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Ayin Beis: Existence Unplugged

Ayin Beis: Existence Unplugged

By Rabbi Simon Jacobson
Decipher, study and explore the revolutionary Chassidic discourses that spanned from 5672-5676 (1912-1915). The ideas found in this century old text contain innovative modalities in education, science, psychology and many other schools of thought - ideas that have the power to change us and the world in which we live. Join Rabbi Simon Jacobson as he unlocks this secretive text, providing tools to decipher man's greatest questions in life: Why are we here? What does the unconscious look like? Can we bridge the finite and the infinite? How to express the inexpressible? Can the rational mind spe
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Ayin Beis Chapter 96: Revealing the Hidden Sefirot (1) with Rabbi Simon Jacobson
Sefirah: Narrative Revealing the Hidden Sefirot (1) BEHIND THE SCENES: Core, Hidden and Revealed Faculties Ayin Beis Volume 1, Discourse 25, V'Avraham Zokon 5673, Chapter 96 p. 185-186 Short Summary: Long Summary: Yet, the meaning in R' Shem Tov's words -- that the sefirot tell the story of "hidden thoughts" -- is that the containers reveal not only the energies of atzilus, but also that the energies in the containers of the sefirot of atzilus reveal the source of these sefirot in the ten hidden sefirot, that is in the ten hidden sefirot as they extend and begin to manifest. They also reveal a sense of the the core hidden sefirot (prior to their manifesting). We will understand this with an example of human faculties, which are rooted in the core faculties in the core soul. At the core they are not faculties in any way at all, only that the faculties come from there. The core faculties -- which we can say is the level of yechida -- are similar to the core soul (which us beyond all the five dimensions, including yehcida), in the sense that is it totally shapeless (peshitus). They are the level concealment that has no substance (he'lem she'ayno b'metzius), like a flint stone, which is not even a source for the faculties. Source implies 1) some substance, 2) the beginning of a process, as well as 3) that the source is impacted by the process. All these elements are  not possible in the core, which 1) has no substance, 2) precedes the process, 3) is not impacted by the process. The core faculties are expressed, but not the way a source expresses itself. We can say that the core faculties don't emerge from the core soul rather that the core soul "carries" within it, from its inception, all the archetypal faculties. The core faculties in turn produce the source faculties, which now can be defined as a "source," that is not yet a revealed faculty, but neither is totally abstract; it is now in the category of faculty, though not revealed. This is called "hidden transmission" (hamshocho ne'elemes), the power to conceive (koach ha'maskil), which cannot be defined as expressed intellect, but is in the world of intellect nonetheless. It is beyond (defies) actual concepts, but is not beyond (does not defy) the category of intelligence.
01:39:24
May 15, 2022
Ayin Beis Chapter 95: Why Do We Need Atzilus with Rabbi Simon Jacobson
Sefirah: Narrative WHY DO WE NEED ATZILUS? Ayin Beis Volume 1, Discourse 25, V'Avraham Zaken 5673, Chapter 95 p. 183-185 Short Summary:  Long Summary: R' Shem Tov's words, that the sefirot tell and reveal the hidden thoughts is not simply referring to the containers revealing the energies, but that the general spheratic structure, of energies and containers, reveal the divine energy higher than atzilus. The explanation in this can be understood by first appreciating the role and function of atzilus. Atzilus reveals the divine into existence. As it says in the Zohar (II 22b, Parshat Bo), that the ten sefirot are in order for us to perceive and know the divine (attributes). Without atzilus we wouldn't be able to have an understanding, comprehension and feelings for the divine. G-d could obviously create existence without the interface of atzilus. But then we (through our own tools) would not have a way to become aware of and to sense the divine. Because existence on its own, by definition, conceals the divine. Indeed, it is this concealment that allows existence to come into being as an independent entity. Especially if existence would have been created without atzilus, then there would have been no progressive manifestation (hislabshus) of the divine in the process of creation, thus there would have been no connection and relationship between the creation and its source. The interface of atzilus allows for this relationship, and for there to be divine awareness in existence. Though creation itself dictates that there is a creator, and also that the creator is infinitely beyond us, thus giving us a sense of the eminence (hafloah) of the divine -- yet: this awareness itself is 1) due to atzilus, 2) only a general awareness, no details, and 3) even the eminence of the divine (sensed by a creation that is infinitely inferior) is not the true definition of grandeur, because what type of eminence is it to say that something is greater than a lowly crass (self-absorbed) existence (yesh)?! It is only through atzilus -- which reveals the hidden divine power of the finite (the ten hidden sefirot) and expresses the divine in a form of structure -- that allows our (airtight) existence to connect, become aware and feel the divine. Our existence was created as a "new," independent, entity, which conceals its source; atzilus emerged as an entity that is not "new," but one that reveals the hidden divine, and reveals it in a way that can be received by existence. Due to the emanation of atzilus manifesting in specific divine attributes, faculties and emotions (the ten sefirot: chochma, binah, chesed, gevurah etc.), existence has in it (the capacity for) comprehending and experiencing (feeling) the divine in detail. As the Zohar says, that because the divine energy contracted and channeled into specific attributes we are able to perceive the divine through His attributes. As the Pardes explains (this Zohar), that this is also through the containers which shape and define the energy.
02:01:59
May 08, 2022
Ayin Beis Chapter 93: with Rabbi Simon Jacobson
Ayin Beis Discourse ; Chapter 93
01:55:44
April 11, 2022
Ayin Beis Chapter 92: Containers Reveal Energies with Rabbi Simon Jacobson
Sefirah: Narrative CONTAINERS REVEAL ENERGIES Ayin Beis Volume 1, Discourse 24, V'hu Omed 5673, Chapter 92 p. 176-178 Short Summary:  Long Summary:
01:54:26
April 04, 2022
Ayin Beis Chapter 91: Containers Revealing Energies with Rabbi Simon Jacobson
Sefirah: Narrative THE STORY Containers Revealing Energies Ayin Beis Volume 1, Discourse 24, V'hu Omed 5673, Chapter 91 p. 175-176 Short Summary:  Long Summary: [Following the first interpretation of sefirah from the word mispar, number, now begins a 13-chapter discussion of the second interpretation in sefirah, from the word sippur, narrative, which will conclude with chapter 103].
01:18:25
March 28, 2022
Ayin Beis Chapter 90 : Transforming Quantity into Quality with Rabbi Simon Jacobson
Sefirah: Number TRANSFORMING QUANTITY INTO QUALITY  Ayin Beis Volume 1, Discourse 23, Tzohar Taaseh 5673, Chapter 90 p. 172-174
02:04:41
March 21, 2022
Ayin Beis Chapter 89: Is Counting Positive with Rabbi Simon Jacobson
Sefirah: Number RAW NUMBERS: Is Counting Positive? Ayin Beis Volume 1, Discourse 23, Tzohar Taaseh 5673, Chapter 89 p. 171-172 Short Summary:  Long Summary: The Shaloh asks: Doesn't counting signify the opposite of value, as the Talmud says (Baba Metziah 42a) that there is no blessing to be found in something that is counted and measured? And he answers, that there are two types of numbers/counts: 1) The number of things in the material world, which is crass, and this number is not good, because it indicates division and divisiveness, and also limitation and mortality (when we count material things in our physical world, without any focus on their sublime value, our numbers are and concerned with raw measures of quantity, which define the parameters that divide us). 2) The number as it is appreciated in the world to come (the spiritual), which is beyond number and has no end and limit (because it is not about raw quantity, but sublime value and quality). This is the difference between "es she'darko limnos," the count in the world to come, from the level of "es" (alef tav), the letters of the Torah, and "kol she'darko limnos," the count in the material world. The root of this difference is based on the Talmud's answer explaining why it says "number" and then "one that cannot be counted:" the latter is referring to a time when they are fulfilling the divine will, and the former is when they are not. Number/count in the material world is a defined and measured state of being, with a distinct end. In contrast, number/count in the spiritual world to come, though it consists of a number, has no end. As it is said, "scholars do not have peace not in this world and not in the world to come, they perpetually continue to ascend from level to level" with no end. As the Shaloh explains, that their divine comprehension continues to always grow and expand, and since there is no end in understanding the divine, the number (of levels) continues to ascend and count endlessly. Yet, this endless number of levels is all in the context of comprehension, which is a defined state of structure. When they are fulfilling the divine will they reach the qualitative level of number in the world to come, which is state of beyond number (due to its qualitative value). This "spiritual" number (of the world to come) can be explained in two ways: 1) It refers to the number of divine containers of atzilut, which reveal the divine power to create structure, which is endless (just like the the divine power of the infinite is endless). I.e. the count (number) reveals the infinite power of the counter vested in the count. Though the sefirot of atzilut are ten defined entities, they each extend endlessly even from the perspective of the containers. 2) It refers to the number of energies, which are at their core endless (as explained earlier in ch. 86), especially due to the energies cleaving to their source in the infinite energy. And through our efforts in fulfilling the divine will through Torah and teshuvah, we draw down beyond number into number, we fuse quantity and quality, and thus the material numbers of this world become transformed into a state of beyond number of the world to come. Concepts: Number. Value. Eternal souls. Sefirot (chapters 49-124)
01:32:32
February 27, 2022
Ayin Beis Chapter 88 (2): Are Souls Rooted in Energies or Containers with Rabbi Simon Jacobson
Sefirah: Number THE VALUE OF SOULS Are Souls Rooted in Energies or Containers? Ayin Beis Volume 1, Discourse 23, Tzohar Taaseh 5673, Chapter 88 (1) p. 169-170 Short Summary:  Long Summary: Souls too are individually perpetually eternal, compared to the celestial bodies. Even more so -- because the celestial bodies are part of physical existence, and their eternal power is due to the divine that is outside of them and not internalized. By contrast, souls themselves are divine entities, the soul I have given you is pure -- atzilus and above (tehira i'laah), from the name Havaya (Igeret HaTeshuvah ch. 4).  Even according to what it says in other places (Biurei HaZohar Pinchas) that the souls are rooted in the (inner) containers (koach ha'gvul), the containers too are divine, as explained there. [In Igeret HaKodesh it says that that the souls have "left and separated" from the containers. But we have to say that they are still connected, only in a concealed way (dveikus bilti nikeres), like the containers themselves].  Just like the ohr (energy) remains connected and is inherently eternal, so too the containers. Especially considering that they are containers for, united with, the energy (and with their source in the koach ha'gevul, finite power of the divine ein sof). Thus, the containers are also in a state of inherent sustenance (kiyum atzmi), and so are the souls that are rooted in the containers (Hu kayom v'Shemo kayom v'Kisoi nochon). As the souls descend below they also 1) retain their divine closeness and connection (to Havaya) through Torah and mitzvot - am krovo, v'atem ha'dveikim b'Havaya Elokeichem. 2) Also the divine infinite force radiates within them through Torah and mitzvot. 3) The souls (which have in them Havaya) bear witness that reveal the transcendent divine energy in existence. Divine providence over souls is therefore from Havaya -- a conduct that is beyond natural, either 1) completely supranatural, or 2) miracles that are hidden on nature, Havaya in Elokim. This explains the Shaloh, that the count (of these souls in bodies) draws down the divine presence, because their counting is due to their value, and the count reflects the revealed divine conduct with these souls, signifying the divine presence among them. Concepts: Number. Value. Eternal souls. Sefirot (chapters 49-124)
01:35:22
February 20, 2022
Ayin Beis Chapter 88 (1): ETERNAL SOUL with Rabbi Simon Jacobson
Sefirah: Number ETERNAL SOUL Ayin Beis Volume 1, Discourse 23, Tzohar Taaseh 5673, Chapter 88 (1) p. 169-170 Short Summary:  Long Summary: Souls too are individually perpetually eternal, compared to the celestial bodies. Even more so -- because the celestial bodies are part of physical existence, and their eternal power is due to the divine that is outside of them and not internalized. By contrast, souls themselves are divine entities, the soul I have given you is pure -- atzilus and above (tehira i'laah), from the name Havaya (Igeret HaTeshuvah ch. 4).  Even according to what it says in other places (Biurei HaZohar Pinchas) that the souls are rooted in the (inner) containers (koach ha'gevul), the containers too are divine, as explained there. [In Igeret HaKodesh it says that that the souls have "left and separated" from the containers. But we have to say that they are still connected, only in a concealed way (dveikus bilti nikeres), like the containers themselves].  Just like the ohr (energy) remains connected and is inherently eternal, so too the containers. Especially considering that they are containers for, united with, the energy (and with their source in the koach ha'gevul, finite power of the divine ein sof). Thus, the containers are also in a state of inherent sustenance (kiyum atzmi), and so are the souls that are rooted in the containers (Hu kayom v'Shemo kayom v'Kisoi nochon). Concepts: Number. Value. Eternal souls. Sefirot (chapters 49-124)
