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ArchaeoCafé

ArchaeoCafé

By ArchaeoCafé
Welcome to yesterday. ArchaeoCafé brings you news, interviews and discussions about archaeology and history.
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ArchaeoCafé - Episode 2-34 - Palaeofelinology: An interview with Claudio Ottoni
In this episode I talk with Claudio Ottoni about the origin and history of domestic cats. Episode notes are available on the ArchaeoCafé website. http://archaeocafe.kvasirpublishing.com/archaeocafe-podcast-ep-234-ottoni/ About Claudio Ottoni Dr. Ottoni is a professor at the University of Rome "Tor Vergata". His research interests are in biomolecular archaeology and the study of ancient DNA as a tool to reconstruct the past of human and animal populations. In particular, much of his research has focused on the history of cat-human interactions and particularly through the use of palaeogenetics. He has previously lead research projects at the Center for Archaeological Sciences (CAS) of the KU Leuven University, in Belgium, the Center for Ecology and Evolutionary Synthesis (CEES) of the University of Oslo, in Norway, and the Diet and Ancient Technology Laboratory (DANTE) of the Sapienza University of Rome, in Italy. Dr. Ottoni is currently the head of the FELIX project, funded by the European Research Council.  Web: https://uniroma.academia.edu/ClaudioOttoni https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Claudio-Ottoni https://scholar.google.com/citations?user=0u2SiNQAAAAJ https://orcid.org/0000-0001-8870-1589 Some useful terminology and links FELIX project This project analyses cats from 10,000 years ago until the 19th century from archaeological sites in Europe, the Near and Middle East, and North Africa to gain insights into the cat-human relationship. By reconstructing the genomes and the dietary habits of ancient cats, the objective of the project is to reconstruct the unique biological and ecological features that shaped cat domestication, and the dispersal of domestic cats across the globe. https://www.ercfelix.com/project/ Domestic cat (Felis catus) A domestic species of small carnivorous mammal. It is the only domesticated species in the family Felidae. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cat Hierakonpolis or Nekhen The religious and political capital of Upper Egypt at the end of prehistoric Egypt (c. 3200–3100 BCE) and probably during the Early Dynastic Period (c. 3100–2686 BCE). https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nekhen Shillourokambos A Pre-Pottery Neolithic B (PPNB) site near Parekklisia, in southern Cyprus occupied from the end of the 9th to the second half of the 8th millennium BCE. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shillourokambos Selected reading The Dispersal of the Domestic Cat: Paleogenetic and Zooarcheological Evidence by Claudio Ottoni and Wim Van Neer Near Eastern Archaeology, 2020, vol. 83(1), p. 38-45. https://doi.org/10.1086/707312 The palaeogenetics of cat dispersal in the ancient world by Claudio Ottoni and others Nature Ecology & Evolution, 2017, vol. 1, article number 0139 https://doi.org/10.1038/s41559-017-0139 Of cats and men: The paleogenetic history of the dispersal of cats in the ancient world by Claudio Ottoni and others bioRxiv, 2016, article number 080028 https://doi.org/10.1101/080028 For more episodes and news, visit our website and social media pages. Blog: http://archaeocafe.kvasirpublishing.com/archaeoblog/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/archaeocafe/ Anchor: https://anchor.fm/archaeocafe
01:15:20
April 18, 2022
ArchaeoCafé - Episode 2-33 - Archaeology in 3D: An interview with Clarence Surette & Zeb Kawei
In this episode we talk with Clarence Surette and Zeb Kawei about 3D scanning, modelling, and printing in archaeology. Episode notes are available on the ArchaeoCafé website. http://archaeocafe.kvasirpublishing.com/archaeocafe-podcast-ep-233-surette-kawei/ About Clarence Surette Clarence is a bio-archaeology technician at Lakehead University. A lot of his research has focused on the analysis of microfossils (such as phytoliths, pollen, starch) and how it applies to reconstructing past diets and environments. In recent years, Clarence's work has focused on investigating the use of 3D modelling in archaeology. Since 2007, he has been the president of the Thunder Bay Chapter of the Ontario Archaeological Society. Web: https://www.lakeheadu.ca/users/S/clsurett/node/21165 https://lakeheadu.academia.edu/ClarenceSurette https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Clarence-Surette https://www.linkedin.com/in/clarence-surette-a5531a43/ About Zebedee "Zeb" Kawei Zeb is a graduate of Lakehead University and currently an archaeologist at Ecofor Consulting. His research focuses on reconstructing paleo-environment in virtual reality.   Web: https://lakeheadu.academia.edu/ZebedeeKawei Some useful terminology and links Blender https://www.blender.org/ MeshLab https://www.meshlab.net/ Meshmixer https://www.meshmixer.com/ Artifact GeoMorph Toolbox 3D https://sourceforge.net/projects/artifact-geomorph-toolbox-3d/files/ Stratovan https://www.stratovan.com/blog/landmark-editor Lakehead Anthropology Sketchfab page https://sketchfab.com/LakeheadAnthropology Selected reading Quick and dirty: streamlined 3D scanning in archaeology by Jarrod Knibbe, and others Published in "CSCW '14: Proceedings of the 17th ACM conference on Computer supported cooperative work & social computing" in 2014. p. 1366–1376 https://dl.acm.org/doi/abs/10.1145/2531602.2531669 Promoting the Past: The Educational Applications of 3D Scanning Technology in Archaeology by Ashley McCuistion Journal of Middle Atlantic Archaeology, 2013, Vol. 29, p. 35-42 https://www.academia.edu/5242308/ Towards the definition of best 3D practices in archaeology: Assessing 3D documentation techniques for intra-site data recording by Fabrizio Galeazzi Journal of Cultural Heritage, 2016, Vol. 17, p. 159-169 https://doi.org/10.1016/j.culher.2015.07.005 For more episodes and news, visit our website and social media pages. Blog: http://archaeocafe.kvasirpublishing.com/archaeoblog/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/archaeocafe/ Anchor: https://anchor.fm/archaeocafe
01:09:46
April 11, 2022
ArchaeoCafé - Episode 2-32 - Disclosure policies in archaeology: An interview with Gareth Spicer
In this episode I talk with Gareth Spicer about policies of disclosure in archaeology and how this has influenced some of the projects that he has worked on. Episode notes are available on the ArchaeoCafé website. http://archaeocafe.kvasirpublishing.com/archaeocafe-podcast-ep-232-spicer/ About Gareth Spicer Gareth is a principal archaeologist at Turtle Island Cultural Resource Management based in Calgary, Alberta, Canada.  Web: https://www.linkedin.com/in/gareth-spicer-819b4360/ Some useful terminology and links Turtle Island CRM http://turtleislandcrm.com/ Selected reading Archaeologists dig for answers at new Walterdale site CBC News, 10 August 2012  https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/edmonton/archaeologists-dig-for-answers-at-new-walterdale-site-1.1163310 Much of Edmonton’s rich aboriginal prehistory sits in storage by Elise Stolte Edmonton Journal, 16 August 2012 https://edmontonjournal.com/news/insight/much-of-edmontons-rich-aboriginal-prehistory-sits-in-storage For more episodes and news, visit our website and social media pages. Blog: http://archaeocafe.kvasirpublishing.com/archaeoblog/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/archaeocafe/ Anchor: https://anchor.fm/archaeocafe
01:04:29
April 04, 2022
ArchaeoCafé - Episode 2-31 - The Solutrean hypothesis: An interview with Bruce Bradley
In this episode I talk with Bruce Bradley about the Solutrean hypothesis and his work investigating this subject. Episode notes are available on the ArchaeoCafé website. http://archaeocafe.kvasirpublishing.com/archaeocafe-podcast-ep-231-bradley/ About Bruce Bradley Dr. Bradley is an emeritus professor at the University of Exeter. His research currently focuses on the Pleistocene in South America and American Southwest Ancestral Puebloan archaeology. He is also active in research into the early occupations of the Atlantic seaboard in North America. Bruce is also well-known in the knapper community for his skill and ability to replicate ancient techniques and styles of knapped stone tools.  Web: https://humanities.exeter.ac.uk/archaeology/staff/bradley/ https://exeter.academia.edu/BruceBradley https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Bruce-Bradley https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Bruce-Bradley-2 https://www.primtech.net/ Some useful terminology and links Optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Optically_stimulated_luminescence Meadowcroft Rockshelter site https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Meadowcroft_Rockshelter Page-Ladson site https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Page-Ladson Topper site https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Topper_Site Gravettian https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gravettian Magdalenian https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Magdalenian Denali https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Denali https://www.nps.gov/dena/index.htm Selected reading Across Atlantic Ice: The Origin of America's Clovis Culture by Dennis J. Stanford, Bruce A. Bradley University of California Press, 2013, 336 pages. https://www.ucpress.edu/book/9780520275782/across-atlantic-ice https://www.audible.com/pd/Across-Atlantic-Ice-Audiobook/B008BK8KE4 Ice Bridge Director: Robin Bicknell Nature of Things, CBC (Season 57, Episode 11) Episode air date: 14 January 2018 (Canada) https://www.cbc.ca/natureofthings/episodes/ice-bridge https://www.imdb.com/title/tt7870326/ New Evidence for a Possible Paleolithic Occupation of the Eastern North American Continental Shelf at the Last Glacial Maximum by Dennis Stanford and colleagues Prehistoric Archaeology on the Continental Shelf, 2014, p. 73-93 https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4614-9635-9_5 https://www.academia.edu/7054896/ Solutrean Hypothesis: Genetics, the Mammoth in the Room by Stephen Oppenheimer, Bruce Bradley & Dennis Stanford World Archaeology, 2014, Vol. 46(5), Debates in World Archaeology, p. 752-774.  https://doi.org/10.1080/00438243.2014.966273  The North Atlantic Ice-Edge Corridor: A Possible Palaeolithic Route to the New World by Bruce Bradley and Dennis Stanford World Archaeology, 2004, Vol. 36(4), Debates in World Archaeology, p. 459-478. https://doi.org/10.1080/0043824042000303656 For more episodes and news, visit our website and social media pages. Blog: http://archaeocafe.kvasirpublishing.com/archaeoblog/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/archaeocafe/ Anchor: https://anchor.fm/archaeocafe
01:07:08
March 28, 2022
ArchaeoCafé - Episode 2-30 - Archaeology and YouTube: An interview with Raven Todd DaSilva
In this episode we talk with Raven Todd DaSilva about popularising archaeology through YouTube. Episode notes are available on the ArchaeoCafé website.  http://archaeocafe.kvasirpublishing.com/archaeocafe-podcast-ep-230-todd-dasilva/ About Raven Todd DaSilva Raven is a graduate of University College London. Her research interests are in archaeology and heritage conservation. She hosts the YouTube channel 'Dig it with Raven', in which she informs viewers about archaeology and history. Web: https://www.linkedin.com/in/raven-todd-dasilva-563a4672/ https://www.digitwithraven.com/ https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Raven-Todd-Dasilva https://www.instagram.com/digitwithraven/ https://www.facebook.com/digitwithraven/ https://twitter.com/digitwithraven Selected media Dig It With Raven YouTube channel https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6P0a1_YLM0i2LoLmP9jCRw For more episodes and news, visit our website and social media pages. Blog: http://archaeocafe.kvasirpublishing.com/archaeoblog/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/archaeocafe/ Anchor: https://anchor.fm/archaeocafe
34:48
March 21, 2022
ArchaeoCafé - Episode 2-29 - The mystery of Skeleton Lake: An interview with Alka Barthwal
In this episode I talk with Alka Barthwal about her research at Roopkund Lake, the history of the site, and hypotheses about who the skeletons belonged to and what happened to them. Episode notes are available on the ArchaeoCafé website. http://archaeocafe.kvasirpublishing.com/archaeocafe-podcast-ep-229-barthwal/ About Alka Barthwal Dr. Barthwal is a professor of bioanthropology at Suresh Gyan Vihar University. Her research focuses on palaeopathology and bioanthropology, specifically the analysis of ancient human skeletal remains. Her main subject of interest is the skeletons of Roopkund - who the people were, what happened to them, and how they were connected to local people. Web: https://independent.academia.edu/AlkaBarthwal  https://www.linkedin.com/in/dr-alka-barthwal-182b5985/ Some useful terminology and links Roopkund Locally known as Mystery Lake or Skeleton Lake. A high altitude glacial lake in Uttarakhand, India. Located in the Himalayas, at an altitude of about 5029 m, the area around the lake is uninhabited and is surrounded by rock-strewn glaciers and snow-clad mountains. It is known for the hundreds of ancient human skeletons found around the lake. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roopkund Uttarakhand ('Northern Land' in Hindi.) A state in northern India. It is often referred to as the "Devbhumi" (literally "Land of the Gods") due to its religious significance and numerous Hindu temples and pilgrimage centres found throughout the state. It is known for the natural environment of the Himalayas, the Bhabar and the Terai regions. It borders the Tibet Autonomous Region of China to the north; the Sudurpashchim Province of Nepal to the east; the Indian states of Uttar Pradesh to the south and Himachal Pradesh to the west and north-west. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Uttarakhand Nanda Devi Raj Jat [नंदा देवी राज जात] A pilgrimage and festival of Uttarakhand. India. In Chamoli Garhwal, Nanda Devi Raj Jat is organized once in 12 years. The pilgrimage starts from Kansuwa village near Karnprayag and goes up to the heights of Roopkund and Hemkund with a four horned sheep (called Chausingya-Meda in Garhwali). After the Havan-Yagna is done, the sheep is freed with decorated ornaments, food and clothing, and other offerings. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nanda_Devi_Raj_Jat Selected reading Roopkund Mystery "Pathology Reveals Head Injury behind the Casualties" by Alka Barthwal Heritage: Journal of Multidisciplinary Studies in Archaeology, 2018, Vol. 6, p. 1084‐1096. http://www.heritageuniversityofkerala.com/JournalPDF/Volume6/58.pdf Roopkund: An Unsolved Mystery by Alka Barthwal, R.S. Negi, V.S. Chauhan, H.B.S. Chauhan शोध संचयन Shodh Sanchayan, 2013, Vol. 4(2), p. 1-4. https://www.academia.edu/6238666/ Ancient DNA from the skeletons of Roopkund Lake reveals Mediterranean migrants in India by Éadaoin Harney and colleagues Nature Communications, 2019, Vol. 10, article 3670. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41467-019-11357-9 For more episodes and news, visit our website and social media pages. Blog: http://archaeocafe.kvasirpublishing.com/archaeoblog/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/archaeocafe/ Anchor: https://anchor.fm/archaeocafe
01:06:46
March 14, 2022
ArchaeoCafé - Episode 2-28 - Neolithic navigation: An interview with Vincent Lascour
In this episode I talk with Vincent Lascour about the Neolithic in Corsica, and his experimental work in recreating crafts and tools from the region, in particular the work of the Chalcophore association in recreating and testing a Neolithic boat to travel between Corsica and Sardinia, a key aspect of the obsidian trade network of the period. Episode notes are available on the ArchaeoCafé website. http://archaeocafe.kvasirpublishing.com/archaeocafe-podcast-ep-228-lascour About Vincent Lascour Vincent is a craftsman specializing in the reproduction of prehistoric tools. Following 6 years working at the AFAN (National Association for Archaeological Excavations, today INRAP) and having experience at the Samara historical park, he directed his activities towards more educational and experimental aspects of archaeology through a specialization in flint knapping methods. He is a founder of the Créarchéo company and the Chalcophore association. Web: https://www.linkedin.com/in/vincent-lascour-17299ba3/ https://www.facebook.com/artisans.archeologie Some useful terminology and links Chalcophore association A group of researchers focussed on the reconstruction of the obsidian exchange system between Corsica and Sardinia in the Neolithic. Their research involves, among other things, building the boats necessary for the crossing, and understanding modes of navigation at sea with the means available during the Neolithic. They also aim to raise public awareness of the Chalcolithic through technical demonstrations and participatory workshops for young people. http://chalcophore.weebly.com/ https://www.facebook.com/chalcophore/ Créarchéo An artisanal company that creates reproductions of archaeological objects using the same materials and techniques used in the past. It was founded in March 1998 by Vincent Lascour. https://crearcheo.weebly.com/historique.html https://crearcheo.pagesperso-orange.fr/ Pirogue A generic term for small native boats, today particularly in regions once colonized by France and Spain, particularly dugouts made from a single log (also called a dugout, logboat and monoxylon). https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pirogue https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dugout_canoe Selected reading Préhistoire interactive by Vincent Lascour https://vimeo.com/386036431 Vincent Lascour - association Chalcophore - débitage laminaire du silex by De Peretti chantal https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l64GwuKyE8Y Vincent Lascour, directeur de l'association Chalcophore. Projet : La route de l'obsidienne by De Peretti chantal https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r9_AbTX8xF8 For more episodes and news, visit our website and social media pages. Blog: http://archaeocafe.kvasirpublishing.com/archaeoblog/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/archaeocafe/ Anchor: https://anchor.fm/archaeocafe
48:60
March 07, 2022
ArchaeoCafé - Episode 2-27 - Searching for Japanese labour camps in western Canada: An interview with Leanne Riding and Art Carson
In this episode we talk with Leanne Riding and Art Carson about Japanese internment and labour camps in Canada during World War II and their project to find, map, and document these camps in western Canada. Episode notes are available on the ArchaeoCafé website. http://archaeocafe.kvasirpublishing.com/archaeocafe-podcast-ep-227-riding-carson About Leanne Riding Leanne has a degree in History from the University of British Columbia. She has previously held positions as Heritage Committee Member of the National Association of Japanese Canadians, Archival Assistant at the Japanese Canadian Cultural Centre, and co-chaired the Asian Canadian Writers' Workshop Society. She is the winner of the 2006 Hunter Campbell Lewis Memorial Book Prize. Her current research explores the development of B.C.'s transportation system and Japanese Canadian internment and forced labour camps during World War II. Since 2012, Leanne has run the "Yellowhead - Blue River Japanese Road Camps Research Project". Web: https://scholar.google.ca/citations?user=vwIi9VwAAAAJ https://www.coroflot.com/shamurokku/stream About Art Carson Art is a wilderness guide and historian based in Valemount, British Columbia, Canada. Web: https://www.carsons.ca/mtnmania.htm https://www.therockymountaingoat.com/2017/09/art-of-hiking/ Some useful terminology and links Yellowhead-Blue River Highway Project A former project of the Surveys and Engineering Branch of the federal Department of Mines and Resources which ran from 1942 to 1944 and employed Japanese-Canadian men (mostly Japanese nationals) whether physically fit or not, originally living in West Coast of B.C. It was part of the forced removal and dispossession of Japanese Canadians by the Federal Government during World War II. The area spans from the interior of B.C. into the province of Alberta. https://www2.gov.bc.ca/assets/gov/driving-and-transportation/driving/japanese-internment-signs/yellowhead_blue_river_road_camp.pdf Nikkei Internment Memorial Centre A museum that preserves and interprets one of ten Canadian concentration camps where more than 27,000 Japanese Canadians were incarcerated by the Canadian government during and after World War II. https://newdenver.ca/nikkei/ Work Camps on the Yellowhead Route: Japanese Canadian internees and the building of a highway by Margaret Tessman ARTiculate, 2017, Spring/Summer, page 6. http://www.wkartscouncil.com/articulate/Articulate%20Summer%202017%20web.pdf Selected reading Issei road: Japanese Canadian labour camps of northeastern B.C. [blog] by Leanne Riding https://yellowheadroadcamps.wordpress.com/ Finding 19 lost Japanese labour camps: Testing the limits of Google Earth by Leanne Riding The Rocky Mountain Goat. 24 April 2017 https://www.therockymountaingoat.com/2017/04/nineteen-lost-japanese-labour-camps-testing-the-limits-of-google-earth/ For more episodes and news, visit our website and social media pages. Blog: http://archaeocafe.kvasirpublishing.com/archaeoblog/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/archaeocafe/ Anchor: https://anchor.fm/archaeocafe
01:13:59
February 28, 2022
ArchaeoCafé - Episode 2-26 - Chippin' Away: An interview with Akash Srinivas
