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Vygotsky Podcast

Vygotsky Podcast

By Anthony Barra
Let's try to better understand Vygotsky's ideas. These are audio versions of my YouTube videos found here: http://tiny.cc/2eylsz I'm no expert, so take my remarks with salt. Fortunately, most episodes in this podcast *DO* feature conversations with experts and deep researchers. Season 1 - Chats about CHT; Season 2 - 5 Principles for Vygotskian Research; Season 3 - Answered Questions Season 4 - Snippets (from Chats about CHT); Season 5 - Notes on certain concepts; Season 6 - More short clips (from http://tiny.cc/vr3ns) Season 0 - Chats with friends (w/ emphasis on learning & development)
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(S4,Ep82) 9 Laws of Vygotsky's cultural-historical theory
Nikolai Veresov gets provocative again, and I wonder, "Should I publish  this?"  There is little doubt that almost everybody in the field has forgotten  more than I have learned about Vygotsky, so why should I publish  provocations such as these?  Because the information seems essential, important, and interesting.  (Initially published May 11, 2021) Full chat here: http://tiny.cc/sucxtz
02:20
May 11, 2021
(S4,Ep81) A book recommendation (Vygotsky's theory)
Nikolai Veresov shares a book recommendation and gives the reasons why  (Initially published May 11, 2021) Full chat here: http://tiny.cc/sucxtz
02:01
May 11, 2021
(S4,Ep80) Ideal vs. Present: the status of Vygotsky's theory
Nikolai Veresov argues that Vygotsky's status is inaccurately valued and suggests reasons why.   (Initially published May 11, 2021) Full chat here: http://tiny.cc/sucxtz
01:39
May 11, 2021
(S1,Ep22) Giants of Science: Newton. Darwin. Copernicus. . . . Vygotsky?
Nikolai Veresov presents a case that Vygotsky is to psychology what Darwin is to biology, Newton is to physics, and Copernicus is to astronomy. Veresov suggests reasons for the undervaluing of Vygotsky's cultural-historical theory (CHT) and discusses potential pathways to restoration. (Initially published May 8, 2021) Highlights include:   1:20 - What is the state of Vygotsky's "reputation" in 2021?  6:16 - A fundamental theory of psychological science  8:06 - CHT is a dialectical-psychological theory  12:40 - The Darwinian contribution of Vygotsky (Subject-matter)  17:45 - The Newtonian contribution of Vygotsky (Laws)  21:05 - The Copernican contribution of Vygotsky (Method)  27:02 - Is Vygotsky's theory undervalued, and if so is its status recoverable?  33:50 - Productive paths forward?   38:17 - Is Vygotsky's work treated with condescension?  41:55 - Is a Vygotskian TED-Talk doable and/or advisable?  46:16 - Inspirations and influences (Kravtsova, Bosovic, Davydov)  52:58 - Contemporary recommendations (Dafermos, van Oers, Zaretsky, Hedegaard, School 91)  58:01 - Marketplace for teachers: Activity Theory, CHAT, or CHT  1:02:29 - A brief summary of our discussion   http://tiny.cc/su7xtz - Rethinking Cultural-Historical Theory. A Dialectical Perspective to Vygotsky. Dafermos, M. (2018), Springer.
01:05:51
May 9, 2021
(S4,Ep79) Vygotsky's Theory as a System of Concepts
Nikolai Veresov explains how Vygotsky's cultural-historical theory was  built as a system of concepts.  Veresov then demonstrates how a CHT  concept can be analyzed and applied as a theoretical tool.    0:03 - Analysis vs. Interpretation (and why the difference matters)  1:14 - Two questions for understanding the content of CHT concepts  2:19 - The importance of these two questions  3:21 - EXAMPLE: the interaction between ideal and present forms  (Question 1)  5:17 - EXAMPLE: the interaction between ideal and present forms  (Question 2)   *Excerpted from a private conversation (used with permission).  Initially published April 21, 2021.
09:47
April 21, 2021
(S4,Ep78) Piaget & Vygotsky: the foundational difference between them
Nikolai Veresov discusses the under-reported "most important difference" between Piaget and Vygotsky, who had much in common, including a  general approach to solving the "crisis in psychology."   Excerpted from a  private conversation (and used with permission).  Initially published April 21, 2021.
02:57
April 21, 2021
(S5,Ep13) "Should I read Vygotsky?" (for teachers, parents, & the curious in general)
Reading Vygotsky is challenging, yet the challenge is part of the fun. These excerpts are a good doorway into Vygotsky's writing -- and if you like them, consider checking out any or all of the following:   https://bit.ly/3stZ2hJ​ - "Thinking and Speech, Chapter 6 - The Development of Scientific Concepts in Childhood"  https://bit.ly/2NZe8MZ​ - "Reading Thinking and Speech" video lectures from Nikolai Veresov  https://bit.ly/3ds693Z​ - Some notes on the Veresov lectures  https://bit.ly/31sXGrz​ - "Distinguishing Spontaneous, Scientific, and Pseudo- Concepts"  https://bit.ly/3dbZcno​ - Peter Smagorinsky on "Sturdy Concepts"    (Initially published March 27, 2021) *excerpts are from Vygotsky, L. S. (1987). Thinking and Speech. In R. W. Rieber, & A. S. Carton (Eds.), The Collected Works of L. S. Vygotsky (Vol. 1), Problems of General Psychology (pp. 39-285). New York: Plenum Press. (Original Work Published 1934)
18:12
March 27, 2021
(S5,Ep12) Excerpts from "The Life of Genre, the Life in the Classroom"
Bazerman (1997) on genre - an influential piece for me  (Initially posted March 8, 2021) Tangentially related to Vygotsky, but related enough. 
10:22
March 10, 2021
(S3,Ep22) Vygotsky essentialized?
Andy Blunden weighs in on a question I've been asking for a while: "What do you think the following passage means?" (Initially published January 25, 2021) Additional responses, via xmca listserv, are here: http://tiny.cc/3l27tz   The passage in question: [A better understanding of child psychology is possible] "...only if we  radically change our representation of child development and take into  account that it is a complex dialectical process that is characterized  by a complex periodicity, disproportion in the development of separate  functions, metamorphoses or qualitative transformation of certain forms  into others, a complex merging of the processes of evolution and  involution, a complex crossing of external and internal factors, a  complex process of overcoming difficulties and adapting" (Vygotsky 1997,  Vol 4. pp. 98–99)
15:27
January 26, 2021
(S5,Ep11) Book review: Genre and the Invention of the Writer
A review of Anis Bawarshi's (2003) book -- interesting from a Vygotskian  and a pedagogical perspective.  (Initially published December 23, 2020) (I think I wrote this review but am not 100% sure.  I will update as  soon as I find out for sure and will credit appropriately if necessary!)
06:24
December 23, 2020
(S5,Ep10) The "X" and "Y" of J. Bruner's Curricular Theory
This paper was written for a course at Temple University about 10 or 12  years ago.  (Initially published December 21, 2020) Jerome Bruner was kind enough to read the paper and to reply: "Thank you  for sending on your thoughtful piece on my early work on curricula and  school learning . . . I found it very stimulating."   Paper here: http://tiny.cc/o9v6tz
15:39
December 21, 2020
(S5,Ep9) A genre theory model of collaborative inquiry
Excerpts from a 2009 curriculum design paper titled, "A genre theory  model of collaborative inquiry."  (Initially published December 20, 2020) This middle section of the paper references Bazerman, Bawarshi, Bruner,  Devitt, Freadman, Halliday, Hillocks, Smith & Wilhelm, and Wiggins  & McTighe.   The first section, not included, introduces the project and review  curricular theory from Addams, Apple, Bobbitt, Dewey, Eisner,  Montessori, Noddings, Pinar, and Popham.    The final section of the paper aims to combine genre theory and  collaborative inquiry in a hybrid-learning model, via an online  class-blog. Paper here: http://tiny.cc/3l27tz
15:56
December 21, 2020
(S4,Ep77) An interesting assignment
This is one of my favorite assignments, in part because it arose as a  solution to multiple, simultaneous problems.  And also because the  resulting work from students is always fun to read.   Full chat here: http://tiny.cc/r5v6tz   Class document here: http://tiny.cc/o9v6tz
02:27
December 21, 2020
(S4,Ep76) A poetry lesson - for consideration & critique
This lesson is good enough but also far from great.  How might you rethink, revise, or improve it?  Huw Lloyd offers more helpful feedback on this and other lessons here: http://tiny.cc/r5v6tz  (Initially published December 17, 2020) Class documents here: http://tiny.cc/i9v6tz
02:27
December 21, 2020
(S4,Ep75) Some ideas for revising classroom lessons
Huw Lloyd helps me to rethink a lesson that I like but also know is flawed. The suggestions are adaptable to many types of lesson revision.   (Initially published December 17, 2020) The lesson, influenced by Vygotsky's idea that "word meaning develops,"  is summarized here: http://tiny.cc/z7v6tz   Full chat here: http://tiny.cc/r5v6tz   Main reference: "The primary result of this work . . .that constitutes the conceptual  center of our investigation (is) the finding that word meaning develops.  The discovery that word meaning changes and develops is our new and  fundamental contribution to the theory of thinking and speech. It is our  major discovery, a discovery that has allowed us to overcome the  postulate of constancy and unchangableness of word meaning which has  provided the foundation for previous theories of thinking and speech."  (Vygotsky, 1987, p. 245)  The collected works of L. S. Vygotsky. Vol.  1. Problems of general psychology, Including the volume Thinking and  Speech. New York: Plenum. Vygotsky, L. S.   Related: "Where do new words come from?" - Marcel Danesi (TED-ED) - http://tiny.cc/flx6tz
02:26
December 21, 2020
(S4,Ep74) Some inquiry approaches to the concept of "register"
Huw Lloyd suggests a method of concept-building where the concept (in  this case, register) feels like a "personal invention not (just) a  historical invention."  (Initially published December 17, 2020)   Full chat here: http://tiny.cc/r5v6tz
02:27
December 20, 2020
(S4,Ep73) Can group problem-solving address individual shortcomings?
Huw Lloyd discusses some cognitive benefits of synthesizing different  perspectives, invoking an interesting metaphor from Michael Cole.  (Initially published December 17, 2020) Full chat here: http://tiny.cc/r5v6tz
02:26
December 20, 2020
(S1,Ep21) Rethinking teaching from a developmental perspective
After clarifying some theoretical distinctions and then presenting some teaching ideas of his own, developmental researcher Huw Lloyd helps me to rethink some of my own classroom lessons. Classroom handouts are  linked at the bottom of this description.  (Initially published December 15, 2020) Highlights include:  0:40 - Clarifying the relationship between activity and epistemological forms  3:40 - Attention is freed up when operations are achieved (gas-tank analogy)  7:24 - Designing lessons to distribute activities amongst the group  10:20 - Bringing multiple perspectives together  12:12 - Davydovian ways to introduce academic concepts (e.g., register)  20:16 - A request for feedback on some classroom lessons  21:40 - Activity 1: "Word meaning develops"  24:30 - Huw's feedback on lesson 1: redesigns to make students more active participants   31:24 - Reaching all students is a challenge -- some ideas  37:10 - Activity 2: building poetry-reading skills  41:33 - Huw's feedback on lesson 2: restructure to enhance independence & authentic inquiry  48:15 - Activity 3: the follow-up assessment to lesson 2  50:05 - Activity 4: "The Visitor" - imaginative in-role mentorship  54:00 - Huw's feedback on lesson 4    59:42 - Reaching all students is a challenge -- some ideas  1:02:10 - Ideas to extend or rethink lessons from a developmental education lens  1:07:04 - Seeing into students' heads is a challenge  1:08:42 - Pedagogical takeaways from Huw  1:13:04 - A final key point: redesigning for problem-oriented inquiry   References:  Lloyd, H. (2020) "A Study of Active Orientation, Part 1: A Perspective-Based Theory of Cognitive Development" - http://tiny.cc/vua6tz  Classroom handouts: http://tiny.cc/snr6tz   This chat is Part 3/3.  Part 2 is here: http://tiny.cc/tnr6tz
01:15:47
December 16, 2020
(S4,Ep72) From conscious & slow to unconscious & quick
Huw Lloyd gives an example of how sign use can turn a conscious action into an unconscious operation.  (Initially published December 13, 2020) Full chat: http://tiny.cc/kac6tz   Lloyd, H. (2020) "A Study of Active Orientation, Part 1: A Perspective-Based Theory of Cognitive Development" - http://tiny.cc/vua6tz
02:26
December 16, 2020
(S1,Ep20) Knowing where to look: a finer-grained look at development
In a previous chat, Huw Lloyd introduced "5 epistemological forms  implicated in cognitive development."  Here, Here Huw digs into various  finer details of how such forms may develop, and also discusses how and  why the trio signs, actions, and operations can be a helpful system for  construing psychological development.  Part 1 is here: http://tiny.cc/4om6tz  (Initially published December 13, 2020) Highlights include:   0:28 - Getting more into the formative process of cognitive development (or recapping/clarifying some key parts of part 1)  3:45 - Some useful ways to think about epistemological forms  5:25 - We can choose to treat anything - within our perception - as a sign  8:42 - Situation- and setting-based reasoning   13:25 - Knowing where to look: epistemology can fuel confidence in setting-based situations   16:50 - Empirical vs theoretical orientations  20:24 - The compelling nature of not knowing  25:30 - Planting a flag to recap the chat thus far  26:50 - The relation of Huw's work to Activity Theory and CHT   28:12 - Actions as goal-directed movement & thinking (made manifest through signs)  30:39 - Automatic vs. autonomic operations    35:44 - Operations don't require conscious attentions and are not serial (brick wall analogy)  38:44 - Conscious actions can turn into unconscious operations  42:29 - A "middle ground" where a residue of external signs still remains (w/ examples)  48:00 - The role of active orientation in expressing intention  50:22 - Actions and reactions (and emotions regulating actions)  55:11 - Productively distinguishing emotion from feeling   1:02:07 - How signs can suggest strategy and thus orientation (followed by a demonstration)  1:04:30 - Discerning AO by studying microdevelopment and morphogenesis of actions into operations  1:10:30 - Capturing neoformations and demonstrating conscious awareness and independence  1:14:16 - Does this kind of analysis transfer to many domains?   1:15:40 - Development is not just about importing culture but increasingly sophisticated sign use  1:16:59 - How might similar investigations go with older learners?  1:21:27 - Some quick closing questions   Some quotations:  - "these epistemological forms are representative of degrees of sophistication with using signs"   - "signs are like one side of the coin of which the other one is awareness"   - "as your reasoning improves, the richness of where you can put your attention improves"  - "he knows where to look" and has confidence  - "those signs that become used can detach themselves from the necessity of conscious awareness of them"  - "by looking at the configuration of signs at play, you can discern strategy, and from strategy you can discern orientation"  -"development is not just about importing culture" but increased "sophistication in the use of signs"   Lloyd, H. (2020) "A Study of Active Orientation, Part 1: A Perspective-Based Theory of Cognitive Development" - http://tiny.cc/vua6tz
01:29:21
December 16, 2020
(S4,Ep71) Like a ZPD without the requirement of company?