01:33:52
February 13, 2022
Ayin Beis with Rabbi Simon Jacobson Chapter 87
Sefirah: Number NUMBER = VALUE Ayin Beis Volume 1, Discourse 23, Tzohar Taaseh 5673, Chapter 87 p. 166-169 Short Summary:  Long Summary: The difference between number of energies and number of containers explains the difference between "es she'darko limnos" (items which are always sold by count), and "kol she'darko limnos" (items which are generally sold by count but sometimes are sold by weight). Count demonstrates value. As the Shaloh writes regarding the counting of the Jews, which reflects the divine presence among them. Explanation: Counting each individual item signifies that each item is valuable. Like the celestial bodies -- counting the stars by their number, which is due to their value -- that they perpetuate eternally (verse), due to the divine power vested in them. The earthly bodies also perpetuate but only by species, the divine in heaven revealed, the divine on earth concealed. Verse: xxx. Divine providence everywhere in every detail, but there are levels in this: providence from Havaya -- revealed, redemption, and providence from Elokim, exile. Through garments which are necessary for the transmission to materialize in the material world, but the blessing comes from G-d. Celestial bodies have a revealed divine in each individual star -- thus their individual count. Concepts: Number. Value. Celestial Bodies Sefirot (chapters 49-124)
01:56:45
February 06, 2022
Ayin Beis Chapter 86 (2): Where Quantity Meets Quality with Rabbi Simon Jacobson
Sefirah: Number NUMBER: CONTAINER OR ENERGY? Where Quantity Meets Quality and Number Meets Beyond Number Ayin Beis Volume 1, Discourse 22, B'Yom Ha'Shemini Atzeret 5673, Chapter 86 (1) p. 164-166 Short Summary:  Long Summary: In avodah this is the difference between the mesirat nefesh of the divine soul (the elevation of the energies), bittul b'metziyus, in which the quality of energy is abundant, and the animal soul (elevation of the containers), bittul ha'yesh, in which the containers are abundant. We need some further explanation how numbers emerge in energies, which is also due to them being "touched" by the containers: Containers consist of two dimensions -- the inner and outer container. The inner dimension serves only to express the energy, like the colors of light, the core name (shem ha'etzem), or a step lower. These are the primary containers of the nine higher sefiros. Therefore the abundant number there is in energies, and the number of containers are reduced . The outer containers, which are primarily in malchus, define and shape the energies. And therefore in malchus we have a higher number of containers than of energies. This explains the fusion of number and beyond number ("the number of souls will be beyond number"): This refers to the number of energies, which are a number but not one of division and distinction, but of quality. "There is no number to His understanding:" The inner mind is primarily energy, thus it combines number and beyond number. "The number of souls will be beyond number" also refers to the souls drawing down the infinite into the finite (beyond number into number), through their study of Torah (inner mind), "sixty kingdoms and countless alomot" -- the sixty tractatee bring on infinite worlds; and through their teshuvah, which reaches the inner concealed depths that are beyond number. This also explains Shemini Atzeret -- the level of binah (shemini), tevunah, which retains (atzeret) and internalizes the transcendent revelations of the Rosh Hashana, Yom Kippur and Sukkot, thereby integrating beyond number (transcendence) and number. Shemini Atzeret is thus one day, with one offering (unlike Sukkot which has multiple offerings), signifying its unity of the finite and the infinite. Concepts: Number. Energy. Container. Sefirot (chapters 49-124)
01:49:01
January 30, 2022
Ayin Beis Chapter 86 (1) NUMBER: QUANTITY OR QUALITY? with Rabbi Simon Jacobson
Sefirah: Number NUMBER: QUANTITY OR QUALITY? Container or Energy? Ayin Beis Volume 1, Discourse 22, B'Yom Ha'Shemini Atzeret 5673, Chapter 86 (1) p. 163-164 Short Summary:  Long Summary: As it is known, that sometimes the highest numbers are above and the lowest ones below (ten thousands in keser and units in malchus), and sometimes it says the opposite that the lowest numbers are above and the highest ones below (units in keser and thousands and ten thousands in malchus). The difference is whether we are speaking from the perspective of the energies or of the containers: From the energy perspective the greatest amount of is on higher levels and its gets diminished as the energy descends and is transmitted below. Containers are diminished in higher states, and increase as the flow descends. "More" energy means something different than "more" containers:" Numbers and magnitude in energy is qualitative (not more details, but higher and more intense energy). While in containers "more" is quantitative -- more detailed and defined containers. This is the meaning in the words of the Pardes that the primary number is in malchus -- that is number of defined containers, which are far greater in malchus than in the higher levels, where the number (quality) of energies is greater. Malchus is like speech that reveals the details that are higher and more sublime in thought.
01:26:02
January 23, 2022
Ayin Beis Chapter 85: ANATOMY OF A NUMBER with Rabbi Simon Jacobson
Sefirah: Number Zecher Rav Tuvcho (2) ANATOMY OF A NUMBER Ayin Beis Volume 1, Discourse 22, B'Yom Ha'Shemini Atzeret 5673, Chapter 84 (2) p. 160-161 Short Summary:  Long Summary: We will understand "zecher" -- a reflection of all the levels (rav tuvcho) -- with the example of a person counting an enormous number, say the number 10,000 (10 times revovah): As he counts one by one, first reaching one hundred, than a thousand, anf finally all 10,000, he comes to appreciate the magnitude and quality (mispar atzmi v'amiti) of the number. Afterwards, when he sums it up and describes it to another in a brief total of "10,000," this number is only a symbol -- a zecher -- of the magintude, but does not capture its essential power as when he actually counted it unit by unit. The number (mispar ha'kolel) is a state of diminishment (katnus) compared to the magnitude (gadlus) experienced in the detailed counting (mispar ha'merubah). To break it down further: The collective number (mispar ha'kolel) also exists by the counter, when for example he knows the number before he begins to count. This total (klal) precedes and is qualitatively higher (gadlus) than the actual detailed counting (prat), which only reveals the number (but does not add any new quality). Like the qualitative superiority of thought, where all the details are in an elevated state, compared to speech, which diminishes and breaks the ideas down into details. The point of this example is to demonstrate that there is magnitude (gadlus) and reduction (katnus) in both the collective number and the detailed number: From the perspective of the counter himself, both the collective number (the klal that precedes the prat) and the detailed number express the magnitude of the number - the collective number captures the quality of the entity; the detailed numbers are counting the essence of the entity. But from the perspective of the outsider who is being told the number, both the collective number and the detailed number reflect a diminished and reduced state. This example helps us understand how things are above: Number signifies parameters, which are determined primarily by the containers, which limits and defines the energy flow and thus reveals it (anything that is not defined is not revealed). The containers of atzilus reveal the hidden divine number (structure) in the energies. In atzilus itself the primary containers are in malchus: The containers of the nine higher sefiros are one with the energy; they only reveal the nature of the energy, like the colors of light. In malchus the containers take on a function that effects the lower levels. Thus malchus is the primary level which reveals the finite number of the higher sefirot, like the Pardes explains. Number in the nine higher sefirot is primarily the number of energies (these numbers also come because they are "touched," effected, by the containers, yet the primary revelation is of energy not container); number in malchus is primarily the number of containers. Concepts: Number Sefirot (chapters 49-124)
01:49:35
January 16, 2022
Ayin Beis Chapter 84 (2): ABOUNDING GOODNESS with Rabbi Simon Jacobson
Sefirah: Number Zecher Rav Tuvcho (1) ABOUNDING GOODNESS: The Process of Transmission Ayin Beis Volume 1, Discourse 22, B'Yom Ha'Shemini Atzeret 5673, Chapter 84 (2) p. 160-161 Short Summary:  Long Summary: We will understand this based on the explanation in the Siddur on zecher rav tuvcho. Tov (goodness) is the level of yesod, which is the channel that transmits from source to recipient. Rav tuvcho -- abounding (abundance of) goodness -- refers to the many yesodos, the concealments (tzimtzumim) necessary to transmit from level to a lower level, in order for the recipient tio be able to contain the transmission. In general there are 4 tzimtzumim: 1) Concealing the essential wisdom of the teacher into one point. 2) Breaking that point into details. 3) Finding the right words to express the idea to the recipient (speeach within thought). 4) Expressing the idea in actual words (maaseh). Or the last two: transmitting the idea in general terms, then breaking them down into details. So too above there are generally four levels -- corresponding to the four letters of Havaya: 1) The yud -- the top point of the kav. 2) The heh - Adam Kadmon (beriyah d'klolus), which contains the entire comsic order and all its details in one image. 3) The vav - yetzirah d'klolus. 4) The last heh -- atzilus (asiyah d'klolus). Or: 1) Yud -- the point of the reshimu. 2) Heh - the 231 gates of the world of the "malbish." 3) Vav - the kav, following the tzimtzum of the malbish. 4) Adam Kadmon. All this is rav tuvcho, which is only a zecher (a recollection, remembrance), a reflection that travels through malchut to the angels in biy"a. Concepts: Transmission. Sefirot (chapters 49-124)
01:42:15
January 09, 2022
Ayin Beis Chapter 84 (1): MALCHUT: REVEALING THE NUMBER with Rabbi Simon Jacobson
Sefirah: Number MALCHUT: REVEALING THE NUMBER Ayin Beis Volume 1, Discourse 22, B'Yom Ha'Shemini Atzeret 5673, Chapter 84 (1) p. 160 Short Summary:  Long Summary: The Pardes in Shaar Ha'Kinuiim (entry on mispar hayamim) writes that "number of days" refers to malchut, which reveals the number of the supernal days -- the six emotions, which on their own have a number, but it is concealed and undefined until malchut reveals it. Concepts: Malchut. Number Sefirot (chapters 49-124)
01:38:39
January 02, 2022
Ayin Beis Chapter 83 (3): WHAT'S IN A NUMBER? with Rabbi Simon Jacobson
Sefirah: Number WHAT'S IN A NUMBER? Ayin Beis Volume 1, Discourse 22, B'Yom Ha'Shemini Atzeret 5673, Chapter 83 (3) p. 159-160 Short Summary:  Long Summary: But we still need to understand how can we say that that there are sefirot in iggulim, when sefirot are a defined structure (with qualitative differences between one level and another)?  We will understand this by first prefacing what we discussed earlier (ch. 17), that there are sefirot even in the infinite energy that is higher than the ten hidden sefirot. Because every revelation is through sefirot. but those sefirot are endless and have no parameters. As a reflection of the essence that is substanceless (peshitus) these sefirot are also substanceless. The question is: How can sefirot -- which are structure -- be substanceless? To understand this we need to first explain the meaning of sefirot. [Now begins a lengthy discussion for 47 chapters, that will conclude in ch. 124, to answer the question about sefirot in transcendence]. The first meaning of the word sefirah is number. As the Pardes writes: number signifies the finite. Though the sefirot are not finite on their own, compared to their source they are considered finite, and also based on their affect on existence. A number connotes two things: 1) A finite entity, 2) revealing the distinct number of an entity whose distinction was previously concealed. The number does not add or subtract anything from the entity; all it does is reveal. The sefirot in atzilus are only in a state of number -- meaning that they reveal the distinct personalities and structure of the ten sefirot that were previously concealed in the ten hidden sefirot. But in atzilut they are still archetypes, and only in biy"a, where existence begins to emerge as independent state of yesh, do the sefirot take on actual defined shape.  [The next 9 chapters, ch. 83-90, all discuss this first interpretation in sefirah: number. In ch. 91 he begins with the second interpretation which continues for 13 chapters, 91-103. Followed by chapters 104-123 where he moves on to the third interpretation, upon whose conclusion he returns to answer the initial question: how can we associate sefirot to transcendence (igguilim)?]  Concepts: Sefirah. Number Sefirot (chapters 49-124)
01:39:02
December 27, 2021
Ayin Beis Chapter 83 (2): WHAT'S IN A NUMBER? with Rabbi Simon Jacobson