In this episode I talk with Akash Srinivas about lithics research and the Palaeolithic in India as well as podcasting for public education. Episode notes are available on the ArchaeoCafé website. http://archaeocafe.kvasirpublishing.com/archaeocafe-podcast-ep-226-srinivas About Akash Srinivas Akash is an archaeologist at the Indian Institute of Science Education & Research in Mohali, India. His research focuses in particular on the production and use of stone tools during the South Asian Palaeolithic, specifically in India. He also co-hosts the podcast Chippin' Away. Web: https://sites.google.com/view/akashsrinivas https://orcid.org/0000-0003-4006-7448 https://iisermohali.academia.edu/AkashSrinivas https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Akash_Srinivas Some useful terminology and links Palaeolithic A period in prehistory distinguished by the original development of stone tools that covers c. 99% of the period of human technological prehistory. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paleolithic Artefact typology The result of the classification of things according to their physical characteristics. The products of the classification (in other words, the classes) are also called types. Most archaeological typologies organize portable artefacts into types, but typologies of larger structures, including buildings, field monuments, fortifications or roads, are equally possible. A typology helps to manage a large mass of archaeological data. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Typology_(archaeology) Stone tool technology [A.K.A. lithic technology] Includes a broad array of techniques used to produce usable tools from various types of stone. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lithic_technology Selected reading Chippin' Away A podcast on archaeology and anthropology of South Asia, hosted by Akash Srinivas and Durga Kale. https://chippinaway.buzzsprout.com/ Palaeolithic archaeology at Kibbanahalli, Southern Karnataka, India by Akash Srinivas Antiquity, 2014, Vol. 88(342) http://journal.antiquity.ac.uk/projgall/srinivas342 The Missing Piece: A Review of Lower and Middle Palaeolithic Archaeology in Southern Karnataka by Akash Srinivas Heritage: Journal of Multidisciplinary Studies in Archaeology 5 (2017): 715‐734 https://www.academia.edu/36027187/  Role of Social Matrices in the Preservation of the Archaeological Record: A Case Study of the Differential Preservation of the Archaeological Record in the Kibbanahalli Palaeolithic Complex, Southern Karnataka, India by Akash Srinivas In the book: Sustainability and Sociocultural Matrices: Transdisciplinary contributions for Cultural Integrated Landscape Management, Vol. 3, Editors: Luiz Oosterbeek, Benno Werlen, Laurent Caron. 2017. p. 26-37. https://www.academia.edu/35545666/  For more episodes and news, visit our website and social media pages. Blog: http://archaeocafe.kvasirpublishing.com/archaeoblog/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/archaeocafe/ Anchor: https://anchor.fm/archaeocafe
37:53
February 21, 2022
ArchaeoCafé - Episode 2-25 - Wool dogs: An interview with Dylan Hillis and Denis St. Claire
In this episode I talk with Dylan Hillis and Denis St. Claire about Wool Dogs on the northwest coast of North America, using dog remains to study human diets, and using oral history to study the past. Episode notes are available on the ArchaeoCafé website. http://archaeocafe.kvasirpublishing.com/archaeocafe-podcast-ep-225-hillis-st-claire About Dylan Hillis Dylan Hillis is a graduate student at the University of Victoria. His previous research looked at dietary variation in ancient domestic dogs on the West Coast of Vancouver Island. At present, he is investigating ocean temperature change over the last several thousand years in the Northeast Pacific using zooarchaeological data. Specifically, he is interested in how ancient fish populations responded to dynamic ocean temperatures in the deep past, how fish populations will likely respond to a warming ocean in the current context of a climate crisis, and importantly, what this means for the food security of coastal communities along the British Columbia coast. Web: https://www.uvic.ca/socialsciences/anthropology/people/graduate-students/profiles/hillisdylan.php https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Dylan-Hillis/research https://independent.academia.edu/DylanHillis https://www.nsercresnet.ca/dylan-hillis.html About Denis St. Claire Denis St. Claire is an ethnohistorian and archaeologist with over 40 years of research experience in Barkley Sound (British Columbia, Canada). He is an adopted member of Tseshaht First Nation (Port Alberni, B.C.). He is also proprietor of Coast Heritage Consulting based in Victoria, B.C. Web: https://independent.academia.edu/DenisStClaire https://canadianarchaeology.com/caa/about/awards/recipients/margaret-and-james-f-pendergast-award/denis-st-claire https://hashilthsa.com/news/2013-05-27/st-claire-earns-national-honors-work-nuu-chah-nulth Some useful terminology and links Wool Dog A.K.A. Salish Wool Dog or Comox dog. An extinct breed of white, long-haired, Spitz-type dog that was developed and bred by the Coast Salish peoples of what is now Washington state and British Columbia. Their fur was prized for making the famous and rare "Salish" blankets, as the Salish peoples did not have sheep and wild mountain goat wool was difficult to gather. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Salish_Wool_Dog Coast Salish A group of ethnically and linguistically related Indigenous peoples of the Pacific Northwest Coast, living in British Columbia, Canada and the U.S. states of Washington and Oregon. They speak one of the Coast Salish languages. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coast_Salish Selected reading Ancient dog diets on the Pacific northwest coast: zooarchaeological and stable isotope modelling evidence from tseshaht territory and beyond by Dylan Hillis, Iain McKechnie, Eric Guiry, Denis E. St. Claire, and Chris T. Darimont Scientific Reports, 2020, vol. 10, article number 15630. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-020-71574-x For more episodes and news, visit our website and social media pages. Blog: http://archaeocafe.kvasirpublishing.com/archaeoblog/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/archaeocafe/ Anchor: https://anchor.fm/archaeocafe
01:00:48
February 14, 2022
ArchaeoCafé - Episode 2-24 - Using LiDAR in archaeology: An interview with Sarah Smith
In this episode I talk with Sarah Smith about the use of LiDAR in archaeology and her research at the Highland Valley Copper Mine. Episode notes are available on the ArchaeoCafé website. http://archaeocafe.kvasirpublishing.com/archaeocafe-podcast-ep-224-smith About Sarah Smith Sarah Smith is a senior archaeologist and project manager at Stantec, based in Burnaby, in British Columbia, Canada. Throughout her career, she has worked on and directed cultural resource management projects throughout the province of British Columbia. She completed a master's degree in heritage resource management at the Department of Archaeology at Simon Fraser University. Her research at SFU, conducted in collaboration with the Nlaka'pamux Nation Tribal Council and Teck Resources, focused on the efficacy of LiDAR data as a tool for archaeological prospection and was based on her work at the Highland Valley Copper Mine. Web: https://www.linkedin.com/in/sarah-smith-62308732/ https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Sarah_Smith80/research Some useful terminology and links LiDAR ("light detection and ranging" or "laser imaging, detection, and ranging") A method used in archaeology to make digital 3D representations of areas on the earth's surface. It can reveal micro-topography that is otherwise hidden by vegetation. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lidar Highland Valley Copper Mine The largest open-pit copper mine in Canada, located near Logan Lake, British Columbia. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Highland_Valley_Copper_mine Nlaka'pamux Nation Tribal Council A First Nations government Tribal Council comprising bands in the Fraser Canyon and Thompson Canyon areas of the Canadian province of British Columbia. https://nntc.ca/about-overview.html https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nlaka%27pamux_Nation_Tribal_Council Selected reading Analysis of the efficacy of LiDAR data as a tool for archaeological prospection at the Highland Valley Copper Mine by Sarah Smith Masters thesis at Simon Fraser University, Department of Archaeology, 2021, 153 pages. https://summit.sfu.ca/item/21351 LiDAR’s Potential for Improving Archaeological Field Inventories in British Columbia, Indigenous Archaeology, and Beyond SFU Student News, 2021 http://www.sfu.ca/archaeology/current-students/HRM/hrmnews/lidar-potential.html Airborne LiDAR, archaeology, and the ancient Maya landscape at Caracol, Belize by Arlen F. Chase and others Journal of Archaeological Science, 2011, vol. 38(2), p. 387-398 https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jas.2010.09.018 For more episodes and news, visit our website and social media pages. Blog: http://archaeocafe.kvasirpublishing.com/archaeoblog/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/archaeocafe/ Anchor: https://anchor.fm/archaeocafe
34:29
February 07, 2022
ArchaeoCafé - Episode 2-23 - Archaeology and racism: An interview with William White (Part 2)
In this episode I talk with William White about aspects of racism in archaeology, ways that it manifests, and effects that it produces. Episode notes are available on the ArchaeoCafé website. http://archaeocafe.kvasirpublishing.com/archaeocafe-podcast-ep-223-white About William White Dr. White is an assistant professor at the Anthropology Department of the University of California, Berkeley. His research focuses on historical archaeology in the U.S.A., historical preservations, and the use of digital media (particularly blogs and podcasts) in disseminating archaeology and history related knowledge. He has over 10 years of experience working in cultural resource management. Web: https://anthropology.berkeley.edu/william-white https://www.linkedin.com/in/williamwhite3rd/ https://www.instagram.com/succinctbill/  Some useful terminology and links Society of Black Archaeologists An international organization of Black archaeologists founded in 2012.  https://www.societyofblackarchaeologists.com/ Historical archaeology A form of archaeology dealing with places, things, and issues from the past or present when written records and oral traditions can inform and contextualize cultural material. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Historical_archaeology Selected reading  Why the Whiteness of Archaeology Is a Problem by William White and Catherine Draycott Sapiens, 7 JUL 2020 https://www.sapiens.org/archaeology/archaeology-diversity/ The 2020 Race Uprisings and Archaeology’s Response by William White Succinct Research, 17 June 2020 http://www.succinctresearch.com/the-2020-race-uprisings-and-archaeologys-response/ Are Archaeologists Racist?: Part I by William White Succinct Research, 22 January 2015 http://www.succinctresearch.com/are-archaeologists-racist-part-i/ Are Archaeologists Racist?: Part II by William White Succinct Research, 26 January 2015 http://www.succinctresearch.com/are-archaeologists-racist-part-ii/ For more episodes and news, visit our website and social media pages. Blog: http://archaeocafe.kvasirpublishing.com/archaeoblog/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/archaeocafe/ Anchor: https://anchor.fm/archaeocafe
29:47
January 31, 2022
ArchaeoCafé - Episode 2-22 - Blogs, podcasts, and digital history: An interview with William White (Part 1)
In this episode I talk with William White about means of disseminating archaeological research with the general public. Episode notes are available on the ArchaeoCafé website. http://archaeocafe.kvasirpublishing.com/archaeocafe-podcast-ep-222-white About William White Dr. White is an assistant professor at the Anthropology Department of the University of California, Berkeley. His research focuses on historical archaeology in the U.S.A., historical preservations, and the use of digital media (particularly blogs and podcasts) in disseminating archaeology and history related knowledge. He has over 10 years of experience working in cultural resource management. Web: https://anthropology.berkeley.edu/william-white https://www.linkedin.com/in/williamwhite3rd/ https://www.instagram.com/succinctbill/  Some useful terminology and links Cultural Resource Management (CRM) The management of historic places of archaeological, architectural, and historical interests, considering such places in compliance with environmental and historic preservation laws https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cultural_resource_management Historical archaeology A form of archaeology dealing with places, things, and issues from the past or present when written records and oral traditions can inform and contextualize cultural material. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Historical_archaeology Public archaeology An approach to archaeological research which aims to increase the involvement of the public, particularly people with a vested interest in the research. This may include direct participation of the public in various stages of planning, field work, and analyses. It includes dissemination of the research in a format accessible to the public. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Community_archaeology Selected media and reading  Succinct Research Publications for cultural resource management, historic preservation, and heritage conservation service professionals. http://www.succinctresearch.com/ CRM Archaeology A podcast about cultural resource management. https://www.archaeologypodcastnetwork.com/crmarchpodcast Becoming an Archaeologist: Crafting a Career in Cultural Resource Management by William White Published by Succinct Research in 2016. 70 pages. http://www.succinctresearch.com/cultural-resource-management-products/cultural-resource-management-ebooks/ Blogging Archaeology by William White Published by Succinct Research in 2014. 294 pages. https://www.digtech-llc.com/blogarch-ebook/ Creating Space for a Place: The River Street Archaeology Project by William White Arizona Anthropologist, 2017, Vol. 27, pages 69-82. https://journals.librarypublishing.arizona.edu/arizanthro/article/id/552/ For more episodes and news, visit our website and social media pages. Blog: http://archaeocafe.kvasirpublishing.com/archaeoblog/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/archaeocafe/ Anchor: https://anchor.fm/archaeocafe
18:56
January 24, 2022
ArchaeoCafé - Episode 2-21 - Public archaeology in Bangladesh: An interview with Nazmul Hassan
In this episode I talk with Nazmul Hassan about his work researching and promoting public archaeology in Bangladesh. Episode notes are available on the ArchaeoCafé website. http://archaeocafe.kvasirpublishing.com/archaeocafe-podcast-ep-221-hassan About Nazmul Hassan Nazmul is a freelance archaeologist based in Comilla, Bangladesh. He completed his graduate studies in archaeology at Comilla University where his research focused largely on public archaeology and safeguarding archaeological heritage in Bangladesh. Web: https://nazmularccou.wordpress.com/author/nazmularc/ https://nazmulhassan019.wixsite.com/website/blog/categories/archaeology-blog https://tuhin.academia.edu/NazmulHassan https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Md-Hassan-55 https://www.linkedin.com/in/md-nazmul-hassan-a53995126?originalSubdomain=bd  Some useful terminology and links Public archaeology An approach to archaeological research which aims to increase the involvement of the public, particularly people with a vested interest in the research. This may include direct participation of the public in various stages of planning, field work, and analyses. It includes dissemination of the research in a format accessible to the public. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Community_archaeology Wari-Bateshwar An archaeological site in Narsingdi District, Bangladesh. It is the site of an ancient fort city active between about 2000 to 450 BCE. https://en.banglapedia.org/index.php?title=Wari-Bateshwar https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wari-Bateshwar_ruins For more episodes and news, visit our website and social media pages. Blog: http://archaeocafe.kvasirpublishing.com/archaeoblog/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/archaeocafe/ Anchor: https://anchor.fm/archaeocafe
21:33
January 17, 2022
ArchaeoCafé - Episode 2-20 - Mediaeval farming: An interview with Claus Kropp
In this episode I talk with Claus Kropp about Mediaeval agriculture, experimental archaeology, and working at an experimental archaeological open-air laboratory. Episode notes are available on the ArchaeoCafé website. http://archaeocafe.kvasirpublishing.com/archaeocafe-podcast-ep-220-kropp About Claus Kropp Claus is an experimental archaeologist and the scientific manager of the Lauresham Open Air Laboratory for Experimental Archaeology at Lorsch Abbey in Germany. His research interests include Early Mediaeval settlement archaeology, draft cattle, (re)constructing Early Mediaeval agriculture, animal husbandry (including transhumance) and manorialism. Web: https://independent.academia.edu/ClausKropp https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Claus_Kropp/research https://exarc.net/institutional-members/people-behind/claus-kropp-ma https://www.agriculturalmuseums.org/author/ckropp-lorsch/  Some useful terminology and links Lorsch Monastery World Heritage Site Founded around 764 by the family of the Franconian count Cancor. In 1621, during the Thirty Years' War, Spanish troops destroyed the monastery complex. It was one of the most renowned monasteries of the Carolingian Empire. Even in its ruined state, its remains are among the most important pre-Romanesque–Carolingian style buildings in Germany. https://kloster-lorsch.de/en/welcome https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lorsch_Abbey https://whc.unesco.org/en/list/515 Lauresham open-air laboratory Located in the heart of the Lorsch Monastery, this facility is based on archaeological finds at the settlement. A team of experienced craftsmen under scientific supervision, including the Archaeological Institute of the University of Hamburg, built an ensemble of buildings - including residential, farm, stables and storage buildings, as well as a chapel. In addition, there are various agricultural areas - such as meadows, fields and gardens - and farm animals. The laboratory has a special research interest in exploring different approaches to learn about mediaeval agriculture. Various long-term experiments on site focus on crops, subsistence strategies, field systems, and draft animals, as well as manuring and agricultural implements. https://kloster-lorsch.de/freilichtlabor https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC71FasTYYaY5bA9n947Xn0A Selected media Claus Kropp - Draft Cattle in (Archaeological) Open-Air Museum and Living History Farms Virtual Conference. Draft Animals in the Past, Present and Future. May 8-9th 2021. Lauresham Laboratory for Experimental Archaeology https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zcHEVSX5UsY Medieval Agriculture in Experiment Claus Kropp - Lauresham Open-Air Laboratory for Experimental Archaeology (Germany) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Csexh48XQ2I AIMA Lecture - Claus Kropp - A Year On the Field Claus Kropp giving his AIMA lecture on the project "A Year On The Field". https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VnkTOyyrN1g For more episodes and news, visit our website and social media pages. Blog: http://archaeocafe.kvasirpublishing.com/archaeoblog/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/archaeocafe/ Anchor: https://anchor.fm/archaeocafe
59:38
December 13, 2021
ArchaeoCafé - Episode 2-19 - Anthropology for Homo Sapiens: An interview with Adrianna Wiley
In this episode I talk with Adrianna Wiley about her use of popular media platforms such as YouTube and TikTok to tell the public about anthropology. Episode notes are available on the ArchaeoCafé website. http://archaeocafe.kvasirpublishing.com/archaeocafe-podcast-ep-219-wiley About Adrianna Wiley Adrianna is an anthropologist and bioarchaeologist studying at the University of Guelph. Her research has focused on topics such as Arctic fox butchering, as well as mental well-being among university students. Aside from her research, she is actively involved in public education and awareness of topics related to anthropology though the use of online media. Web: https://ca.linkedin.com/in/adrianna-wiley https://socioanthro.uoguelph.ca/people/adrianna-wiley Some useful links Anthropology for Homo Sapiens YouTube https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCcnUP00S-_1G0BrEJ2rQhUQ anthropology4homosapiens TikTok https://www.tiktok.com/@anthropology4homosapiens anthropology4homosapiens Instagram https://www.instagram.com/anthropology4homosapiens/ @OsteologicalW Twitter https://twitter.com/OsteologicalW @Anthropology4Homospaiens More links on Linktree https://linktr.ee/Anthro4Homosapiens For more episodes and news, visit our website and social media pages. Blog: http://archaeocafe.kvasirpublishing.com/archaeoblog/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/archaeocafe/ Anchor: https://anchor.fm/archaeocafe
21:58
December 06, 2021
ArchaeoCafé - Episode 2-18 - Minimally invasive archaeology: An interview with Bonnie Glencross, Gary Warrick, and Louis Lesage
In this episode I talk with Bonnie Glencross, Gary Warrick, and Louis Lesage about minimally invasive strategies in archaeology and their work on the Tay Point Archaeology project. Episode notes are available on the ArchaeoCafé website. http://archaeocafe.kvasirpublishing.com/archaeocafe-podcast-ep-217-prieto About Bonnie Glencross Dr. Glencross is an assistant professor and chair of the Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies at Wilfrid Laurier University. Her research focuses on bioarchaeology, human skeletal anatomy and biology, and paleopathology. She co-founded the Tay Point Archaeology project in 2014. Web: https://wlu-ca.academia.edu/BonnieGlencross https://www.wlu.ca/academics/faculties/faculty-of-arts/faculty-profiles/bonnie-glencross/index.html https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Bonnie-Glencross About Gary Warrick Dr. Warrick is an emeritus professor at the Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, the Indigenous Studies program, and the History program at Wilfrid Laurier University. His main research areas are Huron-Wendat archaeology and Indigenous archaeology. He co-founded the Tay Point Archaeology project in 2014. Dr. Warrick was the president of the Canadian Archaeological Association and is a fellow at the Tshepo Institute for the Study of Contemporary Africa. Web: https://www.wlu.ca/academics/faculties/faculty-of-liberal-arts/faculty-profiles/gary-warrick/index.html https://wlu-ca.academia.edu/GaryWarrick https://www.researchgate.net/scientific-contributions/Gary-Warrick-2130103389 About Louis Lesage Dr. Lesage is the director of the Bureau du Nionwentsïo of the Huron-Wendat Nation in Wendake, Quebec, Canada. His original field of study is wildlife biology, in which he has published numerous articles. His current work focuses on protecting and making known the rights and heritage of the Huron-Wendat. He has been involved in many consultation projects, largely in southern Ontario, to document the archaeological sites and make sure that the work on them is done properly. He has worked with various universities and archaeologists to establish collaborations and involvement between archaeologists and First Nations representatives. Web: https://independent.academia.edu/LesageLouis https://www.researchgate.net/scientific-contributions/Louis-Lesage-80212097 Selected reading and other media Minimally Invasive Research Strategies in Huron-Wendat Archaeology: Working toward a Sustainable Archaeology by Bonnie Glencross, Gary Warrick, Edward Eastaugh, Alicia Hawkins, Lisa Hodgetts, and Louis Lesage Advances in Archaeological Practice, 2017, Vol. 5(2), p. 147-158 https://doi.org/10.1017/aap.2017.7 New insights from old dog bones: Dogs as proxies for understanding ancient human diets by Bonnie Glencross, Louis Lesage, Tracy Prowse, Taylor Smith, and Gary Warrick in the book "Working with and for Ancestors", p. 190-201 published by Routledge in 2020 https://doi.org/10.4324/9780367809317-19 For more episodes and news, visit our website and social media pages. Blog: http://archaeocafe.kvasirpublishing.com/archaeoblog/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/archaeocafe/ Anchor: https://anchor.fm/archaeocafe