What role does active orientation play in cognitive development, or cognitive reorganization?  Huw Lloyd gives a unique answer.  (Initially published December 9, 2020) Full chat: http://tiny.cc/kac6tz  Lloyd, H. (2020) "A Study of Active Orientation, Part 1: A Perspective-Based Theory of Cognitive Development" - http://tiny.cc/vua6tz
02:27
December 9, 2020
(S4,Ep70) Five "epistemological forms" - increasingly sophisticated
Huw Lloyd introduces '5 epistemological forms implicated in cognitive development,' increasingly sophisticated forms of thinking.  (Initially published December 8, 2020) Full chat: http://tiny.cc/kac6tz  Lloyd, H. (2020) "A Study of Active Orientation, Part 1: A Perspective-Based Theory of Cognitive Development" - http://tiny.cc/vua6tz
02:27
December 9, 2020
(S4,Ep69) Overlooked aspects of "mental tools"
Huw Lloyd cautions against ignoring epistemological or individual facets when talking about mental tools.  (Initially published December 8, 2020) Full chat: http://tiny.cc/kac6tz  Lloyd, H. (2020) "A Study of Active Orientation, Part 1: A Perspective-Based Theory of Cognitive Development" - http://tiny.cc/vua6tz
02:21
December 9, 2020
(S1,Ep19) Development of Epistemological Forms
Huw Lloyd's work interests me for a few reasons: it is challenging, it is precise, and it addresses ambiguities that have confused me in the past.  In this chat, Huw and I discuss some pros and cons of being a 'theorist' along with his foundational paper, "A Study of Active Orientation, Part 1: A Perspective-Based Theory of Cognitive Development."  (Initially published December 8, 2020) Highlights include:  1:10 - Is Huw a theorist?  8:43 - Did Huw "invent" active orientation, Davydov-style?  15:15 - Active orientation (AO) as a variant of activity theory  17:07 - What role does AO play in cognitive development or cognitive reorganization?  20:24 - A few questions to hang in the air  22:53 - 5 epistemological forms implicated in cognitive development (by degrees of sophistication)  27:22 - Form 1: References to constant objects of action within a given context of activity  28:45 - Form 2: References to recurring contexts of activity  31:21 - Form 3: Reference to plans of action distinct from the activity that the plans are about  35:31 - Form 4: Reference to systems of criteria  41:18 - Form 5: References to self-generative processes  48:40 - Relating the 5 forms to Vygotsky (three variants of logical reasoning) 55:43 - What is "personal epistemological knowledge"? 59:00 - Huw's thinking style (and formative influences) 1:02:55 - A few thinking tips for reflective thinking and self-knowledge 1:13:03 - Active orientation and the formative process 1:20:22 - Don't ignore epistemological or individual facet when talking about mental tools! 1:23:08 - Mental tools in the classroom 1:27:14 - The importance of protracted, situated problem-solving (situation as teacher) 1:34:03 - Advice for teachers and mentors (active orientation and maximizing engagement) 1:36:50 - A marketing question for independent scholars   Lloyd, H. (2020) "A Study of Active Orientation, Part 1: A Perspective-Based Theory of Cognitive Development" - http://tiny.cc/vua6tz
01:43:14
December 9, 2020
(S4,Ep68) Where is Vygotsky in CHAT?
Nikolai Veresov discusses the differences between cultural-historical  theory (CHT) and cultural-historical activity theory (CHAT) and explains how each can be used effectively, while cautioning against conflating  or combining the two.  (Initially published December 3, 2020) Full video: http://tiny.cc/s316tz
02:26
December 7, 2020
(S4,Ep67) What is the opposite of death?
By example, Nikolai Veresov illustrates the method Vygotsky used to analyze the development of human consciousness.   (Initially published December 3, 2020)  Full video: http://tiny.cc/s316tz
02:26
December 7, 2020
(S4,Ep66) Specific features: CHT and CHAT
Nikolai Veresov discusses specific features of cultural-historical  theory (CHT), cultural-historical activity theory (CHAT), and also  activity theory (AT).   (Initially published December 3, 2020)  Full video: http://tiny.cc/s316tz
05:31
December 7, 2020
(S4,Ep65) Are the stereotypes true?
Nikolai Veresov addresses three stereotypes about himself and his opinions of cultural-historical activity theory (CHAT).   (Initially published December 3, 2020) Full video: http://tiny.cc/s316tz   Veresov (2020) "Identity as a sociocultural phenomenon: the dialectics of belonging, being and becoming" is here: http://tiny.cc/pty5tz
02:27
December 7, 2020
(S1,Ep18) A chat about CHAT (and CHT)
Nikolai Veresov helps to distinguish cultural-historical activity theory (CHAT) and cultural-historical theory (CHT).  (Initially published December 2, 2020) Highlights include:  0:35 - What is CHAT? (Ant's confession)  1:58 - Nikolai's preference for clarification over comparison  3:39 - Veresov (2020): Two theories with many strengths  5:51 - Nikolai's appreciation and respect for CHAT  7:27 - Nikolai's concerns about CHAT  8:36 - Historical background of CHT, Activity Theory, and CHAT   15:24 - Why is this important?  19:17 - Is Nikolai alone here?  23:18 - Three coexisting theories  25:55 - Specific features of CHT and of CHAT  32:20 - Is CHAT more about systems while CHT is about individuals?  34:45 - Personality, transformation, and metamorphosis (CHAT and CHT)  38:31 - Is there a metamorphosis dynamic in CHAT?  40:44 - The concept of contradiction in CHT and in CHAT  43:41 - An example of dialectical unity (life and birth and death)  48:52 - Vygotskian application of dialectical unity (not subject-object but individual-social)  54:12 - Example: development of HPF or cultural forms of behavior?   59:36 - Mediation in CHAT and in CHT    1:04:11 - Can tools ever have more agency than individuals?   1:09:50 - Should perezhivanie make an appearance in CHAT?  1:16:49 - Is CHAT concerned with cultural or social *development*?  1:19:28 - Where is Vygotsky in CHAT?  1:21:32 - Can developmental CHT principles map onto CHAT-esque domains?  1:25:13 - Nikolai's objection  Veresov (2020)  "Identity as a sociocultural phenomenon: the dialectics of belonging, being and becoming" is here: http://tiny.cc/pty5tz
01:31:46
December 2, 2020
(S6,Ep18) An interesting translation/summary project
David Kellogg shares a story (and a few slides) from a South Korean translation of Vygotsky's work on Emotions.  (Initially published November 30, 2020) Excerpted from "Can Vygotsky be simplified? (or at least illustrated?)" - http://tiny.cc/4ps5tz
02:19
December 2, 2020
(S3,Ep21) Vygotsky - through a Labor Education lens
Helena Worthen recreates what she might say to inquisitive members of her labor education classes.   (Initially published December 1, 2020) Helena's book, "What Did You Learn At Work Today?" is here: http://tiny.cc/l6v5tz
09:26
December 2, 2020
(S3,Ep20) Can Vygotsky be simplified? (or at least illustrated?)
David Kellogg responds to two requests: - How are you using comic strips to present Vygotsky's teaching on the emotions?  - Can Vygotsky's theory be simplified for a general audience, without being too 'simplistic'?  (Initially published November 29, 2020) More Q & A here: http://tiny.cc/73p4tz
57:42
November 29, 2020
(S3,Ep19) Are concepts more 'verb' than 'noun'?
"Is it true to say that everything is a process, that we should grasp the world as process rather than things?"  Andy Blunden weighs in.  (Initially published November 15, 2020) More Q & A here: http://tiny.cc/73p4tz
08:01
November 16, 2020
(S3,Ep18) What is the relationship between HPF-development and concept-development?
Andy Blunden offers his thoughts.  (Initially published November 14, 2020) More Q & A here: http://tiny.cc/73p4tz
03:45
November 16, 2020
(S4,Ep64) What Are Concepts -- and How Might They Be Taught?
Important questions. Interesting answers. Excerpts from Andy Blunden,  Huw Lloyd, Peter Smagorinsky, David Kellogg, and Nikolai Veresov provide a great start to a rich conversation...   (Initially published November 1, 2020) Sources for all clips are available here: http://tiny.cc/led1tz
05:24
November 16, 2020
(S4,Ep63) Pleasures and Challenges of Communicating with The Public
Writing for the general public is challenging -- and rewarding.  How would YOU explain Vygotsky's theory for a general audience -- e.g, parents, teachers, coaches, relatives --  without sacrificing accuracy?  It might be harder than it looks!  (Initially published October 30, 2020) Academic Peter Smagorinsky publishes prolifically and also contributes regular newspaper columns for The Atlanta Journal-Constitution.   Philosopher Andy Blunden translates, curates, and publishes at ethicalpolitics.org and also maintains a vibrant YouTube presence.   The full clips are available here: http://tiny.cc/ez91tz or here: http://tiny.cc/mz91tz
03:50
November 16, 2020
(S6,Ep17) What Is Culture? (and the mythopoetic past and future)
Jordan Hall offers a Vygotsky-esque definition of culture before  focusing on one slice of culture: narrative storytelling. He then talks  about various dimensions of narrative, including narrative as  cultural-artifact, narrative as mythopoetic past, and narrative as a  reliable "mythopoetic" guide for future-shaping, or at least for  imagined futures.  (Initially published October 28, 2020) Full video here: http://tiny.cc/6a51tz
02:58
November 16, 2020
(S6,Ep16) Are These the New Utopians?
. . . and are they any wiser?  Two excerpts from Daniel Schmachtenberger, on the dialectics of development and on proceeding  with caution.  (Initially published October 28, 2020.) Sources: clip 1 - http://tiny.cc/kru0tz  clip 2 - http://tiny.cc/mru0tz
07:12
November 16, 2020
(S6,Ep15) What is dramatic perezhivanie?
Nikolai Veresov discusses the refraction and microgenesis of dramatic  perezhivanie, a concept introduced previously with Marilyn Fleer. (Originally published October 20, 2020) The full lecture, "Demystifying Perezhivanie: understanding development  in the cultural-historical framework," is here: http://tiny.cc/87ezsz
03:21
October 23, 2020
(S6,Ep14) Was Vygotsky a Social Determinist?
Nikolai Veresov looks to the concept of perezhivanie to answer the question.  (Originally published October 12, 2020) The full lecture, "Demystifying Perezhivanie: understanding development in the cultural-historical framework," is here: http://tiny.cc/87ezsz
02:27
October 13, 2020
(S4,Ep62) Are the laws of thought objective?