Sefirah: Number WHAT'S IN A NUMBER? Ayin Beis Volume 1, Discourse 22, B'Yom Ha'Shemini Atzeret 5673, Chapter 83 (2) p. 159-160 Short Summary:  Long Summary: But we still need to understand how can we say that that there are sefirot in iggulim, when sefirot are a defined structure (with qualitative differences between one level and another)?  We will understand this by first prefacing what we discussed earlier (ch. 17), that there are sefirot even in the infinite energy that is higher than the ten hidden sefirot. Because every revelation is through sefirot. but those sefirot are endless and have no parameters. As a reflection of the essence that is substanceless (peshitus) these sefirot are also substanceless. The question is: How can sefirot -- which are structure -- be substanceless? To understand this we need to first explain the meaning of sefirot. [Now begins a lengthy discussion for 47 chapters, that will conclude in ch. 124, to answer the question about sefirot in transcendence]. The first meaning of the word sefirah is number. As the Pardes writes: number signifies the finite. Though the sefirot are not finite on their own, compared to their source they are considered finite, and also based on their affect on existence. A number connotes two things: 1) A finite entity, 2) revealing the distinct number of an entity whose distinction was previously concealed. The number does not add or subtract anything from the entity; all it does is reveal. The sefirot in atzilus are only in a state of number -- meaning that they reveal the distinct personalities and structure of the ten sefirot that were previously concealed in the ten hidden sefirot. But in atzilut they are still archetypes, and only in biy"a, where existence begins to emerge as independent state of yesh, do the sefirot take on actual defined shape.  [The next 9 chapters, ch. 83-90, all discuss this first interpretation in sefirah: number. In ch. 91 he begins with the second interpretation for 13 chapter, 91-103. Then in ch. 104-123 he moves on to the third interpretation, upon whose conclusion he returns to answer the initial question: how can associate sefirot to transcendence (igguilim)?]  Concepts: Sefirah. Number Sefirot (chapters 49-124)
01:01:20
December 22, 2021
Ayin Beis Chapter 83 (1): Sefirot In Iggulim with Rabbi Simon Jacobson
The Paradox of Transcendence SEFIROT IN IGGULIM (TRANSCENDENCE)? Ayin Beis Volume 1, Discourse 22, B'Yom Ha'Shemini Atzeret 5673, Chapter 83 (1) p. 158-159 Short Summary:  Long Summary: But we still need to understand how there are sefirot in iggulim that have no structure, when sefirot are a defined structure (with qualitative differences between one level and another)?  We will understand this by first prefacing what we discussed earlier (ch. 17), that there are sefirot even in the infinite energy that is higher than the ten hidden sefirot. Because every revelation is through sefirot. but those sefirot are endless and have no paramterers. As a reflection of the essence that is substanceless (peshitus) these sefirot are also substanceless. The question is: How can sefirot -- which are structure -- be substanceless? To understand this we need to first explain the meaning of sefirot. [Now begins a lengthy discussion for 47 chapters,, that will conclude and return in ch. 124 to answer the question about sefirot in transcendence]. Concepts: Transcendence. Sefirot Transcendence (chapters 49-83)
01:50:31
December 13, 2021
Ayin Beis Chapter 82: The Paradox of Transcendence with Rabbi Simon Jacobson
The Paradox of Transcendence TEMIMUS: UNWAVERING SINCERITY Ayin Beis Volume 1, Discourse 21, B'Sukkot Teishvu 5673, Chapter 82 p. 155-158 Short Summary:  Long Summary: We can understand the qualitative equality of all levels of transcedence (regardless of their quantitative measure) from temimus -- integrity, sincerity, wholesomeness, which is rooted in the pure supra-rational desire of the soul. Temimus is realted to an atzmi, which is not subject to changes and fluctiations that come from rational thinking. It is the absolute unwavering trust in G-d and His blessings, and not in any vehicles that carry the blessing, including the overinvestment in machinations and schemes, instead of simple trust in G-d as source of all blessings. This can be in two ways: 10 creating a container but knowing that G-d's blessing is the key to success. 2) At times, no container is needed only trust in the divine. Better to rely on G-d -- the transcednent -- than trust man -- the immanent (supernal man). This temimus permeates the entire structure: The mind -- positive thinking, without complaints. The heart -- integrity. Action -- unwavering comittment expressed in actual behavior. Indeed, action demonstrates the truth of the conviction and sincerity. Regardless of their distinct expression, the sincerity is equal in all these levels. Which desmonstrates how the differences in revealed measure between abundant or diminished expression does not effect the transcendent intensity, which is equal everywhere. Concepts: Temimus. Sincerity Transcendence (chapters 49-83)
02:02:08
December 06, 2021
Ayin Beis Chapter 81 (2): The Paradox of Transcendence with Rabbi Simon Jacobson
The Paradox of Transcendence WHAT DEFINES STRUCTURE: QUANTITY OR QUALITY? Ayin Beis Volume 1, Discourse 21, B'Sukkot Teishvu 5673, Chapter 81 (2) p. 152-155 Short Summary:  Long Summary: This is the meaning of the Etz Chaim that the energy in Atzilus radiates in different measures (in keser and chochma from up close, in z"a like through a window, in malchus through a hole), reflecting the quantitative diminishment of the same energy from level to level (while in biy"a it radiates through a  curtain, signifying a qualitiative leap). You can expand the hole and turn it into a window. Like the transmission from a teacher to a student, which contains all the intellect in a concentrated and concealed fashion (and the student will appreciate the intellect after 40 years). Same is true with intellect tha give birth to emotions (though they are different qualitative idioms), that the emotions contain the intellect in a concelaed state, and later when they mature the intellect is revealed in them. All this demonstrates that structure, even of the immanent energy, is not defined that much by the quantitative measure of energy, being that even diminshed energy contains all the abundance in a concealed form [and the primary structure is defined by the qualitative difference of the immanent entities]. How much more so in transcendent energy, that its different quantitative manifestations (in ten sefirot) does nor imply structure. The quantitative diminishment of immanent energy actually weakens the energy, and because immanent energy is defined by its revelation, a dimnished state of energy defines its level. While the diminishment of transcendent energy (desire) does not weaken the intensity of the transcendence. Concepts: Transcendence Transcendence (chapters 49-83)
01:08:55
November 29, 2021
Ayin Beis Chapter 81 (1): The Paradox of Transcendence with Rabbi Simon Jacobson
The Paradox of Transcendence WHAT DEFINES STRUCTURE: QUANTITY OR QUALITY? Ayin Beis Volume 1, Discourse 21, B'Sukkot Teishvu 5673, Chapter 81 (1) p. 152-155 Short Summary:  Long Summary: This is the meaning of the Etz Chaim that the energy in Atzilus radiates in different measures (in keser and chochma from up close, in z"a like through a window, in malchus through a hole), reflecting the quantitative diminishment of the same energy from level to level (while in biy"a it radiates through a  curtain, signifying a qualitiative leap). You can expand the hole and turn it into a window. Like the transmission from a teacer to a student, which contains all the intellect in a concentrated and concealed fashion (and the student will appreciate the intellect after 40 years). Same is true with intellect tha give borth to emotions (though they are different qualitative idioms), that the emotions contain the intellect in a concelaed state, and later when they mature the intellect is revealed in them. All this demonstrates that structure, even of the immanent energy, is not defined that much by the quantitative measure of energy, being that even diminshed energy contains all the abundance in a concealed form [and the primary structure is defined by the qualitative difference of the immanent entities]. How much more so in transcendent energy, that its different quantitative manifestations (in ten sefirot) does not imply structure. The quantitative diminishment of immanent energy actually weakens the energy, and because immanent energy is defined by its revelation, a dimnished state of energy defines its level. While the diminishment of transcendent energy (desire) does not weaken the intensity of the transcendence. Concepts: Transcendence Transcendence (chapters 49-83)
01:45:54
November 21, 2021
Ayin Beis Chapter 80: The Paradox of Transcendence with Rabbi Simon Jacobson
The Paradox of Transcendence ARE THERE LEVELS IN TRANSCENDENCE? Ayin Beis Volume 1, Discourse 21, B'Sukkot Teishvu 5673, Chapter 80 (1) p. 150-152 Short Summary:  Long Summary: Question: Aren't there ten sefirot also on the level of iggulim, as well as a hierarchy of higher and lower makifim, and even each makif has a higher and lower level (as we see in regard to repairing spiritual infections) -- so how can we say that the transcendent energy has no diversity and distinction? Answer: These distinctions are only quantitative, in the measure of revealed or diminished energy, but not qualitatively, because all the transcedent energies are fundamentally one. Thus, these quantitative distinctions of higher and lower do not contradict our earlier discussion that transcendence has no levelsm because quantitative distinction is not the primary defintion of hierarchy, as we discussed earlier that even in the immanent energy the primary heirachy (of higher and lower) is not in quantity, but in quality: quantitively binah can reach the level of chochma, but qualitatively it cannot (even in their source in atik). Concepts: Transcendence Transcendence (chapters 49-83)
01:49:55
November 15, 2021
Ayin Beis Chapter 79: The Paradox of Transcendence with Rabbi Simon Jacobson
The Paradox of Transcendence TRANSCENDENT UNANIMITY: ALL CROWNS EVOLVE FROM ONE ANOTHER Ayin Beis Volume 1, Discourse 20, Shuva Yisroel 5673, Chapter 79 p. 148-150 Short Summary:  Long Summary: With all that was discussed (in chapters 59-78) about the relationship of transcendence and its impact on immanence, nevertheless transcendent energy -- the desire in each world -- is beyond the structure and all the makifim (kesorim) are equal with no distinctions. In the immanent structure one level is not the same as another. The wisdom of asiyah (action, like artistry or embroidery) is fundamentally different than the wisdom of atzilus (essential wisdom), and even when it grows it can never become wisdom of atzilus. (Torah is different being higher than the structure). But the desire, keser, of each world can grow to the keser of a higher world and beyond (like through innocence in keser of asiyah one can reach higher than keser of atzilus). Because all "kesorim evolve from one another" -- they are all one essential personality, beyond any distinctions. Concepts: Transcendence Transcendence (chapters 49-83)
01:37:38
November 07, 2021
Ayin Beis Chapter 78: 3 Types of Teshuvah with Rabbi Simon Jacobson
Yotzer Prayer: 7 Steps Within Malchus (4) 3 Types of Teshuvah  Ayin Beis Volume 1, Discourse 20, Shuva Yisroel 5673, Chapter 78 p. 146-148 Short Summary:  Long Summary: Just as these three, nefesh ruach neshomo, reflect dufferent type of service, they are also sitinguished in their type of teshuvah: 1) The teshivah of nefesh is on action related transgressions, and on the general inclination and consumption with material crassness, and on the lack of committment to heaven. The sadness over one's predicament leads to rejecting the past and resolving to begin a new path into the future. 2) Teshuvah of ruach is in the lack of emotional love and respect in one's service. The importance of ahava and yirah is: 1) a mitzvah, 2) they refine ther animal soul turning it into "human," 3) this is the purpose of the souls' descent. The sadness over the divine soul's deprivation of being realized elicits a passionate teshuvah, to reintroduce ahava and yirah. This teshuvah itself is one that has more passion that the teshivah of nefesh, which may touch deeper being that it is over inappropriate behavior (while tuach is over more subtle matters), but it is not as emotional (hispaalus). In addition, teshuivah of ruach is some ways touches even deeper, like a fruit on top of a tree which falls farther than lowedr hanging fruit. So too, one is who capable of an emotional relationship and doesn't pursue it, is on some ways in deeper potential trouble. 3) Teshuvah of neshomo is over the lack of divine comprehension and contemplation, ejich is also a mitzvah, and one that rises above them all. Specifically -- teshivah over the lack of beging touched by the what one understands. This is an even deeper teshivah, because here the individual intellectually understands the divine, he therefore knows and appreciated the distance he is experiencing, far deeper than the lower forms of teshuvah. We receive strength from above to fulfill and sustain all three levels of teshuvah. These are three makifim - transcendent forces -- of tzur, magen, misgav: Following the general makif of adon uzeinu which affect all in a general way of awakening the Jewish spark (makchus) within, this in turn gives power to the the three crowsn of biy"a to infuse energy into the specific service of different souls: Nefesh/action based. Ruach/emotion based. Neshomo/mind based. We thus see te tols and impact of all the levels of keser, the general all encompassing one, and the specific detailed ones. Concepts: Binah. Malchus Transcendence (chapters 49-83)
01:31:22