01:14:28
November 29, 2021
ArchaeoCafé - Episode 2-17 - Questions about quartzite: An interview with Alejandro Prieto
In this episode we talk with Alejandro Prieto about the use of quartzite in Europe during the Palaeolithic. We also discuss topics such as the societies who inhabited the Cantabrian Region during the Middle and Upper Palaeolithic and the methods used in petroarchaeology. Episode notes are available on the ArchaeoCafé website. http://archaeocafe.kvasirpublishing.com/archaeocafe-podcast-ep-217-prieto About Alejandro Prieto Dr. Prieto is a researcher at the University of the Basque Country and the University of Salamanca. His research focuses on the Palaeolithic period in Cantabria (northern Spain) and the Rhine Valley, quarrying processes in the Palaeolithic (particularly at Troisdorf-Ravensberg, German), and the use of quartzite as a knappable material. His research is aimed at understanding past raw material acquisition, distribution and management mechanisms in the Rhine Valley and places in Cantabria. He often makes use of petrographic methods to characterise raw materials and artefacts. Alejandro is an editor of the Journal of Lithic Studies and Revista Arkeogazte. Web: https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Alejandro-Prieto-4 https://ehu.academia.edu/AlejandroPrieto https://scholar.google.com/citations?user=75T1duQAAAAJ https://orcid.org/0000-0002-3853-525X Some useful terminology and links Middle Palaeolithic The second subdivision of the Palaeolithic. During this period, archaic humans including Homo sapiens neanderthalensis appeared and flourished all over the world. As with many general categories of ancient history, the exact dates of the period vary by region. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Middle_Paleolithic Upper Palaeolithic The third and last subdivision of the Palaeolithic - preceded by the Middle Palaeolithic and followed by the Mesolithic and Neolithic. According to some theories this period coincided with the appearance or widespread occurrence of many modern behavioural characteristics of modern humans - for example, art, burials, extensive long distance trade, composite tools. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Upper_Paleolithic quartzite A hard, non-foliated metamorphic rock which was originally pure quartz sandstone. Sandstone is converted into quartzite through heating and pressure usually related to tectonic compression within orogenic belts. https://www.mindat.org/min-51087.html Selected reading and other media Lithic raw material in the Cantabrian region: Dialectical relationship between flint and quartzite in the Palaeolithic record by Alejandro Prieto, Alvaro Arrizabalaga, and Iñaki Yusta Journal of Lithic Studies, 2021, Vol. 8(1), 32 p. https://doi.org/10.2218/jls.4334 Defining and Characterizing Archaeological Quartzite: Sedimentary and Metamorphic Processes in the Lithic Assemblages of El Habario and El Arteu (Cantabrian Mountains, Northern Spain) by Alejandro Prieto, Iñaki Yusta, Alvaro Arrizabalaga Archaeometry, 2019, Vol. 61(1), p. 14-40. https://doi.org/10.1111/arcm.12397 For more episodes and news, visit our website and social media pages. Blog: http://archaeocafe.kvasirpublishing.com/archaeoblog/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/archaeocafe/ Anchor: https://anchor.fm/archaeocafe
44:32
November 22, 2021
ArchaeoCafé - Episode 2-16 - Drone archaeology: An interview with Katelyn O'Keefe
In this episode we talk with Katelyn O'Keefe about the use of drones for doing aerial surveys in archaeology and for looking at landscape change over time in order to assess risks to cultural heritage. We also discuss the history of Qikiqtaruk (Herschel Island) in Yukon (Canada) and the archaeological and heritage work currently taking place there. Episode notes are available on the ArchaeoCafé website. http://archaeocafe.kvasirpublishing.com/archaeocafe-podcast-ep-216-okeefe About Katelyn O'Keefe Katelyn is a graduate student of archaeology at the University of Calgary. She is part of a research group that digitally documents heritage sites. Her graduate research involves using drone imagery to measure year-to-year change at Pauline Cove on Qikiqtaruk (Herschel Island), a culturally significant heritage site in Yukon. She has previously worked on archaeological projects in Alberta, Saskatchewan, Nunavut, and Yukon (Canada). Web: https://antharky.ucalgary.ca/manageprofile/profiles/katelyn-o-keefe https://www.linkedin.com/in/katelyn-o-keefe-32b7171bb/ Some useful terminology and links Qikiqtaruk (Herschel Island) Digital Preserve Website A repository for digital data sets such as interactive 3D models related to Herschel Island or Qikiqtaruk Territorial Park. Led by Dr. Peter Dawson of the University of Calgary. https://herschel.preserve.ucalgary.ca/ Qikiqtaruk (Herschel Island) An island in the Beaufort Sea (Arctic Ocean), which lies 5 km off the coast of Yukon. The earliest evidence of human occupation unearthed so far by archaeological investigations is that of the Thule culture, dating to approximately 1000 years ago. The Inuvialuktun word for Herschel Island is "Qikiqtaruk", which simply means "island". Commercial bowhead whale hunting in the area began in 1889. Whalers hunting in the area overwintered on the island. In 1907, the whaling industry dwindled. Throughout the early and mid 20th century the island was used by fur traders, missionaries, the RCMP and the Inuvialuit, who visit and make use of the resources on the island to this day. https://www.smithsonianmag.com/travel/endangered-site-herschel-island-canada-54373929/ https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Herschel_Island Inuvialuit culture & history The Inuvialuit are the Inuit of the Canadian Western Arctic. Inuvialuit means 'Real People' in the Inuvialuktun language. They, like all other Inuit, are descendants of the Thule who migrated eastward from Alaska. https://www.inuvialuithistory.ca/ Selected reading and other media The Rise of Drone Technology in Archaeology Coptrz website https://coptrz.com/the-rise-of-drone-technology-in-archaeology/ Drones for Heritage Uses Historic England website https://historicengland.org.uk/research/methods/airborne-remote-sensing/drones/ NGA Explains: What is Photogrammetry? National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency How measurements taken from photos can be turned into 3D information. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=POQj3BlH7gc For more episodes and news, visit our website and social media pages. Blog: http://archaeocafe.kvasirpublishing.com/archaeoblog/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/archaeocafe/ Anchor: https://anchor.fm/archaeocafe
57:39
November 15, 2021
ArchaeoCafé - Episode 2-15 - Archaeology and Missing Children: An interview with Eldon Yellowhorn
In this episode I talk with Eldon Yellowhorn about the Missing Children Project and his use of archaeology in this project. We also discuss calls to action in the Final Report of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission (Canada) which are particularly relevant to archaeology, and we discuss the various ways that history can be recorded, revealed and retold. Episode notes are available on the ArchaeoCafé website. http://archaeocafe.kvasirpublishing.com/archaeocafe-podcast-ep-215-yellowhorn About Eldon Yellowhorn Dr. Yellowhorn (whose Piikani name is Otahkotskina) is from the Piikani First Nation. His early career in archaeology began in southern Alberta where he studied the ancient cultures of the plains. He completed undergraduate degrees in physical geography (BS, 1983) and archaeology (BA, 1986) at the University of Calgary and later graduate degrees in archaeology at Simon Fraser University (MA, 1993) and anthropology at McGill University (PhD, 2002). He was appointed to faculty at Simon Fraser University in 2002 (where he currently teaches archaeology and First Nations studies) and established the Department of First Nations Studies in 2012. He teaches courses dedicated to chronicling the experience of Aboriginal people across Canada. He was president of the Canadian Archaeological Association from 2010 to 2012, the first Aboriginal person elected to this position. His research has examined the northern plains, and the ancient lifeways of his Piikani ancestors. His main interest is the evolution of communal hunting from the early Holocene to the nineteenth century when this custom was rendered obsolete with the extinction of the bison herds. He augmented his research of material culture with Piikani oral narratives. He is a native speaker of the Blackfoot language and is working to preserve it and ensure it has a future. Web: https://www.sfu.ca/indg/about/people/eldon-yellowhorn.html https://www.sfu.ca/fenv/about/meet-the-people/research-profiles/profiles/eldon-yellowhorn/ https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/4004864.Eldon_Yellowhorn Some useful terminology and links Indian Residential Schools system (Canada) A network of boarding schools for Indigenous peoples. Between 1831 and 1996, residential schools operated in Canada through funding by the Canadian government's Department of Indian Affairs and administration by Christian churches. Attendance was mandatory from 1894 to 1947. The school system was created to isolate Indigenous children from the influence of their own native culture and religion in order to assimilate them into the dominant Canadian culture. The number of school-related deaths remains unknown due to incomplete records. Estimates range from 3,200 to over 30,000. http://www.afn.ca/policy-sectors/indian-residential-schools/ Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada (TRC) A truth and reconciliation commission active in Canada from 2008 to 2015, organized by the parties of the Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement. The TRC provided those directly or indirectly affected by the legacy of the Indian Residential Schools system with an opportunity to share their stories and experiences. https://nctr.ca/about/history-of-the-trc/truth-and-reconciliation-commission-of-canada/ For more episodes and news, visit our website and social media pages. Blog: http://archaeocafe.kvasirpublishing.com/archaeoblog/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/archaeocafe/ Anchor: https://anchor.fm/archaeocafe
38:31
November 08, 2021
ArchaeoCafé - Episode 2-14 - Pseudoarchaeology: An interview with Stephanie Halmhofer
In this episode we talk with Stephanie Halmhofer about pseudoarchaeology and her research on topics such as the ancient aliens hypothesis and hyperdiffusionism. Episode notes are available on the ArchaeoCafé website. https://archaeocafe.kvasirpublishing.com/archaeocafe-podcast-ep-214-halmhofer/ About Stephanie Halmhofer Stephanie is a doctoral student at the University of Alberta. Her thesis research focuses on the ways cults in North America use archaeology and pseudoarchaeology to build and support their mythical origins, and how cults impact the archaeological landscape. Her previous research has also included the study of glass beads, osteological analyses of human skeletal remains, and museum collection cataloguing and exhibition. Web: https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Stephanie-Halmhofer https://independent.academia.edu/StephanieHalmhofer https://scholar.google.ca/citations?user=VhxQ_UAAAAAJ https://www.linkedin.com/in/stephanie-halmhofer-m-a-150588b6/ Some useful terminology and links pseudoarchaeology Interpretations of the past from outside the archaeological science community, which reject the accepted data gathering and analytical methods of the discipline. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pseudoarchaeology pseudoscience Statements, beliefs, or practices that claim to be both scientific and factual but are incompatible with the scientific method. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pseudoscience ancient aliens hypothesis A pseudoarchaeological hypothesis which suggests that intelligent extraterrestrial beings visited Earth and made contact with humans in ancient history and that this contact influenced the development of modern cultures, technologies, religions, and human biology. Two well-known proponents are Erich von Däniken and Giorgio Tsoukalos. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ancient_astronauts https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Erich_von_D%C3%A4niken https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Giorgio_A._Tsoukalos hyperdiffusionism A pseudoarchaeological hypothesis suggesting that certain historical technologies or ideas originated with a single people or civilization before their adoption by other cultures. A frequent aspect of hyperdiffusionism is that the similarities among unrelated cultures are explained as having been inherited from the civilization of a lost continent (for example, Atlantis, Mu, or Lemuria) which has since sunk into the sea. Many of Graham Hancock's books involve examples of hyperdiffusionism. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hyperdiffusionism https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Graham_Hancock For more episodes and news, visit our website and social media pages. Blog: http://archaeocafe.kvasirpublishing.com/archaeoblog/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/archaeocafe/ Anchor: https://anchor.fm/archaeocafe
01:00:51
November 01, 2021
ArchaeoCafé - Episode 2-13 - High altitude archaeology: An interview with Ekta Singh
In this episode I talk with Ekta Singh about the history of Spiti Valley in northern India and her archaeological research in the area as well as some of the general aspects of doing archaeological research in the high altitude environment of the Himalayas. Episode notes are available on the ArchaeoCafé website. http://archaeocafe.kvasirpublishing.com/archaeocafe-podcast-ep-213-singh About Ekta Singh Dr. Singh is a researcher at the Hemwati Nandan Bahuguna Garhwal University (HNB Garhwal) in Uttarakhand, India. Her research focuses on the history of the Spiti Valley through various forms of archaeological analysis. Some of her particular research interests include weaving and lithics technology. Web: https://ingumbad.academia.edu/EktaSingh https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Ekta-Singh-10 https://scholar.google.co.in/citations?user=PRlkuLYAAAAJ  Some useful terminology and links Spiti Valley A cold desert mountain valley located high in the Himalayas in the north-eastern part of the northern Indian state of Himachal Pradesh. The name "Spiti" means "The middle land" (the land between Tibet and India). https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spiti_Valley Rock art Human-made markings placed on natural stone surfaces. These may be drawn, painted, or carved. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rock_art#Paintings Petroglyph A marking engraved, carved or scratched into a rock surface. The rock is left in situ (as opposed to, for example, portable carved stone objects). A form of rock art. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rock_art#Petroglyphs For more episodes and news, visit our website and social media pages. Blog: http://archaeocafe.kvasirpublishing.com/archaeoblog/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/archaeocafe/ Anchor: https://anchor.fm/archaeocafe
48:10
October 25, 2021
ArchaeoCafé - Episode 2-12 - Archaeology and disabilities: An interview with Jon White
In this episode I talk with Jon White about his archaeological research on disabilities in the past as well as about archaeologists with disabilities today - how they can affect archaeologists and strategies for dealing with them. Episode notes are available on the ArchaeoCafé website. http://archaeocafe.kvasirpublishing.com/archaeocafe-podcast-ep-212-white About Jon White Jon is a doctoral student of archaeology at the University at Buffalo, State University of New York. He is also the Assistant Director of Alternative Testing and Assistive Technology at the Disability Resource Center at the University at Albany, State University of New York. His archaeological research looks at topics such as marginalization and exclusion, disability, urbanism and settlement planning, and the eastern Mediterranean during the Bronze Age. Web: https://sunybuffalo.academia.edu/JWhite  http://iema.buffalo.edu/people/white/  https://www.linkedin.com/in/jonathan-white-1aa98568/ Some useful terminology and links Ableism Discrimination and social prejudice against people with disabilities and/or people who are perceived to be disabled. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ableism  For more episodes and news, visit our website and social media pages. Blog: http://archaeocafe.kvasirpublishing.com/archaeoblog/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/archaeocafe/ Anchor: https://anchor.fm/archaeocafe
26:36
October 18, 2021
ArchaeoCafé - Episode 2-11 - Wily foxes: An interview with Adrianna Wiley
In this episode I talk with Adrianna Wiley about the Thule Inuit usage and processing of Arctic foxes and about their modern day use by the Inuvialuit on Banks Island (Northwest Territories). Episode notes are available on the ArchaeoCafé website. http://archaeocafe.kvasirpublishing.com/archaeocafe-podcast-ep-211-wiley About Adrianna Wiley Adrianna is an anthropologist and bioarchaeologist studying at the University of Guelph. Her research has focused on topics such as Arctic fox butchering, as well as mental well-being among university students. Her research project was funded by SSHRC, NSTP, Western University USRI. Web: https://ca.linkedin.com/in/adrianna-wiley https://socioanthro.uoguelph.ca/people/adrianna-wiley Some useful terminology and links Inuvialuit The Inuvialuit are Inuit people who live in the western Canadian Arctic region. They are descendants of the Thule who migrated eastward from Alaska. https://irc.inuvialuit.com/ https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Inuvialuit https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Inuvialuit_Settlement_Region Inuvialuit Living History (Inuvialuit Pitqusiit Inuuniarutait) project A project focused on the little-known MacFarlane Collection of objects housed at the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, DC. https://www.inuvialuitlivinghistory.ca/ Thule The ancestors of all modern Inuit. They developed in coastal Alaska by the year 1000 CE and expanded eastward across northern Canada, reaching Greenland by the 13th century. In the process, they replaced people of the earlier Dorset culture that had previously inhabited the region. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thule_people qarmaq (plural: qarmat) An Inuktitut term for a type of inter-seasonal, single-room family dwelling. To the Central Inuit of Northern Canada, it refers to a hybrid of a tent and igloo, or tent and sod house. Depending on the season, the lower portion was constructed of snow blocks or stone, while the upper portion used skins or canvas. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Qarmaq ulu (plural: uluit) An all-purpose knife traditionally used by Inuit, Iñupiat, Yupik, and Aleut women. It is utilized in applications as diverse as skinning and cleaning animals, cutting a child's hair, or cutting food. Traditionally they were made with a caribou antler, muskox horn or walrus ivory handle and slate cutting surface. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ulu Selected reading A Paleoeskimo Occupation on Southern Banks Island, N.W.T. by Charles D. Arnold Arctic, 1980, Vol. 33(3), p. 400-426 https://www.jstor.org/stable/40509052 https://doi.org/10.14430/arctic2574 Fox Exploitation by the Paleoeskimo at The Tayara Site, Nunavik by Hervé Monchot and Daniel Gendron Arctic Anthropology, 2011, Vol. 48(1), p. 15-32 https://doi.org/10.1353/arc.2011.0107 https://www.researchgate.net/publication/254927048 For more episodes and news, visit our website and social media pages. Blog: http://archaeocafe.kvasirpublishing.com/archaeoblog/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/archaeocafe/ Anchor: https://anchor.fm/archaeocafe
38:05
October 11, 2021
ArchaeoCafé - Episode 2-10 - Hard rock archaeology: An interview with Adrian Burke
In this episode we talk with Adrian Burke about the application of geosciences in archaeology and his research on tracing the movement of stone artefacts and raw materials in ancient times. Episode notes are available on the ArchaeoCafé website. http://archaeocafe.kvasirpublishing.com/archaeocafe-podcast-ep-210-burke About Adrian Burke Dr. Burke is an archaeologist at the Université de Montréal. His research focuses on the ancient history of northeastern North America and in particular the acquisition and use of stone in the past. He makes use of various methods from fields such as geology, chemistry, and physics. Dr. Burke manages the Centre de référence lithique du Québec (Quebec lithic reference collection) and is the director of the L'axe Laurentien depuis l'an deux mille avant notre ère project. Web: https://anthropo.umontreal.ca/repertoire-departement/professeurs/professeur/in/in14786/sg/Adrian%20L.%20Burke/ https://recherche.umontreal.ca/nos-chercheurs/repertoire-des-professeurs/chercheur/is/in14786/ https://umontreal.academia.edu/AdrianBurke https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Adrian_Burke2 Some useful terminology and links lithics A term used in archaeology to refer to stone artefacts and the raw materials used to produce them. petrography A branch of petrology (itself a sub-field of geology) that focuses on detailed descriptions of rocks - including the mineral content and the textural relationships within the rock. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Petrography X-ray fluorescence (XRF) A method used in archaeology (as well as various other fields) to determine the element and chemicals that a material made up of. It is commonly used in archaeology to analyse stone, glass, ceramics, and metals. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/X-ray_fluorescence Centre de référence lithique du Québec (Quebec lithic reference collection) A comparative lithic reference collection that was created by archaeologist Yvon Codère to help archaeologists working in Quebec and the greater Northeast. It contains over 500 geologic samples of rocks that were potentially used in the past to make stone tools. http://www.avataq.qc.ca/en/Institute/Departments/Archaeology/Online-Resources/Collections/crlq Selected reading Inscriptions and Silences: Challenges of Bearing Witness at the Gila River Incarceration Camp by Koji Lau-Ozawa International Journal of Historical Archaeology, 2021, Vol. 25, p. 851–876 https://doi.org/10.1007/s10761-020-00568-2 https://academia.edu/44270273/ Critical Mass: Charting a Course for Japanese Diaspora Archaeology by Koji Lau-Ozawa and Douglas Ross International Journal of Historical Archaeology, 2021, Vol. 25, p. 577–591 https://doi.org/10.1007/s10761-020-00561-9 https://www.academia.edu/44270259/ For more episodes and news, visit our website and social media pages. Blog: http://archaeocafe.kvasirpublishing.com/archaeoblog/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/archaeocafe/ Anchor: https://anchor.fm/archaeocafe