Nikolai Veresov discusses Vygotsky's "greatest contribution" -- the "discovery of the objectively existing laws of the development of all higher psychological functions"  (Originally published October 12, 2020) Side questions include: Have these laws been challenged? Is Vygotsky's theory a left-wing theory? Should conservatives be wary of this theory? Excerpted from "Vygotsky's Role in the History of Psychology - Part 2" http://tiny.cc/2983iz   
03:20
October 13, 2020
(S6,Ep13) A great little story: qualitative changes are not temporary
In an era of widespread replication crises, particularly in the social sciences, Nikolai Veresov reminds us that qualitative changes "don't come back."  He then illustrates this "principle of sustainable results" with a historical anecdote about about Soviet propaganda and one researcher's honor.  (Originally published September 14, 2020) More on the principle of sustainable results (Principle 5) here:  http://tiny.cc/gvxusz   Excerpted from "Cultural-historical genetic research methodology-Part 1  by Nikolai Veresov" http://tiny.cc/9g2usz
02:20
September 14, 2020
(S6,Ep12) How the ZPD is a Research Tool
Nikolai Veresov argues that Vygotsky's zone of proximal development  (ZPD) was created as a research tool, specifically as a means of helping  researchers "find the buds" of development, i.e., to determine which  psychological functions are in their earliest stage of development.  (Originally published September 14, 2020) The ZPD, therefore, is the conceptual tool that aligns with research principle #1: 'the principle of buds of development' (more here:  http://tiny.cc/gvxusz)    Excerpted from "Cultural-historical genetic research methodology-Part 1  by Nikolai Veresov" http://tiny.cc/9g2usz
03:51
September 14, 2020
(S6,Ep11) Is Nikolai too dogmatic here?
Nikolai Veresov argues that Vygotsky's subject matter required a special methodology for analysis -- and that the subject matter, theory, and  methods must all be aligned.  (Originally published September 11, 2020) Excerpted from "Cultural-historical genetic research methodology-Part 1  by Nikolai Veresov" http://tiny.cc/9g2usz   cf. http://tiny.cc/bg2usz "Advice for publishing social science  research"
02:20
September 14, 2020
(S5,EP8) Humility of chairs
This is a classroom lesson, repurposed for online "distance learning,"  and based in part of the following quotation:  "Word meaning is a phenomenon of verbal thought, or of the meaningful  word. It is a unity of word and thought. No further evidence is needed  to support this basic thesis. Our experimental studies have consistently  supported and justified it. They have shown that by taking word meaning  as a unit of verbal thinking we create the potential for investigating  its development and explaining its most important characteristics at the  various developmental stages. The primary result of this work, however,  is not this thesis itself but a subsequent conclusion that constitutes  the conceptual center of our investigation, that is, the finding that  word meaning develops. The discovery that word meaning changes and  develops is our new and fundamental contribution to the theory of  thinking and speech. It is our major discovery, a discovery that has  allowed us to overcome the postulate of constancy and unchangableness of  word meaning which has provided the foundation for previous theories of  thinking and speech."  L. S. Vygotsky (1934/1987) Thinking and Speech,  Chapter 7, p. 245   (Originally published September 12, 2020) Lesson summary and links: http://tiny.cc/zu4usz  Closing song: "Ethereal" (2017) by Hunter Myers (grade 8 at the time)
14:17
September 12, 2020
(S4,Ep61) Vygotsky the teacher
David Kellogg characterizes Vygotsky's teaching and thinking, and also  explains why Vygotsky will keep us busy for another 100 years.  (Originally published September 20, 2020) Full chat here: http://tiny.cc/j60usz
02:26
September 11, 2020
(S4,Ep60) Building Semantic Memory
David Kellogg cites language as the interface between individual and  environment, and the development of word meaning as the prime builder of  memory.  (Originally published September 10, 2020) Full chat here: http://tiny.cc/j60usz
02:26
September 11, 2020
(S4,Ep59) A Vygotskian spin on a national curriculum
David Kellogg finds Vygotsky in an interesting national curriculum.   Full chat here: http://tiny.cc/j60usz
02:27
September 10, 2020
(S4,Ep58) Is there a best and worst time for progressive teaching?
From a pedological lens, David Kellogg suggests that there's a time and  place for progressive, child-centered teaching -- under special  conditions, and certainly not as a matter of course. (Originally published September 10, 2020) Full chat here: http://tiny.cc/j60usz
02:09
September 10, 2020
(S1,Ep17) David Kellogg on Pedology and the Importance of Word Meaning
In this teaching-centric conversation, David Kellogg shares an interesting perspective on pedagogical (and pedological) Vygotsky.  (Originally published September 9, 2020) Highlights include:  0:46 - Pedology vs. pedagogy   5:24 - Vygotsky's long life after death . . . and some Breaking News  10:02 - The important of "interests" for concept development  11:48 - Hats David has worn (continuing the point on "interests")  16:38 - Challenging children & zones of actual vs next development  18:35 - Can memory be developed late, and if so, how?  24:00 - Types of games (R. Caillois) and the importance of semantic memory   26:50 - The importance of language & the (in)appropriateness of progressive teaching  30:11 - An elaboration of Vygotsky's law of four stages (cf. http://tiny.cc/e8vtsz)  35:10 - A developmental educational framework David likes -- and his Vygotskian spin on it  42:25 - Semantic memory and "Conversation as the great chain-complex of child development"   44:04 - Some of teaching suggestions Anthony appreciated (original: https://bit.ly/33dAoGz)  49:43 - Vygotsky's partial critique of "Thinking and Speech: Chapter 5"  57:55 - What is semantic memory (and semantic meaning)?  1:04:53 - An engaging teaching demo aimed toward semantic meaning development  1:09:01 - Why David thinks Language trumps Activity  1:14:32 - Vygotsky as teacher and pedagogical philosopher
01:18:29
September 10, 2020
(S3,Ep17) Three questions about the "unit of analysis" idea
Three follow-up questions - on the idea of 'unit of analysis' - after a recent chat with Andy Blunden. (Originally published September 5, 2020) The recent chat referenced is here: http://tiny.cc/uzvssz
10:50
September 5, 2020
(S4,Ep57) Opinions on diversity
Vygotsky is a nice common interest.  As caricatures, Andy and I should hate each other; as individuals, not so much. (Originally published September 4, 2020) Full chat here: http://tiny.cc/iptssz
02:26
September 4, 2020
(S4,Ep56) Perspective-shaping experiences
Andy Blunden reflects - personally and generally - on the role of dramatic experiences on personality development.  (Originally published September 4, 2020) Full chat here: http://tiny.cc/iptssz
02:27
September 4, 2020
(S4,Ep55) Vygotsky's explosion of creativity
Andy Blunden lists various units of analysis developed by Vygotsky during a fertile period, against a revolutionary backdrop.  (Originally published September 4, 2020) Full chat here: http://tiny.cc/iptssz
02:27
September 4, 2020
(S4,Ep54) Two sides to the "unit of analysis" idea
Andy Blunden distinguishes the 'mechanical' unit of analysis from the 'organic'  (Originally published September 4, 2020) Full chat here: http://tiny.cc/iptssz
02:27
September 4, 2020
(S4,Ep53) What does "unit of analysis" mean?
Andy Blunden offers historical context and an explanation.  (Originally published September 4, 2020) Full chat here: http://tiny.cc/iptssz
02:26
September 4, 2020
(S4,Ep52) A collapsible, unfoldable, highly concentrated approach
Huw Lloyd focuses on a "small but very powerful set of ideas" at the heart of a developmental education approach. Full video: http://tiny.cc/vhbrsz
02:25
September 3, 2020
(S4,Ep51) Pleasures of problem-solving
Huw Lloyd on the pleasures of implementing ideas into real-world  results, and making room for such emotions in classrooms, via a problem-oriented approach.  (Originally published September 3, 2020) Full video: http://tiny.cc/vhbrsz
02:27
September 3, 2020
(S4,Ep50) Davydov and Developmental Education (a primer)
Huw Lloyd identifies some key attributes of developmental education.  (Originally published September 3, 2020) Full video: http://tiny.cc/vhbrsz
02:27
September 3, 2020
(S4,Ep49) Is Active Orientation a practice?
Huw Lloyd suggests personal and classroom benefits of being mindful of our own active orientation.  (Originally published September 3, 2020) Full video: http://tiny.cc/vhbrsz
02:27
September 3, 2020
(S4,Ep 48) What does Active Orientation mean?
Developmental researcher Huw Lloyd gives an introduction. (Originally published September 3, 2020) Full video: http://tiny.cc/vhbrsz
02:27
September 3, 2020
(S5,Ep7) Environments for Active Learning: a Vygotskian perspective (Hillocks, 1995)
Excerpts from George Hillocks, Jr.'s (1995) book, Teaching Writing as Reflective Practice  (Originally published September 1, 2020) 0:23 - Three Modes of Teaching: Environmental, Presentational, and Natural Process  2:40 - Features of Environments for Active Learning  4:27 - Goals and Objectives of Environmental Teaching  8:27 - Selection of Materials and Problems  10:23 - Providing Support for Learning: Structural & Small peer-group support  13:50 - Student Ownership  15:42 - Environmental Teaching: a Vygotskian Perspective    Full text: http://tiny.cc/p09rsz
16:02
September 1, 2020
(S1,Ep16) Straddling the Abstract and the Concrete -- with Andy Blunden
Researcher and chronicler Andy Blunden reflects on his own relationship with Vygotsky, his role and contributions to the Vygotsky-sphere, and some developmental landmarks.  (Originally published August 28, 2020) Highlights include:  1:45 - Andy's role in the Vygotsky-sphere  7:20 - Hegel's 'unit of analysis' (circle/whole) and das einfach  15:15 - Vygotsky's inventiveness & extensions of the Goethe/Hegel 'unit of analysis' tradition  22:09 - "Vygotsky was to psychology like Einstein was to physics" (interdisciplinary breakthroughs)  27:48 - CHAT/CHT and orthodoxy ("the only orthodoxy is science")  34:11 - What are the best and worst critiques of Marxism from the Right?  43:10 - Andy's expertise and 'social change' analyses via the 'unit of analysis' approach  56:30 - How accurate have Andy's 'unit of analysis' diagnoses been?  1:01:30 - What is Vygotsky's theory?  1:10:35 - Does development happen gradually or suddenly?  1:18:54 - Is collective development a thing, or individuals only? (collective perezhivanie)  1:26:21 - "Dialectics of development" and different types of change  1:34:09 - Any "Vygotskian moments" in Andy's own development?  1:45:10 - Themes in Andy's story?  1:49:23 - How will Andy be remembered?   References: "The coronavirus pandemic is a world perezhivanie" - https://bit.ly/32zJOfg Fate of a Man (1959) - https://bit.ly/3hDXbRL "The Unit of Analysis and Germ Cell in Hegel, Marx, and Vygotsky" - https://bit.ly/2YLFqsn
02:02:03
August 29, 2020
(S1,Ep15) Self-awareness, Perspective, and Imagination -- with Huw Lloyd
Researcher Huw Lloyd, fluent in numerous mental models, is a good explainer of concepts -- including many I was completely unversed in. A few threads run through the entirety of this chat: development,  self-awareness, and construing an active orientation to any given situation.   SECTION 1: Our pathways to Vygotsky   0:36 - Reflections on Huw's recent "Vygotsky and Parenting"  (http://tiny.cc/ymqpsz)  1:45 - Pros and cons of taking scholarly shortcuts   6:07 - Huw's arrival to Vygotsky, in part through dissatisfaction  elsewhere   SECTION 2: Huw's ideas about Active Orientation  16:38 - What is Active Orientation?   23:30 - Is Active Orientation a practice? (An exercise in self  awareness)  31:58 - Active Orientation can be documented (microgenesis research of  Huw's)  SECTION 3: What is Developmental Education?  40:37 - A primer on Davydov and Developmental Education   46:07 - Empirical thinking vs. Theoretical thinking   50:23 - Grokking the material and the History of ideas   52:59 - Problems are Good   55:40 - An illustrative lesson of Davydov's   1:03:43 - Some key characteristics of developmental education   1:07:41 - Crises, construals, and neoformations   1:10:20 - The Desert Oak: a developmental TRIZ problem   SECTION 4: Imagination and Confidence-building   1:16:07 - Imagination, flow, and problem-solving  1:24:10 - Systems and Design Ideas (TRIZ approach)   1:30:22 - Earned, authoritative confidence: Your tempered ideas are become Real  1:35:20 - The importance of problem-construal or framing  1:48:04 - Problem-creating, -solving, and -construing   1:53:51 - This is rich, highly concentrated material (Foundational, generative,  "unfoldable" concepts)   1:55:27 - Notational vs. developmental education (and epistemology)   1:57:10 - Final two questions (adult-development & advice for  problem-designers)  2:06:20 - Complex vs. complicated (and self-regulation and distance  learning)   2:09:46 - An idea for lunch (as promised: http://tiny.cc/bvqpsz)   References:  http://tiny.cc/5vqpsz - "A Study of Active Orientation" (brief  introduction)  http://tiny.cc/2xqpsz - "TRIZ: a Powerful Methodology for Creative  Problem Solving"  http://tiny.cc/dxqpsz - "Going with the Flow: How to Engage Boys (and  Girls) in Their Literacy Learning"
02:13:53
August 27, 2020
(S5,Ep6) Commentary on Vygotsky's work on defectology (Smagorinsky, 2012)
Two excerpts from Peter Smagorinsky's (2012) "Vygotsky, 'Defectology,'  and the Inclusion of People of Difference in the Broader Cultural  Stream"  (Originally published August 21, 2020) 0:14 - "Vygotsky's View of the Defect"  6:36 - "Discussion"   Full text: http://tiny.cc/5pqosz
14:24
August 21, 2020
(S5,Ep5) Overview of Vygotsky's Theory (Veresov, 2020)
Three excerpts from Nikolai Veresov's "Discovering the Great Royal Seal: New Reality of Vygotsky’s Legacy"  (Originally published August 21, 2020) 0:16 - "The subject-matter of cultural-historical theory" 8:22 - "New realities and new opportunities" 11:32 - "Final remarks" Full article: http://tiny.cc/4mnosz
14:22
August 20, 2020
(S5,Ep4) Overview of Vygotsky's Theory (Wertsch, 1985)
An excerpt from one of my favorite books, James Wertsch's (1985) "Vygotsky and the Social Formation of Mind"  (Originally published August 20. 2020)
06:54
August 20, 2020
(S5,Ep3) Overview of Vygotsky's Theory (Chaiklin, 2003)
An excerpt from Seth Chaiklin's (2003) "The zone of proximal development in Vygotsky’s analysis of learning and instruction" -- from the section, "Vygotsky's Theory of Child Development"  (Originally published August 20, 2020) Full text: http://tiny.cc/aenosz
10:14
August 20, 2020
(S6,Ep10) Pros and Cons of (terminological) Diversity
Nikolai Veresov being provocative -- no surprise there  : )   (Originally published May 13, 2020 here: http://tiny.cc/f72osz) Do the many benefits of (terminological) diversity outweigh the drawbacks? What if you're not an "insider"?  Full source: http://tiny.cc/vew0oz (recommended!)