November 01, 2021
Ayin Beis Chapter 77 (2) 3 Types of Souls with Rabbi Simon Jacobson
Yotzer Prayer: 7 Steps Within Malchus (4) 3 Types of Souls  Ayin Beis Volume 1, Discourse 20, Shuva Yisroel 5673, Chapter 77 (2) p. 145-146 Short Summary:  Long Summary: Tzur misgoveinu, mogen yisheinu, misgav b'adeinu correspond to the makifim of nefesh, ruach neshomo, in which different souls are rooted: nefesh is the root of the souls whose primary service is in action. Ruach are the souls who serve with feelings, driven by comprehension. Neshomo are the souls who serve with the mind, which produce emotions. Concepts: Binah. Malchus Transcendence (chapters 49-83)
58:54
October 25, 2021
Ayin Beis Chapter 77 (1): Mother Adorns Daughter: Malchus Matures with Rabbi Simon Jacobson
Yotzer Prayer: 7 Steps Within Malchus (4) Adon Uzeinu (3): Mother Adorns Daughter: Malchus Matures  Ayin Beis Volume 1, Discourse 20, Shuva Yisroel 5673, Chapter 77 (1) p. 143-145 Short Summary:  Long Summary: At times binah emanates energy into malchus endowing her with masculine (adon) status, as the Zohar (I 2a) says: Mother lends daughter her garments and adorns her with her ornaments... this one is called master (adon), as is said "behold, the ark of the covenant , master of all the earth." On the soul level this is when the root (mazal) of the soul channels energy and empowers the soul, as it manifests and is concealed in the body and the animal soul, with thoughts of teshuvah. It arouses the awareness in the "lost" and displaced soul to seek out its divine spark -- "u'bikashtem me'shom" -- that is lost and scattered in the crassness of the animal soul and material existence. This awareness causes the divine soul to cry out from its inner depths in anguish over its distance and dire straits, which in turn lifts the soul out of its exile, and also impacts the animal soul to change. This impact is acutely felt by the animal soul when it reaches a state of desperation and also the animal soul to feel helpless. The broken soul in turn causes it to be transformed. This is Adon Uzeinu -- binah empowering malchus to free itsekf from its displacement, and on the contrary -- its thirst reaches higher than the initial desire (binah). 2) Empowering malchus to be revealed in a powerful and internal way -- during Rosh Hashana and Yom Kippur, when the focus is on the service of kabolas ol malchus shomayim, the conscious and revealed devotion and connection to the divine. (1) Freedom from Captivity. 2) Dynamic kabolat ol; makifim of biy"a).  Concepts: Binah. Malchus Transcendence (chapters 49-83)
01:45:39
October 17, 2021
Ayin Beis Chapter 76: Adon Uzeinu (2): The Mother: Provider with Rabbi Simon Jacobson
Yotzer Prayer: 7 Steps Within Malchus (3) Adon Uzeinu (2): The Mother: Provider Ayin Beis Volume 1, Discourse 20, Shuva Yisroel 5673, Chapter 76 p. 142-143 Short Summary:  Long Summary: In contrast to the level of "daughter" (the state of the exiled soul, which does not have its own power to ascend, and is dependent on Torah for its elevation) the level of "mother" (binah) is an elevated spiritual state, in which -- on the contrary -- the soul actually transmits to (and elevates) the Torah.  Both souls and Torah "precede" (are above) existence. At times we find that souls are higher than Torah, like a groom which transmits to the Torah as bride; and then we find that Torah is higher than souls, and binds souls to the divine. The explanation in this is that it depends on which level of the soul is being discussed:Torah is higher than the  dimension of the soul that manifests in a body -- nefesh ruach neshomo, the service within the structure of mind and heart. Because Torah is rooted in chochma of atzilus, which is higher than the mortal comprehension of souls (even of exalted souls) who can only perceive the existence of the divine not its inner personality. Due to the soul's manifestation in a body and animal soul, which conceal the soul's energy, the soul needs the Torah's help to connect to the divine. And especially, a weakened soul. But the root and source of the soul, which does not manifest in the body, is higher than chochma; this is the supra-rational service of "desire of the heart" (re'usa d'liba). In relation to this level the soul is higher than Torah and transmits the divine essence into the Torah. This is the level of "mother", who blesses her child. And due to this binah (mother) is in a state of "masculine" maturity, transmitting the divine essence into z"a. Concepts: Binah Transcendence (chapters 49-83)
44:43
October 10, 2021
Ayin Beis Chapter 75: Yotzer Prayer: 7 Steps Within Malchus (3) with Rabbi Simon Jacobson
Yotzer Prayer: 7 Steps Within Malchus (3) Adon Uzeinu (1): The Daughter: Vulnerability Ayin Beis Volume 1, Discourse 19, Ani L'Dodi 5673, Chapter 75 p. 140-142 Short Summary:  Long Summary: Adon (uzeinu): mature malchus. malchus achieving masculine status, as it connects with binah. malchus on its own is the level of "daughter," the recipient who need to protection. In avodah: weak and vulnerable, as the divine soul is dominated by the animal soul. It thus needs the power of Torah to give it strength. The preparation for that is "fogetting your people and house of your father" -- reigning in and controlling your temptations. Elul -- teshuvah ta'taah -- with the power of Torah, leads us to the teshuva i'laah of Rosh Hashana and Yom Kippur. Concepts: Malchus. Transcendence (chapters 49-83)
01:08:56
October 03, 2021
Ayin Beis Chapter 74 (2): FIRST FOUR LEVELS IN MALCHUS with Rabbi Simon Jacobson
Yotzer Prayer: 7 Steps Within Malchus (2) FIRST FOUR LEVELS IN MALCHUS Ayin Beis Volume 1, Discourse 19, Anu L'Dodi 5673, Chapter 74 (2) p. 138-140 Short Summary:  Long Summary: "The beginning" refers to the beginning of all beginnings -- atzmus. The intention of the 'beginning" is wedged in the end -- in malchut,  "melech yochid," "melech ha'kodesh," "adon olam asher molach b'terem kol," fundamental exaltation (hisna'asus atzmi). This is malchut - power to create: "Elokei olam" -- the divine name as it is encompassed in and one with the essence -- yecholes. "B'rachomecho Ha'rabim" is the name as it is revealed. These first two levels are like the difference between mlacht as it is rooted in binah (concealed) and in z"a (more revealed). "Racheim aleinu" - keser malchus: the ani of keser and atzmus infuses the ayin of malchus with exaltation: the elevation of nature through miracles which manifest in nature. "Racheim" (compassion) comes from an exalted state -- a makif -- which recognizes the lowliness and distance of an entity and has compassion toward it. Immanent energy does not require and evoke compassion. "Adon Uzeinu" -- the compassion creates a makif that empowers and elevates the soul. Concepts: Malchus. Transcendence (chapters 49-83)
01:32:41
September 26, 2021
Ayin Beis Chapter 74 (1): FIRST FOUR LEVELS IN MALCHUS with Rabbi Simon Jacobson
Yotzer Prayer: 7 Steps Within Malchus (2) FIRST FOUR LEVELS IN MALCHUS Ayin Beis Volume 1, Discourse 19, Anu L'Dodi 5673, Chapter 74 (1) p. 138-140 Short Summary:  Long Summary: "The beginning" refers to the beginning of all beginnings -- atzmus. The intention of the 'beginning" is wedged in the end -- in malchut,  "melech yochid," "melech ha'kodesh," "adon olam asher molach b'terem kol," fundamental exaltation (hisna'asus atzmi). This is malchut - power to create: "Elokei olam" -- the divine name as it is encompassed in and one with the essence -- yecholes. "B'rachomecho Ha'rabim" is the name as it is revealed. These first two levels are like the difference between mlacht as it is rooted in binah (concealed) and in z"a (more revealed). "Racheim aleinu" - keser malchus: the ani of keser and atzmus infuses the ayin of malchus with exaltation: the elevation of nature through miracles which manifest in nature. "Racheim" (compassion) comes from an exalted state -- a makif -- which recognizes the lowliness and distance of an entity and has compassion toward it. Immanent energy does not require and evoke compassion. "Adon Uzeinu" -- the compassion creates a makif that empowers and elevates the soul. Concepts: Malchus. Transcendence (chapters 49-83)
02:01:12
September 19, 2021
Ayin Beis Chapter 73: POWER OF MALCHUS with Rabbi Simon Jacobson
Yotzer Prayer: 7 Steps Within Malchus POWER OF MALCHUS Ayin Beis Volume 1, Discourse 19, Anu L'Dodi 5673, Chapter 73 p. 136-138 Short Summary:  Long Summary: Concepts: Malchus. Transcendence (chapters 49-83)
01:11:39
September 12, 2021
Ayin Beis Chapter 72 (3): From Non-Existential to Existential and Below with Rabbi Simon Jacobson
From Non-Existential to Existential and Below Yotzer Prayer: 7 Steps From the Source to Existence Ayin Beis Volume 1, Discourse 19, Anu L'Dodi 5673, Chapter 72 (3) p. 135-136 Short Summary:  Long Summary: Concepts: Atzmus (the Divine Essence) Transcendence (chapters 49-83)
01:05:26
September 05, 2021
Ayin Beis Chapter 72 (2): Yotzer Prayer with Rabbi Simon Jacobson
From Non-Existential to Existential and Below Yotzer Prayer: 7 Steps From the Source to Existence Ayin Beis Volume 1, Discourse 19, Anu L'Dodi 5673, Chapter 72 (2) p. 135-136 Short Summary:  Long Summary: Concepts: Atzmus (the Divine Essence) Transcendence (chapters 49-83)
01:52:14
August 29, 2021
Ayin Beis Chapter 72 (1): Atzmus: Elokei Olam with Rabbi Simon Jacobson
Atzmus: Elokei Olam Yotzer Prayer: 7 Steps From the Source to Existence Ayin Beis Volume 1, Discourse 19, Anu L'Dodi 5673, Chapter 72 (1) p. 135 Short Summary:  Long Summary: Concepts: Atzmus (the Divine Essence) Transcendence (chapters 49-83)
01:36:49
August 22, 2021
Ayin Beis Chapter 71 (2): Awakening the Desire with Rabbi Simon Jacobson
Boruch She'Omar: 5 Steps from Non-Existence to Existence (1) Awakening the Desire Ayin Beis Volume 1, Discourse 18, Zeh Ha'yom 5673, Chapter 70 (2) p. 130-132 Analysis Short Summary:  Long Summary: Concepts: Boruch She'Omar. Desire for existence Transcendence (chapters 49-83) More info: www.ayinbeis.com
01:14:06
August 15, 2021
Ayin Beis Chapter 71 (1): 5 Levels of Soul with Simon Jacobson
Boruch She'Omar: 5 Steps from Non-Existence to Existence (1) 5 Levels of Soul Ayin Beis Volume 1, Discourse 18, Zeh Ha'yom 5673, Chapter 71 (1) p. 132-134 Analysis Short Summary:  Long Summary: Concepts: 5 Levels of Soul. Boruch She'Omar. Desire for existence Transcendence (chapters 49-83)
01:47:26
August 08, 2021
Ayin Beis Chapter 70: Boruch She'Omar: From Desire to Structure with Simon Jacobson
Boruch She'Omar: 5 Steps from Non-Existence to Existence (1) From Desire to Structure Ayin Beis Volume 1, Discourse 18, Zeh Ha'yom 5673, Chapter 70 p. 130-132 Analysis Short Summary:  Long Summary: Concepts: Boruch She'Omar. Desire for existence Transcendence (chapters 49-83)
01:26:46
August 01, 2021
Ayin Beis Chapter 69-70 (2): Shaarei Teshuvah Shaar haTefilah ch.9 with Rabbi Simon Jacobson
Ayin Beis with Rabbi Simon Jacobson Chapter 69-70 Addendum 2 Comparative Studies: Shaarei Teshuvah Shaar haTefilah ch. 9 Boruch She'Omar: 5 Steps From  Non Existence to Existence (2) From the Source to Existence
01:23:49
July 25, 2021
Ayin Beis Chapter 69-70 (1): Shaarei Teshuvah Shaar haTefilah ch. 8 with Rabbi Simon Jacobson
Ayin Beis with Rabbi Simon Jacobson Chapter 69-70 Addendum 1 Comparative Studies: Shaarei Teshuvah Shaar haTefilah ch. 8 Boruch She'Omar: 5 Steps From  Non Existence to Existence (2) From the Source to Existence
01:15:21
July 18, 2021
Ayin Beis Chapter 69 (3): From the Source to Desire with Rabbi Simon Jacobson
Boruch She'Omar: 5 Steps from Non-Existence to Existence (1) From the Source to Desire Ayin Beis Volume 1, Discourse 18, Zeh Ha'yom 5673, Chapter 69 (3) p. 129-130 Analysis Short Summary:  Long Summary: Concepts: Boruch She'Omar. Desire for existence Transcendence (chapters 49-83)
01:22:21
July 11, 2021
Ayin Beis Chapter 69 (2): Desire for Existence with Rabbi Simon Jacobson
Boruch She'Omar: 5 Steps from Non-Existence to Existence (1) Desire for Existence Ayin Beis Volume 1, Discourse 18, Zeh Ha'yom 5673, Chapter 69 (2) p. 129-130 Short Summary:  Long Summary: Concepts: Boruch She'Omar. Desire for existence Transcendence (chapters 49-83)
01:52:18
July 04, 2021
Ayin Beis Chapter 69 (1): The Stirring with Rabbi Simon Jacobson
Boruch She'Omar: 5 Steps from Non-Existence to Existence (1) The Stirring Ayin Beis Volume 1, Discourse 18, Zeh Ha'yom 5673, Chapter 69 (1) p. 129 Short Summary:  Long Summary: Concepts: Energy. Desire for existence Transcendence (chapters 49-83)
01:14:52
June 27, 2021
Ayin Beis Chapter 68: Immanence and Transcendence with Rabbi Simon Jacobson
Immanence and Transcendence Summary of Chapters 1-67 Ayin Beis Volume 1, Discourse 18, Zeh Hayom 5673, Chapter 68 p. 127-128 Short Summary:  Long Summary: Concepts: Desire.. Transcendence (chapters 49-83)
02:33:36
June 20, 2021
Ayin Beis Chapter 67 (2): Existential Impact of Transcendence (4) with Rabbi Simon Jacobson
Existential Impact of Transcendence (4) Standing Strong Ayin Beis Volume 1, Discourse 17, Atem Netzovim, Chapter 67 (2) p. 126-127 Short Summary:  Long Summary: Concepts: Keser of Atzilus. Soul. Sources: Transcendence (chapters 49-83)
01:17:50
June 13, 2021
Ayin Beis Chapter 67 (1): The Keser of Atzilus Effect with Rabbi Simon Jacobson
Existential Impact of Transcendence (4) The Keser of Atzilus Effect Ayin Beis Volume 1, Discourse 17, Atem Netzovim, Chapter 67 (1) p. 124-126 Short Summary:  Long Summary: The impact of keser of atzilus is not on general existence (like the bittul that a"k effects), but on the souls, which are rooted in atzilus -- it causes them to have hidden love and re'usa d'liba, to offer testimony on the transcendent, the hidden of all the hidden. Israel is like desire, which rules the faculties. And it also impacts them to be revealed. The makif (keser) of atzilus is a close makif, which is closer to the internal and immanent, affecting the spontaneous thoughts of teshuvah, and the resting of the shechinah that inspires a person. Concepts: Keser of Atzilus. Soul.