57:09
October 04, 2021
ArchaeoCafé - Episode 2-09 - Japanese American internment during World War II: An interview with Koji Lau-Ozawa
In this episode we talk with Koji Lau-Ozawa about the history of Japanese internment camps in the U.S.A. during the Second World War and his archaeological research into the camps. Episode notes are available on the ArchaeoCafé website. http://archaeocafe.kvasirpublishing.com/archaeocafe-podcast-ep-209-lau-ozawa About Koji Lau-Ozawa Koji is a historical archaeologist at Stanford University currently researching the Japanese diaspora in the U.S.A., examining the material connections and landscapes of Japanese American communities. In particular, he has been working in collaboration with the Gila River Indian Community to investigate the site of the WWII Gila River Incarceration Camp. This long-term project combines archaeological, oral historical and archival research. A second site of his investigations looks at the material culture of a pre-WWII urban Japanese American community in Santa Barbara. He has previously also worked in the Bay Area for the National Park Service and Stanford Heritage Services. Web: https://anthropology.stanford.edu/people/koji-lau-ozawa https://stanford.academia.edu/KojiOzawa https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Koji_Lau-Ozawa https://www.linkedin.com/in/koji-lau-ozawa-776765180 Some useful terminology and links Japanese American Internment during WWII The forced relocation and incarceration in concentration camps in the western interior of the country of over 110,000 people of Japanese ancestry. More than two thirds of the internees were United States citizens. https://encyclopedia.densho.org/history/ https://densho.org/terminology/  WWII Gila River Incarceration Camp An American concentration camp, built by the War Relocation Authority during World War II for the incarceration of Japanese Americans from the West Coast. The camp held over 13,000 inmates, most from California. https://encyclopedia.densho.org/Gila_River/  Densho: The Japanese American Legacy Project A non-profit organization whose mission is “to preserve and share history of the WWII incarceration of Japanese Americans to promote equity and justice today.” Densho collects video oral histories, photos, documents, and other primary source materials regarding Japanese American history, with a focus on the incarceration of Japanese Americans during World War II. https://densho.org/about-densho/  Selected reading Inscriptions and Silences: Challenges of Bearing Witness at the Gila River Incarceration Camp by Koji Lau-Ozawa International Journal of Historical Archaeology, 2021, Vol. 25, p. 851–876 https://doi.org/10.1007/s10761-020-00568-2 https://academia.edu/44270273/ Critical Mass: Charting a Course for Japanese Diaspora Archaeology by Koji Lau-Ozawa and Douglas Ross International Journal of Historical Archaeology, 2021, Vol. 25, p. 577–591 https://doi.org/10.1007/s10761-020-00561-9 https://www.academia.edu/44270259/ For more episodes and news, visit our website and social media pages. Blog: http://archaeocafe.kvasirpublishing.com/archaeoblog/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/archaeocafe/ Anchor: https://anchor.fm/archaeocafe
58:33
September 27, 2021
ArchaeoCafé - Episode 2-08 - Gender and archaeology: An interview with Katie Vanderkolk
In this episode I talk with Katie Vanderkolk about gender in archaeology. Episode notes are available on the ArchaeoCafé website. http://archaeocafe.kvasirpublishing.com/archaeocafe-podcast-ep-208-vanderkolk About Katie Vanderkolk Katie Vanderkolk is a graduate student of archaeology at the University of Calgary. Their research focuses on a chaine operatoire analysis of ceramics. Web: https://www.linkedin.com/in/kaitlyn-vanderkolk-544b9619b/ Some useful terminology and links Feminist archaeology Feminist archaeology employs a feminist perspective in interpreting past societies. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Feminist_archaeology Gender archaeology A method of studying past societies through their material culture by closely examining the social construction of gender identities and relations. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gender_archaeology Non-binary gender Non-binary is used to describe people who feel their gender cannot be defined within the margins of gender binary. Instead, they understand their gender in a way that goes beyond simply identifying as either a man or woman. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Non-binary_gender Judith Butler An American philosopher and gender theorist whose work has influenced political philosophy, ethics, and the fields of third-wave feminism, queer theory, and literary theory. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Judith_Butler Selected reading (De)queering Hatshepsut: Binary bind in archaeology of Egypt and kingship beyond the corporeal by Uroš Matić Journal of Archaeological Method and Theory, 2016, Vol. 23, p. 810–831 https://doi.org/10.1007/s10816-016-9288-9 Sexuality studies in archaeology by Barbara L. Voss Annual Review of Anthropology, 2008, Vol. 37, p. 317-336 https://doi.org/10.1146/annurev.anthro.37.081407.085238 Archaeologies of sexuality: An introduction by Barbara L. Voss and Robert A. Schmidt in the book "Archaeologies of Sexuality" published by Routledge in 2000, pages 1-32 https://www.academia.edu/44912984/ Feminisms, queer theories, and the archaeological study of past sexualities by Barbara L. Voss World Archaeology, 2000, Vol. 32(2), Queer Archaeologies, p. 180-192 https://www.academia.edu/1832026/ Coming to terms with Navajo "nádleehí": A critique of "berdache," "gay," "alternate gender," and "two-spirit" by Carolyn Epple American Ethnologist, 1998, Vol. 25(2), p. 267-290 https://www.jstor.org/stable/646695 Archaeology and the study of Gender by Margaret W. Conkey and Janet D. Spector Advances in Archaeological Method and Theory, 1984, Vol. 7, p. 1-38 https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-12-003107-8.50006-2 For more episodes and news, visit our website and social media pages. Blog: http://archaeocafe.kvasirpublishing.com/archaeoblog/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/archaeocafe/ Anchor: https://anchor.fm/archaeocafe
40:57
September 20, 2021
ArchaeoCafé - Episode 2-07 - Domesticating dogs: An interview with Robert Losey
In this episode I talk with Robert Losey about the domestication of dogs and their ongoing adaptations as they interact with humans. Episode notes are available on the ArchaeoCafé website. http://archaeocafe.kvasirpublishing.com/archaeocafe-podcast-ep-207-losey About Robert Losey Dr. Losey is a professor at the University of Alberta specialising in the archaeology of human-animal relationships. He has worked extensively in the North American and Siberian Arctic and Eastern Russia where much of his recent research focuses on dog and reindeer domestication, and the long-term history of dog sledding. Web: https://apps.ualberta.ca/directory/person/rlosey https://ualberta.academia.edu/RobertLosey https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Robert-Losey https://scholar.google.com/citations?user=CfrDhogAAAAJ Some useful terminology and links Domestication A long term process by which behavioural or physiological changes occur in a species of plant and animal over many generations due to human control over or influence on reproduction. It involves the a long term relationship with humans, so much so that the plant or animal population evolves to living with humans. This may be intentional or unintentional. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Domestication Tamed The conditioned behavioural modification of a wild-born animal when its natural avoidance of humans is reduced and it accepts the presence of humans. This does not involve genetic modification of the individual animal or of a population. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tame_animal For more episodes and news, visit our website and social media pages. Blog: http://archaeocafe.kvasirpublishing.com/archaeoblog/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/archaeocafe/ Anchor: https://anchor.fm/archaeocafe
48:55
September 13, 2021
ArchaeoCafé - Episode 2-06 - Excavating Oak Island: An interview with Laird Niven
In this episode we talk with Laird Niven about his research on Oak Island and his involvement in the Curse of Oak Island TV show as well as some background on the show and the history of the island. Episode notes are available on the ArchaeoCafé website. http://archaeocafe.kvasirpublishing.com/archaeocafe-podcast-ep-206-niven About Laird Niven Laird graduated from Dalhousie University in 1981 and has been working since then as a professional archaeologists in Nova Scotia, Canada. He has worked on numerous CRM assessment projects throughout the province, designed site-specific methodologies, conducted field studies, and been involved in public consultation. One of his main research interests is the history of Black Loyalists in Nova Scotia. Laird has been involved in the archaeological research on Oak Island since 2007. Web: https://twitter.com/ldniven http://worldcat.org/identities/viaf-105664531/ Some useful terminology and links Oak Island A 57-hectare privately owned island in Lunenburg county on the south shore of Nova Scotia, Canada. The island is best known for various theories about possible buried treasure or historical artefacts, and the associated exploration. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oak_Island https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oak_Island_mystery https://www.oakislandtours.ca/ http://mmmgroup2.altervista.org/e-oak.html The Curse of Oak Island A reality television series that chronicles a team of treasure hunters and their search for legendary treasure on Oak Island. https://www.imdb.com/title/tt3455408/ Miꞌkmaq Pronunciation: English: [mɪɡmɑː], Miꞌkmaq: [miːɡmaɣ] A First Nations people of the Northeastern Woodlands, indigenous to the areas now known as Canada's Atlantic Provinces and the Gaspé Peninsula of Quebec as well as the northeastern region of Maine. They call their national territory Miꞌkmaꞌki (or Miꞌgmaꞌgi). The nation has a population of about 170,000, of whom nearly 11,000 speak Miꞌkmaq, an Eastern Algonquian language. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mi%EA%9E%8Ckmaq http://mymnfc.com/ (Mi'kmaw Native Friendship Centre) Samuel Ball (born: 1764; died: 1845) Born a slave in South Carolina, Samuel Ball was an early Black Loyalist settler in Nova Scotia and former resident of Oak Island. While he was alive, he was one of the richest men in the province. By the time he died in 1845, Ball owned more than 100 acres on Oak Island, as well as a nearby island called Hook Island (today known as Sam’s Island). https://www.oakislandtours.ca/samuel-ball.html https://www.saltwire.com/nova-scotia/lifestyles/rosemary-godin-samuel-ball-a-success-story-never-told-551951/ https://blog.michaeleastwriter.com/the-characters-of-oak-island-samuel-ball-respected-cabbage-farmer-or-something-more-1bf3d1f626a9 For more episodes and news, visit our website and social media pages. Blog: http://archaeocafe.kvasirpublishing.com/archaeoblog/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/archaeocafe/ Anchor: https://anchor.fm/archaeocafe
59:56
September 06, 2021
ArchaeoCafé - Episode 2-05 - Racism in archaeological associations: An interview with Sarah Janesko & Erin Cagney
In this episode, I talk with Sarah Janesko and Erin Cagney about racism in professional organisations and their work to improve the policies of the Society for American Archaeology. Episode notes are available on the ArchaeoCafé website. http://archaeocafe.kvasirpublishing.com/archaeocafe-podcast-ep-205-janesko-cagney About Sarah Janesko Sarah is an archaeologist and Assistant Project Manager with New South Associates.  She manages archaeological collections in Alexandria, Virginia, U.S.A. During her career, she has studied and worked on historic excavations in Maryland and managed collections from across the United States. Web: https://anth.umd.edu/gradprofile/janesko/sarah https://newsouthassoc.com/?page_id=3929 https://www.linkedin.com/in/sarah-janesko/  About Erin Cagney Erin Cagney is an archaeologist in the Washington, D.C. region. She works for WSP, USA conducting cultural resource surveys and writing national register nominations for private, state, and federal clients.  She has worked at sites in Washington, D.C. and across the Mid-Atlantic and Southeast. In the past, she worked as an assistant laboratory manager at the Veterans Curation Program in Alexandria, Virginia, interned with the D.C. Historic Preservation Office, and worked for various CRM firms. Web: https://www.linkedin.com/in/erin-cagney-30b6582b/ https://veteranscurationprogram.org/erin-cagney/  Some useful terminology and links Society for American Archaeology (SAA) A professional association for archaeology of the Americas, founded in 1934 and based in Washington, D.C., U.S.A. https://www.saa.org/  BIPOC Black, Indigenous, and people of colour Anti-Racist Resources for Archaeologists compiled by Terrance Weik, Sarah Janesko, Erin Cagney, Kathleen Sterling, Gabby Hartemann, Mini Sharma-Ogle, Lindsay Montgomery https://www.saa.org/member-initiatives/for-members-by-members https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1qZDvjMtFuvAGwfboL7Kko9U98Ipi4eLG4vSMq7MW2l0/edit?usp=sharing  For more episodes and news, visit our website and social media pages. Blog: http://archaeocafe.kvasirpublishing.com/archaeoblog/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/archaeocafe/ Anchor: https://anchor.fm/archaeocafe
49:19
August 30, 2021
ArchaeoCafé - Episode 2-04 - Tuning in to archaeology: An interview with Chloë Duckworth
In this episode, we talk with Chloë Duckworth about educating the public about archaeology through the use of video and how it differs between YouTube, TikTok and television. We also discuss her role on The Great British Dig. Episode notes are available on the ArchaeoCafé website. http://archaeocafe.kvasirpublishing.com/archaeocafe-podcast-ep-204-duckworth About Chloë Duckworth Dr. Duckworth is an archaeologist at Newcastle University with an interest in the history of glass and the human relationship to technology. She also run the ArchaeoDuck YouTube and TikTok channels where she presents about topics in archaeology. She is also director of the Madinat al-Zahra Survey Project, co-director of the Alhambra Royal Workshops Project, and director of the al-Andalus Glass Project. Web: https://www.ncl.ac.uk/hca/people/profile/chloeduckworth.html https://www2.le.ac.uk/departments/archaeology/people/associates/duckworth https://www.youtube.com/c/ArchaeoDuck https://www.tiktok.com/@archaeoduck https://twitter.com/archaeoduck/ https://www.facebook.com/archaeoduck/ Some useful terminology and links The Great British Dig A TV show on Channel 4 that follows a team of archaeologists as they excavate back gardens around Britain. https://www.channel4.com/programmes/the-great-british-dig-history-in-your-garden https://vimeo.com/496460237 Animal, Vegetable, Mineral Episode with Mortimer Wheeler, V. Gordon Childe, and Sean Riordain. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RdI6T-74E_o For more episodes and news, visit our website and social media pages. Blog: http://archaeocafe.kvasirpublishing.com/archaeoblog/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/archaeocafe/ Anchor: https://anchor.fm/archaeocafe
42:19
August 23, 2021
ArchaeoCafé - Episode 2-03 - A little bird told me: An interview with Kari Prassack
In this episode, we talk with Kari Prassack about using bird remains to reconstruct past environments and landscapes, about the overlap between archaeology and palaeontology, and about her work in engaging the public and generating interest in research and science. Episode notes are available on the ArchaeoCafé website. http://archaeocafe.kvasirpublishing.com/archaeocafe-podcast-ep-203-prassack About Kari Prassack Dr. Prassack is a vertebrate paleoecologist and zooarchaeologist with a current taxonomic focus on Pliocene-Recent carnivorans and birds. Her research incorporates ecological method and theory, controlled and naturalistic neotaphonomic observations, and paleobiogeographical data to address the ecology of extinct taxa and changes in terrestrial vertebrate paleocommunities across time and space. She currently works at the Hagerman Fossil Beds National Monument where she is the lead paleontologist. She is also the project leader of the Hagerman Paleontology, Environments and Tephrochronology (PET) Project, a co-principal investigator of the Předmostí Canid Project, and a research affiliate on the Olduvai Geochronology and Archaeology Project. Web: https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Kari_Prassack https://nps-gov.academia.edu/KariPrassack https://scholar.google.com/citations?user=rItepKgAAAAJ  Some useful terminology and links Zooarchaeology Also "zooarchaeology" or among archaeologists "faunal analysis". The study of non-human animals in archaeological contexts. This field of research often combines the studies of archaeology and zoology. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zooarchaeology Hagerman Fossil Beds National Monument A national park near Hagerman, Idaho, U.S.A. It is internationally significant for its paleontological resources. It includes the world's richest fossil deposits, in quality, quantity, and diversity, from the late Pliocene epoch. Many of its fossils represent the last vestiges of species that existed before the last Ice Age, the Pleistocene, and the earliest 'modern' flora and fauna. Hagerman Fossil Beds is one of North America's most important sites for Pliocene birds. https://www.nps.gov/hafo/index.htm https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hagerman_Fossil_Beds_National_Monument Tephrochronology A technique that uses layers of tephra (volcanic ash from a single eruption) as chronological markers within layers of soil. Each volcanic event produces ash with a unique chemical "fingerprint" that allows the deposit to be identified across the area affected by fallout. Once the volcanic event has been independently dated, the tephra layer will act as time marker anywhere it is encountered. Layers beneath the ash will be older, and layers above will be younger. If tephra layers can be identified both above and below a layer of interest then the age of the contents of that layer (for example, artefacts or fossils) must be between the ages of the two tephra layers. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tephrochronology https://www.nps.gov/articles/000/hafo-paleo-ash-beds.htm For more episodes and news, visit our website and social media pages. Blog: http://archaeocafe.kvasirpublishing.com/archaeoblog/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/archaeocafe/ Anchor: https://anchor.fm/archaeocafe
53:34
August 16, 2021
ArchaeoCafé - Episode 2-02 - Excavating in cyberspace: An interview with Jeremy Brooks
In this episode, I talk with Jeremy Brooks about the uses of virtual reality in archaeology, and the AVROD Virtual Reality platform. Episode notes are available on the ArchaeoCafé website. https://archaeocafe.kvasirpublishing.com/archaeocafe-podcast-ep-202-brooks About Jeremy Brooks Jeremy is an archaeologist based in Peterborough, Canada. He completed a master's degree at Trent University and founded the company AVROD and developed the database and platform used by AVROD. Web: https://www.linkedin.com/in/jeremyavrod/ Some useful terminology and links AVROD (Archaeological Virtual Reality Online Database) A pioneering VR platform dedicated to digitizing and disseminating the world’s archaeological and cultural heritage sites for scientific and public study and exploration. Its mission is to enhance the way researchers share and study archaeological data while creating an innovative and engaging medium for public users to learn and experience world history. https://www.avrod.com/ https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC0dDb2bOpxGsx25r1v9C5-Q https://steamcommunity.com/groups/avrod https://www.facebook.com/avrod.vr/ https://twitter.com/avrod_vr  Virtual reality A simulated experience that can be similar to or completely different from the real world. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Virtual_reality Augmented reality An interactive experience of a real-world environment where the objects that reside in the real world are enhanced by computer-generated perceptual information. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Augmented_reality In the news Virtual reality archaeology pitch wins Peterborough Cubs’ Lair young entrepreneurs competition https://globalnews.ca/news/4692506/virtual-reality-archaeology-avrod/ Local Tech Company Launches Virtual Reality Platform For Users To Explore Global, Historical & Archaeological Sites https://www.ptbocanada.com/journal/2021/1/28/local-tech-company-launches-virtual-reality-platform-for-users-to-explore-global-historical-amp-archaeological-sites Trent University grad student’s VR platform for archaeologists wins Cubs’ Lair https://kawarthanow.com/2018/11/23/trent-university-grad-students-vr-platform-for-archaeologists-wins-cubs-lair/ Sky’s The Limit for Archaeology Student’s Innovative VR Platform https://www.trentu.ca/news/story/23249 For more episodes and news, visit our website and social media pages. Blog: https://archaeocafe.kvasirpublishing.com/archaeoblog/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/archaeocafe/ Anchor: https://anchor.fm/archaeocafe
39:20
August 09, 2021
ArchaeoCafé - Episode 2-01 - A hundred and one uses for reindeer: An interview with Tatiana Nomokonova