02:20
August 16, 2020
(S6,Ep9) Distinguishing Spontaneous, Scientific, and Pseudo- Concepts
Excerpted from "Spinoza, Chess, and Other Magic Gateways" featuring David Kellogg.   Full video: http://tiny.cc/fyansz
02:05
August 14, 2020
(S3,Ep16) Andy Blunden on Conscious Awareness
In response to a question from a Chapter 6 excerpt from Thinking and Speech, Andy expands the passage and weighs in.  (Originally published August 14, 2020)   Relevant and related content from Andy is here: http://tiny.cc/aw84iz   Here is the passage in question, from Thinking and Speech, Ch. 6, pp. 190-1:  "To perceive something in a different way means to acquire new potentials for acting with respect to it. At the chess board, to see differently is to play differently. By generalizing the process of activity itself, I acquire the potential for new relationships with it. To speak crudely, it is as if this process has been isolated from the general activity of consciousness. I am conscious of the fact that I remember. I make my own remembering the object of consciousness. An isolation arises here. In a certain sense, any generalization or abstraction isolates its object. This is why conscious awareness – understood as generalization – leads directly to mastery.    Thus, the foundation of conscious awareness is the generalization or abstraction of the mental processes, which leads to their mastery. Instruction has a decisive role in this process. Scientific concepts have a unique relationship to the object. This relationship is mediated through other concepts that themselves have an internal hierarchical system of interrelationships. It is apparently in this domain of the scientific concept that conscious awareness of concepts or the generalization and mastery of concepts emerges for the first time. And once a new structure of generalization has arisen in one sphere of thought, it can – like any structure – be transferred without training to all remaining domains of concepts and thought. Thus, conscious awareness enters through the gate opened up by the scientific concept."   David Kellogg's close-reading of this same passage is here: http://tiny.cc/9vansz
19:47
August 14, 2020
(S3,Ep15) Huw Lloyd on Vygotsky and Parenting
Huw and I are parents of the same-aged children -- boys for him, girls for me.  Having read various of Huw's written contributions with interest, I was eager to hear his thoughts on parenting and Vygotsky.  As is often the case with topics such as these, Huw had more to contribute than he initially realized.  Thank you to Huw, and perhaps he and I can continue the conversation on developmental education, a topic I'd like to understand more clearly.  (Originally published August 14, 2020) 1:23 - Section 1: Introduction and Preamble  28:32 - Section 2: Personal Notes, Parenting, and Vygotsky   More from Huw here: http://tiny.cc/d6ansz   
01:36:14
August 14, 2020
(S3,Ep14) Chess, Spinoza, and Other Magic Gateways
David Kellogg offers us a Vygotsky close-reading, along with some interesting personal anecdotes, grounded in some visual storytelling about chess and xianqi.  (Originally published August 12, 2020) More here on David's new book translation on Vygotsky's late-career lectures on pedology: http://tiny.cc/4p3nsz Here is the passage in question, from Thinking and Speech, Ch. 6, pp. 190-1:  "To perceive something in a different way means to acquire new potentials for acting with respect to it. At the chess board, to see differently is to play differently. By generalizing the process of activity itself, I acquire the potential for new relationships with it. To speak crudely, it is as if this process has been isolated from the general activity of consciousness. I am conscious of the fact that I remember. I make my own remembering the object of consciousness. An isolation arises here. In a certain sense, any generalization or abstraction isolates its object. This is why conscious awareness – understood as generalization – leads directly to mastery.    Thus, the foundation of conscious awareness is the generalization or abstraction of the mental processes, which leads to their mastery. Instruction has a decisive role in this process. Scientific concepts have a unique relationship to the object. This relationship is mediated through other concepts that themselves have an internal hierarchical system of interrelationships. It is apparently in this domain of the scientific concept that conscious awareness of concepts or the generalization and mastery of concepts emerges for the first time. And once a new structure of generalization has arisen in one sphere of thought, it can – like any structure – be transferred without training to all remaining domains of concepts and thought. Thus, conscious awareness enters through the gate opened up by the scientific concept."
43:47
August 12, 2020
(S6,Ep8) The concept of perezhivanie as an analytical tool
Interesting clip from an online Nikolai Veresov lecture "concepts are analytical tools . . . and I'm afraid that the concept of perezhivanie will have the same destiny another famous concept of Vygotsky, Zone of Proximal Development, which was misunderstood for the last 30 years"    Full video: https://vimeo.com/164861983 (This excerpt was published on February 5, 2020 at http://tiny.cc/vr3nsz)
02:19
August 12, 2020
(S6,Ep7) Cultivating 'crisis' in the classroom (the good kind)
Interesting clip from a 2010 Natalia Gajdamaschko talk   ". . . development comes out of resolving some sort of contradiction . . . some type of crisis . . . a good crisis"    Full video: http://tiny.cc/5fjejz "Part 5 - Natalia Gajdamaschko on Vygotsky" (This excerpt was published on January 30, 2020 at http://tiny.cc/vr3nsz)
02:20
August 12, 2020
(S6,Ep6) Clip 5: Educational implications and ideas (Holbrook Mahn)
The fifth of an interesting set of clips from 2014 Holbrook Mahn talk.     Clip 5: Mahn's take on #ZPD, yet another update (corrective?) to Vygotsky's most cited (and most misinterpreted?) concept.     Full video: http://tiny.cc/eybwiz  *Compare this take to @psmagorinsky's ZND (http://tiny.cc/a5bwiz), Nikolai Veresov's 'levels' of HPFs (http://tiny.cc/zdcwiz), & Chaiklin's (http://tiny.cc/d315hz) (This excerpt was published on January 30, 2020 at http://tiny.cc/vr3nsz)
01:43
August 12, 2020
(S6,Ep5) Clip 4: Educational implications and ideas (Holbrook Mahn)
The fourth of an interesting set of clips from 2014 Holbrook Mahn talk.     Clip 4: creating deliberate bridges from everyday to academic language   Full video: http://tiny.cc/eybwiz (This excerpt was published on January 30, 2020 at http://tiny.cc/vr3nsz)
01:50
August 12, 2020
(S6,Ep4) Clip 3: Educational implications and ideas (Holbrook Mahn)
The third of an interesting set of clips from 2014 Holbrook Mahn talk.     Clip 3: Particularly helpful for second language learners . . .   Full video: http://tiny.cc/eybwiz (This excerpt was published on January 30, 2020 at http://tiny.cc/vr3nsz)
02:16
August 12, 2020
(S6,Ep3) Clip 2: Educational implications and ideas (Holbrook Mahn)
The second of an interesting set of clips from 2014 Holbrook Mahn talk.     Clip 2: How might academic concepts show up in everyday life?  Start there.   Full video: http://tiny.cc/eybwiz (This excerpt was published on January 30, 2020 at http://tiny.cc/vr3nsz)
02:11
August 12, 2020
(S6,Ep2) Clip 1: Educational implications and ideas (Holbrook Mahn)
The first of an interesting set of clips from 2014 Holbrook Mahn talk.   Clip 1: concept mapping (conceptual systems)    Full video: http://tiny.cc/eybwiz   #teaching #conceptdevelopment #zpd (This excerpt was published on January 30, 2020 at http://tiny.cc/vr3nsz)
02:11
August 12, 2020
(S6,Ep1) Lenin's Tomb (feat. Mike Cole)
This brief clip raises a number of questions, including:  where are 'the buds'? - what are the qualitative reorganizations here?  why are the buds (e.g., of volition) not yet present for the 3 year-olds, present for the 5 year-olds, and already flowered for the 8 year-olds?  (ages are approximate, I know)  how temporary is the 5 year-olds' improved volition? does it wear off?  is it now 'activated' for good? - for the 8 year-olds, is volition developed for tasks such as standing still but still in 'bud' stage for more demanding acts of will?   Original source: "Mike Cole on ZOPED" http://tiny.cc/jtivpz   More here: "Vygotsky and Context: Toward a Resolution of Theoretical Disputes" http://tiny.cc/yv6upz (This short excerpt was published on May 28, 2020 at http://tiny.cc/vr3nsz)
02:20
August 12, 2020
(S4,Ep47) Vocabulary Games - a fun, metacognitive, generative approach
Peter Smagorinsky describes some of his most beloved lessons -- competitive vocabulary games.  Resources to each of these games are available for free at http://www.petersmagorinsky.net/TEBD/Books/Vocabulary_Games/ExpansionsIndex.htm   Our full interview, "Insights & Inquiries with Peter Smagorinsky" is here: http://tiny.cc/ceumsz
02:27
August 10, 2020
(S4,Ep46) Which educational idea is most overlooked?
Peter Smagorinsky makes a case for constructivism, offering some definitions along the way.  (Originally published August 9, 2020) The full interview, "Insights & Inquiries with Peter Smagorinsky" is here: http://tiny.cc/ceumsz
02:27
August 10, 2020
(S4,Ep45) "All teaching is local"
Peter Smagorinsky shares a bit of advice based on numerous decades spent teaching, researching, and training future teachers.  (Originally published August 9, 2020) The full interview, "Insights & Inquiries with Peter Smagorinsky" is here: http://tiny.cc/ceumsz
02:27
August 10, 2020
(S4,Ep44) Did a "cultural mismatch" stop this student-teacher from succeeding?
Or were other factors more salient? In this clip, Peter Smagorinsky relates an interesting case study from his recent book, "Learning to Teach English and the Language Arts: A Vygotskian Perspective on Beginning Teachers’ Pedagogical Concept Development" - http://tiny.cc/aeumsz  (Originally published August 9, 2020) Our full interview, "Insights and Inquiries with Peter Smagorinsky" is here: http://tiny.cc/ceumsz
02:27
August 10, 2020
(S3,Ep13) What is important about "the crisis of age"?
Andy Blunden weighs in.  (Originally published Aug 8, 2020) More from Andy on this topic here: https://www.ethicalpolitics.org/wits/...  Also here: http://tiny.cc/ltrmsz
07:24
August 8, 2020
(S4,Ep43) A bridge (Vygotskian research and classroom teaching)
These three clips have captured my attention.  (Originally published Apr 25, 2020) Clip 1 - Vygotsky's "Law of 4 Stages"  Clip 2 - How this law can help teachers and students  Clip 3 - A memory game (biological vs. cultural memory)   Full video: http://tiny.cc/byn7rz
07:16
August 8, 2020
(S4,Ep42) The Key to Unlocking Vygotsky?
Nikolai Veresov says that understanding dialectics is a prerequisite for grasping the depth of Vygotsky's project, since "cultural-historical theory is the result of the application of dialectics into psychology." For instance, somewhat obscure concepts such as neoformations, drama, zpd, the process of development, and more become much clearer through the lens of dialectical logic.  (Originally published Jul 17, 2020) Full video: http://tiny.cc/sqijsz More on Vygotsky's application of dialectics here: http://tiny.cc/zqijsz
02:25
August 7, 2020
(S4,Ep41) How many ways can a public symbol be read?
An interesting contribution to a larger cultural conversation, with Peter Smagorinsky  (Originally published Jul 11, 2020) Original chat here: http://tiny.cc/4v5asz
02:26
August 7, 2020
(S4,Ep40) How good is your memory?
Nikolai Veresov on Biological vs. Cultural memory  A demonstration of the influence of a 'cultural tool' on a higher mental function (Originally published Feb 13, 2020) Full video: http://tiny.cc/drpmsz https://twitter.com/cvoelter/status/1153932664925298693
02:25
August 7, 2020
(S4,Ep39) Should researchers work hard to persuade skeptics?