01:30:35
June 06, 2021
Ayin Beis Chapter 66: Adam Kadmon and Atzilus with Rabbi Simon Jacobson
Levels of Desire (4) Adam Kadmon and Atzilus Ayin Beis Volume 1, Discourse 17, Atem Netzovim, Chapter 66 p. 123-124 Short Summary:  Long Summary: The primal desire and thought of adam kadmon is the power of desire, the heskem, which is still within the essence, and not yet the full blown desire in motion as it manifests in keser of atzilus, which is the revealed and stimulated desire. Like the difference between kadesh and kodosh, thought (beriyah d'klolus, a"k) and speech (yetzirah d'klolus, keser of atzilus), which leads to action (asiya d'klolus, atzilus). Another reason for the need of the revealed desire (keser): because a"k is in a state of ain sof relative to atzilus. To bring the ten sefirot into being requires a spcific desire, a makif proti, for atzilus specifically. Concepts: Adam Kadmon. Atzilus Sources: Transcendence (chapters 49-83)
01:24:33
May 23, 2021
Ayin Beis Chapter 65: Pre-Desire: Desire to Desire with Rabbi Simon Jacobson
Levels of Desire (3) Pre-Desire: Desire to Desire Ayin Beis Volume 1, Discourse 17, Atem Netzovim, Chapter 65 p. 121-123 Short Summary: The actual (revealed) desire is preceded and rooted in the power of desire (or concealed desire), thought, which is simply a heskem, a resolution and determination on the worthiness of the desire, but is not yet an actual stimulated desire, being drawn and longing to the object. It can even take time between these two stages. (This is lower than the firm essential desire (rotzon ha'muchlat b'etzem), which is simply within the essence, and may never be expressed). Long Summary: The actual (revealed) desire is preceded and rooted in the power of desire (or concealed desire), which is simply a resolution and determination (heskem) on the worthiness of the desire, but is not yet an actual stimulated desire, that is longing for and palpably being drawn to the object.  This stage of desire, which emerges after some awakening of desire, is a step lower than the firm essential desire (rotzon ha'muchlat b'etzem), which is simply within the essence beyond any form of arousal, and may never be stimulated and expressed. By contrast, the desire we are discussing comes after his interest has been aroused and he had an internal dialogue whether this object is worthy to be desired or not, and he has determined that it is worthy. Yet, the desire is still only a determination, not an actual yearning. It's possible that years may elapse until he will actually desire and pursue the object. This determination is called "thought," not actual desire - rotzon -- which consists of the same letters as "tzinor", a channel that draws down the soul to a particular object, being that he is excited and immersed in the desire. Concepts: Determination to Desire Sources: Transcendence (chapters 49-83)
01:16:03
May 09, 2021
Ayin Beis Chapter 64: Revealed Desire with Rabbi Simon Jacobson
Levels of Desire (2) Revealed Desire Ayin Beis Volume 1, Discourse 17, Atem Netzovim, Chapter 64 p. 120-121 Short Summary: The need for a specific desire for each individual world can be further understood by knowing that there are two levels of desire: actual desire which is palpably drawn to the objective of creating existence. (Lower than essential desire, like that of parent to child, G-d and souls, which has no objective at all, and is only an expression of their essential connection, regardless of revelation or quality, unlike the desire for -- and pain from concealed -- divine revelation).
01:38:17
May 03, 2021
Ayin Beis Chapter 63 (2): Internalizing Desire with Rabbi Simon Jacobson
Levels of Desire (1) Internalizing Desire Ayin Beis Volume 1, Discourse 16, Ki Tovo, Chapter 63 Part 2, p. 118-119 Long Summary: According to the above we can understand the opening verse (of this discourse) "when you will enter the land that G-d has given you": Eretz (land in Hebrew) means desire (ratzon), referring to the simple desire (rotzon poshut) of the soul for the divine. This desire (eretz) is given to us by G-d from above, as a heritage (nachala), which is the transcendent forces of the soul. However, to reach this simple desire we first need to "enter the land" - serve with our rational faculties. There are two types of desire: A rational one and supra-rational one. We begin with the former, and that creates a container to generate the latter. Prayer - a ladder from earth to heaven - personifies this experience: We begin with the contemplation in pesukei d'zimrah, songs of praise about the creation of existence, followed by the pre-Shema blessings contemplating the sublimation of the angels, and the bittul of souls in their comprehension of the divine in Shema. All this is rational service - the ladder on the ground , which then leads to the supra-rational service in Shemoneh Esreh (amidah) - the top of the ladder reaching to transcendent heaven, which G-d gives us from above. The verse then continues: V'yorashto v'yoshavto boh (possessing and settling the land). Posessing the land is through conquering it from the seven nations, which is the service of refining the the seven emotions of the animal soul, transforming darkness to light, and thus possessing the transcendent energies of Tohu, which comes specifically through sublimating crass materialism. The root of the crass is in the containers, and by conquering and sublimating the crass we repair and sublimate the containers above, which reaches the higher transcendental energy of tehiru i'llah (as discussed in ch. 62). In contrast to rational service, which dissipates after prayer (taking with it also the supra-rational love), this supra-rational service, which refines and transforms the animal soul, has a permanent impact (yerusha has no discontinuity , unlike a gift which does). Both these levels are transcendent. Then comes v'yoshavto boh (settling in the land) - transcendent gets internalized, and their is a fusion of the transcendent and the immanent. In human service this is Torah which follows prayer, internalizing the transcendent experience of prayer. This all year round service is reflected more specifically in Elul, Rosh Hashana, Yom Kippur and Sukkot: Rosh Hashana is the service of dedication to the divine (kabolat ol malchus shomayim), through revealing inner soul essence. Also the teshuvah of Rosh Hashana is the higher teshuvah (teshuvah i'laah), returning to the divine source. In Elul we prepare for this through the lower teshuvah (teshuvah ta'taah), rejecting the inappropriate, feeling sadness over being distant from the divine. Everyone through their own initiative has the capacity to reach this lower level of teshuvah, by being accountable for the details of his life, and feeling bad over his iniquities and determining strongly to uproot the inappropriate. An auspicious time for this is in the days of Elul, and specifically in the days of Selichos. Through this one becomes a container for the higher teshuvah of Rosh Hashana, and then Yom Kippur, when even higher revelations emerge through the bodily afflictions of fasting, diminishing the fat and the blood, which reveals the transcendent "higher purity." Then on Sukkot the transcendent permeates the immanent, Ba'Sukkot teishvu, you shall dwell internally in the transcendent Sukkot, which integrates the transcendence of Rosh Hashana and Yom Kippur.
01:38:38
April 26, 2021
Ayin Beis Chapter 63: Levels of Desire and Transcendence with Rabbi Simon Jacobson
Levels of Desire and Transcendence (1) Levels of Desire and Transcendence Ayin Beis Volume 1, Discourse 16, Ki Tovo, Chapter 63 p. 117-119 Short Summary: In addition to the general makifim (of tehiru i'laah and tehiru ta'taah) there are also the specific makifim for each world, due to the equalized energy and lack of distinction of the individual levels as they stand in the makif kloli (transcendent desire). Long Summary: In addition to the general transcendent energies (makifim klolim) of tehiru i'laah and tehiru ta'taah which desire and encompass all of existence, there are also the specific transcendent levels (makifim) for each respective "world": The keser (crown, makif) of atzilus - the specific desire to emanate atzilus; the keser and desire of beriyah; to the keser and desire of asiyah. The reason for this is: Though the desire for all aspects of existence (of all the worlds) begin in the simple pre-tzimtzum desire (rotzun ha'poshut), and even more so in the primordial thought of A"K, which has a relationship with existence (more than the pre-tzimtzum desire, where there is no existence of worlds in any shape or form), nevertheless in that transcendent thought and desire all distinctions of existence are totally concealed and encompassed, to the point that they are all equalized. In A"K atzilus and asiya are equal. For two reasons: 1) Even though once they emerge the energy level of one world is very different than another (in atzilus the divine energy is revealed and one with the containers, while in biy"a they are separate), yet while they are contained in A"K the energy of all the levels is the same (just as A"K encompasses them all even after they emerge). Similar to how the soul radiates equally during the  revelation of the concealed faculties (at a celebration), as discussed in ch. 22. 2) In A"K all distinctions of levels are completely concealed. Thus, in order to bring into actual existence the distinct worlds there needs to be a specific desire for each individual world. For example: When someone builds any structure, first comes a general desire for the overall structure, which includes all the details (the shape of the rooms, floors, doors, windows, as well as the building materials, wood, stones, earth), but the details are not yet distinguishable in this all encompassing desire for a home. Then, when it comes to the action stage, then there is a specific desire for each room, floor and each respective detail. Concepts: Makif. Sources: Example of desire to build home: Shabbat Parshat Tisa 5565 -- cited in the sources for ch. 60, pp. 323. Biurei HaZohar Tzemach Tzedek pp. 256. See also Adam Ki Yi'hiye Samach Vav p. 200. V'hoyu Emunas Itecho 5652 pp. 39. Va'yovo Amalek 5709 p. 39. Transcendence (chapters 49-83)
01:09:30
April 19, 2021
Ayin Beis Chapter 62: The Iggul HaGadol Effect with Rabbi Simon Jacobson
Existential Impact of Transcendence (3) The Iggul HaGadol Effect (1) Ayin Beis Volume 1, Discourse 16, Ki Tovo, Chapter 62 p. 116-117 Short Summary: Impact of the higher macro-cosmic transcendent energy (thiru ilaah; iggul hagadol) on existence: bittul of the containers, the body, which reaches deeper than the bittul of the energy. Long Summary: All the above (chapters 60-61) is about the impact of Adam Kadmon on existence: Though it is a distant transcendent force (makif ha'rachok), it still has some relationship with existence, and thus has some conscious effect on souls. But the higher pre-tzimtzum transcendent energy, the higher purity (thiru ilaah), which (after the tzimtzum) is the level of the "great sphere" (iggul hagadol) that precedes the ray of light (kav), though it too encompasses all, it has no relationship with existence and thus has no conscious effect. Yet also this dimension has an impact on existence: the bittul of the containers - their receptivity to contain energy, and in a way that they can utterly unite with the energy - originates from their root in the transcendent "higher purity"/"great sphere" (which is why the containers are round). This bittul of the containers reaches deeper than the bittul of the energy, as per the explanation in the Midrash that "Isaac's ram stretched out its arm and touched the talit (prayer shawl) of Abraham": Abraham is the level of the kav (rooted in the hidden tiferet). Abraham's talit (makif) is the "great sphere" which precedes the kav. Due to the binding (akeidah) of Issac, which is the offering the body (the container) as a korban, Issac's ram (which replaced him as the offering) reached and touched the "great sphere." This is because the sacrifice offering of the body reaches a greater place than the sacrifice offering of the soul. In our service this bittul of the body (container) is the power of offering (korbanot), in which the physical fat and blood are consumed by the heavenly fire. Similarly, when we fast and sacrifice our bodily fat and blood to G-dliness. This is also the greatness of Yom Kippur when we afflict our bodies, which reaches higher than teshuvah (of our souls). This bittul of the body - uniting with the divine - reaches the higher macro-cosmic transcendent energy (makif ha'kloli). And that is why in the future. when the higher transcendent energy will be revealed, and the kav will reach and reveal the bottom of the "great sphere," the body will be G-dly due to the revelation of the transcendent energy, which is reached explicitly through the bittul of the containers. Concepts: Iggul HaGadol. Tehiru I'laah Transcendence (chapters 49-83)
01:44:55
April 12, 2021
Ayin Beis Chapter 61 : Existential Impact of Transcendence with Rabbi Simon Jacobson
Existential Impact of Transcendence (2) The Adam Kadmon Effect (2) Ayin Beis Volume 1, Discourse 16, Ki Tovo, Chapter 61 p. 113-116 Short Summary: Additional impact of A"K on existence: 1) concealed love in every soul, mesirat nefesh, supra-rational faith. 2) kabolat ol malchut shomayim - naaseh that preceded nishma - bittul to the source of desire (baal ha'ratzon). Long Summary: [Continuing the discussion of A"K's impact on existence, he adds a second type of impact -- the effect that the internal dimension of A"K has on souls]. We can additionally explain [the impact of A"K on existence] based on Likkutei Torah (Tazria 21a), that though A"K cannot manifest in an internal/conscious way, a reflection of its energy must infuse souls: A"K infuses the soul with its transcendent nature to expire in its yearning for the divine; the soul's deep seated supra-rational faith and hidden love, which is why every Jew has the capacity to give his life to sanctify G-d (mesirat nefesh al kiddush Hashem). and he has the ability and free will to reveal this dimension into his consciousness. This energy comes from the inner dimension of A"K, while the bittul of "all that stand upright" in existence in general (discussed in the previous chapter) originates from the outer dimension of A"K. We can further understand the energy of A"K in souls as being expressed in their total devotion (kabolat ol malchut shomayim) to the source, the "Master of desire" (baal ha'ratzon), which is higher than and precedes their commitment to His actual desires (kabolat ol mitzvot), "we will do then we will listen" (naaseh preceding nishma), to the point that he has pleasure from serving the divine, and even higher: his pleasure is from the pleasure of the master. Concepts: Adam Kadmon. Transcendence (chapters 49-83)
01:44:06
March 22, 2021
Ayin Beis Chapter 60 (2): Existential Impact of Transcendence with Rabbi Simon Jacobson
Existential Impact of Transcendence (1) The Adam Kadmon Effect (1) Ayin Beis Volume 1, Discourse 16, Ki Tovo, Chapter 60 p. 112-113 Short Summary:  Long Summary: Concepts: Adam Kadmon. Transcendence (chapters 49-83)
01:23:11
March 15, 2021
Ayin Beis Chapter 60 (1): Existential Impact of Transcendence with Rabbi Simon Jacobson
Existential Impact of Transcendence (1) The Adam Kadmon Effect (1)  Ayin Beis Volume 1, Discourse 16, Ki Tovo, Chapter 60 p. 112-113 What impact does the macro-cosmic transcendent energy (makif ha'kloli) have on existence? And what difference in impact is there between the two levels of transcendent energy, the one before the tzimtzum (tehiru Il'aah) and the one after the tzimtzum (tehiru ta'taah, Adam Kadmon)? We can understand the impact of Adam Kadmon (or abbreviated as A"K) on existence based on the concept that "the entire structure -- of A"K -- shall prostrate before you." Due to its close proximity to the divine, A"K stands in complete subjugation (bittul) to the divine. And this subjugation effects all the worlds, because A"K is like a blueprint - a snapshot - that encompasses all of existence. However, this bittul embedded in existence is very concealed and not consciously felt by existence, because the "image" of existence in A"K is in a state of "makif," transcendent and beyond the consciousness and awareness of existence. As such, the "one glance" and knowledge of A"K (which knows and sees every detail of existence) has no impact and influence on our free will to choose as we see fit. (Even though the divine knowledge alone, in its omnipotent power, can create existence, that is only "after" it arises in His desire to create, but before that, though He knows it all, His omnipotent power also has the ability that this knowledge not create). To the extent, that one can choose the opposite of bittul and completely separate from the divine. One can say that this bittul (of A"K) in existence allows it to receive life which comes from the divine source. Bittul - receptivity - is the container to receive divine life, therefore even the "other side" must have some form of bittul and subordination). Yet, it is completely concealed. Concepts: Adam Kadmon. Transcendence (chapters 49-83) Sources: This chapter can be properly understood after studying its sources. The central theme of the chapter -- the impact on existence of the general makif, the all encompassing transcendence of Adam Kadmon (tehiru ta'toah) -- is based on the Alter Rebbe's discourse of Shabbat Parshat Tisa 5565 (Maamorei Admur HaZakon 5565 pp. 326 (two versions, with one being the hanocho written by the Mitteler Rebbe). The Tzemech Tzedek's version, with additions, is in Biurei HaZohar pp. 256. The overall discussion in this discourse is an explanation of the nature of Adam Kadmon, its role and impact on existence. Adam Kadmon -- lit. "primordial man" -- is the first entity to emerge after the tzimtzum. It is the general plan and Divine will to create (tehiru ta'taah); the macrocosmic snapshot of all of existence -- encompassing the entire structure of all time and space in one picture, "He gazes and sees to the end of all generations...with one glance" (Talmud, Rosh Hashana 18b). Yet, the "image" in Adam Kadmon (or abbreviated as A"K) is a state of "makif," transcendent and beyond the consciousness and awareness of existence. As such, the "one glance" and knowledge of A"K (which knows and sees every detail of existence) has no impact and influence on our free will to choose as we see fit.