In this episode, I talk with Tatiana Nomokonova about zooarchaeology, reindeer herding, scapulae, and ethnoarchaeology in Siberia. Episode notes are available on the ArchaeoCafé website. http://archaeocafe.kvasirpublishing.com/archaeocafe-podcast-ep-201-nomokonova About Tatiana Nomokonova Dr. Nomokonova is a zooarchaeologist at the University of Saskatchewan. She has led and participated in several multidisciplinary international projects focusing on human-animal relationships in the North. These projects include studies of Nenets reindeer domestication practices on the Iamal Peninsula in the Russian Arctic, the life histories of ancient dogs in the Circumpolar North, interactions between Indigenous people and Baikal seals, and the diets and subsistence practices of boreal forest hunter-gatherers and pastoralists in Eastern Siberia. All of these projects involve integration of zooarchaeology and ethnography, and collaborative work with Indigenous communities. Web: https://artsandscience.usask.ca/profile/TNomokonova#/profile https://scholar.google.ca/citations?user=_tdryDoAAAAJ https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Tatiana-Nomokonova-2 https://usask.academia.edu/TatianaNomokonova Some useful terminology and links Iamal Peninsula [Russian: полуо́стров Яма́л] (also written as "Yamal Peninsula") Located in the Yamalo-Nenets Autonomous Okrug of northwest Siberia, Russia. In the language of its indigenous inhabitants, the Nenets, "Yamal" means "End of the Land".   https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yamal_Peninsula Nenets A Samoyedic ethnic group native to northern arctic Russia. Their main subsistence comes from hunting and reindeer herding. Using reindeer as a draft animal throughout the year enables them to cover great distances. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nenets_people Scapulimancy the practice of divination by use of shoulder blade bones. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scapulimancy Iarte VI and Ust’-Polui Iron Age sites in the Iamal Peninsula of Arctic Siberia.  Selected publications The variable histories of reindeer scapula on the Iamal Peninsula of Arctic Siberia. by Tatiana Nomokonova, Robert J. Losey. Andrei V. Plekhanov, Heather J. McIntyre Archaeological Research in Asia, 2020, Vol 21, p. 100176. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ara.2020.100176 Iarte VI and Late Holocene reindeer remains from the Iamal Peninsula of Arctic Siberia. by Tatiana Nomokonova, Robert J. Losey. Andrei V. Plekhanov, Heather J. McIntyre Arctic Anthropology, 2018, Vol 55(2), p. 54-73. http://aa.uwpress.org/content/55/2/56.abstract For more episodes and news, visit our website and social media pages. Blog: http://archaeocafe.kvasirpublishing.com/archaeoblog/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/archaeocafe/ Anchor: https://anchor.fm/archaeocafe
46:07
August 02, 2021
ArchaeoCafé - Episode 33 - Community based, collaborative, and Indigenous archaeology: An interview with Kaitlyn Malleau, Sarah Hazell, and Naomi Recollet
In this episode, I talk with Kaitlyn Malleau, Sarah Hazell, and Naomi Recollet about community based, collaborative, and indigenous archaeology. Episode notes are available on the ArchaeoCafé website. http://archaeocafe.kvasirpublishing.com/archaeocafe-podcast-ep-33-malleau-hazell-recollet About Kaitlyn Malleau Kaitlyn is a Ph.D. student at the University of Toronto where her research focuses on technological systems and how they are shared and communicated between different communities. She is also Director of Education at the Ontario Archaeological Society. Web: https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Kaitlyn_Malleau/research https://www.linkedin.com/in/kaitlyn-malleau-98862a15a/ About Naomi Recollet Naomi is a member of Wiikwemkoong Unceded Territory and is the archivist and programming coordinator at the Ojibwe Cultural Foundation in M'Chigeeng First Nation. She has a double graduate degree in Museum Studies and Information Studies from the University of Toronto. Her interests in archaeology are involve repatriations work, increasing training capacity within and for indigenous communities, making sure that there is space for indigenous knowledge, and creating opportunities for artists, elders, knowledge keepers, archaeologist and other academics to interact with and learn from one another. Web: http://www.wapikoni.ca/movies/unceded http://www.wapikoni.ca/movies/return-of-the-warriors-sword https://ojibweculture.ca/ About Sarah Hazell Sarah is a member of Nipissing First Nation. She is also an adjunct professor at Laurentian University, a Ph.D. candidate at McGill University, and the Workshop Coordinator for the Ontario Archaeological Society. Her interest focus on finding ways to build archaeological capacity in indigenous communities in order to eventually create a more equitable place at the table regarding research, legislation and industry. Web: https://www.ontarioarchaeology.org/resources/Documents/ArchNotes%2024(4).pdf https://anishinabeknews.ca/2019/11/26/northern-indigenous-communities-participate-in-archaeological-monitor-training/ Some useful terminology and links Ojibwe Cultural Foundation The Ojibwe Cultural Foundation was created to preserve and revitalize the language, culture, arts, spirituality, and traditions of the Anishinaabe People of the Mnidoo Mnising (Manitoulin Island) and surrounding areas. https://ojibweculture.ca/ The revitalization of Anishinaabek ceramics through archaeology, land, and art-making a project in partnership between the Ojibwe Cultural Foundation and the Gardiner Museum.  Manitoulin Island Summer Historical Institute (MISHI) an annual week-long summer institute on Manitoulin Island focused on Anishinaabe studies. Its focus is to bring together students, teachers, knowledge-holders, artists, and Elders to learn about Anishinaabe history and culture. Every summer program has a different theme https://robarts.info.yorku.ca/research-clusters/hip/manitoulin-island-summer-historical-institute-mishi/ For more episodes and news, visit our website and social media pages. Blog: http://archaeocafe.kvasirpublishing.com/archaeoblog/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/archaeocafe/ Anchor: https://anchor.fm/archaeocafe
42:51
February 03, 2021
ArchaeoCafé - Episode 32 - Making scents of archaeology: An interview with Paul Martin (Part 2)
In this episode, I talk more with Paul Martin about the use of dogs on archaeological surveys and his research on testing the potentials and limits of this method. Episode notes are available on the ArchaeoCafé website. http://archaeocafe.kvasirpublishing.com/archaeocafe-podcast-ep-32-martin-pt-2 About Paul Martin Paul Martin is an archaeologist, forensic anthropologist, and dog trainer. He is one of the foremost researchers quantitatively investigating the potentials and limitations of using dogs in archaeological research. He runs the archaeological survey company Martin Consulting and is currently doing research at the University of Memphis. Web: https://www.linkedin.com/in/paul-martin-6a0a9429/ https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Paul_Martin11 Some useful terminology and links Martin Consulting An archaeological consulting company that specialises in historical cemetery mapping. Martin Consulting utilizes a multidisciplinary approach - including a combination of geophysics, forensic anthropology, and human remains detection dogs - to conduct archaeological surveys. Previous projects have included locating and mapping small scale historical family cemeteries to large complex surveys to help protect cultural resources and identify potential hazmat hazards. https://www.martinarchaeology.com/ https://www.facebook.com/martinarchaeological/ Detection dog A dog that is trained to use its senses to detect substances and indicate to a handler when these substances are found. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Detection_dog Human remains detection (HRD) or cadaver dogs Dogs that are used to locate the remains of deceased victims https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Search_and_rescue_dog#Cadaver_dog Geophysical survey A ground-based physical sensing techniques used for archaeological imaging or mapping. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Geophysical_survey_(archaeology) Ground-penetrating radar A non-intrusive geophysical method of surveying the sub-surface to investigate underground features. The method uses radar pulses to create images of what is beneath the surface. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ground-penetrating_radar Olfactory system the sensory system used for smelling https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Olfactory_system What the Dog Knows: Scent, Science, and the Amazing Ways Dogs Perceive the World book by Cat Warren https://catwarren.com/ For more episodes and news, visit our website and social media pages. Blog: http://archaeocafe.kvasirpublishing.com/archaeoblog/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/archaeocafe/ Anchor: https://anchor.fm/archaeocafe
01:12:50
December 16, 2020
ArchaeoCafé - Episode 31 - Making scents of archaeology: An interview with Paul Martin (Part 1)
In this episode, I talk with Paul Martin about the use of dogs on archaeological surveys and his research on testing the potentials and limits of this method. Episode notes are available on the ArchaeoCafé website. http://archaeocafe.kvasirpublishing.com/archaeocafe-podcast-ep-31-martin-pt-1 About Paul Martin Paul Martin is an archaeologist, forensic anthropologist, and dog trainer. He is one of the foremost researchers quantitatively investigating the potentials and limitations of using dogs in archaeological research. He runs the archaeological survey company Martin Consulting and is currently doing research at the University of Memphis. Web: https://www.linkedin.com/in/paul-martin-6a0a9429/ https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Paul_Martin11 Some useful terminology and links Martin Consulting An archaeological consulting company that specialises in historical cemetery mapping. Martin Consulting utilizes a multidisciplinary approach - including a combination of geophysics, forensic anthropology, and human remains detection dogs - to conduct archaeological surveys. Previous projects have included locating and mapping small scale historical family cemeteries to large complex surveys to help protect cultural resources and identify potential hazmat hazards. https://www.martinarchaeology.com/ https://www.facebook.com/martinarchaeological/ Detection dog A dog that is trained to use its senses to detect substances and indicate to a handler when these substances are found. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Detection_dog Human remains detection (HRD) or cadaver dogs Dogs that are used to locate the remains of deceased victims https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Search_and_rescue_dog#Cadaver_dog Geophysical survey A ground-based physical sensing techniques used for archaeological imaging or mapping. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Geophysical_survey_(archaeology) Ground-penetrating radar A non-intrusive geophysical method of surveying the sub-surface to investigate underground features. The method uses radar pulses to create images of what is beneath the surface. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ground-penetrating_radar Olfactory system the sensory system used for smelling https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Olfactory_system What the Dog Knows: Scent, Science, and the Amazing Ways Dogs Perceive the World book by Cat Warren https://catwarren.com/ For more episodes and news, visit our website and social media pages. Blog: http://archaeocafe.kvasirpublishing.com/archaeoblog/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/archaeocafe/ Anchor: https://anchor.fm/archaeocafe
01:02:04
December 09, 2020
ArchaeoCafé - Episode 30 - Garden-variety archaeology: An interview with Bonnie Clark
In this episode, we talk with Bonnie Clark about the archaeology of gardens, historical archaeology, and her research at the site of the Amache Japanese internment camp in Colorado, U.S.A. Episode notes are available on the ArchaeoCafé website. http://archaeocafe.kvasirpublishing.com/archaeocafe-podcast-ep-30-clark About Bonnie Clark Dr. Clark is a professor of historical archaeologist at the University of Denver (DU), Department of Anthropology as well as the Curator for Archaeology of the DU Museum of Anthropology. She currently leads the DU Amache Project. Her work on the Amache Project has been highlighted in numerous venues including Archaeology and American Archaeology magazines. In 2011, Dr. Clark’s work was recognized by her peers with the University of Denver’s Teacher/Scholar of the Year award. Web: https://portfolio.du.edu/bclark https://liberalarts.du.edu/about/people/bonnie-j-clark https://independent.academia.edu/BonnieJClark https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Bonnie_Clark3 Some useful terminology and links Japanese American Internment during WWII The forced relocation and incarceration in concentration camps in the western interior of the country of about 120,000 people of Japanese ancestry. Sixty-two percent of the internees were United States citizens. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Internment_of_Japanese_Americans Granada Relocation Project (a.k.a "Camp Amache") Located near the town of Granada, Colorado, U.S.A., this relocation center was one of 10 centers constructed in the U.S.A. during World War II for the purpose of interning Japanese Americans and people of Japanese descent. More than 10,000 people passed through Camp Amache and, with over 7,300 internees at its peak. Two-thirds of the internees were citizens of the U.S.A. https://www.nps.gov/places/granada-relocation-center.htm Amache Preservation Society (APS) The APS maintains the physical site of Amache and is instrumental in its preservation. It has renovated and restored key Amache landmarks. https://amache.org/ DU Amache project A community collaboration committed to researching, preserving, and interpreting the physical history of Amache, Colorado’s WWII-era Japanese American internment camp. https://portfolio.du.edu/amache https://www.facebook.com/DUAmacheResearchProject  Selected publications Finding Solace in the Soil: An Archaeology of Gardens and Gardeners at Amache by Bonnie J. Clark Dr. Clark's new book on the archaeology of Amache's gardens. https://upcolorado.com/university-press-of-colorado/item/3885-finding-solace-in-the-soil Cultivating Community: The Archaeology of Japanese American Confinement at Amache by Bonnie Clark In: Legacies of Space and Intangible Heritage: Archaeology, Ethnohistory, and the Politics of Cultural Continuity in the Americas (2017) https://doi.org/10.5876/9781607325727.c005 For more episodes and news, visit our website and social media pages. Blog: http://archaeocafe.kvasirpublishing.com/archaeoblog/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/archaeocafe/ Anchor: https://anchor.fm/archaeocafe
01:00:06
December 02, 2020
ArchaeoCafé - Episode 29 - Palaeocaninology: An interview with Mietje Germonpré
In this episode, I talk with Mietje Germonpré about the origins of domesticated dogs. Episode notes are available on the ArchaeoCafé website. http://archaeocafe.kvasirpublishing.com/archaeocafe-podcast-ep-29-germonpre About Mietje Germonpré Dr. Germonpré is a paleontologist and archaeozoologist, at the Royal Belgian Institute of Natural Sciences, in Brussels, Belgium. Her research includes subjects such as prehistoric canid and the domestication of the wold into the dog, Pleistocene fauna at Paleolithic sites and human-animal relationships, and the seasonality and mobility of the last Neanderthals and first anatomically modern humans in North-Western Europe from a faunal perspective. Her research showed that the wolf was domesticated as a dog more than 30,000 years ago, twice as long as assumed by the current view. Web: https://naturalsciences-be.academia.edu/MietjeGermonpr%C3%A9 https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Mietje_Germonpre https://scholar.google.com/citations?user=2xtqux0AAAAJ https://orcid.org/0000-0001-8865-0937 Some useful terminology and links Goyet Caves a series of connected caves near the village of Mozet in the Namur province of Belgium. During the 1860s, a dog-like cranium was discovered and dated to 31,680 years old. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Goyet_Caves Předmostí archaeological site An important Central European, Late Pleistocene hill site in the north western part of Přerov, Moravia near the city of Přerov in the modern day Czech Republic, dated to between 24,000 and 37,000 years old. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/P%C5%99edmost%C3%AD_u_P%C5%99erova_(archaeological_site) Canids dog-like carnivorans of the biological family Canidae. All living members of this family are part of the subfamily Caninae, and are called canines. Members of this subfamily include domestic dogs, wolves, foxes, and jackals among others. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Canidae Origins of the dog The origin of the domestic dog includes the dog's genetic divergence from the wolf, its domestication, and its development into dog types and dog breeds. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Origin_of_the_domestic_dog Selected publications Origins and genetic legacy of prehistoric dogs by Anders Bergström and others Science, 2020 https://doi.org/10.1126/science.aba9572 Self-domestication or human control? The Upper Palaeolithic domestication of the wolf by Mietje Germonpré, and others https://www.researchgate.net/publication/327766187/ Palaeolithic dog skulls at the Gravettian Předmostí site, the Czech Republic by Mietje Germonpré, Martina Lázničková-Galetová, Mikhail V. Sablin Journal of Archaeological Science, 2012 https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jas.2011.09.022 For more episodes and news, visit our website and social media pages. Blog: http://archaeocafe.kvasirpublishing.com/archaeoblog/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/archaeocafe/ Anchor: https://anchor.fm/archaeocafe
43:20
November 25, 2020
ArchaeoCafé - Episode 28 - Racism in archaeology: An interview with Maria Franklin
In this episode, I talk with Maria Franklin about racism and the lack of people of colour in archaeology. Episode notes are available on the ArchaeoCafé website. http://archaeocafe.kvasirpublishing.com/archaeocafe-podcast-ep-28-franklin About Maria Franklin Dr. Franklin is a professor at the Department of Anthropology at the University of Texas. Her research focuses on the archaeology of historical periods in the USA with a particular emphasis on black populations during and after slavery and incorporates oral history and descendant community involvement. Her interests include also public involvement in archaeological research and the politics of archaeology itself. Dr. Franklin has previously sat on the Board of Directors of the Society for Historical Archaeology. Web: https://liberalarts.utexas.edu/anthropology/faculty/mf65474 https://utexas.academia.edu/MariaFranklin https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Maria_Franklin3 http://orcid.org/0000-0003-4561-6397 Some useful terminology and links Society of Black Archaeologists The mission of the Society of Black Archaeologists (SBA) is to promote academic excellence and social responsibility by creating a space for Black archaeologists and other scholars who support SBA’s goals and activities. https://www.societyofblackarchaeologists.com/ Society for Historical Archaeology a professional organization of scholars concerned with the archaeology of the modern world https://sha.org/ Historical archaeology a form of archaeology dealing with places, things, and issues from the past or present when written records and oral traditions can inform and contextualize cultural material https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Historical_archaeology Antioch Colony a community in Texas founded by former slaves in 1870 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Antioch_Colony,_Texas https://www.facebook.com/AntiochColony/ https://news.utexas.edu/2010/09/20/artifacts-descendants-tell-story-of-freed-slaves-in-texas/ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wqQMsIjVDW8 For more episodes and news, visit our website and social media pages. Blog: http://archaeocafe.kvasirpublishing.com/archaeoblog/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/archaeocafe/ Anchor: https://anchor.fm/archaeocafe
57:54
November 18, 2020
ArchaeoCafé - Episode 27 - Archaeology with a dash of salt: An interview with Vasile Diaconu
In this episode, we talk with Vasile Diaconu about the Cucuteni culture, salt production in prehistory, and about learning and teaching ancient skills. Episode notes are available on the ArchaeoCafé website. http://archaeocafe.kvasirpublishing.com/archaeocafe-podcast-ep-27-diaconu About Vasile Diaconu Dr. Diaconu is an archaeologist Museum History and Ethnography of Târgu Neamț in eastern Romania. His research focuses on the Cucuteni culture, and salt production in prehistory. He uses a hands-on approach to learning and teaching about history by incorporating experimental and experiential activities. Web: https://neamt.academia.edu/DiaconuVasile https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Vasile_Diaconu3 https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCISUIb_kSwrZV9IatdiStQQ https://exarc.net/members/ind/vasile-diaconu Some useful terminology and links Chalcolithic the “Copper Age”. A cultural period at the end of the Stone Age when people had the technology to produce copper. Some researchers consider it a part of the Neolithic, while others consider it an intermediary age between the Neolithic and the Bronze Age. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chalcolithic Bronze Age a period of time characterized by bronze artefacts and the use of bronze implements. In Europe, it follows the Neolithic or Chalcolithic and ranges from about 3200 BCE (although much earlier in the Balkan region) until about 600 BCE. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bronze_Age https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bronze_Age_Europe Cucuteni culture also known as the Cucuteni–Trypillia culture and Tripolye culture, this was a Neolithic and Chalcolithic culture located in the Republic of Moldova, western Ukraine, and northeastern Romania from approximately 5500 to 2750 BCE. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cucuteni%E2%80%93Trypillia_culture Museum History and Ethnography of Targu Neamt [in Romanian: Muzeul de Istorie şi Etnografie Târgu Neamț] The museum exhibits show the history of the Târgu Neamț, particularly from the mediaeval period, as well of the traditional crafts and tools of Neamț county. http://mietn.muzeu-neamt.ro/ mace A mace is a blunt weapon that uses a heavy head on the end of a handle to deliver powerful strikes. The material of the mace head varies throughout history, often having been stone, bone or metal. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mace_(bludgeon) For more episodes and news, visit our website and social media pages. Blog: http://archaeocafe.kvasirpublishing.com/archaeoblog/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/archaeocafe/ Anchor: https://anchor.fm/archaeocafe
37:37
November 11, 2020
ArchaeoCafé - Episode 26 - Raising the Arrow: An interview with Scarlett Janusas
