
Dr. Gustavo Carlo is the Millsap Endowed Professor of Diversity and Multicultural Studies in the Department of Human Development and Family Science at the University of Missouri. He is also the director and co-director of two centers there: The Center for Family Policy and Research and the Center for Children and Families Across Cultures. In 2017, he was named a University of Missouri Top Achiever and he has received numerous awards for his excellence in mentorship. Dr. Carlo’s research concerns prosocial and moral development, and how cultural variables are related to that development. In particular he’s researched positive development among Latinx youth. In this episode, we discuss different types of prosociality, and which cultural features are associated with developing different prosocial motivations. Full Interview Transcript available at: https://drive.google.com/open?id=1xwp5gyLcbBAJqXesrB9oA3tN6QoqjuRe APA Citation: Cazzell, A. R. (Host). (2019, September 17). Development of Prosocial Motivations with Gustavo Carlo [Audio podcast]. Retrieved from https://anchor.fm/amber-cazzell0
1:16:19
September 24, 2019
Ethical Pluralism and Multicultural Exchanges with Richard Shweder
Dr. Richard Shweder is the Harold H Swift Distinguished service professor of Human Development in the University of Chicago’s Department of Comparative Human Development. Dr. Shweder’s anthropological work has received numerous awards, including the John Simon Guggenheim Fellowship, the American Association for the Advancement Socio-Psychological Prize for his essay, “Does the Concept of the Person Vary Cross-Culturally?” and, in 2016, the Lifetime Achievement Award from the Society for Psychological Anthropology. His fieldwork in Orissa, India led to his pluralistic theory of the “big three ethics,” which influenced the later development of several psychological theories, including Moral Foundations Theory.  His recent work concerns the accommodation (or lack thereof) in multicultural exchanges in Western Liberal Democracies. Today, we discuss his three ethics and the challenges of moral multicultural exchanges. APA Citation: Cazzell, A. R. (Host). (2019, September 17). Ethical Pluralism and Multicultural Exchanges with Richard Shweder [Audio podcast]. Retrieved from https://anchor.fm/amber-cazzell0/episodes/Ethical-Pluralism-and-Multicultural-Exchanges-with-Richard-Shweder-e5ddr3
1:08:47
September 17, 2019
Mind Perception and the Trouble with Moral Platypuses with Kurt Gray
Dr. Kurt Gray is an associate professor of Psychology at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. There, he directs the Mind Perception and Morality Lab—a research lab dedicated to understanding who we interpret to have minds, and why it matters. Specifically, Dr. Gray and his research team examine how mind perception influences moral judgments. In this podcast, we discuss his research, his new Center for the Science of Moral Understanding which aims to reduce social and political polarization, as well as his most recent book co-edited with Jesse Graham, The Atlas of Moral Psychology. NOTES: 3:00 - Book, Illusion of Conscious Will  8:30 - Paper, humans don't like AI making moral decisions 12:10 - Paper, the moral agency and patiency of moral exemplars 16:00 - Paper, helping veterans get hired 18:45 - Center for the Science of Moral Understanding 28:55 - Paper, meta-analysis of replicating incidental disgust 39:00 - The Atlas of Moral Psychology 41:05 - Yoel Inbar's paper, Applied Moral Psychology 51:20 - Book, The Mind Club 51:40 - Book, The Mind's I
52:50
September 10, 2019
The Evolved Nest with Darcia Narvaez
Dr. Darcia Narvaez is a professor of psychology at the University of Notre Dame. There, she directs the Evolved Developmental Morality Lab, where her program of research concerns how provision of physical, emotional, and social resources early in life bear upon the development of ethical behavior. This early physical and social environment, the so-called “evolved nest,” and it’s effects are the topic of our conversation today. Her recent work and book, Indigenous Sustainable Wisdom: First Nation Know-How for Global Flourishing, concerns understanding and integrating indigenous wisdom for how to live a good life. In addition to her scholarly works, Darcia also writes a popular blog for Psychology Today, called Moral Landscapes. Notes: 7:00 - Hunter-Gatherer Childhoods book 13:30 - Chapter about the "evolved nest" 17:40 - Last Child in the Woods Richard Louv 22:00 - article and supplemental materials for assessing the evolved nest 31:20 - chapter about losing Darwin's moral sense 33:30 - Western Illusion of Human Nature book Marshall Sahlins 35:37 - Neurobiology and the Development of Human Morality 40:22 - The Continuum Concept Jean Liedoff 41:32 - https://evolvednest.org/ 42:00 - Brain-based Parenting Daniel Hughes 44:00 - Attachment Parenting International, Holistic Moms Network 47:12 - Free Range Parenting Lenore Skenazy 49:30 - Moral Landscapes Psychology Today blog 52:00 - Relational developmental systems article by Willis Overton 1:00:30 - Enlightenment Now Steven Pinker
1:05:32
September 3, 2019
Fairness, Equality, and Research Framing with Mark Sheskin
Dr. Mark Sheskin is an assistant professor of social sciences at Minerva Schools at KGI and an instructor in the cognitive science department at Yale university. He’s also the co-leader of the Child Lab, where he’s working to harness the power of the internet to conduct studies with children online. In this podcast, we discuss his research focus on the origins of fairness motivations, how studies of prosociality are affected by research framing, as well as his involvements at Minerva, Yale, and the Child Lab. Notes: 8:00 - Tinbergen's four questions 11:00 - Paper on the slow emergence of fairness behaviors 19:50 - Article--is the Marshmallow test explained by reliability of authority figures? 27:06 - Vox Marshmallow article that "tells us s'more" 32:30 - The Child Lab 36:40 - Paper about income inequality 48:30 - Kim Scott's LookIt Lab 54:00 - Paper about best practices for online studies with children 1:02:00 - Building the Intentional University book