02:06:48
March 07, 2021
Ayin Beis Chapter 59: Transcendence Meets Immanence with Rabbi Simon Jacobson
Anatomy of Transcendence (3) Transcendence Meets Immanence Ayin Beis Volume 1, Discourse 15, Ki Teitzei, Chapter 59 p. 109-111 Short Summary: Transcendence has a relationship with immanence. Thus there are levels in transcendent energy commensurate to the immanent energy. Yet, from the perspective of transcendence even the immanent (which is shefa from its own persective and ours below) is like light.
02:02:56
March 01, 2021
Ayin Beis Chapter 58: Anatomy of Transcendence with Rabbi Simon Jacobson
Anatomy of Transcendence (2) Transcendence: Everywhere -- But Concealed Ayin Beis Volume 1, Discourse 15, Ki Teitzei, Chapter 58 p. 106-109 Short Summary: Transcendent energy is within all of existence. It actually is the primary force of creation, and the source of all revelations, even of the immanent energy. Yet, it remains concealed as it is not manifest and enclothed in the parameters of existence.  Long Summary: This does not mean that the transcendent energy (ohr makif) surrounds and is not within existence. Quite the contrary: It is actually the primary force that brings creation into being, and the source of all revelations, even of the immanent energy. Like the desire that controls and reveals all the faculties, even though its is removed from them. With the qualification that the soul's desire does not have the power to create; while divine desire is the primary force of creation. Immanent energy, which is commensurate to the existence it energizes, can only bring onto being an ethereal entity that is identical to itself, not the creation of a coarse yesh. Transcendent energy -- the divine desire that guides everything in existence -- is also the  source of all revelations, including that of the immanent energy, and including any increased flow of immanent energy, like the divine revelation in the holy Temple. Yet, this transcendent energy remains concealed, as it is not manifest and enclothed in the parameters of existence. Though it contains ("grasps") and governs everything equally, nothing -- "no thought can contain it," unlike the immanent energy which serves existence ans is manifest and contained in each respective level accordingly. In its pre-tzimtzum root, these two energies originate from the divine energy that envisions existence (shi'ur atzmo b'koach), with all its parameters; and the energy whose only role is to express its source, and thus does not manifest in any internal way, and is therefore without any hierarchy and differentiation; it encompasses all of existence, from the highest to the lowest levels, equally. Concepts: Ohr Makif. Transcendent Energy. Transcendence (chapters 49-83)
01:58:16
March 01, 2021
Ayin Beis Chapter 57: Anatomy of Transcendence with Rabbi Simon Jacobson
Anatomy of Transcendence Ayin Beis Volume 1, Discourse 15, Ki Teitzei, Chapter 57 p. 104-106 Short Summary: Transcendent energy has two dimensions: 1) Its essence only expresses its source and is thus utterly seamless without any relationship to anything but the source, and therefore has no name (unlike the immanent energy which has a function to perform in existence, and thus has defined substance). 2) Its expansion effects something (and is called "desire"), yet does not manifest internally and remains a transcendent force. Long Summary: Question: The sun and the soul both have a function in existence to effect something (the sun: to illuminate the earth; the soul: to enliven), and are not merely expressing the essence (giliu ha'etzem). Also the transcendent energy (ohr makif) performs functions in the worlds. So what is the difference between the transcendent energy and the immanent energy? From the examples (of the sun and the soul) it is understood that anything on the level of ohr (light), even that which produces something, does not perform the way shefa does. Shefa manifests and is contained in the process, while ohr does not, which is why sunlight and the energy of the soul emanate equally regardless of the recipient. The primary difference between the two is in their root: The transcendent energy (ohr) emanates from its source in a state of ayin (without form or substance), since it only comes to reveal its source; the immanent energy (shefa) emanates in a defined way that has substance and identity, because its role is to effect existence, and only something of substance can have a defined effect. The immanent energy thus effects bittul in existence, but only the bittul ("ayin" of the yesh ha'nivra) relative to existence. And the transcendent energy effects total bittul ("ayin" of the yesh ha'amiti).  This is the fundamental state of the two energies as they come from the Essence: the essence of the transcendent energy (atzmus ha'ohr)  only expresses its source and is thus utterly seamless without any relationship to anything but the source; the immanent energy has a function to perform in existence. However, as these energies extend "outside" of the source (hispashtus ha'ohr) also the transcendent energy effects something (and has at least the name "desire" as opposed to the essence of the energy which has no name at all), yet its effect is completely different then the effect of the immanent energy: The latter manifests in existence in an internal and integrated way. The former, even as it extends and has a relationship with existence, does not manifest internally and remains a transcendent force, because its fundamental "identity" is one that totally reflects its source and is in a state of utter nothingness. This energy thus always remains distant and uncontainable even by the highest levels of existence, and encompasses all of existence equally. Concepts: Ohr Makif. Ohr Pnimi. Transcendent energy. Immanent energy. Transcendence (chapters 49-83) Analysis: Based on this discussion in this chapter its seems apparent that the example of the sun and the soul (to understand transcendent energy) applies only to the expansion of the energy, which effects something, not to the essence of the energy, which only reflects its source. We therefore have no contradiction between that which was stated in ch. 48 that the sun has a function, and is thus an example for the immanent and not the transcendent energy, and the discussion on ch. 55 and on explaining how the sun is an example of the dispassionate transcendent energy -- because the former is discussing the essence of the energy, which is indeed unlike the sun, and the latter is addressing the energy's expression, which is similar to the sun.
01:55:46
February 15, 2021
Ayin Beis Chapter 56: Transcendence and Immanence with Rabbi Simon Jacobson
Ohr and Shefa (4) Transcendence and Immanence Ayin Beis Volume 1, Discourse 14, Shoftim, Chapter 56 p. 101-104 Short Summary: Uncontained sunlight is a better example than the soul which is bound by the body it occupies; the soul's energy is a better example in so far that it is emanates by will. Ohr and shefa are an example for the transcendent and immanent divine energy.
01:48:49
February 08, 2021
Ayin Beis Chapter 55: Ohr and Shefa with Rabbi Simon Jacobson
Ohr and Shefa (3) Ohr: Dispassionate Energy Ayin Beis Volume 1, Discourse 14, Shoftim, Chapter 55 p. 99-101 Short Summary: Emission in the form of ohr, by contrast to shefa, is merely a reflection and expression of the source, without any substance of its own. It therefore has no impact on the transmitter and requires no effort, application and exertion to transmit. Like sunlight and the soul's life force. Long Summary: The nature of ohr, by contrast to shefa, is merely a reflection and expression of the source, without any substance of its own. Like the light of the sun, which is not a "piece" of the sun, as evidenced in the fact that when the its source leaves, like at sunset, the light disappears. Light therefore causes no change and has no impact on the source. The sun is "indifferent' whether it shines or not, because it does not become stronger or weaker in the process. When the sun is blocked by a curtain or clouds it does not impact and weaken the sun at all; it continues to shine regardless (unlike a teacher who cannot transmit if the student is blocked). The sun thus also requires no effort, application and exertion to transmit (like a fire that automatically warms an object placed in it). And the recipient need not prepare itself to receive the benefits of light. On the other hand, ohr has a virtue and advantage over shefa that it is like its source (me'ayn ha'maor, ke'mo ha'etzem), while shefa is only informed by its source (le'fi oifen ha'etzem): An intelligent person expresses his intelligence in his teachings (even in mundane talk), but that which he conveys is not comparable to the way he understands it himself and he has to modify it for his students. Unlike ohr which is exactly like its source. i.e. a radiating light emanating from a luminary (albeit in a diminished form compared to its intensity in its source). Similarly to sunlight is the energy and life force of the soul, which is also only a mere reflection (not the soul's essence), and therefore it has no impact on the source and does not require effort and investment. The diminishment (tzimtzum) of the soul's energy to manifest in a body is only in order for it to have a relationship with the body (similar to the fanning of the flames to bring them closer to warm an object). The preparation of the body to receive the soul is only an overall compatibility ingrained in the creation of the human body that it be an appropriate container for the human soul, unlike the containers  and the organs which require preparation (on their part of the container) to draw into it the faculty's energy (as well as evaluation on the part of the energy how to manifest in the container). Thus the soul's life force energizes the entire body, from head to heel, equally, and there is no difference for the soul whether it enlivens a bulky body or a slim one. All this is because the soul's energy emission is in a form ohr, which is not manifest and contained like shefa.
01:16:54
February 01, 2021
Ayin Beis Chapter 54: Ohr and Shefa with Rabbi Simon Jacobson
Ohr and Shefa (2) Shefa: Invested Energy Ayin Beis Volume 1, Discourse 14, Shoftim, Chapter 54 p. 96-98 Short Summary: Shefa emits something of substance, which manifests, is contained and confined to the object that it transmits to, and thus the transmitter is effected by the flow and must invest himself in the process. Like a teacher who has to apply and exert himself to convey teachings to his students. Long Summary: The nature of shefa (the substantive flow of energy) can be better understood from the way the ethereal faculties manifest in the functions they generate. [In the last chapter he discussed how the more tangible and "earthy" energy -- the power of movement -- manifests in human actions, like throwing and drawing. Now he is discussing how the more delicate faculties -- the cognitive and emotive -- manifest in these same activities. And this will give us more clarity in the nature of shefa, how it invests its energy into the actions it initiates, and how it is effected by this process]. {Whether the act of throwing or drawing, or the act of teaching students, shefa compels the source of the emanation to apply and exert himself to the activity he wants to achieve}.  Throwing an object requires that the thrower invest some intelligence in the process, how to throw and in what direction. The same, and even more so, in drawing. We cannot compare the intelligence and emotions invested in the menial act of throwing to that which is invested in the sophisticated art of drawing. As we see, that once someone trains themselves to throw correctly, they no longer need concentration in the act. While the artist needs to concentrate each time he creates a new work. The example of this above is the creation of the universe, which has in it both an element of "throwing" and "art:" The Sefer HaBahir says that He "took pieces and threw them, and from that the earth was created." This refers to the finite power of the divine, that manifests in existence in a concealed way (like the energy that manifests in throwing an object). The Talmud says that "with ten things the world was created: With wisdom, with understanding, with reason, with strength, with rebuke..." This is how the immanent divine energy manifests within existence, with different degrees of energy manifesting in different creations: some receive their energy primarily from the intellect, and others from the emotions (though in general all of existence is with these 10 things).  Similar to the difference of the amount of energy and passion invested when issuing a command or when speaking words of love or wisdom. The "investment" in the shefa transmission is even more apparent in the teaching process. [The above explained shefa in context of the power of movement, the lowest of the faculties. Now he moves upward to shefa as it is conveying knowledge, which becomes internalized in the student]. Though transmission of knowledge is a reflection (not the essence of the mind itself, which comes through birth), it what is being conveyed is substantial intelligence, which will remain with the student even after the teacher leaves (unlike light/energy, which dissipates once the source is gone). As such -- being a flow of substance -- the teacher must apply and commit himself to the effort, and he is impacted by it. Additionally, because the shefa is meant to be internalized, the best teacher is one who applies himself and strategizes how to effectively reach each individual student so that he can integrate the ideas being conveyed. Thus we see that shefa is distinguished by 1) a transmission of substance, 2) it impacts the transmitter. 3) it requires effort and application.  Concepts: Shefa. Transcendence (chapters 49-83)
01:38:39
January 25, 2021
Ayin Beis Chapter 53: Infinite Light with Rabbi Simon Jacobson
Ohr Ein Sof: Infinite Light Shefa and Ohr (1) Ayin Beis Volume 1, Discourse 14, Shoftim, Chapter 53 p. 94-96 Short Summary: Ohr ein sof means that the energy itself is infinite. We can understand this by examining the difference between shefa (flow) and ohr (light), with shefa being an emission of substance that creates a change and effects its source, and requires investment.