In this episode, I talk with Scarlett Janusas about marine archaeology in Canada, and her involvement in a project investigating the development of the Avro Arrow. Episode notes are available on the ArchaeoCafé website. http://archaeocafe.kvasirpublishing.com/archaeocafe-podcast-ep-26-janusas About Scarlett Janusas Scarlett Janusas is a Canadian archaeologists with over 40 years of experience in the fields of archaeology and heritage. In additional to traditional terrestrial archaeology, she has an extensive range of experience also in marine archaeology. During her career, she has been Vice-President and President of the Association of Professional Archaeologists and President of the Ontario Marine Heritage Committee, and is currently the Chair for the Tobermory Hyperbaric Facility. Scarlet is also the President of Scarlett Janusas Archaeology Inc., an archaeological and heritage consulting company operating throughout Ontario, Canada. Web: http://www.actionarchaeology.ca/index.php/about/staff-associates/#scarlett https://www.linkedin.com/in/scarlett-janusas-02445333/ Some useful terminology and links Avro Arrow The Avro Arrow was a delta-winged interceptor aircraft designed and built by Avro Canada in the 1950s, intended to serve as the Royal Canadian Air Force's primary interceptor. In 1959, the project development was halted and the assembly line, tooling, plans, existing airframes, and engines were ordered to be destroyed. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Avro_Canada_CF-105_Arrow Raise the Arrow project This projects involves the search and recovery of the free-flight models of the Avro Arrow launched into Lake Ontario from a military range at Point Petre, Ontario. https://www.facebook.com/raisethearrow/ https://ml-fd.caf-fac.ca/en/2018/08/18277 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MqvZWp4N5gc Fish weir an obstruction placed in a body of water to direct the passage of, or trap fish. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fishing_weir For more episodes and news, visit our website and social media pages. Blog: http://archaeocafe.kvasirpublishing.com/archaeoblog/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/archaeocafe/ Anchor: https://anchor.fm/archaeocafe
43:05
November 04, 2020
ArchaeoCafé - Episode 25 - Microscopes and the Mesolithic: An interview with Jess Bates
In this episode, we talk with Jess Bates about the Mesolithic settlement of Star Carr, experimental archaeology, and the York Experimental Archaeological Research (YEAR) Centre. Episode notes are available on the ArchaeoCafé website. http://archaeocafe.kvasirpublishing.com/archaeocafe-podcast-ep-25-bates About Jess Bates Jessica "Jess" Bates is an archaeologist at the University of York. Her research focuses on knapped stone tool usage during the Mesolithic and how Early Mesolithic structures were used by hunter-gatherers. She uses microwear analysis alongside geographical information systems, to explore patterns in tool-using behaviours within and around the structures. In addition to her research, she also helps to run the York Experimental Archaeological Research (YEAR) Centre. Web: https://www.york.ac.uk/archaeology/people/research-students/jessbates/ https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Jess_Bates Some useful terminology and links Star Carr a Mesolithic site in North Yorkshire, England, generally regarded as the most important and informative Mesolithic site in Great Britain. The site was occupied approximately from 9300 to 8480 BCE. http://www.starcarr.com/ York Experimental Archaeological Research (YEAR) Centre an outdoor experimental archaeology workspace located on the campus of the University of York. https://www.york.ac.uk/archaeology/centres-facilities/year-centre/ https://yorkexperimentalarchaeology.wordpress.com/ Experimental archaeology a field of study which attempts to generate and test archaeological hypotheses, usually by replicating or approximating the feasibility of ancient cultures performing various tasks or feats Mesolithic The period between the Upper Palaeolithic and the Neolithic - it refers to the final period of hunter-gatherer cultures in Europe and Western Asia, between the end of the Last Glacial Maximum and the Neolithic Revolution. Microwear analysis microscopic analysis that can identify if the flint was used, and how it was used PI  (Principle Investigator) the lead researcher on a research project, often the main person responsible for an archaeological excavation or field work. Antler headdresses One of the most intriguing artefacts found at Star Carr are the antler "frontlets" or headdresses. There are a number of different interpretations concerning what they were used for: possibly for hunting red deer, possibly used by shamans in ritual activities. Hafting a process by which an artefact, often bone, stone, or metal is attached to a haft (handle or strap). For more episodes and news, visit our website and social media pages. Blog: http://archaeocafe.kvasirpublishing.com/archaeoblog/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/archaeocafe/ Anchor: https://anchor.fm/archaeocafe
01:02:57
October 21, 2020
ArchaeoCafé - Episode 24 - Himalayan heritage: An interview with Sonali Gupta
In this episode, I talk with Sonali Gupta about archaeology and anthropology in the Himalayas, and The Himalayan Institute of Cultural & Heritage Studies. Episode notes are available on the ArchaeoCafé website. http://archaeocafe.kvasirpublishing.com/archaeocafe-podcast-ep-24-gupta About Sonali Gupta Dr. Gupta is an anthropological archaeologist. In addition to having a degree in law, she completed her doctorate at the University of California in Los Angeles where she specialised in Egyptian archaeology. She went on to work at UCLA as Director of Public Programs and Lecturer at the Cotsen Instititue of Archaeology and became a post-doctoral fellow there in 2018. Dr. Gupta has worked on and directed various research projects in India, Egypt, Indonesia, and Malaysia. She is currently the founder and director at The Himalayan Institute of Cultural and Heritage Studies in the state of Himachal Pradesh, India.  Web: https://ioa.ucla.edu/people/sonali-gupta-agarwal https://ucla.academia.edu/SonaliGupta https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Sonali_Gupta-agarwal Some useful terminology and links The Himalayan Institute of Cultural & Heritage Studies (HICHS) An alternate learning institution for both academics and non-academics to learn through experiences, workshops, retreats and expeditions with qualified scholars with Ph.D. researchers. The institute actively encourages collaboration for workshops with other institutions and professionals. The HICHS a residence available for visiting scholars and writers. (Contact the institute for details.) The HICHS is located in the town of Katrain in the state of Himachal Pradesh, India. The institute is directed by Dr. Sonali Gupta. Dr. Parth Chauhan co-directs a number of important projects at the HICHS. https://www.facebook.com/TheHICHS/ (news page) https://www.facebook.com/groups/879906309073414/ (discussion group) https://www.instagram.com/the_hichs_himalayan_institute/ https://www.youtube.com/user/sangla55 HICHS Lecture Series  A series of live presentations and discussions hosted weekly by the HICHS. The lectures are archived on YouTube. https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL6duGjC3xLmmFKBvtpjwG-famJGAqYmV6 Himachal Pradesh [ਹਿਮਾਚਲ ਪ੍ਰਦੇਸ਼ - literally "snow-laden province" in Hindi] A state in the northern part of India, situated in the Western Himalayas, and characterized by an extreme landscape featuring moutnain peaks and extensive river systems. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Himachal_Pradesh https://en.wikivoyage.org/wiki/Himachal_Pradesh Devta / Devata A Hindu term for a local deity. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Devata gur A type of shaman in Himalayan traditions https://www.academia.edu/40829113/ For more episodes and news, visit our website and social media pages. Blog: http://archaeocafe.kvasirpublishing.com/archaeoblog/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/archaeocafe/ Anchor: https://anchor.fm/archaeocafe
52:32
October 14, 2020
ArchaeoCafé - Episode 23 - First-person shoveller: An interview with Alex Martire and Tomás Partiti
In this episode, I talk with Alex Martire and Tomás Partiti about their work on producing video games and apps to teach about archaeology. Episode notes are available on the ArchaeoCafé website. http://archaeocafe.kvasirpublishing.com/archaeocafe-podcast-ep-23-martire-partiti About Alex Martire Alex initially studied classical history and later specialised in archaeology. He has published various articles on the combination of virtual reality and archaeology. He currently teaches cyberarchaeology at the Universidade de São Paulo and is the team leader of the ARISE research group.  Web: http://lattes.cnpq.br/2974994861825943 About Tomás Partiti Tomás has a background in classical history, numismatics, and archaeology. He is part of the ARISE research group at the Universidade de São Paulo . Web: http://lattes.cnpq.br/8681811117065623 Some useful terminology and links ARISE (Arqueologia Interativa e Simulações Eletrônicas) [Interactive Archeology and Electronic Simulations] A research group at the Museum of Archeology and Ethnology (Universidade de São Paulo), whose main objective is the analysis of electronic games from an archaeological point of view as well as the development of interactive electronic applications that assist in the fields of education and museology. http://www.arise.mae.usp.br/ Sambaquis - Uma História Antes do Brasil [Shellmounds - A history before Brazil] An adventure style video game set on and around a sambaqui about 3000 years ago. It's objective is to teach about the past through story telling and game play. http://www.arise.mae.usp.br/sambaquis-apresentacao/ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vaJoCL4E6mc Sambaqui A Brazilian shellmound site, often translated in English as "midden" or "shell midden". Some are not technically middens (garbage piles) as they appear to have been created specifically for cultural, non-functional purposes. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Midden Arqueologia R.A. - Grupos pré-coloniais de Santa Catarina [A.R. Archaeology - Precolonial groups of Santa Catarina] an app that allows the user to view archaeological artefacts of the ancient inhabitants of Santa Catarina in augmented reality. https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.ARISE.ArqueologiaRA For more episodes and news, visit our website and social media pages. Blog: http://archaeocafe.kvasirpublishing.com/archaeoblog/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/archaeocafe/ Anchor: https://anchor.fm/archaeocafe
01:04:40
October 07, 2020
ArchaeoCafé - Episode 22 - Cultural Resource Management in Canada: A round table discussion (Part 2)
In this episode, I continue my discussion with archaeologists from across Canada to talk about cultural resource management (CRM) in Canada. In the final part of our discussion we consider the following questions. • What are the current issues affecting the CRM industry in Canada? • How has the industry changed in recent decades? • How is collections management handled in CRM? What is done with all of the artefacts collected during CRM projects and who pays for it?  Episode notes are available on the ArchaeoCafé website. http://archaeocafe.kvasirpublishing.com/archaeocafe-podcast-ep-22-crm-canada-pt-2 Guest speakers:  Aaron Osicki Aaron is an archaeologist at Parks Canada, responsible for archaeological sites and resource management in Canada's national parks and nation historic sites. He has previously worked in CRM throughout western Canada. Chris Kerns Chris is currently a CRM report writer in Ontario.  Over the past 15 years he has worked in CRM as a technician, field director, and assistant project manager all across the USA and in the U.K.  Cristina Caria-McCoy Cristina is an R license holding CRM archaeologist in Ontario, currently writing her master's thesis on the commodification of archaeology and the political economies of southern Ontario CRM. Joseph Cull Since 2011, Joseph has worked as a field technician, crew chief, supervisor, and field director. Currently, he is the archaeology sector representative for an international labour union. Kaitlyn McMullen Kaitlyn is a lab technician for a CRM company in Ontario. She graduated from an archaeology and conservation-collections management programme. Kathryn Huzyk Kathryn is currently a field director in British Columbia and previously did field work in Saskatchewan, Manitoba, and Ontario.   Margarita de Guzman Margarita is the owner of a CRM company in western Canada. She has worked mainly in British Columbia and Alberta but also done work throughout western Canada as well as in the U.K.  Stuart Karrow Stuart has been working in CRM in Ontario for 7 years. For the last 3 years he has been a P licence field director. Tommy Ng For about 25 years Tommy has worked as a field technician and project manager in the Northwest Territories, British Columbia, Alberta, and Saskatchewan, as well as in the U.S.A. He is currently a partner and owner of a CRM company in Calgary. William “Bill” Lucas Bill is a First Nation archaeologist in Ontario. He has been doing CRM archaeology for 8 years and is now an R licence holder.  For more episodes and news, visit our website and social media pages. Blog: http://archaeocafe.kvasirpublishing.com/archaeoblog/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/archaeocafe/ Anchor: https://anchor.fm/archaeocafe
01:03:06
September 23, 2020
ArchaeoCafé - Episode 21 - Cultural Resource Management in Canada: A round table discussion (Part 1)
In this episode, I am joined by archaeologists from across Canada to talk about cultural resource management (CRM) in Canada. In the first part of our discussion we consider the following questions. • What skills and training are needed to work in CRM, and how are post-secondary schools addressing this? • What is the job market like for recent graduates hoping to start a career in CRM? • How does CRM vary between provinces and is there much opportunity for mobility between provinces or regions for field technicians? • At present, how well does the system protect archaeological sites? • In practice, what role do Indigenous communities usually play in CRM projects?  Episode notes are available on the ArchaeoCafé website. http://archaeocafe.kvasirpublishing.com/archaeocafe-podcast-ep-21-crm-canada Guest speakers:  Aaron Osicki Aaron is an archaeologist at Parks Canada, responsible for archaeological sites and resource management in Canada's national parks and nation historic sites. He has previously worked in CRM throughout western Canada. Chris Kerns Chris is currently a CRM report writer in Ontario.  Over the past 15 years he has worked in CRM as a technician, field director, and assistant project manager all across the USA and in the U.K.  Cristina Caria-McCoy Cristina is an R license holding CRM archaeologist in Ontario, currently writing her master's thesis on the commodification of archaeology and the political economies of southern Ontario CRM. Joseph Cull Since 2011, Joseph has worked as a field technician, crew chief, supervisor, and field director. Currently, he is the archaeology sector representative for an international labour union. Kaitlyn McMullen Kaitlyn is a lab technician for a CRM company in Ontario. She graduated from an archaeology and conservation-collections management programme. Kathryn Huzyk Kathryn is currently a field director in British Columbia and previously did field work in Saskatchewan, Manitoba, and Ontario.   Margarita de Guzman Margarita is the owner of a CRM company in western Canada. She has worked mainly in British Columbia and Alberta but also done work throughout western Canada as well as in the U.K.  Stuart Karrow Stuart has been working in CRM in Ontario for 7 years. For the last 3 years he has been a P licence field director. Tommy Ng For about 25 years Tommy has worked as a field technician and project manager in the Northwest Territories, British Columbia, Alberta, and Saskatchewan, as well as in the U.S.A. He is currently a partner and owner of a CRM company in Calgary. William “Bill” Lucas Bill is a First Nation archaeologist in Ontario. He has been doing CRM archaeology for 8 years and is now an R licence holder.  For more episodes and news, visit our website and social media pages. Blog: http://archaeocafe.kvasirpublishing.com/archaeoblog/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/archaeocafe/ Anchor: https://anchor.fm/archaeocafe
52:33
September 16, 2020
ArchaeoCafé - Episode 20 - Hot off the press: An interview with Mark Milligan
In this episode, I talk with Mark Milligan about using digital media to disseminate archaeological news to the general public and about his work starting up and running the popular news site HeritageDaily. Episode notes are available on the ArchaeoCafé website. http://archaeocafe.kvasirpublishing.com/archaeocafe-podcast-ep-20-milligan About Mark Milligan Mark has a diverse background in archaeology, publishing, and IT and has decrees in both Archaeology and Computer Science. He is a founder and manager editor of the HeritageDaily news site, which was first launched in 2011. Web: https://www.linkedin.com/in/markusmilligan/ https://www.heritagedaily.com/about-us Some useful terminology and links HeritageDaily [website] a dedicated, independent publisher of the latest research and discoveries from across the academic community with a focus on archaeology, anthropology, palaeoanthropology and palaeontology https://www.heritagedaily.com/ HeritageDaily app The HeritageDaily application allows readers to carry in their pocket, the latest discoveries and research. https://www.heritagedaily.com/application Uncovered London app An alternative guide for discovering London. The application will take you far removed from the usual tourist clichés and reveal London’s hidden treasures. https://www.heritagedaily.com/uncovered-london-app-for-ios-android For more episodes and news, visit our website and social media pages. Blog: http://archaeocafe.kvasirpublishing.com/archaeoblog/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/archaeocafe/ Anchor: https://anchor.fm/archaeocafe
55:54
September 09, 2020
ArchaeoCafé - Episode 19 - On thin ice: An interview with Glen MacKay
In this episode, I talk with Glen MacKay about archaeology in the Canadian Arctic, effects of global warming, and his work with the Government of the Northwest Territories. Episode notes are available on the ArchaeoCafé website. http://archaeocafe.kvasirpublishing.com/archaeocafe-podcast-ep-19-mackay About Glen MacKay Glen MacKay is a territorial archaeologist and manager of the Northwest Territories Cultural Places Program (CPP) with the Government of the Northwest Territories, Canada. He is also co-investigator on the multidisciplinary NWT Ice Patch Study. Web: https://independent.academia.edu/GlenMacKay https://www.researchgate.net/scientific-contributions/81638584_Glen_MacKay Some useful terminology and links Northwest Territories Cultural Places Program (CPP) a NWT government institution whose purpose is to promote the protection, investigation, interpretation, and commemoration of significant cultural places in the Northwest Territories. It achieves these goals by providing programs to document, manage and protect archaeological sites, by administering official community and geographic names, and by commemorating significant cultural and historic places. https://www.pwnhc.ca/cultural-places/ NWT Archaeology Program a government institution that promotes the protection, conservation and investigation of archaeological sites in the Northwest Territories https://www.pwnhc.ca/cultural-places/archaeology-program/ Alpine ice patch an accumulation of annual snow that does not melt entirely away during the summer. Each year new snow is added to the previous accumulation and as the patch grows, it begins to compress into ice. NWT Ice Patch Study a collaborative effort to learn and share knowledge about the human and environmental history of the Northwest Territories by investigating permanent ice patches in the Mackenzie Mountains. https://www.pwnhc.ca/item/hunters-of-the-alpine-ice-the-nwt-ice-patch-study/ Rapid Loss of Perennial Alpine Ice Patches, Selwyn and Mackenzie Mountains, NWT [article] by Glen MacKay, Leon Andrew, Naomi Smethurst, & Thomas D. Andrews In this article, the authors highlight the importance of the ice patches in the Selwyn and Mackenzie Mountains. Through core samples and the melting process of the ice patches, scientists are able to gather important information on the animals and hunters that relied on these patches. https://blog.alpineclubofcanada.ca/state-of-the-mountains/2019/11/29/rapid-loss-of-perennial-alpine-ice-patches Cultural Chronology in North American and Greenlandic Arctic [web page] an overview chronology provided by the Avataq Cultural Institute http://www.avataq.qc.ca/en/Institute/Departments/Archaeology/Discovering-Archaeology/Arctic-Chronology For more episodes and news, visit our website and social media pages. Blog: http://archaeocafe.kvasirpublishing.com/archaeoblog/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/archaeocafe/ Anchor: https://anchor.fm/archaeocafe
57:58
August 26, 2020
ArchaeoCafé - Episode 18 - An archaeologist's best friend: An interview with Gary Jackson
In this episode, I talk with Gary Jackson about training Migaloo, the worlds first canine archaeologist. Episode notes are available on the ArchaeoCafé website. http://archaeocafe.kvasirpublishing.com/archaeocafe-podcast-ep-18-jackson/ About Gary Jackson Gary has over 30 years experience training dogs for a variety of occupations, including some traditional tasks such as guarding, narcotics detection, and explosives detection - as well as some unique occupations including koala, cane toad, and cancer detection. Most notable for archaeologists is that he trained the first dog to work exclusively in detecting ancient human remains. Web: https://www.gazjackson.com/about https://www.facebook.com/gazjacksondogtrainer/ https://www.linkedin.com/in/garyjacksondogtrainer/ https://www.youtube.com/user/garymnk9 About Migaloo Migaloo was a black Labrador retriever (and a bit of mastiff) from Australia, trained by Gary Jackson. In the Aboriginal language of Australia, "migaloo" means "white fellow". She was the world's first dog to be trained exclusively to work in archaeology by detecting buried historical human remains. She worked in Australia with her handler Bud Streten in his work locating and protecting traditional burial sites. In addition to her work in Australia, she also worked in France and Belgium to look for lost WWII graves. Migaloo retired in 2013 and passed away in 2019. Web: https://www.nationalgeographic.com/news/2012/12/121210-archaeology-dogs-australia-conservation-canines/ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Bzysp7dDz0I https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kN1UZ7XwA9k Some useful terminology and links How to Select and Raise Your Ultimate Dog [book] by Gary Jackson. A step-by-step guide to professional dog training including how to select and test a puppy or adult dog and prepare them as your ultimate dog. https://www.gazjackson.com/shop Human Remains Detection Dogs as a New Prospecting Method in Archaeology [article] Glavaš, V., Pintar, A. Journal of Archaeological Method and Theory, 26: 1106–1124 (2019). An article about a recent use of general (modern) human remains detection dogs in archaeology. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10816-018-9406-y Detection dog a dog that is trained to use its senses to detect substances and indicate to a handler when these substances are found. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Detection_dog Human remains detection (HRD) or cadaver dogs dogs that are used to locate the remains of deceased victims https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Search_and_rescue_dog#Cadaver_dog For more episodes and news, visit our website and social media pages. Blog: http://archaeocafe.kvasirpublishing.com/archaeoblog/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/archaeocafe/ Anchor: https://anchor.fm/archaeocafe