1:14:35
August 20, 2019
Aristotelian Virtue Ethics with Blaine Fowers
Dr. Blaine Fowers is a professor at the University of Miami’s Department of Education and Psychological Studies, and is the founder of the Network for Research on Morality. His research focuses on Aristotelian Virtue Ethics and character development, with an emphasis on application of the rich theory that sets Aristotelian ethics apart from other ethical traditions. He is the author and coauthor of five books, including Frailty, Suffering, and Vice: Flourishing in the face of human limitations. In this podcast, we discuss his scholarship, as well as his purpose and plans for the Network of Research on Morality. Notes: 10:20 - Angela Duckworth's popular book about grit 13:00 - Blaine's book, Frailty, Suffering, and Vice: Flourishing in the face of human limitations 18:50 - Paper about the four-quadrant matrix of goods 28:30 - For deeper conversation about moral realism, check out this episode of MSP 42:30 - Paper suggesting that social desirability measures are correlated with honesty-humility 51:50 - Blaine's presentation, "Science is an Inherently Moral Enterprise" 57:00 - All talks from the 2019 Network of Research on Morality Symposium
1:06:52
August 6, 2019
The Case for Moral Realism with Brent Slife
Dr. Brent Slife is an Emeritus professor of Psychology at Brigham Young University and is the Editor-in-chief of the APA’s Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology. He has been honored with numerous awards for his outstanding research and teaching career and in addition to these many achievements, he’s authored and co-authored 9 books. Today, we discuss his most recent book, co-edited with Stephen Yanchar, titled Hermeneutic Moral Realism: Theory and Practice. Notes: Dr. Slife's book, Hermeneutic Moral Realism in Psychology: Theory and Practice Relationally-oriented girls' boarding school, Greenbrier Academy Svend Brinkmann's book, Psychology as a Moral Science Dr. Slife's Presentation, "Is Social Justice Justified?" Alasdair MacIntyre's After Virtue & narrative work Charles Taylor's book, Sources of the Self: The Making of the Modern Identity
1:05:04
July 23, 2019
The Making of Moral Foundations Theory with Jesse Graham
Dr. Jesse Graham is the George S Eccles chair in business ethics, and an associate professor of management at the University of Utah. He’s most known for his work with Jonathan Haidt in developing Moral Foundations Theory—a theory that basic moral foundations guide a wide-array of behaviors and ideological preferences, political ones. In this podcast, Jesse and I talk about his experience in developing the theory, what theoretical challenges it faces, and his work to apply MFT to behavioral nudging. 3:10- The Emotional Dog paper by Haidt 7:10- Joseph & Haidt 2004 paper  8:30- Paper on Libertarian foundations 10:00- Paper about criteria for foundations 13:00- Moral Foundations Questionnaire, scale development paper 14:50- Steven Pinker's New York Times Op-ed 16:00- Joshua Greene's 2001 "trolley-ology" paper 30:30- Morteza Dehghani researches use of foundation-language 34:40- Larry Nucci critiques MFT for its relativism 37:00- Martha Nussbaum's book critiquing disgust-based moral action 46:00-  Example articles that call disgust "irrelevant" or suggest it taints judgments: Schnall et al., 2008; Zhong et al, 2010 CORRECTION: study of "illegitimate power distributions" was NOT based on MFT, as Amber had said. 50:00- Feinberg & Willer papers on nudging conservatives and liberals 53:30- John Jost critique of MFT legitimizing conservative foundations 55:50- Jesse's response normative MFT claims 1:00:00- Jesse's vaccine hesitancy paper
1:09:29
July 9, 2019
"Stupid Rules": Social Domains and Moral Development with Larry Nucci
Dr. Larry Nucci is an adjunct professor in the Graduate School of Education at UC Berkeley, an emeritus professor of Psychology at the University of Illinois, Chicago, and the editor-in-chief of the journal Human Development. His research pertains to the social and moral development of children, and he’s worked to apply social domain theory to moral education programs. In this podcast, Larry and I discuss his work with Elliot Turiel to flesh out Social Domain Theory against the backdrop of Richard Shweder’s three ethics, and the later emergence of Moral Foundations Theory. Notes: For more information and resources about Larry Nucci and Social Domains theory, visit this website. Richard Shweder's three ethics. Teaching resources and recommended readings can be found at: https://www.moraledk12.org/ Jonathan Haidt's study of morality in Brazil. Articles that address the relativism of Moral Foundations Theory (in addressing rape of Yazidi women): Character as a Developmental System, Recovering the Role of Reasoning in Moral Education to Address Inequity and Social Justice. 
1:02:21
June 25, 2019
A Brief History of Moral Psychology with Sam Hardy
Dr. Sam Hardy, an associate professor of psychology at Brigham Young University, describes the branches of moral psychology that emerged in the wake of Lawrence Kholberg's theory of cognitive moral development. Notes:  Video about Kholberg's theory of moral stages Richard Shweder's three ethics Moral foundations theory website Jonathan Haidt's "The emotional dog and it's rational tail: A social-intuitionist approach to moral judgement" Moral identity approaches: Blasi's moral identity, Colby & Damon's book on moral exemplars, Larry Walker's lay conceptions of morality Turiel & Nucci's Social Domain Theory Dan Lapsley's book, Moral Psychology Simpson effect example: paper of relationship between conscientiousness and neuroticism
1:09:06
June 11, 2019