Nikolai Veresov offers his views on the topic of persuading his skeptics.  (Originally published Jun 16, 2020) Full interview here: http://tiny.cc/lj0uqz  Playlist - "5 Principles for Vygotskian Research" here: http://tiny.cc/owkwqz
02:22
August 7, 2020
(S4,Ep38) How does Principle 5 (neoformations) keep us humble?
Nikolai Veresov explains how the Principle of Sustainable Results can be used to keep us (as researchers, teachers, individuals, etc) and our claims humble.   (Originally published Jun 16, 2020) Full interview here: http://tiny.cc/lj0uqz
02:27
August 7, 2020
(S4,Ep37) Transformers & Flowers
Nikolai Veresov explains, via analogy, the difference between transformation and qualitative reorganization.  (Originally published Jun 16, 2020)   Full interview here: http://tiny.cc/lj0uqz
02:26
August 7, 2020
(S4,Ep36) Culture and Humanity
Nikolai Veresov makes an interesting observation about the links between culture, humanity, thinking, and the importance of 'ideal forms'  (Originally published Jun 16, 2020) Full interview here: http://tiny.cc/lj0uqz
02:27
August 7, 2020
(S4,Ep35) Different Logic for Different Problems?
Nikolai Veresov explains how Vygotsky solved a logical conundrum by shifting from one logical paradigm to another, thereby focusing on 'objective processes' instead of subjective phenomena.  (Originally published Jun 15, 2020) Full interview here: http://tiny.cc/lj0uqz
02:24
August 7, 2020
(S4,Ep34) A paradigm shift (concrete task vs. development?)
"The general advice is: when the child has a problem, don't think it it because of genetics; don't think it's because of brain disorder. Think about: maybe the child was not supported . . . think about how to introduce the tools he or she probably doesn't have" (Originally published Apr 25, 2020) Full video: http://tiny.cc/1qpmsz
02:27
August 7, 2020
(S4,Ep33) A different way to think about struggling students (Vygotskian)
Psychologist Nikolai Veresov describes Vygotsky's "most important" law of 4 stages of development of human higher psychological functions (HPFs).  Veresov suggests that students might struggle because one or more of their HPFs (e.g., thinking, memory, imagination, will, attention) has been interrupted at one of the stages of development.  (Originally published Apr 20, 2020) Full video: http://tiny.cc/eppmsz
02:27
August 7, 2020
(S4,Ep32) Talking Argument with Michael Smith
Do we teach argument naively?  Too rigidly? (Originally published April 19, 2020) Full video: http://tiny.cc/zopmsz
01:53
August 7, 2020
(S4,Ep31) New Vygotsky book
For what it's worth, I think it's great to talk up and promote your own book.  If I ever wrote one, I'd talk about it all the time :  )  Here, Nikolai Veresov introduces his recent project with David Kellogg -- their translation and commentary on Vygotsky's late-career lectures on pedology: https://link.springer.com/book/10.1007/978-981-15-0528-7  (Originally published April 18, 2020) *excerpted from a chat on "the Principle of Developmental Tools" http://tiny.cc/mnpmsz
10:24
August 7, 2020
(S4,Ep30) What is universal about human psychological development?
"HPFs are all different: thinking is not the same as memory; memory is not the same as imagination; imagination is not the same as will; and will is not the same as attention. 'But my task,' Vygotsky said, 'my task is not to find what separates them; my task is to find what is similar . . . "  (Originally published April 18, 2020) *excerpted from a chat on "the Principle of Developmental Tools" http://tiny.cc/mnpmsz
02:26
August 7, 2020
(S4,Ep29) Nikolai Veresov on Mediation - What or Who?
"It is not the stick that takes the banana; it's chimpanzee-using-stick to take the banana"   *excerpted from a chat on "the Principle of Developmental Tools" http://tiny.cc/mnpmsz
02:26
August 7, 2020
(S4,Ep28) What is the Zone of NEXT Development?
Peter Smagorinsky compares the well-known ZPD concept (zone of proximal development) with the less-known, longer-looking ZND (zone of next development).  (Originally published Mar 11, 2020) Source: http://tiny.cc/t6e5kz    References: "Is Instructional Scaffolding Actually Vygotskian, and Why Should It Matter to Literacy Teachers?" https://ila.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1002/jaal.756  The Butterflies of Zagorsk: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Butterflies_of_Zagorsk
02:26
August 7, 2020
(S4,Ep27) Andy Blunden on how specific predicaments create a need for development
How specific predicaments can force the development of skills, and fuel the dynamic transition between stages  (Originally published Feb 10, 2020) Full video: http://tiny.cc/13ntjz
02:26
August 7, 2020
(S4,Ep26) Andy Blunden on conflict-resolution and development
How does 'the social situation' influence development?  It's a dynamic process . . .   (Originally published Feb 10, 2020) Full video: http://tiny.cc/13ntjz
02:27
August 7, 2020
(S4,Ep25) Andy Blunden on preconceptual forms of thinking
The stuff before the stuff needed to survive out there in the big wide world.  (Originally published Jan 24, 2020)  Full video: http://tiny.cc/aw84iz
02:25
August 7, 2020
(S4,Ep24) Andy Blunden on pseudoconcepts
When you think you understand key CHT ideas only to realize: http://tiny.cc/zf94iz   (Originally published Jan 24, 2020) Full video: http://tiny.cc/aw84iz
03:26
August 7, 2020
(S4,Ep23) Andy Blunden on the beginning of thinking
This is a great analogy to describe 'the beginning of conceptual thought.'   (Originally published Jan 24, 2020) Full video: http://tiny.cc/aw84iz
02:24
August 7, 2020
(S4,Ep22) The Great Puzzle (and Nikolai's compliment)
"The Great Puzzle" could be a great movie -- the discovery of how we actually become human.   (Originally published Jan 23, 2020) Full video: http://tiny.cc/pt93iz
02:01
August 7, 2020
(S4,Ep21) Nikolai Veresov on the process of development (from 'buds' to 'fruits')
It's possible - by studying the Process of development -- not just results, but the whole process, from 'roots' to 'fruits'  (Originally published Jan 23, 2020) Full video: http://tiny.cc/pt93iz
02:03
August 7, 2020
(S4,Ep20) Nikolai Veresov on 5 Principles for Conducting a Vygotskian Experiment
"I want this lost voice to come back again"  (Originally published Jan 23, 2020) Full video: http://tiny.cc/2983iz
02:21
August 7, 2020
(S4,Ep19) Andy Blunden on Book Smarts vs. Life Smarts
What are the roots or pathways of 'real knowledge'?  (Originally published Jan 23, 2020)  Full video: http://tiny.cc/jy83iz
02:17
August 7, 2020
(S4,Ep18) Andy Blunden on "Solved Puzzles"
How is a concept like a solved puzzle?  (Originally published Jan 23, 2020)  Full video: http://tiny.cc/jy83iz
02:22
August 7, 2020
(S4,Ep17) Andy Blunden on the 'art of teaching'
How can teachers arrange problems worth solving? (where learning a concept = solving the problem; vice-versa)  (Originally published Jan 23, 2020) Full video: http://tiny.cc/jy83iz
02:08
August 7, 2020
(S4,Ep16) Seeing around corners with mental models
Was it Vygotsky's range of mental models that enabled him to see and solve 'unsolvable' problems?  Speakers include Nikolai Veresov, Shane Parrish, Steven Strogatz  (Originally published Feb 6, 2020)
02:27
August 7, 2020
(S4,Ep15) Peter Smagorinsky on the emotional confidence needed to write simply
Is long-windedness an sign of insecurity - or something else, or both?  (Originally published Jan 23, 2020) Full video: http://tiny.cc/by93iz
02:25
August 7, 2020
(S4,Ep14) Peter Smagorinsky on distinguishing the savory from the useful
My own preference is multivocalism http://tiny.cc/7w93iz  (Originally published Jan 23, 2020) Full video: http://tiny.cc/by93iz
02:26
August 7, 2020
(S4,Ep13) Peter Smagorinsky on Biological and Cultural Development
An interesting explanation of lower and higher mental functions (Originally published Jan 23, 2020) Full video: http://tiny.cc/by93iz
02:08
August 7, 2020
(S4,Ep12) Nikolai Veresov on Researching the Process of Development of Executive Functions
An interesting study by Marilyn Fleer, Nikolai Veresov, and Sue Walker:  http://tiny.cc/g73liz "Playworlds and Executive Function in Children" (Originally published Jan 23, 2020)   Full video: http://tiny.cc/2983iz
02:26
August 7, 2020
(S4,Ep11) Nikolai Veresov on helping children - and adults - overcome obstacles
"And then we look: do they have enough higher psychological functions to overcome this?" (Originally published Jan 23, 2020) Full video: http://tiny.cc/2983iz
01:53
August 7, 2020
(S4,Ep10) Is Vygotsky's theory a left-wing theory?
Should Conservatives be wary of this theory? (Originally published Jan 23, 2020) Full video: http://tiny.cc/2983iz
02:26
August 7, 2020
(S4,Ep9) Nikolai Veresov on the (Unsolvable) Crisis in Psychology
How can you study a tool by using the same tool? (Originally published Jan 23, 2020) Full video: http://tiny.cc/u483iz
02:27
August 7, 2020
(S4,Ep8) Peter Smagorinsky on Learning Difficult Concepts
What are the costs of learning difficult concepts? (Originally published Jan 23, 2020) Full video: http://tiny.cc/cr83iz
01:49
August 7, 2020
(S4,Ep7) Peter Smagorinsky on "Social" Concepts
Are hard-science concepts similar to social-science ones?  Are they equally reliable?  (Originally published Jan 23, 2020) Full video: http://tiny.cc/cr83iz
01:18
August 7, 2020
(S4,Ep6) Peter Smagorinsky on reading Vygotsky without the help of mentors
Are there any benefits to trying to study Vygotsky on your own?  And is it doable? (Originally published Jan 23, 2020)   Full video: http://tiny.cc/cr83iz
01:53
August 7, 2020
(S4,Ep5) Peter Smagorinsky on "Sturdy" Concepts
What's better: theory or practice?  (Originally published Jan 23, 2020) Full video: http://tiny.cc/cr83iz
01:51
August 7, 2020
(S4,Ep4) Nikolai Veresov on learning vs. development
When does learning NOT make us smarter?   Full video: http://tiny.cc/fl83iz
02:17
August 7, 2020
(S4,Ep3) Nikolai Veresov on viewpoint-shaping dramas
"we didn't give up; we overcame the dramas of our lives...and the way we look on the world now very much depends on the dramas of our life we've overcome..."  (Originally published Jan 23, 2020) Full video: http://tiny.cc/fl83iz
01:15
August 7, 2020
(S4,Ep2) Nikolai Veresov on Vygotsky's breakthrough
What would Nikolai say is the central point of CHT?  (Originally published Jan 23, 2020) Full video: http://tiny.cc/fl83iz
01:26
August 7, 2020
(S4,Ep1) Nikolai Veresov on the misunderstanding of ZPD
Why is Vygotsky's most famous concept still "a victim of misunderstanding"?  (Originally published Jan 23, 2020) Full video here: http://tiny.cc/fl83iz
01:02
August 7, 2020
(S3,Ep12) Vygotskian Threshold Concepts?
What do you think is the most powerful threshold concept in Vygotsky's work?  Andy Blunden weighs in, followed by responses from three other Vygotskian researchers. (Originally published Jun 25, 2020) From Meyer and Land (2003): "Threshold Concepts’ may be considered to be “akin to passing through a portal” or “conceptual gateway” that opens up “previously inaccessible way[s] of thinking about something”    Meyer and Land, 2003: "Our discussions with practitioners in a range of disciplinary areas have led us to conclude that a threshold concept, across a range of subject contexts, is likely to be:   Transformative, in that, once understood, its potential effect on student learning and behaviour is to occasion a significant shift in the perception of a subject, or part thereof.     Probably irreversible, in that the change of perspective occasioned by acquisition of a threshold concept is unlikely to be forgotten, or will be unlearned only by considerable effort.    Integrative; that is, it exposes the previously hidden interrelatedness of something."   Flanagan, 2020: "Examples of the threshold concept must be transformative and involve a traverse through a liminal space. They are likely to be characterised by many of, but not necessarily all of, the other features listed below:  Transformative: Once understood, a threshold concept changes the way in which the student views the discipline. - Troublesome: Threshold concepts are likely to be troublesome for the student. Perkins [1999, 2006] has suggested that knowledge can be troublesome e.g. when it is counter-intuitive, alien or seemingly incoherent.   Irreversible: Given their transformative potential, threshold concepts are also likely to be irreversible, i.e. they are difficult to unlearn.     Integrative: Threshold concepts, once learned, are likely to bring together different aspects of the subject that previously did not appear, to the student, to be related.   Bounded: A threshold concept will probably delineate a particular conceptual space, serving a specific and limited purpose.     Discursive: Meyer and Land [2] suggest that the crossing of a threshold will incorporate an enhanced and extended use of language.   Reconstitutive: "Understanding a threshold concept may entail a shift in learner subjectivity, which is implied through the transformative and discursive aspects already noted. Such reconstitution is, perhaps, more likely to be recognised initially by others, and also to take place over time (Smith)".    Liminality: Meyer and Land [4] have likened the crossing of the pedagogic threshold to a ‘rite of passage’ (drawing on the ethnographical studies of Gennep and of Turner in which a transitional or liminal space has to be traversed; “in short, there is no simple passage in learning from ‘easy’ to ‘difficult’; mastery of a threshold concept often involves messy journeys back, forth and across conceptual terrain. (Cousin [2006])”.