01:02:24
August 19, 2020
ArchaeoCafé - Episode 17 - Archaeology beneath the waves: An interview with Tiya Chatterji (Part 2)
In this episode, I talk more with archaeologist Tiya Chatterji about her research, and the future of maritime archaeology in India. Episode notes are available on the ArchaeoCafé website. http://archaeocafe.kvasirpublishing.com/archaeocafe-podcast-ep-17-chatterji-pt-2/ About Tiya Chatterji Tiya Chatterji is an archaeologist working at the History Division of the Indian Navy. After starting out in traditional terrestrial archaeology, her research focus shifted to maritime history and archaeology. She is also a freelance writer on the topic of travel, heritage, and history. Web: https://www.linkedin.com/in/tiya-chatterji-929a67169/ https://twitter.com/chatterjitiya Some useful terminology and links Chandravati A mediaeval town in Rajasthan. According to popular history, there may have been 999 temples around the town. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chandravati Maritime Research Center (Pune, India) One of the main research institutions in India focusing on various aspects of maritime research. Located in Pune, Maharashtra. http://indianmaritimefoundation.org/mrc/ http://indianmaritimefoundation.org/mrc/about_us.html Dwarka An ancient city in northwestern India, often identified with the Dwarka Kingdom, the ancient kingdom of Krishna, and is believed to have been the first capital of Gujarat. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dwarka Underwater Archaeology in India: The Lost Enigma [book] by Tiya Chatterji (check back later for a link when the book has been published) For more episodes and news, visit our website and social media pages. Blog: http://archaeocafe.kvasirpublishing.com/archaeoblog/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/archaeocafe/ Anchor: https://anchor.fm/archaeocafe
38:54
August 05, 2020
ArchaeoCafé - Episode 16 - Archaeology beneath the waves: An interview with Tiya Chatterji (Part 1)
In this episode, I talk with archaeologist Tiya Chatterji about her research, and the future of maritime archaeology in India. Episode notes are available on the ArchaeoCafé website. http://archaeocafe.kvasirpublishing.com/archaeocafe-podcast-ep-16-chatterji-pt-1/ About Tiya Chatterji Tiya Chatterji is an archaeologist working at the History Division of the Indian Navy. After starting out in traditional terrestrial archaeology, her research focus shifted to maritime history and archaeology. She is also a freelance writer on the topic of travel, heritage, and history. Web: https://www.linkedin.com/in/tiya-chatterji-929a67169/ https://twitter.com/chatterjitiya Some useful terminology and links Chandravati A mediaeval town in Rajasthan. According to popular history, there may have been 999 temples around the town. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chandravati Maritime Research Center (Pune, India) One of the main research institutions in India focusing on various aspects of maritime research. Located in Pune, Maharashtra. http://indianmaritimefoundation.org/mrc/ http://indianmaritimefoundation.org/mrc/about_us.html Dwarka An ancient city in northwestern India, often identified with the Dwarka Kingdom, the ancient kingdom of Krishna, and is believed to have been the first capital of Gujarat. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dwarka Underwater Archaeology in India: The Lost Enigma [book] by Tiya Chatterji (check back later for a link when the book has been published) For more episodes and news, visit our website and social media pages. Blog: http://archaeocafe.kvasirpublishing.com/archaeoblog/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/archaeocafe/ Anchor: https://anchor.fm/archaeocafe
47:34
July 29, 2020
ArchaeoCafé - Episode 15 - Histories of the Amazon: An interview with Anne Rapp Py-Daniel and Myrtle Pearl Shock
In this episode, I talk with Anne Rapp Py-Daniel and Myrtle Pearl Shock about the importance of local history, particularly the long period of pre-European history in Brazil, and their initiative “Arqueologia nas Escolas: Histórias da Amazônia” which is introducing local histories and hands-on learning to the public school curriculum in Pará state, in the northeast of Brazil. Episode notes are available on the ArchaeoCafé website. http://archaeocafe.kvasirpublishing.com/archaeocafe-podcast-ep-15-rapp-py-daniel-and-shock/ About Anne Rapp Py-Daniel Dr. Py-Daniel is a professor of archaeology at the Universidade Federal do Oeste do Pará (UFOPA) in the city of Santarém, in northeastern Brazil. Her work focuses on the archaeology of death, taphonomic processes, particularly in the Amazon. She is currently working on the dissemination of archaeological knowledge in to the public. Web: https://ufopa.academia.edu/AnneRappPyDaniel https://scholar.google.com.br/citations?user=Ds5ZptMAAAAJ https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Anne_Rapp_py-daniel http://lattes.cnpq.br/2636987367384833 About Myrtle Pearl Shock Dr. Shock is a professor of archaeology at the Universidade Federal do Oeste do Pará (UFOPA) in the city of Santarém, in northeastern Brazil. Her work focuses on issues of environmental management and plant cultivation in the lowlands, cerrado and tropical forest, through palaeoetnobotanical research. Web: https://scholar.google.com/citations?user=x7NgiQ8AAAAJ http://lattes.cnpq.br/5738499175959946 Some useful terminology and links Arqueologia nas Escolas: histórias da Amazônia An intiative to disseminate and democratize the knowledge produced by archaeological research carried out in Monte Alegre and Santarém, Pará, Brazil. https://www.facebook.com/Arqueologia-nas-Escolas-Histórias-da-Amazônia-1575686789189174/ Projeto “Arqueologia nas Escolas” recebe Menção Honrosa do Prêmio Rodrigo Melo Franco de Andrade https://www.ecoamazonia.org.br/2019/12/projeto-arqueologia-escolas-recebe-mencao-honrosa-premio-rodrigo-melo-franco-andrade/ Projeto “Arqueologia nas Escolas” recebe Menção Honrosa do Prêmio Rodrigo Melo Franco de Andrade https://www.museu-goeldi.br/noticias/projeto-201carqueologia-nas-escolas201d-recebe-mencao-honrosa-do-premio-rodrigo-melo-franco-de-andrade Ufopa lança material didático sobre arqueologia amazônica para escolas públicas da região http://www2.ufopa.edu.br/ufopa/noticias/2018/fevereiro/ufopa-lanca-material-didatico-sobre-arqueologia-amazonica-para-escolas-publicas-da-regiao For more episodes and news, visit our website and social media pages. Blog: http://archaeocafe.kvasirpublishing.com/archaeoblog/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/archaeocafe/ Anchor: https://anchor.fm/archaeocafe
01:00:43
July 16, 2020
ArchaeoCafé - Episode 14 - Tales from the trenches: An interview with W. Michael Gear (Part 2)
In this episode, I talk more with author and archaeologist W. Michael Gear about oral traditions, the long history of North America, writing historical fiction, and his and Kathleen O'Neal Gear's novels. Episode notes are available on the ArchaeoCafé website. http://archaeocafe.kvasirpublishing.com/archaeocafe-podcast-ep-14-gear-pt-2/ About W. Michael Gear W. Michael Gear is an archaeologist and award winning author of fiction. Along with Kathleen O'Neal Gear, co-writes the First North American's series of historical fiction which spans the vast period of time from when the first people migrated to the Americas at the end of the last Ice Age up until the arrival of the Europeans in the 15th century. In addition to being an authors, Michael is also also an archaeologist and anthropologist.  Web: https://www.gear-gear.com/ https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/W._Michael_Gear https://www.goodreads.com/author/list/47406.W_Michael_Gear Some useful terminology and links First North Americans series The series explores various civilisations and cultures in prehistoric North America. https://www.gear-gear.com/the-books/people-books https://www.goodreads.com/series/40994-north-america-s-forgotten-past https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/North_America%27s_Forgotten_Past Oral tradition a form of communication wherein knowledge, art, ideas and cultural material is received, preserved and transmitted orally from one generation to another. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oral_tradition Shamanism a religious practice that involves a practitioner, a shaman, who is believed to interact with a spirit world through altered states of consciousness, such as trance. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shamanism Haudenosaunee (Iroquois) a confederacy of nations in the Great Lakes region of North America. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Iroquois Chaco Canyon Between AD 900 and 1150, Chaco Canyon was a major center of culture for the Ancestral Puebloans. https://www.nps.gov/chcu/index.htm https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chaco_Culture_National_Historical_Park Cahokia a pre-Columbian Native American city (which existed circa 1050–1350 CE) directly across the Mississippi River from modern St. Louis, Missouri. Cahokia was the largest and most influential urban settlement of the Mississippian culture, which developed advanced societies across much of what is now the central and southeastern United States, beginning more than 1000 years before European contact. https://cahokiamounds.org/ https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cahokia For more episodes and news, visit our website and social media pages. Blog: http://archaeocafe.kvasirpublishing.com/archaeoblog/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/archaeocafe/ Anchor: https://anchor.fm/archaeocafe
01:01:47
July 01, 2020
ArchaeoCafé - Episode 13 - Tales from the trenches: An interview with W. Michael Gear (Part 1)
In this episode, I talk with author and archaeologist W. Michael Gear about popularising the long history of North America, the challenges of writing historical fiction, and bringing archaeological research to the public. Episode notes are available on the ArchaeoCafé website. http://archaeocafe.kvasirpublishing.com/archaeocafe-podcast-ep-13-gear-pt-1/ About W. Michael Gear W. Michael Gear is an archaeologist and award winning author of fiction. Along with Kathleen O'Neal Gear, co-writes the First North American's series of historical fiction which spans the vast period of time from when the first people migrated to the Americas at the end of the last Ice Age up until the arrival of the Europeans in the 15th century. In addition to being an authors, Michael is also also an archaeologist and anthropologist.  Web: https://www.gear-gear.com/ https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/W._Michael_Gear https://www.goodreads.com/author/list/47406.W_Michael_Gear Some useful terminology and links First North Americans series The series explores various civilisations and cultures in prehistoric North America. https://www.gear-gear.com/the-books/people-books https://www.goodreads.com/series/40994-north-america-s-forgotten-past https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/North_America%27s_Forgotten_Past Oral tradition a form of communication wherein knowledge, art, ideas and cultural material is received, preserved and transmitted orally from one generation to another. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oral_tradition Shamanism a religious practice that involves a practitioner, a shaman, who is believed to interact with a spirit world through altered states of consciousness, such as trance. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shamanism Haudenosaunee (Iroquois) a confederacy of nations in the Great Lakes region of North America. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Iroquois Chaco Canyon Between AD 900 and 1150, Chaco Canyon was a major center of culture for the Ancestral Puebloans. https://www.nps.gov/chcu/index.htm https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chaco_Culture_National_Historical_Park Cahokia a pre-Columbian Native American city (which existed circa 1050–1350 CE) directly across the Mississippi River from modern St. Louis, Missouri. Cahokia was the largest and most influential urban settlement of the Mississippian culture, which developed advanced societies across much of what is now the central and southeastern United States, beginning more than 1000 years before European contact. https://cahokiamounds.org/ https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cahokia For more episodes and news, visit our website and social media pages. Blog: http://archaeocafe.kvasirpublishing.com/archaeoblog/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/archaeocafe/ Anchor: https://anchor.fm/archaeocafe
01:17:46
June 24, 2020
ArchaeoCafé - Episode 12 - Archaeograffiti: An interview with Grégoire van Havre
In this episode, I talk with Grégoire van Havre about rock art in northeastern Brazil, modelling ancient travel routes in Piauí, computer applications in archaeology, and educational inequalities. Episode notes are available on the ArchaeoCafé website. http://archaeocafe.kvasirpublishing.com/archaeocafe-podcast-ep-12-van-havre/ About Grégoire van Havre Dr. van Havre is a professor of archaeology at the Universidade Federal do Piauí in the city of Teresina, in northeastern Brazil. His work focuses on recurring motifs in rock art throughout the northeastern region of Brazil as well as on prehistoric movement of people in Piauí state. He is also the General Secretary of the Brazil branch of the CAA international organisation. Web: https://ufpi.academia.edu/Gr%C3%A9goirevanHavre https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Gregoire_Van_Havre https://scholar.google.com/citations?user=zLQGo5QAAAAJ Some useful terminology and links Petrograph an image drawn or painted on a rock face; a form of rock art https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rock_art#Paintings Serra da Capivara National Park a national park in the Northeastern region of Brazil. The area has many prehistoric paintings and has the largest and the oldest concentration of prehistoric sites in the Americas. https://whc.unesco.org/en/list/606/ GIS (Geographic Information Systems) a conceptualized framework that provides the ability to capture and analyze spatial and geographic data https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/GIS_in_archaeology ArcGIS a GIS software package for working with maps and geographic information maintained by the Environmental Systems Research Institute (ESRI). https://www.esri.com/en-us/arcgis/about-arcgis/overview QGIS a free and open-source cross-platform desktop geographic information system application that supports viewing, editing, and analysis of geospatial data. https://www.qgis.org/ CAA - Computer Applications and Quantitative Methods in Archaeology CAA is an international organisation bringing together archaeologists, mathematicians and computer scientists. Its aims are to encourage communication between these disciplines, to provide a survey of present work in the field and to stimulate discussion and future progress. https://www.facebook.com/brasil.caa/ https://caa-international.org/about/ For more episodes and news, visit our website and social media pages. Blog: http://archaeocafe.kvasirpublishing.com/archaeoblog/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/archaeocafe/ Anchor: https://anchor.fm/archaeocafe
01:07:39
June 10, 2020
ArchaeoCafé - Episode 11 - Knapping on the job: An interview with Morten Kutschera (Part 2)
In this episode, I talk with Morten Kutschera about hands-on approaches to teaching history and his work producing replicas of artefacts for museums and experimental archaeologists. Episode notes are available on the ArchaeoCafé website. http://archaeocafe.kvasirpublishing.com/archaeocafe-podcast-ep-11-kutschera-pt-2/ About Morten Kutschera A large part of Morten Kutschera’s work focuses on producing replicas of prehistoric artefacts and teaching children about history though hand-on activites. One of his long time interests has been stone tool technologies of the Early Mesolithic and Late Upper Paleolithic of north-western Europe. He has produced replicas for museums throughout Scandinavia and elsewhere in Europe as well as regularly producing accurate replicas of prehistoric tools, particularly knapped stone tools, for use by experimental archaeologists. Morten currently runs his own company ‘Morten Kutschera’s Prehistoric Arts & Crafts’ through which he produces and sells replica artefacts. He is also an honorary research fellow at Exeter University in the U.K. where he teaches various skills related to prehistoric technology. Web: https://exarc.net/members/ind/morten-kutschera https://www.prehistoryalive.com/over-prehistory-alive-worldwide/over-ons/docenten/morten-kutschera/ https://livingbynature.nl/amo-team/morten-kutschera/  Some useful terminology and links Mesolithic The period between the Upper Paleolithic and the Neolithic - it refers to the final period of hunter-gatherer cultures in Europe and Western Asia, between the end of the Last Glacial Maximum and the Neolithic Revolution. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mesolithic Upper Palaeolithic The third and last subdivision of the Paleolithic. The earliest evidence of organized settlements and art come from this period. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Upper_Paleolithic https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paleolithic_Europe Knapping The shaping of stone into tools by impact and pressure to remove material in a predictable way. . https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Knapping Pfahlbaumuseum (Pile Dwelling Museum) An open air Stone Age archaeological museum and research institute with a Stone Age village reconstruction on an excavation site, with lake dwellings & demos of handicrafts. https://www.pfahlbauten.com/lake-dwelling-museum/virtual-museum-tour.html Videos Morten Kutschera making a Mesolithic flake axe https://vimeo.com/159599180 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ifYwLOP2T-k Steinalderbyen by Fosnstraumen [Stone Age towns at Fosnstraumen] https://fosnstraumen.com/ Kjerner og flekker [Cores and flakes] (with English subtitles) https://www.facebook.com/watch/?v=708183136045311 Sharing Heritage @ Pfahlbauten: Feuersteinbearbeitung https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L49TpbmKPCA Morten Kutschera viser flinthandverk [Morten Kutschera shows flint handicrafts] https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qLIfV73NRNQ For more episodes and news, visit our website and social media pages. Blog: http://archaeocafe.kvasirpublishing.com/archaeoblog/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/archaeocafe/ Anchor: https://anchor.fm/archaeocafe
58:31
May 20, 2020
ArchaeoCafé - Episode 10 - Knapping on the job: An interview with Morten Kutschera (Part 1)
In this episode, I talk with Morten Kutschera about hands-on approaches to teaching history and his work producing replicas of artefacts for museums and experimental archaeologists. Episode notes are available on the ArchaeoCafé website. http://archaeocafe.kvasirpublishing.com/archaeocafe-podcast-ep-10-kutschera-pt-1/ About Morten Kutschera A large part of Morten Kutschera’s work focuses on producing replicas of prehistoric artefacts and teaching children about history though hand-on activites. One of his long time interests has been stone tool technologies of the Early Mesolithic and Late Upper Paleolithic of north-western Europe. He has produced replicas for museums throughout Scandinavia and elsewhere in Europe as well as regularly producing accurate replicas of prehistoric tools, particularly knapped stone tools, for use by experimental archaeologists. Morten currently runs his own company ‘Morten Kutschera’s Prehistoric Arts & Crafts’ through which he produces and sells replica artefacts. He is also an honorary research fellow at Exeter University in the U.K. where he teaches various skills related to prehistoric technology. Web: https://exarc.net/members/ind/morten-kutschera https://www.prehistoryalive.com/over-prehistory-alive-worldwide/over-ons/docenten/morten-kutschera/ https://livingbynature.nl/amo-team/morten-kutschera/  Some useful terminology and links Mesolithic The period between the Upper Paleolithic and the Neolithic - it refers to the final period of hunter-gatherer cultures in Europe and Western Asia, between the end of the Last Glacial Maximum and the Neolithic Revolution. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mesolithic Upper Palaeolithic The third and last subdivision of the Paleolithic. The earliest evidence of organized settlements and art come from this period. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Upper_Paleolithic https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paleolithic_Europe Knapping The shaping of stone into tools by impact and pressure to remove material in a predictable way. . https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Knapping Pfahlbaumuseum (Pile Dwelling Museum) An open air Stone Age archaeological museum and research institute with a Stone Age village reconstruction on an excavation site, with lake dwellings & demos of handicrafts. https://www.pfahlbauten.com/lake-dwelling-museum/virtual-museum-tour.html Videos Morten Kutschera making a Mesolithic flake axe https://vimeo.com/159599180 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ifYwLOP2T-k Steinalderbyen by Fosnstraumen [Stone Age towns at Fosnstraumen] https://fosnstraumen.com/ Kjerner og flekker [Cores and flakes] (with English subtitles) https://www.facebook.com/watch/?v=708183136045311 Sharing Heritage @ Pfahlbauten: Feuersteinbearbeitung https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L49TpbmKPCA Morten Kutschera viser flinthandverk [Morten Kutschera shows flint handicrafts] https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qLIfV73NRNQ For more episodes and news, visit our website and social media pages. Blog: http://archaeocafe.kvasirpublishing.com/archaeoblog/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/archaeocafe/ Anchor: https://anchor.fm/archaeocafe
54:28
May 13, 2020
ArchaeoCafé - Episode 9 - Archaeo-diets: An interview with Anna Florin