01:57:00
January 17, 2021
Ayin Beis Chapter 52: Faculties and Desire with Rabbi Simon Jacobson
Faculties and Desire (4): Indivisible Will - Impacting Without Being Impacted Ayin Beis Volume 1, Discourse 13, Chapter 52 p. 91-93 Short Summary: Desire fundamentally impacts the faculties but is not impacted by them. Similarly, the transcendent energy impacts everything equally, but is not impacted in return. Long Summary: All this is because the essential power of desire transmits and impacts every organ and faculty. [This doesn't mean the actual essence of the desire. What transmits is a reflection, but this reflection is essential qualitatively speaking, meaning that it is not subject to the gradations and diminshments that the internal faculties experience as they evolve from level to level]. Thus desire has the power and authority to control all the faculties equally. Desire does not completely manifest and reveal itself in the faculties it controls, unlike the internal energy which manifests and is integrated into the containers. It also is not changed or impacted by the faculties it impacts, unlike the containers that impact and change the energies. [Seemingly also desire is impacted when the internal faculties are expressed. Witness the contentment from conceiving an idea or bestowing a favor, or being sated. However, this does not actually reveal any additional desire; it simply is a state of contentment which can cause an awakening. Additionally, the contentment is primarily due to the pleasure derived, not from the faculties themselves].  All this is due to desire being an expression of the soul's essence, beyond manifestation in containers and indivisible. As such, its essential power manifests every where it transmits, impacting all the faculties equally while not mixing and connecting with them. This is an example to understand the transcendent energy above (sovev kol almin), which is the indivisible supernal desire (rotzon ha'elyon). Torah reflects the immanent energy, which has distinctions and levels, and thus there are differences in the different sections of Torah and in the obligation to study Torah. Mitzvos express and reveal the transcendent energy, which is indivisible, and thus from the perspective of the divine desire one should not measure the difference between lenient and harsh mitzvos (which are distinct from the perspective of the immanent energy), and every one is equally responsible for mitzvos. The primary revelation of the supernal desire (which is concealed in mitzvos) is through "love with all your might," which reveals the divine desire (which has no containers) everywhere equally. This explains the opening verse (of the discourse), "and now Israel, what (mah) does G-d already ask of you? Only that you be in awe:" Awe (yirah) is the supra-rational bittul inherent in each soul -- transcendent energy. Love (ahava), on the other hand, is primarily through contemplating and comprehending the divine, which is immanent energy. Therefore, love is something that not every individual can reach, and it consists of many diverse levels. But awe can be expected of everyone, since each soul has it equally (through the Moses within each person), and it is easier to reach (as long as there are no impediments like blatant disregard) than love and internal contemplation, which requires containers and the work of refining them. This is connected to "one hundred" (mah -- mayah), which is the level of keser, implying the revelation of the transcendent energy: Through the hundred blessings the transcendent energy (of the mitzvos) radiates in the immanent energy. Concepts: Desire. Faculties. Transcendent Energy. Transcendence (chapters 49-83)
01:47:23
January 11, 2021
Ayin Beis Chapter 51: Faculties and Desire with Rabbi Simon Jacobson
Faculties and Desire (3): Will Power Ayin Beis Volume 1, Discourse 13, Chapter 51 p. 89-91 Short Summary: The essential power of desire transmits to the faculties and organs. It thus authoritatively controls them and their movement. Long Summary: Unlike the faculties which transmit only a diminished reflection of themselves to the other faculties (the mind itself rests in the brain; only its outer impact manifests in, say, the arms movements), the desire (which has no container) transmits its essential power, undiminished, to the faculties. [In the next chapter he qualifies this by saying that the desire also transmits not its essence, but a reflection, yet without gradations].  Desire thus controls the faculties through rule and authority -- through imposition, not through applying itself to communicating with the faculties. Unlike the mind which also controls the faculties, but only in a form of an integrated energy (ohr pnimi), which applying itself to the emotions -- educating and training them to follow the mind's guidance. The mind with its humility (bittul) also has the ability to tame the emotions (in one of two ways; either it weakens an emotional impulse to follow the minds lead, or its bittul automatically quells the emotions),but this is only possible when the emotions are receptive to the mind, not if they are at overwhelming intensity. Because the way the faculties work is through having a relationship with each other (derech hislabshus), not through force and imposition. Desire, on the other hand, has no "close" relationship with the faculties; being a higher and more powerful force, it subjugates them to follow its interests. This is even more apparent in desire's ability to suppress the faculties: The intellect can limit a faculties expression, but not suppress it entirely. Whereas desire can entirely suppress the faculties (as well as entirely reveal them). For example, Abraham who suppressed his natural love for his only child when he brought Isaac to the akeidah, due to his total commitment to the divine will. The same with mesiras nefesh (giving one's life for G-d), which requires imposition, either by entirely suppressing all of one's faculties and not reckoning with any self-interest, or by an increased revelation of all the faculties sensing that for everything is worth it for G-dliness. This also explains the reason why desire controls movement in the entire body, and why the organs themselves cannot move on their own (without a desire), though they are alive and have the power to move. Even spontaneous movement, even while asleep, is due to the desire's triggering of the nerves, leaving an impression even during sleep (we also see that when you set your desire to something before going to sleep effects you also during sleep), which is why man is responsible for his actions even during sleep. So why is it that the the body's movement is dependent on desire, and not propelled by its own vitality (as we see from the disease called "maniya" in which the organs are perfectly fine, but the desire to trigger movement has left the person). Answer: The life energy that sustains the faculties is an integrated energy (which is commensurate to the faculties) which only has the power to give them vitality; desire, because it is an essential energy (beyond the faculties), has the force and power to compel the organs to move, as well as to open up new channels of intellect (one should study where his heart desires, because desire compels the mind to open up, unlike intellectual exertion which refines the mind). Concepts: Desire. Faculties. Dominance. Persuasion. Transcendence (chapters 49-83) Points to Consider: What is the "maniya"disease referred to in this chapter?
01:50:34
January 04, 2021
Ayin Beis Chapter 50: Faculties and Desire with Rabbi Simon Jacobson
Faculties and Desire (2): Process vs. No Process Ayin Beis Volume 1, Discourse 13, Chapter 50 p. 88-89 Short Summary: Unlike the internal faculties which manifest each in its respective container, and thus require time, training and conditioning to communicate with each other and to grow, develop and mature, desire does not occupy any container, and thus instantly effects the entire organism, and does not grow over time. Long Summary: Desire does not occupy any container, meaning that it does not manifest internally in  any part of the organism. The proof of this is that the desire's effect is an instant one. As soon as a desire rises to, say, move the arm, the arm moves instantly, without any delay. If the desire was internally manifest in a container, it would inevitably require time to effect the other organs and faculties. Unlike the internal  faculties, which manifest each in its respective container (with the energy committed to and integrated with its container), and thus require time, training and conditioning to communicate with each other and to grow, develop and mature. The immanent faculties have a "relationship" with each other, and thus need to communicate with each other, which is a process that requires applying oneself to time and training. Like a transmitter and a recipient: to transmit knowledge the teacher has to prepare himself to speak to the level of the student, and the student needs to prepare himself to receive from the teacher. So too with the faculties: when a person learns to draw, for example -- the mind needs to train the hands in the proper technique, and the hands needs to be prepared with the right conditioning and habits. A process that takes time. Similarly, the growth and maturity of the faculties is a process that happens over years. "Days speak, and many years impart wisdom" (Job 32:7). Desire on the other hand does not undergo any changes and is not subject to any process. Though desires become incidentally more subdued and concealed as the internal faculties mature and take hold, they still remain fundamentally unchanged. Concepts: Immanent Energy. Transcendent Energy. Faculties. Desire. Transcendence (chapters 49-83)
59:57
December 28, 2020
Ayin Beis Chapter 49: Faculties and Desire with Rabbi Simon Jacobson
Faculties and Desire Ayin Beis Volume 1, Discourse 13, Chapter 49 p. 85-88 Short Summary: The difference between the immanent energy, which is only a reflection that manifests differently in each level, and the transcendent energy, which is an essential force that is equal everywhere, is like the difference between the faculties and desire: the faculties are defined entities outside of the essential soul each with its own distinct function, while desire has no distinct identity and function, and only reflects the soul's inclinations.
02:11:29
December 21, 2020
Ayin Beis Chapter 48: Immanent and Transcendent Energy with Rabbi Simon Jacobson
Immanent and Transcendent Energy Ayin Beis Volume 1, Discourse 12, Chapter 48 p. 83-85 Short Summary: The purpose of the internal energy (pnimn) is to serve existence: the emotional sefirot are needed for creation; the intellectual ones bring about revelation. However the transcendent energy (makif) does not serve any purpose other than reflecting its source.
01:53:52
December 14, 2020
Ayin Beis Chapter 47: Purpose of Atzilus with Rabbi Simon Jacobson
Purpose of Atzilus: The Cognitive Spheres Ayin Beis Volume 1, Discourse 12, Chapter 47 p. 81-83 Short Summary: The purpose of the intellectual attributes is also to serve existence. The purpose of all the sefirot of Atzilus -- including the intellect -- is to serve existence.