10:10
August 7, 2020
(S3,Ep11) Halliday for Teachers? (key concept)
David Kellogg weighs in on the question, "Which 'threshold concept' of Halliday's can open portals for teachers?" (Originally published Jun 19, 2020) 0:07 - A question for David  2:05 - David tells us about "magic gateways"  5:02 - Teachers can use metafunctions to better diagnose and locate struggle  10:18 - The 3 great metafunctions of the Hallidayan system  12:44 - Demonstration: a closer look at one metafunction   Thank you, David.    Potentially of interest: http://tiny.cc/l8e1qz
19:35
August 7, 2020
(S3,Ep10) What's worth knowing about Trust Networks?
Andy Blunden weighs in. (Originally published Jun 2, 2020) Here is The Lancet's retraction: http://tiny.cc/o3tiqz More context on the Lancet hydroxychloroquine study: http://tiny.cc/h4tiqz  Here is the paper referenced in Andy's answer: https://bit.ly/3eWif4e One ammendment from Andy: "One error in my improvisation: The Lancet were apparently tipped off by a whistleblower, rather than by reviewers, but the link you give tells the story as seen by the Lancet. Thank you. The other thing, 'trust network' was apparently a term coined by Wikipedia in 2004 to characterise the network of expertise they have assembled to build Wikipedia. How about that, eh? And this draws attention to how social media 'reify,' or formalise trust networks, giving them stablility, which is amplifying the problem of politicisation which I mentioned. The advent of web-based news, in which the reader curates their own news, is another instance."
08:17
August 7, 2020
(S3,Ep9) Notes on Dialectics, 1 (bird's-eye view)
I am trying to understand Vygotsky's theory in a way that's easy to explain.  This is harder than I had hoped.  For instance, a sufficient understanding of dialectics appears to be a requirement.  Here, I share helpful notes from a trusted source -- Kevin deLaplante -- with sincere thanks. (Originally published Mar 2, 2020) About Kevin: https://kevindelaplante.com/about/
15:48
August 7, 2020
(S3,Ep8) How accurate is Peterson's assessment here?
Issue: identity politics and polarization.  Andy Blunden weighs in.   As can you -- feel free to add a response of your own. (Originally published Feb 26, 2020) Original source: http://tiny.cc/c5xojz
06:60
August 7, 2020
(S3,Ep7) Inner speech is where words go to die? (Vygotsky)
Andy Blunden addresses an interesting question from Helena Worthen.  Thank you to both. (Originally published Feb 17, 2020)
06:40
August 7, 2020
(S3,Ep6) What do all these terms mean?
So many -isms, what do they all mean?  Andy Blunden offers his perspective. (Originally posted Feb 20, 2020)
09:56
August 7, 2020
(S3,Ep5) Was Vygotsky's breakthrough as original as advertised?
Andy Blunden weighs in. (Originally published Feb 12, 2020)
03:45
August 7, 2020
(S3,Ep4) Why did people give their lives for Stalin?
Andy Blunden puts on his red shirt, evaluates Stephen Kotkin's response, and adds his own. (Originally published Feb 12, 2020) Source footage: http://tiny.cc/nn9wjz    Andy's twitter: https://twitter.com/Andy_Blunden  Anthony's twitter: https://twitter.com/AnthonyMBarra
09:59
August 7, 2020
(S3,Ep3) What are the best and worst outcomes of Marx and Vygotsky's ideas?
Andy Blunden weighs in. (Originally published Feb 11, 2020) Andy's twitter: https://twitter.com/Andy_Blunden  Anthony's twitter: https://twitter.com/AnthonyMBarra
04:47
August 7, 2020
(S3,Ep2) Can Marx skeptics have faith in Vygotsky?
Andy Blunden answers . . . and then turns the question around   (Originally published Feb 11, 2020) Andy's twitter: https://twitter.com/Andy_Blunden  Anthony's twitter: https://twitter.com/AnthonyMBarra
02:20
August 7, 2020
(S3,Ep1) What does the Social Situation of Development mean?
I asked Andy Blunden for his explanation of Vygotsky's concept of the social situation of development, and here it is!  Thanks, Andy. (Originally published Feb 10, 2020) Highlights include:  0:07 - How do we get from dependent newborn to independent adult?  1:16 - development takes place through a series of 'unique' stages  2:38 - resolved 'predicaments' fuel the transition between stages  4:54 - to get new needs met, the child overthrows the former situation to establish a new role  5:54 - mutual reinforcement between development and the social situation of development  8:05 - the social situation of development, concisely defined  8:38 - a preview of perezhivanie and adult development   More from Andy here: https://www.ethicalpolitics.org/wits/vygotsky-development.pdf
09:14
August 7, 2020
(S1,Ep14) Insights & Inquiries with Peter Smagorinsky
The always interesting Peter Smagorinsky sits down for another wide-ranging chat. Peter is a Distinguished Research Professor at the University of Georgia with a generous internet presence. His website chronicles Peter's extensive landscaping projects, along with his voluminous academic output (and free resources for teachers).  (Originally published August 4, 2020) Highlights include:  0:27 - How's the weather?  1:52 - PART 1: RECENT INQUIRIES  4:55 - Peter's most recent book (on how teachers learn how to teach)  10:42 - Clock Time vs. Event Time  17:00 - Teacher-to-school 'matches' and 'mismatches,' cultural or otherwise  19:03 - Challenges to 'diversifying the workforce'  24:12 - Benefits, trade-offs, and advice . . .  28:27 - Read outside your field to expand imagination and perspective  31:25 - PART 2: MORE INSIGHTS TO SHARE  33:50 - All teaching is local; be wary of 'best practices'  36:37 - Fun, competitive vocabulary games  42:45 - The importance of metacognitive, generative instruction  46:02 - The need to listen and pay attention to how others are experiencing you  47:16 - Peter's next book: teaching in these times (critical inquiry, empathy, & patriotism)  53:50 - Nutpicking, masks, reason, and the willingness to listen more than talk  57:38 - Educational trends and fashions  1:01:52 - What is Constructivism?   1:09:29 - Parting shots . . .  Competitive Vocab Games: https://bit.ly/31iZkeX 
01:11:23
August 5, 2020
(S0,Ep2) Slowing Down with Matt Marino (Bonus episode)
Old friend Matt Marino shares his upbeat perspective on life, learning, fatherhood, and success. Recorded on an early Sunday morning, August 2020.  (Originally published August 2, 2020) Highlights include: 0:35 - Where's Matt headed? 3:22 - Dinner is Important 5:32 - Living an unfiltered life 9:24 - Kids and Covid 11:36 - Tips on slowing down 18:38 - Keeping kids busy 22:00 - Structure, coherence, and success 27:10 - Dark thoughts, laughter, and heart surgery  37:04 - Matt's interesting job and mental approach   43:21 - Mentorship at Amazon  47:02 - A first-person approach to recruiting  48:10 - Formative work experience and 9/11  53:30 - Recruiting is matchmaking (and Amazon's 14 leadership principles)  59:38 - Developmental leaps and the benefits of listening   1:07:04 - Life is funny 1:09:30 - Matt and podcasting    Matt's professional page: http://tiny.cc/l8amsz Amazon's 14 leadership principles: http://tiny.cc/l8amsz Interesting backstory, Amazon Prime: http://tiny.cc/n8amsz
01:17:56
August 3, 2020
(S0,Ep1) Here's . . . Eric Ness (Bonus episode)
Eric has worn many hats: experimental songwriter, programmer, journalist, environmental analyst, family man, amateur cook, conversationalist, and more.  How do these complementary talents fit together?  In spite of our 20+ year acquaintance, this was our first real face-to-face conversation.   (Originally published March 1, 2020) Highlights include:  1:00 - Two questions from Vivienne  2:21 - Eric's unique life in the UK; family stuff, job stuff ("I am a programmer.")  7:00 - Eric's hobby: 'news-analysis' programming  8:11 - A question from Madeleine on the topic of food  12:23 - How do Programmers name their children?  15:11 - Is Eric "out" as an experimental musician?   16:33 - Spontaneous songwriting, and the benefits of self-imposed constraints  19:22 - Eric's antidote for anxiety and thoughts on creativity ("a skill that you can learn")  23:35 - Coding as a kind of songwriting  26:04 - Eric's experimental programming work with "news analysis"  34:46 - Eric's personal backstory and interest in media narratives -- a wild, international story  41:04 - Working as a reporter in D.C. ("I know how the sausage is made.")  44:13 - Definitions of the word "narrative"  48:02 - Navigating 'grey areas' (facts, fictions, and factual fictions)  49:07 - Harms and non-harms of Trump's BS  1:00:35 - "The kids today"   1:03:33 - "The View from an AI" (alien, or artificial, intelligence) -- analyzing human genres  1:07:48 - Won't A.I.'s master even the fine arts (emotions included)?   1:10:09 - Which genre are WE in, Eric? (We're not programmed, right?)   Eric's twitter: https://twitter.com/ericness   More on Eric's blogging: http://tiny.cc/1vuokz  Russell conjugation: http://tiny.cc/xdkpkz
01:13:54
August 1, 2020
(S2,Ep2) Using the 5 Principles for Vygotskian Research (PART 2)
Part 2 of 2 -- Professor Nikolai Veresov presents research examples for each of the 5 experimental research principles of Vygotsky's Genetic Research Methodology (GRM).  In order to solve puzzles once thought unsolvable, Vygotsky managed to devise a theory (Cultural-historical theory) and a new research method (GRM) to complement the theory. This exclusive episode is appropriate for all researchers - and educators - with serious interest in Vygotsky's ideas. (Originally published June 13, 2020)   Please enjoy:  0:14 - Brief introduction  0:30 - Principle 1 - Research example (Minson et al, 2016) - paper here: http://tiny.cc/5a3vnz  7:00 - Principle 2 - Two ways of using this principle 9:25 - Principle 2 - How does Nikolai uses this principle as a psychologist?  10:54 - Principle 2 - Research example #1 (Fleer et al, 2019) - paper here: http://tiny.cc/g73liz  14:32 - Principle 2 - Research example #2 (Nasciutti et al, 2016) - paper here: http://tiny.cc/dq1vnz  20:15 - Principle 3 - Research example #1 (Ashraf, 2018) - paper here: http://tiny.cc/ho1vnz  25:45 - Principle 3 - Research example #2 (van Oers, 2013) - paper here: http://tiny.cc/mv1vnz  29:24 - Principle 4 - Research example #1 (Nourkova, 2016) - paper here: http://tiny.cc/u62vnz  31:24 - Principle 4 - Research example #2 (Minson et al, 2016) - paper here: http://tiny.cc/5a3vnz  36:04 - Principle 5 - How to use the principle of sustainable neoformations   Part 1 is located here: http://tiny.cc/gf7qqz   The original sources for all clips are located here: http://tiny.cc/db8qqz
41:46
August 1, 2020
(S2,Ep1) 5 Principles for Vygotskian Research (PART 1)
This exclusive episode is appropriate for all researchers - and educators - with serious interest in Vygotsky's ideas.  Vygotskian psychologist Nikolai Veresov introduces and discusses the 5 experimental research principles of Vygotsky's Genetic Research Methodology (GRM). In order to solve puzzles once thought unsolvable, Vygotsky managed to devise a theory (Cultural-historical theory) and a new research method (GRM) to pair with the theory.  This video is Part 1 of 2.  Part 2 will discuss specific experiments that have been conducted with these methodological principles. (Originally published June 13, 2020)  Please enjoy:  0:15 - Brief introduction  0:43 - What does it mean to conduct a Vygotskian experiment?   2:21 - Who is the target audience here?  3:44 - What is different about this Vygotskian research method?  4:45 - How do the 5 research principles relate to the theory itself?  7:02 - Principle 1 - How to find the 'buds of development'  11:32 - Principle 1 - Where are the buds?  14:11 - Principle 2 - How does this 'principle of drama' work?  18:09 - Principle 2 - Will any type of drama do?   19:37 - Principle 2 - Why is this experimental research principle so important?  23:35 - Principle 2 - How and why to apply the principle of drama  28:23 - Principle 3 - How does this 'principle of real and ideal forms' work?  30:36 - Principle 3 - A simple illustration from Vygotsky  38:49 - Principle 3 - Two main considerations when designing research with Principle 3  41:07 - Principle 4 - Why is this 'principle of developmental tools' so important?  42:42 - Principle 4 - Vygotsky's law of 4 stages of every higher psychological function's development  45:35 - Principle 4 - How does principle support research (and learning)?  47:56 - Principle 4 - What sorts of research questions does Principle 4 address?  50:56 - Principle 5 - Important context: Vygotsky's method was new by necessity  53:53 - Principle 5 - Are all changes sustainable "neoformations"?  57:44 - Principle 5 - How does this 'principle of sustainable results' keep us humble?  1:00:16 - Principle 5 - How can we use this principle in experimental studies?  1:04:23 - Reflection - Are most researchers who cite Vygotsky using these 5 principles?   Part 2 is here: http://tiny.cc/q29qqz   The original sources for all clips are located here: http://tiny.cc/db8qqz
01:08:37
August 1, 2020
(S5,Ep2) Vygotsky on teaching (and learning) concepts
Some interesting paragraphs from Thinking & Speech, Ch. 6, pp. 169-70 (Originally published July 26, 2020 at http://tiny.cc/4nylsz) 
02:17
July 31, 2020
(S5,Ep1) Notes on Dialectics, 1 (bird's-eye view)