In this episode, I talk with Anna Florin about archaeobotany and her research at the Madjedbebe site in Australia. About Anna Florin Anna Florin’s PhD research at the University of Queensland focuses largely on identifying plant remains found at archaeological sites. She is currently one of the archaeobotanists working on the Madjedbebe excavations in Northern Australia. As part of her work as an archaeobotanist, she also works with the traditional owners of the site, the Mirarr, to learn about their traditional use of plants and to collect samples of various plants for comparison with remains found during archaeological excavations. Web: https://uq.academia.edu/SAnnaFlorin https://www.researchgate.net/profile/S_Anna_Florin https://social-science.uq.edu.au/profile/1138/anna-florin  Some useful terminology and links Madjedbebe A sandstone rock shelter in Arnhem Land, in the Northern Territory of Australia. Site of the oldest known evidence of human habitation in Australia. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Madjedbebe Mirarr The traditional Aboriginal owners of lands in the Alligator Rivers region of Northern Australia. Custodians of the Madjedbebe site. http://www.mirarr.net/pages/mirarr Pandanus A palm-like tree used throughout the Pacific for food and textiles. Remains of nuts from the pandanus were found at the Madjedbebe site. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pandanus Palynology The study of plant pollen, spores, and certain microscopic planktonic organisms, in both living and fossil form. In archaeology, it is used to help determine past environments. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Palynology Phytoliths Rigid, microscopic structures made of silica, found in some plant tissues and which persist after the decay of the plant. In archaeology, they are used to help determine which plants were present at a location. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phytolith https://texasbeyondhistory.net/varga/images/phytolith.html https://www.ufg.uni-kiel.de/en/professorships-and-fields/phytolith-analysis OSL dating A method of dating soils or certain objects found at archaeological sites. Unlike radiocarbon dating, organic material is not needed for OSL. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Optically_stimulated_luminescence Boncuklu Höyük A 10,500 year old farming village site in Central Turkey. http://boncuklu.org/ [article] The first Australian plant foods at Madjedbebe, 65,000–53,000 years ago https://www.nature.com/articles/s41467-020-14723-0 [article] Ancient plant foods discovered in Arnhem Land  https://stories.uq.edu.au/news/2020/ancient-plant-foods-discovered-in-arnhem-land/index.html For more episodes and news, visit our website and social media pages. Blog: http://archaeocafe.kvasirpublishing.com/archaeoblog/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/archaeocafe/ Anchor: https://anchor.fm/archaeocafe
46:43
May 05, 2020
ArchaeoCafé - Episode 8 - Virtual Archaeology: An interview with Alex Elvis Badillo
In this episode, I talk with Alex Elvis Badillo about his research at Monte Albán, 3D modelling in archaeology, and his work on the Monte Albán Virtual Reality Laboratory at Indiana State University. About Alex Elvis Badillo Dr. Badillo's work focuses largely on Mesoamerican archaeology and human-environment interactions in the past. His research makes use of settlement pattern survey, and the applications of geospatial and 3D technologies such as structure from motion photogrammetry and virtual reality environments. He has previously done field work in Mexico, Peru, and the U.S.A. He is currently an assistant professor at the Department of Earth and Environmental Systems at Indiana State University. Web: https://alexelvisbadillo.weebly.com/ https://www.indstate.edu/faculty-staff/alex-badillo http://indstate.academia.edu/AlexBadillo https://scholar.google.com/citations?user=Z0Tm3EQAAAAJ https://sketchfab.com/abadillo Some useful terminology and links Monte Albán archaeological site A large pre-Columbian archaeological site in southern Mexico. One of the earliest cities of Mesoamerica and socio-political and economic center of the Zapotec civilization. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Monte_Alb%C3%A1n Zapotec civilization An indigenous pre-Columbian civilization that flourished in the Valley of Oaxaca in Mesoamerica from about 700 BCE to 1521 CE. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zapotec_civilization Monte Albán Digital Archaeology Project The primary objective of the project is to collect and analyze digital data to shed light on the function, role, and meaning of the Main Plaza of Monte Albán through time and share this information with the public through a variety of innovative digital visualization tools. https://montealban.oucreate.com/digital-archaeology/ https://youtu.be/7C0GZzg4II4 Monte Albán Sketchfab page https://sketchfab.com/MAGAP Quiechapa Sketchfab page https://sketchfab.com/PAQuie The Geospatial and Virtual Archaeology Lab and Studio (GVALS) Located at Indiana State University, this lab is focused on teaching and research pertaining to the production and analysis of digital 3D reconstructions of objects, architecture, and landscapes. https://alexelvisbadillo.weebly.com/gvals.html For more episodes and news, visit our website and social media pages. Blog: http://archaeocafe.kvasirpublishing.com/archaeoblog/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/archaeocafe/ Anchor: https://anchor.fm/archaeocafe
01:52:08
April 15, 2020
Archaeocafé - Episode 7 - Under the sea: An interview with Maddy McAllister
In this episode, I talk with Maddy McAllister about her research in maritime archaeology, underwater archaeology in general, and her work as a senior curator at the Museum of Tropical Queensland. About Maddy McAllister Dr. McAllister's research as a maritime archaeologist focuses on shipwrecks and underwater archaeology in Australasia, in particular wooden ship construction and site formation processes. Her research involves the visualisation of underwater shipwrecks through the use of underwater 3D photogrammetry and looks at the way that new technology can enhance the information can be learned from sites. Based at the Museum of Tropical Queensland, she is the Senior Curator of Maritime Archaeology at the Queensland Museum Network and at James Cook University, where she manages the maritime archaeological collection. Dr. McAllister is also Vice President of the Australasian Institute for Maritime Archaeology. Web: https://shipwreckmermaid.wixsite.com/home https://www.qm.qld.gov.au/Research/People/People/Profile/M/Dr+Maddy+McAllister#.Xoc1p4hKjMU https://research.jcu.edu.au/portfolio/madeline.mcallister/ https://queenslandmuseum.academia.edu/MadelineMcAllister https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Madeline_Mcallister2 https://scholar.google.com.au/citations?user=GpLfl8sAAAAJ https://twitter.com/shipwrekmermaid https://www.instagram.com/shipwreckmermaid/ Some useful terminology and links Maritime archaeology a discipline within archaeology as a whole that specifically studies human interaction with the sea, lakes and rivers through the study of associated physical remains https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maritime_archaeology Underwater archaeology archaeology practiced underwater https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Underwater_archaeology Shipwreck Mermaid [blog] https://shipwreckmermaid.wixsite.com/home Museum of Tropical Queensland https://mtq.qm.qld.gov.au/ Australasian Institute for Maritime Archaeology http://www.aima-underwater.org.au/ Underwater Cultural Heritage UNESCO website http://www.unesco.org/new/en/culture/themes/underwater-cultural-heritage/ For more episodes and news, visit our website and social media pages. Blog: http://archaeocafe.kvasirpublishing.com/archaeoblog/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/archaeocafe/ Anchor: https://anchor.fm/archaeocafe
01:00:57
April 03, 2020
Archaeocafé - Episode 6 - Rebel archaeology: An interview with Lewis Borck
In this episode, I talk with Lewis Borck about his research on the Gallina culture and the Ancestral Puebloans in general, as well as Puebloan Rebels of the Southwest field project. About Lewis Borck Dr. Borck is a researcher at the Missouri University Research Reactor in the archaeometry group. His research focuses on examining how social movements shaped religion and politics through time. He is interested in combining theories on decentralized social organization with standard archaeological, historical, and anthropological theories of historical change, and has applied these theoretical and methodological interests to the Gallina region of the prehispanic North American Southwest to understand issues of violence as well as resistance to the increasingly hierarchical religious and political situation in the late Chaco landscape and throughout the Mesa Verde region. He runs the Puebloan Rebels of the Southwest field project and field school. In August, Dr. Borck will start work as a professor at the New Mexico Highlands University. Web: https://missouri.academia.edu/LewisBorck https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Lewis_Borck/research https://scholar.google.com/citations?user=lqfHoeMAAAAJ https://www.archaeologysouthwest.org/team/lewis-borck/ https://lewisborck.wordpress.com/ Some useful terminology and links Puebloan Rebels of the Southwest project This project explores the Gallina culture. It project seeks to examine differential expressions of political and social organization in the North American Southwest by exploring divergent architectural patterns at a regional scale. https://ifrglobal.org/program/us-nm-gallina/ Gallina a group of Ancestral Pueblo rebels during the pre-Hispanic period in the American Southwest who resisted elites and inequality from A.D. 1100-1300. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gallina Chaco Canyon Between AD 900 and 1150, Chaco Canyon was a major center of culture for the Ancestral Puebloans. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chaco_Culture_National_Historical_Park Ancestral Puebloans An ancient Native American culture that spanned the present-day Four Corners region of the United States. They lived in a range of structures that included small family pit houses, larger structures to house clans, grand pueblos, and cliff-sited dwellings for defense. They possessed a complex network that stretched across the Colorado Plateau linking hundreds of communities and population centers. They held a distinct knowledge of celestial sciences that found form in their architecture. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ancestral_Puebloans [Article] A brave new world for archaeological survey: Automated machine learning-based potsherd detection using high-resolution drone imagery https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jas.2019.105013 For more episodes and news, visit our website and social media pages. Blog: http://archaeocafe.kvasirpublishing.com/archaeoblog/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/archaeocafe/ Anchor: https://anchor.fm/archaeocafe
01:10:14
March 27, 2020
Archaeocafé - Episode 5 - A career on the rocks: An interview with Todd Kristensen
In this episode, I talk with Todd Kristensen about his work on the Alberta Lithic Reference Project, his research in northern Canada, and about popularising history and heritage through art in the Heritage Art Series. About Todd Kristensen Dr. Kristensen works for the Archaeological Survey of Alberta in Edmonton, Canada. His research looks at the relations between people and landscapes in Western Canada. He also started the Alberta Lithic Reference Project and the Heritage Art Series. Web: https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Todd_Kristensen  https://scholar.google.ca/citations?user=UWX83rEAAAAJ  https://www.linkedin.com/in/todd-kristensen-8b03a9109/  Some useful terminology and links lithics A term used in archaeology to refer to stone artefacts and the raw materials used to produce them. Alberta Lithic Reference Project The goal of the Alberta Lithic Reference Project (ALRP) is to guide the creation of articles and photographic libraries that will form the basis for a stand-alone Alberta toolstone guide. https://www.facebook.com/groups/1420924451253798/ https://albertashistoricplaces.com/2017/05/31/connecting-the-continent-stone-tools-in-alberta/ Heritage Art Series The Heritage Art Series is a collaboration of the Historic Resources Management Branch, the University of Alberta, and the Royal Alberta Museum. Each artwork shares an important story about the people of Alberta. https://albertashistoricplaces.com/heritage-art-series/ Archaeological Survey of Alberta An government institution which evaluates proposed development projects, administers archaeological permits, and manages site information for the province of Alberta (Canada). It also conducts research and works with communities and other stakeholders to increase awareness of archaeology in Alberta and to protect significant sites. https://www.alberta.ca/archaeology.aspx  For more episodes and news, visit our website and social media pages. Blog: http://archaeocafe.kvasirpublishing.com/archaeoblog/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/archaeocafe/ Anchor: https://anchor.fm/archaeocafe
47:44
March 18, 2020
Archaeocafé - Episode 4 - Return to Shanidar: An interview with Emma Pomeroy
In this episode, I talk with Emma Pomeroy about her work as a palaeoanthropologist and the current excavation project at Shanidar Cave. We also discuss some of Dr. Pomeroy's research interests and some of her other projects.  Episode notes http://archaeocafe.kvasirpublishing.com/archaeocafe-podcast-episode-4-return-to-shanidar-an-interview-with-emma-pomeroy/ About Emma Pomeroy Dr. Pomeroy is a lecturer in the evolution of health, diet and disease at the Department of Archaeology, Cambridge University where she combines human bioarchaeology with human biology and palaeoanthropology. Since 2016 she has been the paleoanthropologist at the current excavations at Shanidar Cave. Web: https://www.arch.cam.ac.uk/staff/dr-emma-pomeroy https://www.newn.cam.ac.uk/person/dr-emma-pomeroy/ https://scholar.google.com/citations?user=yOBghKoAAAAJ https://cambridge.academia.edu/EmmaPomeroy https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Emma_Pomeroy   Some useful terminology and links Shanidar Cave an archaeological site located in the Kurdistan Region of Iraq. The site was first excavated by Ralph Solecki in the 1950s. It is most well known for the Neanderthal burials found here. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shanidar_Cave Neanderthal an extinct species or subspecies of archaic humans who lived in Eurasia until about 40,000 years https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Neanderthal   In the news Newly discovered Neanderthal remains from Shanidar Cave, Iraqi Kurdistan, and their attribution to Shanidar 5 (Journal of Human Evolution) https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jhevol.2017.07.001 New Neanderthal remains associated with the ‘flower burial’ at Shanidar Cave (Antiquity) https://doi.org/10.15184/aqy.2019.207 The Skeletons of Shanidar Cave (Smithsonian Magazine) https://www.smithsonianmag.com/arts-culture/the-skeletons-of-shanidar-cave-7028477/ Earliest interbreeding event between ancient human populations discovered (Science News) https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2020/02/200220141232.htm History of our evolution in a new light https://www.mpg.de/11180454/project_humanhistory    For more episodes and news, visit our website and social media pages. Blog: http://archaeocafe.kvasirpublishing.com/archaeoblog/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/archaeocafe/ Anchor: https://anchor.fm/archaeocafe
01:05:51
March 05, 2020
Archaeocafé - Episode 3 - Re-living the Neolithic: An interview with Amiel Abir
In this episode, I talk with Amiel Abir, an experimental and experiential archaeologist in Jerusalem, Israel whose particular interest is the Neolithic period of the Levant. Some useful terminology and links Living history an activity that incorporates historical tools, activities and dress into an interactive presentation that seeks to give observers and participants a sense of stepping back in time https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Living_history Experimental archaeology  a field of study which attempts to generate and test archaeological hypotheses, usually by replicating or approximating the feasibility of ancient cultures performing various tasks or feats https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Experimental_archaeology For more about experimental archaeology, visit the EXARC website. https://exarc.net/ adze / adz a cutting tool similar to an axe but with the cutting edge perpendicular to the handle rather than parallel https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adze halfting a process by which an artefact, often bone, metal, or stone is attached to a haft (handle or strap) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hafting To learn more about Amiel's work, have a look at his instructional videos. https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCLZVcn0MNXBwn4PPX2VA2uA/videos For more episodes and news, visit our website and social media pages. Blog: http://archaeocafe.kvasirpublishing.com/archaeoblog/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/archaeocafe/ Anchor: https://anchor.fm/archaeocafe Twitter: https://twitter.com/archaeo_cafe Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/archaeocafe/
50:21
February 20, 2020
Archaeocafé - Episode 2 - Revealing ancient lifestyles: An interview with Mariuca Vornicu
In this episode, I talk with Mariuca Vornicu about her work in revealing ancient lifestyles through the analysis of stone tools. We also discuss how archaeology and prehistory are portrayed in movies and in the news.  About Mariuca Vornicu  Dr. Vornicu is a researcher at the Institute of Archaeology of the Romanian Academy in Iasi, Romania. She is an archaeologist specialising in the lithic industries of post-Palaeolithic societies of south-eastern Europe. Her current research focuses on assessing the transformations of knapped stone technology throughout the Chalcolithic, in relation with the social and economic context of the time.  Web:  http://www.arheo.ro/cercetator-stiintific-dr-diana-mariuca-vornicu/  https://arheo.academia.edu/DianaMariucaVornicu  https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Diana-Vornicu  Some useful terminology and links  use-wear analysis  a method in archaeology to identify the functions of artefact tools by closely examining their working surfaces and edges  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Use-wear_analysis  scraper  a single sided tool thought to have been used for hide-working and woodworking (by scraping the surface)  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scraper_(archaeology)  awl  a small pointed tool used for piercing holes, especially in leather.  adornments  things which decorate; ornaments  kit  a set of articles or equipment needed for a specific purpose.  prestige goods  exchange goods to which a society ascribes high status or value  Chalcolithic  the "Copper Age". A cultural period at the end of the Stone Age when people had the technology to produce copper. Some researchers consider it a part of the Neolithic, while others consider it an intermediary age between the Neolithic and the Bronze Age.  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chalcolithic  Ötzi (Oetzi)  A Chalcolithic man who was frozen in the Alps between Austria and Italy. In 1991, his body was discovered.  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/%C3%96tzi  AO The Last Neanderthal / AO, le dernier néandertal  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q4I2xnIiq94  Alpha  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uIxnTi4GmCo  For more episodes and news, visit our website and social media pages. Blog: http://archaeocafe.kvasirpublishing.com/archaeoblog/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/archaeocafe/ Anchor: https://anchor.fm/archaeocafe
35:16
February 12, 2020
ArchaeoCafé - Episode 1 - Public Archaeology
In this episode, I discuss public archaeology with guests Mariuca Vornicu, Robyn Humphreys, and Angelica Ruggeri. In our discussion we consider some of the following questions. • What does the term 'public archaeology' refer to? • Why should the public be informed about what we do as archaeologists? • Should there be limits on what is accessible to the public? (Should some information be kept from the public?) • How we can keep the public informed and involved? • What are some current problems to overcome? • How is public archaeology changing?  We also look a bit at how public involvement and access to archaeological research varies in different countries, and how it has changed over time. Guest speakers:  Mariuca Vornicu Mariuca Vornicu is a researcher at the Institute of Archaeology of the Romanian Academy in Iasi, Romania. She is an archaeologist specialising in the lithic industries of post-Palaeolithic societies of south-eastern Europe. Her current research focuses on assessing the transformations of knapped stone technology throughout the Chalcolithic, in relation with the social and economic context of the time. Her interest in public archaeology comes from believing that the history of mankind is not a matter restricted to the knowledge of the specialists, and considers that a public well informed about the past of the human communities will be more aware of the problems regarding heritage conservation and may actively contribute to its safeguarding. Web: http://www.arheo.ro/cercetator-stiintific-dr-diana-mariuca-vornicu/ https://arheo.academia.edu/DianaMariucaVornicu https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Diana-Vornicu  Robyn Humphreys  Robyn is a PhD candidate in the Archaeology Department at the University of Cape Town, South Africa. Her PhD is titled ‘An engaged critical archaeology in contemporary South Africa, archaeological practice and research with human remains’. Her research focuses on how archaeologists and biological anthropologists can better engage with important stakeholders regarding the management of and research on human remains from archaeological sites. She holds a BSc (Med) Hons in Human Genetics and an MSc in Archaeology, also from the University of Cape Town. Web: https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Robyn_Humphreys Angelica Ruggeri  Angelica is researching palaeopathology and non-metric characteristics of bones at the University of Bologna in Italy. She is interested in the use of new media to share archaeological research results with the general public. Episode host:  Otis Crandell  Otis is a researcher at the Centre for Archaeological Study and Research at the Federal University of Paraná in Brazil. He is currently investigating prehistoric settlement patterns. His previous work has looked at prehistoric trade and raw material procurement in south-eastern Eruope. He works to promote free open access publishing in academia, and organises public talks and training events related to archaeology and prehistory. Web: https://ufpr.academia.edu/crandell Links:  Homepage: http://archaeocafe.kvasirpublishing.com/  Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/archaeocafe/  Anchor: https://anchor.fm/archaeocafe  Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/18kLUzkcugIK4yDknbFPIz 
01:26:33
February 06, 2020
ArchaeoCafé - trailer
The ArchaeoCafé podcast presents news, interviews, and discussions about archaeology today.  Links: Homepage: http://archaeocafe.kvasirpublishing.com/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/archaeocafe/ Anchor: https://anchor.fm/archaeocafe Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/18kLUzkcugIK4yDknbFPIz
00:10
January 01, 2020