I am trying to understand Vygotsky's theory in a way that's easy to explain.  This is harder than I had hoped.  For instance, a sufficient understanding of dialectics appears to be a requirement.  Here, I share helpful notes from a trusted source -- Kevin deLaplante -- with sincere thanks. (Originally published March 2, 2020 at http://tiny.cc/4nylsz) About Kevin: https://www.argumentninja.com/about
15:18
July 31, 2020
(S1,Ep13) The Principle of Sustainable Results (neoformations)
The principle of sustainable results, or "neoformations," serves many functions, including keeping us humble. What is the difference between additive and developmental change? What are "qualitative reorganizations"? How essential was "dialectical logic" to Vygotsky's breakthroughs, and what role should it play in Vygotskian research? Chat 5 with Vygotskian psychologist Nikolai Veresov, who weighs in on these topics and cautions against undervaluing them. (Originally published Jun 13, 2020 at Chats about CHT http://tiny.cc/kmylsz) Highlights include:  0:31 - The circumstances that led to Vygotsky's breakthrough  6:45 - Vygotsky's paradigm shift from formal logic to dialectical logic  14:04 - What does "qualitative reorganization" mean?  18:51 - Are all changes an indication of development? ("differentiation")  24:54 - Transformation: Transformers and Terminators  31:47 - The artificial intelligence of machines and people  39:26 - Humanity is the thing; Nikolai's lament on the drying up of cultural resources  47:28 - Vygotsky's method and his theory go together, and belong together  56:01 - Why the humility of Principle 5 is so important  58:25 - The dangers of 'overselling' the importance of the social & 'destroying the buds' with pseudoconcepts  1:00:59 - Can the development of scientific concepts (scientific thinking) be rushed?   1:06:20 - How can we use Principle 5 in research and in classrooms?  1:15:16 - Challenges and benefits of using these five principles  1:25:42 - Principle 5 (neoformations) as the 'humility principle'  1:29:54 - Neoformations are reorganized systems, not just transformations or 'something new'  1:34:43 - The importance of longevity and transfer  1:37:33 - Will there be bridge-building with Nikolai's critics?   1:40:30 - Demonstration: scientific concepts are systems of concepts    5 Principles for Vygotskian Research: http://tiny.cc/1fisqz
01:47:37
July 31, 2020
(S1,Ep12) The Principle of Developmental Tools - with Nikolai Veresov
Nikolai and I continue chatting about GRM, the "genetic research methodology" that unifies Vygotsky's Cultural-historical theory.  GRM is the experimental side; CHT is the theoretical side. This is chat 4. (Originally published April 21, 2020 at Chats about CHT http://tiny.cc/kmylsz) Highlights include:  0:58 - Nikolai discusses his new book (translation of Vygotsky's late lectures for teachers)  6:01 - How many laws did Vygotsky discover?  11:20 - Our goals for today - Conducting a Vygotskian Experiment (Principle 4)  12:30 - Nikolai's role in identifying the 5 Principles of Genetic Research Method  14:42 - Why this experimental principle is important  15:01 - Relation between Principle 4 (experimental principle) and Mediation (theoretical principle)  20:31 - Two types of mediators: physical tools and psychological tools (i.e., signs)  24:48 - The principle of signification distinguishes human from other types of development  28:14 - Who mediates? (as opposed to What mediates?)  32:10 - Interdependence of social interaction and mediation  34:48 - Signification vs signalization: Vygotsky's departure from Pavlov (speech is not a 'second signal system')  40:24 - Is a genre synonymous with a sign or family of signs?  42:46 - Veronika Nourkova's research on the development of memory  44:43 - How is the Principle of Developmental Tools related to the rest of Cultural-historical Theory?  50:20 - Vygotsky's neglected "most important" law of cultural development: The Law of 4 Stages  1:00:24 - HPFs develop at different rates -- law of 'de-synchronicity'  1:05:37 - The importance of Principle 4 as an experimenter and researcher  1:08:29 - What is universal about human psychological development?  1:11:11 - How the law of 4 stages can support research - e.g., Minson study  1:15:16 - Some examples of how (uniquely human) cultural memory works  1:21:27 - Importance for teachers -- very interesting! 1:25:48 - When Nikolai was young . . . and always late  1:28:59 - Which kinds of research questions can be answered with Principle 4?   1:31:56 - Are there ways to identify students' differing rates of HPF development?   1:34:29 - A favorite joke about motivation 1:39:09 - Which HPFs are in action in certain academic tasks?    References:  L. S. Vygotsky's Pedological Works, Vol. 1 Foundations of Pedology - http://tiny.cc/vtlhnz  Tools of the Mind - https://toolsofthemind.org/about/history/  "Refocusing the Lens of Development: Towards Genetic Research Methodology" - http://tiny.cc/wflhnz
01:43:20
July 31, 2020
(S1,Ep11) Meaningful Learning, Creative Teaching with Michael Smith
Looking to rethink, retool, or redesign your teaching?  Michael W. Smith excels at making learning challenging, meaningful, and fun. I know this from personal experience. (Originally published April 17, 2020 at Chats about CHT http://tiny.cc/kmylsz) Highlights include:  1:07 - What jumps to mind when I think of Michael Smith  2:26 - Michael's current work: Essential Question-driven urban, college-prep focused  5:52 - The clever use Semantic Differential Scales as a motivating "easy in"   9:18 - Initiating students into academic "communities of practice"   12:36 - Using Simulated Texts as case-study data (and a great personal story)  17:35 - The merits of Inquiry and Environmental Instruction (a Hillocksian approach)  19:11 - Incentives to write your own simulated texts   23:55 - The Inquiry Square -- a great way to re-tool or revise your teaching   32:49 - "Argument" in the classroom vs. argument in the world ("rational" dojo vs "persuasive" street)  39:57 - "Bad teaching I have done" -- revisiting the Inquiry Square  42:52 - "The heart of the matter" -- Michael's breakthrough and the inquiry square's role in it (Catcher in the Rye "Simulation Games")  53:09 - How about the role of function?  56:30 - Salience! Levels and Dimensions of Setting (and 'Setting as rule-setting')  1:04:00 - The unity and interplay of literary elements (setting, character, conflict, theme)  1:09:01 - Reading people (real and fictional) - revising gut impressions     References of interest:  Some of Michael's books - http://tiny.cc/7k08mz  "Remembering George Hillocks, Jr. 1934-2014" - http://tiny.cc/ha08mz  "Teaching Writing to Adolescents" - http://tiny.cc/wz08mz  "Why Rational Persuasion is a Martial Art" - http://tiny.cc/jh08mz
01:13:09
July 31, 2020
(S1,Ep10) Conducting Vygotskian Research (tools)
Chat 3 with Nikolai Veresov, who presents a heuristic toolset for Vygotskian research that is flexible and customizable to a range of settings.  This is part 2.  (Originally published February 14, 2020 at Chats about CHT http://tiny.cc/kmylsz) Highlights include:  0:30 - What kind of theory is this? How is it possible to collect data that shows the "Hidden process" of development? Is this the most important and most difficult challenge in psychology?  4:05 - Vygotsky had to invent a new method of research (GRM) -- a new method of data collection and data analysis (the Genetic Research Method, or Experimental Genetic Method)  8:31 - Potential problems in the traditional research method  9:44 - How Good Is Your Memory? A demonstration of Biological vs Cultural memory (and the effect of cultural tools on higher mental functions)   15:58 - Vygotsky's warning on mistakenly comparing apples to oranges (or worse, fruits to boots)  20:30 - Strengths of the traditional method  23:03 - What does it mean to conduct Vygotskian experiment?   24:47 - How to find the Buds of Development (Principle 1)  29:23 - Nikolai discusses Minson's use of Principle 1 to aid children's storytelling  36:35 - How and why to apply the Principle of Drama (Principle 2)  46:10 - Introduction to Principle 3 - explanation of the concept and advice for researchers  57:46 - What if the ideal form is present and interacting but very painful? (the role of pleasure or pain)  58:57 - A Principle 3 research design requires two tasks: provide the most efficient ideal forms and ask what are the most efficient ways of interacting with the child and the forms (very teacher-friendly) 1:01:12 - Key distinctions between language and speech (discussion of Ashraf's use of Principle 3)  1:06:34 - Using role-play to fuel the interaction of ideal and present forms (Bert van Oers research)  1:08:57 - The benefits and importance of research alignment (theory, methods, collection, analysis, etc)   This video is a continuation of our previous conversation, located here: http://tiny.cc/75y0jz   References:   Victoria Minson on https://psyjournals.ru/en/kip/2016/n3/minson.shtml   Tanzin Ara Ashraf on second language speech development: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/325180210_Teaching_English_as_a_Foreign_Language_in_Saudi_Arabia_Struggles_and_Strategies  Bert van Oers on role-play as fuel for the interaction of ideal and real forms: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/1350293X.2013.789199  Enjoy ~ https://twitter.com/cvoelter/status/1153932664925298693
01:14:02
July 31, 2020
(S1,Ep9) Conducting Vygotskian Research (background)
Chat 3 with Nikolai Veresov, who provides a range of ways to understand dialectics -- and its role in explaining the relationship between lower and higher mental functions.  (Originally published February 15, 2020 at Chats about CHT http://tiny.cc/kmylsz) Highlights include:  0:30 - What does 'Hegelian method' mean?  3:30 - Dialectics as a kind of predictive logic, and a discussion of 'quantitative change' sparking 'qualitative leaps'   7:00 - Mechanical systems vs. Organical systems  9:10 - What does "qualitative reorganizations" mean?  10:15 - Dialectics as a "philosophical method of thinking about organical systems given that they are always in the Process of Development" (Being and Becoming)  12:05 - Vygotsky discovered how to indirectly apply this philosophical method to psychology  13:45 - How original was Vygotsky's breakthrough?  16:46 - How are lower and higher mental functions (LMF/HMF) related to each other?  19:00 - An example: the development of voluntary ("or cultural") attention  23:15 - Possible ways to help HMFs develop  26:00 - Are social relations a type of quantitative "heat" that qualitatively changes the "water"?    The second part of this conversation is here: http://tiny.cc/g9c8jz   References:   "The transition from quantity to quality: A neglected causal mechanism in accounting for social evolution" - https://www.pnas.org/content/97/23/12926   “Higher mental functions are not built on top of elementary processes, like some kind of second storey, but are new psychological systems comprising a complex nexus of elementary functions that, as part of a new system, being themselves to act in accordance with new laws” Vygotsky, L.S. (1984). Sobraniye sochinenii, Vol. 6, p.58   
28:01
July 31, 2020
(S1,Ep8) Peter Smagorinsky on Cultural Ways of Thinking
On the topic of education, Peter Smagorinsky has likely WRITTEN more words than I have read. Though long, our conversation was not linear, and listening out of order might be the ideal way to go.  (Originally published January 20, 2020 at Chats about CHT http://tiny.cc/kmylsz) Highlights include:  1:00 - After 31 years, is Peter an expert?  3:19 - Anthony most certainly is not (feel free to skip to 9:22)  9:22 - Peter uniquely describes higher and lower mental functions  13:45 - Challenges of reading Vygotsky and studying 'murky' social concepts  17:10 - Why isn't there scientific agreement on 'good teaching'?  21:58 - Where would Peter locate himself on the purist to pragmatist spectrum?  26:56 - The difference between 'scaffolding' and ZPD -- and ZND!  32:43 - Learning how to write like a scholar - and like a public columnist  34:32 - The emotional confidence needed to write simply  36:40 - Advice for teaching short-term and long-term simultaneously  41:42 - Vygotsky's "great overlooked work" & the topic of 'deficit thinking'  44:55 - Disastrous utopianism and equalitarian blindspots  48:05 - Was Vygotsky more interested in how thinking develops or in how to develop thinking?  50:21 - Distinguishing the unsavory from the useful (includes a bit on perspective-hopping)    1:00:33 - What does Vygotsky have to offer teachers? (Peter's unique take)  1:11:55 - (Vygotskian) frameworks and methodologies for Peter's research  1:22:23 - Why do 5-paragraph papers get a bad rap?  1:25:00 - Rounding out Peter's methodology (telos, setting, and tools is "a way to do it")  1:28:32 - MLK, Vygotsky, nonviolence, and violence  1:34:32 - The development of individuals and the development of collectives  1:38:36 - A.I. and Vygotsky  1:41:25 - Peter recommends . . .   References: "Smagorinsky on Meaning - Text, Tool, Culture" (Excerpt) - http://tiny.cc/gbvkjz  "What Does Vygotsky Provide for the 21st-Century Language Arts Teacher?" - http://www.petersmagorinsky.net/About/PDF/LA/LA2013.pdf  Peter's public essays - http://www.petersmagorinsky.net/Vita/vitaweb.htm#PublicEssays  "Educating the Public on the Public's Terms: An Open Letter to Academics" - https://writerswhocare.wordpress.com/2014/07/21/educating-the-public-on-the-publics-terms-an-open-letter-to-academics/
01:45:49
July 31, 2020
(S1,Ep7) Vygotsky's Role in the History of Psychology (Part 2)
Chat 2 with Nikolai Veresov, continued.  (Originally published Jan 10, 2020 at Chats about CHT http://tiny.cc/kmylsz) Highlights include:  1:00 - Nikolai's own role in clarifying Vygotsky's research contributions  5:00 - Should Conservatives be wary of this theory?  8:55 - Why was this theory created; what is its subject matter? (the importance of contextualizing the theory, and how it is distinct)  15:21 - The Why: 5 principles for conducting Vygotskian experiments (Nikolai's rationale)  21:32 - The What: 5 principles for conducting Vygotskian experiments (Crucial distinction: "We do not have objects under study; we do not have functions under study; we have PROCESSES under study")  25:03 - The Which: 5 principles for conducting Vygotskian experiments ("I select the principle that helps me to answer my research question")  30:50 - To what extent was Vygotsky susceptible to motivated reasoning and/or confirmation bias?  32:45 - The principle of drama (or category, or contradiction)  39:20 - Nikolai and colleagues' research studies using the principle of drama (includes the long quote cited below)  44:10 - A Vygotskian experiment with children: "the process of development of children's executive functions in the playworld" (paper here: http://tiny.cc/g73liz)  47:46 - A Vygotskian experiment with adults: "a new system of professional development for school psychologists" (paper here: http://tiny.cc/lh4liz)  53:45 - The principle of the "buds" of development    "What makes us different is that we went through different contradictions, collisions, challenges.  As a psychologist, I'm interested in situations where we can specially create these dramatic collisions - for children and for adults - and then we look: Do they have enough higher psychological functions to overcome this?  If they can not, how they can begin to interact with others in order to drink from this source of development -- because Vygotsky said that social environment is the source of development.  But what does it mean, 'social environment is the source of development?' What does it mean that the river is the source of the water?  The river is the source of the water only when somebody comes to the river and starts drinking from it. "   For more on the 5 principles:  http://nveresov.narod.ru/KIP.pdf - Nikolai's paper, "Introducing cultural historical theory: main concepts and principles of genetic research methodology"  http://tiny.cc/0oe4hz - my short article, "How to Use a Vygotskian Approach: a short guide for teachers & researchers"
59:13
July 31, 2020
(S1,Ep6) Vygotsky's Role in the History of Psychology (Part 1)
Chat 2 with Vygotskian psychologist, Nikolai Veresov.  (Originally published Jan 10, 2020 at Chats about CHT http://tiny.cc/kmylsz) Highlights include: 1:52 - The great puzzle of Vygotsky's time (The "Crisis of Psychology") 6:30 - Even Kant thought the crisis was unsolvable 9:22 - How to see the invisible (W. Wundt's experimental research challenge & discussion of Lower and Higher Psychological Functions, e.g., logical memory, voluntary attention, imagination) 19:50 - Why did Wundt separate LPF and HPF, and how did he study HPF? 22:43 - Vygotsky's main contribution (not just theory but *new method*) Key point: when something is currently invisible, or inaccessible, (e.g., HPFs), see if you can go back to its infancy and track its development before it "disappears underground" http://nveresov.narod.ru/KIP.pdf - see Nikolai's paper, "Introducing cultural historical theory: main concepts and principles of genetic research methodology"
27:49
July 31, 2020
(S1,Ep5) Nikolai Veresov on Vygotsky and Development
This is the first of a series of chats with Vygotskian psychologist,  Nikolai Veresov, who discusses the enduring relevance and popularity of  Vygotsky's work, distinctions between learning and development,  continuing misconceptions of ZPD, the value of cultivating difficulty,  and key principles for conducting Vygotskian experiments.  (Originally published Jan 10, 2020 at Chats about CHT http://tiny.cc/kmylsz) Highlights include:  1:04 - Our target audience & our main goals  2:01 - The enduring relevance of Vygotsky's theory -- and the challenge of understanding it accurately   6:49 - Huge interest in the theory is developing outside of academia  9:55 - "Vygotsky discovered the fundamental laws of the cultural development the human being"  11:37 - Learning vs. Development (not all learning is developmental)  18:27 - ZPD is only one, and not the main, concept of cultural-historical theory  22:49 - Is this a blank slate theory, or something else?  26:28 - We can't understand zone of proximal Development until we understand Development  27:26 - "ZPD as a concept, used everywhere, is a victim of misunderstanding"  36:00 - Are our objectives merely Task-oriented or Developmentally-oriented?  43:04 - 5 Principles for Designing and Conducting a Vygotskian Experiment  55:44 - Principle 2: the necessity of Drama, Collision, Contradiction (V's General Law)  1:00:56 - How Vygotsky applied dialectics to psychology (no development without contradiction)   1:07:38 - Advice for teachers: Cultivate Frustration, Create Small Crises, Help Find Solutions  1:10:11 - Relationship between personal dramas & personal values  1:15:33 - Is the Trump era a collective drama, or category? Collective development?    Dog playing Jenga: http://tiny.cc/ul55hz   Referenced sources:  "How to Use a Vygotskian Approach: a short guide for teachers & researchers" (Barra 2019) - http://tiny.cc/0oe4hz  "Nikolai Veresov’s video-lecture, Fu Jen Catholic University, Taipei, Taiwan" (Veresov 2010) - http://tiny.cc/hse4hz  "Reading 'Thinking and Speech' (Vygotsky)" (Veresov 2010)- http://tiny.cc/0re4hz  “Zone of proximal development (ZPD): the hidden dimension?” (Veresov 2004) - http://tiny.cc/sse4hz  "The zone of proximal development in Vygotsky’s analysis of learning and instruction" (Chaiklin 2003) - http://tiny.cc/d315hz
01:19:19
July 31, 2020
(S1,Ep4) Peter Smagorinsky on Concepts
Peter Smagorinsky speaks about his concrete and abstract understandings of and experiences with Vygotsky's theory of concepts.  (Recorded January 2012 and published Jan 3, 2020 at Chats about CHT http://tiny.cc/kmylsz) Highlights include:  0:31 - challenges (and rewards) of reading Vygotsky without the benefit of mentors   5:00 - many topics are at play re: Vygotsky and concepts   5:48 - why Peter is interested in concepts (as an Educator and a Landscaper)   7:33 - difficult concepts are rarely learned without a cost (plants and otherwise)   10:00 - concepts of good teaching are hard to pin down (social world is less cut & dry than biological)   14:40 - spontaneous vs scientific concepts aren't so neatly divided   19:30 - sturdy concepts are produced by the interplay between experiential & formal knowledge  22:38 - studying how concepts develop: twisting path or twisting pretzel?  37:37 - the link between concepts & happiness (the roles of affect and metaexperience)  46:30 - failure, perseverance, and concepts  50:31 - word-meaning and concepts  58:09 - Vygotsky, concepts, and death    Peter's book, VYGOTSKY AND LITERACY RESEARCH: A METHODOLOGICAL FRAMEWORK, winner of the prestigious David H. Russell Research Award, can be found here: sensepublishers.com/catalogs/bookseries/practice-of-research-method/vygotsky-and-literacy-research/
01:02:19
July 31, 2020
(S1,Ep3) What is a Concept?
Jan. 27, 2012 interview on Vygotsky's theory of concepts with Andy Blunden, author of Concepts, A Critical Approach (available here: brill.nl/concepts). Part 2/2: Andy discusses the development of true concepts, covering topics such as word meaning & definitions, artifacts & actions, social knowledge, ideal lines of development, spontaneous & scientific concepts, and flowers & freeways.  (Originally published at Chats about CHT http://tiny.cc/kmylsz) Highlights include:  1:00 - "The first thing to get straight is that Vygotsky does not have a typology of concepts"  2:36 - Two lines of development: spontaneous and scientific concepts   7:28 - "Fundamentally, concepts are transmitters or containers or expressions or forms, whatever you like, of the wisdom of many generations...passed down through the generations by various means"   8:47 - Concepts are problems and solutions to those problems are encapsulated in a word and the systems of practice around that word, and possibly also in an artifact of some kind   12:08 - "A true concept has to incorporate that element of the transmission of socially, historically acquired knowledge."   15:58 - "Origin, path of development: one begins from book knowledge, the other begins from immediate personal interaction; any actual concept has its roots in both"   18:03 - "Everyday life is penetrated by knowledge that comes out of institutions"   20:27 - A concept is like a city...is a many sided thing, and it's realized in many ways   23:57 - "A concept is like a cloud, and word-meanings rain from this cloud" 26:11 - The relationship between the words 'flower' and 'rose'  29:56 - Romance and problem-solving ("ordinary, everyday people are becoming aficionados of the social sciences")  33:38 - "True" concepts - what is true about a concept is inaccessible through "spontaneous" alone  37:56 - "Vygotsky was an original thinker; the words didn't exist for what he was trying to say"  40:19 - "A unit of life -- a unit of a culture to be more specific -- is a concept, and more specifically it's a solved puzzle; it's the identification of a problem which arose in a specific way of life, and the naming of it, and the institution of a series of related practices organized around that solution.  So that's what a concept it."   44:30 - "In the capacity of a teacher, V knew that real conceptual knowledge can only be acquired when it's the means to the solution to a problem"   49:49 - A compelling challenge for teachers: designing relevant instruction with Concept Development in mind (i.e., concepts as solutions to compelling problem)    "That's what a concept is: it's the identification of a problem and a solution that goes with it (or the solution and the problem that goes with it) within a specific system of practice, or institution -- because if you don't have some system of practice then problems never arise, because people just do something else."   References:  Paula Towsey on the Blocks Experiment: http://tiny.cc/ewb9hz   Andy Blunden's vimeo channel: http://tiny.cc/q2b9hz  CHAT on Vimeo: http://tiny.cc/z0b9hz
53:19
July 31, 2020
(S1,Ep2) What Comes Before Thinking? -- Andy Blunden on Pre-Concepts
2012 interview with Andy Blunden on the real preconditions for independent thinking!  (The sound quality is old.) In this video, Andy discusses "pre-conceptual" processes of psychological development, including syncretic, complexive, and pseudoconceptual thinking, as well as pre- and potential concepts. (Originally published December 29, 2019 at Chats about CHT http://tiny.cc/kmylsz) Highlights include: 0:15 - Syncretic thought-forms (the view from a speeding train in a foreign country) 3:35 - Complexes (different types of shaky beginnings of synthesis, via associations, and abstraction) 12:29 - Collection complexes (fork, knife, cup - functional associations by everyday situations) 14:55 - Pseudconcepts (learner uses an adult word, but not in the same way)  19:31 - Potential concepts (animals can form potential concepts; e.g., trained pigeon habituated to red button) 23:27 - Pre-concepts and more 30:00 - Andy nicely summarizes the psychological functions that correlate with preconceptual thinking Andy Blunden is the author of Concepts, A Critical Approach (available here: brill.nl/concepts). This is the first of two interviews on Vygotsky's theory of concepts (Part 2 is here: https://youtu.be/7UsQRLCpdiw, or here: vimeo.com/35819238). Great quote:  this chat is about "the development of psychological functions which are preconditions to operating as an independent person out there in the social world: dealing with ideology, professional responsibilities, raising your own family, and so on. You need certain psychological functions s before you can even make a beginning on that. . . . When you go into the big wide world...you begin to learn a different much broader type of thinking which entails inheriting and making use of the knowledge of all the past generations."
39:06
July 31, 2020
(S1,Ep1) An invitation ~
An open invitation to anyone willing to enlighten me. (Originally published February 20, 2020 at Chats about CHT http://tiny.cc/kmylsz) What the heck does this mean?     "[A better understanding of child psychology is possible] . . . only if we radically change our representation of child development and take into account that it is a complex dialectical process that is characterized by a complex periodicity, disproportion in the development of separate functions, metamorphoses or qualitative transformation of certain forms into others, a complex merging of the processes of evolution and involution, a complex crossing of external and internal factors, a complex process of overcoming difficulties and adapting" (Vygotsky 1997, Vol 4. pp. 98–99)   Thanks!
01:15
July 31, 2020