01:54:15
December 07, 2020
Ayin Beis Chapter 46: Purpose of the Spheres with Rabbi Simon Jacobson
Purpose of the Spheres Ayin Beis Volume 1, Discourse 12, Chapter 46 p. 80-81 Short Summary: Integrated energy -- the sefirot -- are needed only for existence. Long Summary: All the above is about the integrated energy (ohr pnimi), which manifests in containers, in order to permeate the structure of existence (the "worlds"). Because these defined energies as they are rooted in the pre-tzimtzum boundless light are the level which envisioned and prepared within itself the power (shi'ur atzmo b'koach) to emanate a finite structure. Thus, the energy that results from this does not radiate everywhere equally. Rather, it consists of a hierarchy of levels and gradations -- i.e. the ten sefirot, which are also in the actual energy, and take on substance and shape when they manifest in the containers. However, the transcendent energy (ohr makif), in contrast, does not manifest in containers, because its root in the pre-tzimtzum boundless light is in the infinite light, which reveals and is is similar to the essence. Even though the root of the defined energies is also united with the essence (of the "same garment," min konof, as discussed earlier in chapter 17 and 27), nevertheless this energy only exists in order to bring existence into being. Because were it not for the [interest in creating the structured] worlds, there is no place [no need] for these levels at all (as the Zohar writes). All the sefirot are there for the worlds [and have no other purpose].  Take the sefirah of malchut, sovereignty: Leadership is only possible when there is a nation. The reason for creation is because G-d desired to rule. And since there is no king without a nation, He therefore created worlds over which to rule. Same with the emotional sefirot: In contrast to intellect, which is experienced alone (and when concentration or deliberation is necessary, an other will actually confuse and disturb the intellectual process), and tend to create a sense of separation from others,   emotions are only possible when there is another entity outside of yourself, kindness and compassion can only be directed to another, and by feeling close to the other.  Concepts: The purpose of integrated energy. Sefirot. Emotions. Malchut The Map of Existence -- Internal Energy (chapters 1-48)
01:22:17
November 29, 2020
Ayin Beis Chapter 45 (2): Structure of the Worlds Rabbi Simon Jacobson
Structure of the Worlds: Atzilus, Beriya, Yetzira, Asiya Ayin Beis Volume 1, Discourse 12, Chapter 45 (2) p. 79-80 Short Summary: The structure of the worlds is also defined by a hierarchy of higher and lower. Long Summary: We can say that the comprehension of Beriyah (binah) is like the intellect that relates to the emotions (the subjective value of the idea), mochin d'yenikah, in contrast to the essential intellect itself (which is just the pure unadulterated understanding of the concept), mochin d'gadlus. In divine contemplation this is the comprehension of the divine as it relates to existence and benefits man, as opposed to the divine on its own terms, beyond existence.  Yetzirah is the level of ruach -- emotions. The intellect there is as it governs and controls the emotions. Asiyah is the level of nefesh -- action. The intellect there is functional intelligence -- the lowest level of the mind. Concepts: Structure of the Worlds. The Map of Existence -- Internal Energy (chapters 1-48)
01:31:41
November 29, 2020
Ayin Beis Chapter 45 (1): Structure of the Worlds with Rabbi Simon Jacobson
Structure of the Worlds: Atzilus, Beriyah Ayin Beis Volume 1, Discourse 12, Chapter 45 (1) p. 77-79 Short Summary: The structure of the worlds is also defined by a hierarchy of higher and lower. Long Summary: Just as the specific sefirot are defined by a spiritually structured hierarchy (higher and lower in conceptual/ethereal space), so too are the worlds structured in a hierarchy of levels, and the general sefirot undergo a gradation as they evolve from level to level. Though the same ten sefirot evolve from world to world, they are of a fundamental different nature in each respective world. The ten sefirot of Beriyah are very different from their root in Azilus, as the Tikkunei Zohar says, that the sefirot in Beriyah are only like the image engraved in a seal, not the image itself as they are in the sefirot of Atzilus, and in Yetzirah they are like the image impressed from the seal in wax. Explanation: A screen (parsa) separates atzilus from beriyah. This screen is like an example used to explain a particular concept. The example by definition is "foreign" to the original paradigm, which allows the idea to be conveyed to someone who cannot relate to the original unfiltered concept. The parsa allows us to realte to the divine reality of Atzilus through a different language, paradigm and context than that of Atzilus. Take for example, our corporeal understanding of the divine which is beyond time and space: Everything we understand in this world about the divine is through divine functions which occupy time and space. The only difference is the level of subtlety we can achieve, but even the most refined and abstract human mind cannot truly imagine something beyond space. Even when we envision a paradigm beyond space, spatial context remains our reference point (though it may be concealed). Similar to this contrast between our spatial conceptualization (in the physical world of Asiyah) of a paradigm beyond space and the actual reality beyond space (the spiritual worlds of Biy"a), is the contrast between the comprehension of the divine in Beriyah, which understands the divine using a paradigm that is not divine, and the way the divine is comprehended in Atzilus, which is a divine world, without any "ego" of its own. Though binah of Atzilus nests in Beriyah, there it is separate from chochma, unlike in Atzilus where binah constantly flows from and is connected with and attached to chochma, like a river that flows from its spring. Concepts: Structure of the Worlds. Atzilus and Beriyah. The Map of Existence -- Internal Energy (chapters 1-48)
01:40:08
November 23, 2020
Ayin Beis Chapter 44: Spherical Structure with Rabbi Simon Jacobson
Spherical Structure: Measure, Parameter, Boundary Ayin Beis Volume 1, Discourse 11, Chapter 44 p. 75-77 Short Summary: The structure of the sefirot and the cosmic order -- the fundamental identity of each dimension, its form of expression and degree of energy, and its diminishment through the containers -- is shaped by the kav, which is rooted in the ten hidden sefirot. Long Summary: [This chapter rounds out and concludes the discussion that began in chapter 29 explaining the three levels of the integrated energies]. The Zohar says that every sefirah has a measure (midah), a parameter (gevul) and a boundary (techum). The difference between the three: 1) Measure is the fundamental identity of each sefirah. 2) Parameter is the the sefirah's form of expression and degree of energy, revealed or diminished. 3) Boundary is the limit imposed on the energy by the container (diminishing its lower levels), allowing the emanation of the lower sefirot. The kav ha'midah (measuring line) is the thread of energy that measures and defines all three dimensions of the sefirot -- its identity, parameter and boundary. This is due to the fact that the kav in its root contains ten sefirot -- the ten hidden sefirot. And via the tzimtzum the ten sefirot become distinct. Yet, they still remain in a relatively shapeless state (a line that contains a multitude of points), until the energy manifest in containers, where their identities become increasingly apparent as they assume substance and their defined structures. This explains the verse Tzion b'mishpat te'podeh v'shoveoh b'tzedaka: The work in the structure (mishpat) allows us to reach beyond structure (tzion), and redeem the trappings (shoveoh) of the structure. Concepts: Spherical Structure. The Kav. The Map of Existence -- Internal Energy (chapters 1-48)
01:51:10
November 17, 2020
Ayin Beis Chapter 43: Hierarchy of the Spheres with Rabbi Simon Jacobson
Hierarchy of the Spheres Ayin Beis Volume 1, Discourse 11, Chapter 43, p. 74-75 Short Summary: The "spatial" structure of the sefirot is defined by both the intensity of their energy and their fundamental personalities, with chochma being the "closest," i.e. the highest level of divine awareness, emotions more distant and apart, and malchut the "lowest" level with the least revealed energy. Long Summary: [He now concludes the discussion that began in chapter 37 explaining the gradations of the light in the sefirot, as the Etz Chaim writes that in chochma the light shines "up close;" in binah from "a distance"]. This explain the words of the Etz Chaim that in chochma the light shines "up close" and in binah from "a distance:" Closeness and distance is not as we envision physical proximity. Rather, it refers to conceptual juxtaposition, with chochma being "closer" as in both 1) receiving more energy as well as 2) being fundamentally a higher state of being. An example for this closeness is a great scholar who speaks at length with an average person. In so doing he draws the person close to him through transmitting to him an abundance of energy. This closeness is amplified when the scholar speaks to him with a pleasant and affable countenance. So too in chochma the divine energy shines "up close," in abundance. Additionally, chochma also contains the essence of the concept, which is revealed in seeing the face of the teacher (the pleasant countenance). Moreover, chochma's "closeness" to the divine is one of commonality -- chochma is aligned with the divine that is beyond comprehension, like the close relationship between two individuals whose ideas are aligned with one another, like the closeness between cousins and relatives (kerovim). This spatial hierarchy (which designates the levels of chochma and binah) also defines the position of intellect and emotions -- with intellect being "higher" than emotions due to both above-mentioned factors: 1) A greater measure of energy, and 2) fundamentally and qualitatively a higher dimension. The mind is superior to feelings in several ways: 1) It comprehends the very essence of the subject, while feelings experience only the emotional reaction to the subject, 2) It connects and bonds to the subject; excitement (feelings) about the subject is an outer experience (you are excited about something outside of you). 3) Intellect is self contained, while emotions require another individual outside of the person. This spatial hierarchy defines the structure -- higher and lower -- of all the sefirot, all the way down to malchus, the lowest of all the sefirot, "lowest" both 1) in the degree of revealed energy - malchus, the moon, has no light of its own, and 2) in its fundamental character - malchus is only possible over others, meaning that its entire identity is outside of itself. [This begins to wind down the discussion that began in chapter 33 about the spatial structure of existence. This discussion will continue and conclude in the next two chapters, 44-45]. Concepts: Chochma's "closeness" to the divine. Intellect and emotions. The Map of Existence -- Internal Energy (chapters 1-48)
01:37:44
November 09, 2020
Ayin Beis Chapter 42: Resonance and Conviction of Intelligence with Rabbi Simon Jacobson
Short Summary: Though chochma is cognitive intelligence, it is primarily the resonating conviction that is beyond comprehension, thus rendering it as a fundamentally different entity than binah. Long Summary: In truth, chochma primarily is not comprehension but the resonating conviction (hanocha b'nefesh) that is beyond cognitive intelligence (this is lower that the visual dimension of chochma). This is demonstrated in a number of profound and brilliant ideas which are beyond comprehension, yet they have a place in the intelligence of the wise scholars, due to the their resonating element. The intelligent aspect of chochma, which can later be comprehended, is only its external dimension. As we see when one struggles with a dilemma and then has an epiphany, there is a resonating clarity that he experiences which is concealed once he begins to break down the idea into details. The way to reclaim the clarity is to reconnect and return to the point of departure when he first experienced the epiphany. This clarity in turn opens up a flow of many ideas in binah to understand and comprehend the concept. Chochma is thus the higher perspective (daas elyon): In it radiates the reality of the Divine essence (Yesh ha'Amiti), compared to which comprehension is utterly nullified (ayin). Chochma, is the level of kodesh, which stands apart from comprehension, like oil that floats above, and does not get mixed with, wine. Yet, chochma is the source and root of the comprehension of binah. Thus we see that chochma is higher than binah not just due to the fact that it contains more energy, but because it is fundamentally different and greater than binah. [This concludes the discussion that began in chapter 38. And now he continues in the next chapter explaining the Etz Chaim that the divine energy radiates in chochma up close and in binah from a distance etc. -- concluding the discussion that began in chaper 37].
01:48:57
November 02, 2020
Ayin Beis Chapter 41: Dissecting Intelligence with Rabbi Simon Jacobson
Dissecting Intelligence Is Chochma Beyond Intelligence? Ayin Beis Volume 1, Discourse 11, Chapter 41, p. 70-71 Short Summary: Though chochma is cognitive intelligence, within it radiates an essential resonance that is beyond comprehension, thus rendering it as a fundamentally different entity than binah. Long Summary: Question: Chochma after all (at least in its lower levels) is cognitive intelligence. So how can we say that it is fundamentally different and greater than binah, which is the comprehension of the point of chochma (and every comprhension is only in the existence of the comprehended object, not its essence)? Ostensibly one can say that chochma's relationship to cognition is due to a diminished state of energy in chochma itself in order to allow it to be understood in binah (thus retaining its essential superiority to binah). But in addition to the apparent understanding in this discussion that chochma in general (even in its lowest levels) is essentially higher than binah, we cannot say that chochma's cognition is due just to diminished energy, because the transition from chochma as an essential experience (like sight) to cognition is a fundamental change of "personality" (shinui ha'mehus), and we cannot say that an entity can change its essential personality from one level to the next within that entity.  We will understand this by prefacing that chochma and binah are called "ayin" (substanceless) and "yesh" (substance): Contrary to cause and effect (ilah v'olul) in which the effect exists due to its comprehension and appreciation of its cause, a "yesh" (binah) exists as a result of it NOT comprehending its source (chochma), which is precisely why it has substance. But how can we say that chochma and binah are that far apart when the conceptual point of chochma is comprehended in binah, and all of binah is an understanding of chochma? We therefore must conclude that the essence of radiates even in the cognitive concept of chochma, which cannot be comprehended by binah, thus even the essential cognition of chochma is concealed from binah like an "ayin." Only an external expression of chochma is revealed in binah, in a diminished form, but binah is not just lacking the abundant energy of chochma; it also lacks the essential resonance of chochma, which is totally concealed once the comprehension begins. Concepts: Chochma as intelligence or beyond. The Map of Existence -- Internal Energy (chapters 1-48)
02:02:35
October 26, 2020
Ayin Beis Chapter 40 (2): Vows and their Absolution with Rabbi Simon Jacobson
Vows and their Absolution Ayin Beis Volume 1, Discourse 10, Chapter 40, p. 68-70 Short Summary: Explanation of the chapter on vows in this Torah portion based on the difference between chochma and binah. Long Summary: Based on the above explanation of chochma and binah we can understand the chapter of vows (in this week's Torah portion): Everything material is under the control of kelipat nogeh -- the shining husks in which the light is intermingled with the shell. This dimension (unlike the Shalosh Kelipot Hatmayot, "three totally impure Kelipot") can be uplifted and refined; its spiritual potential can be redeemed by man's constructive intent while making use of the physicality in which it is vested. Vows of abstinence are a result of someone who feel that he cannot withstand the challenges of material life and needs extra precaution. Vows are related to the level of binah, the beginning of the structure of existence, where abstinence may be necessary. Absolving vows comes from chochma, which come from a level higher than the structure, and thus can transform the material, instead of abstaining from it (like the pleasure from food and drink on Shabbat). This is the meaning in the opening of the Torah chapter on vows: "Moses spoke to the heads of the tribes and told them this is the thing" refers to chochma (Moses), which is higher than the structure, and therefore has the power to absolve vows and infuse binah with transformative power. Concepts: Vows and their absolution. The Map of Existence -- Internal Energy (chapters 1-48)
01:25:35
October 19, 2020
Ayin Beis Chapter 40 (1): Chochma: Essential Wisdom with Rabbi Simon Jacobson
Chochma: Essential Wisdom (2) Cause and Effect Type II: Intellectual Transmission Ayin Beis Volume 1, Discourse 10, Chapter 40, p. 67 Short Summary: The progression of cause and effect (both types) are not applicable to chochma, which experiences the essence (like sight) and is thus higher than the cosmic progression. Long Summary: The second type of cause and effect is that both are the same entity. Like within the intellect itself (in contrast to intellect and emotions) -- the idea that is transmitted from teacher to student is not a new concept. Though the transmitted idea is only a reflection of the outer levels of the teacher's comprehension, its still the same idea. And the recipient (the effect) has a commonality with the transmitter (the cause), coupled with the capacity to grow and get more refined and closer to the concept as it is in the source. But this progression of cause and effect (both types) is possible only on the level of expression, not on the level of the essence. The same is above: Progression is possible only on the expressive Divine levels which we are capable of comprehending. But in the incomprehensible essence there is no progression. This is the level of chochma, which  is higher than the cosmic progression: Like sight, the essence of chochma experiences the essential resonating truth, which is beyond comprehension. Concepts: Progression of cause and effect. Chochma beyond the cosmic progression. The Map of Existence -- Internal Energy (chapters 1-48)
01:41:27
September 14, 2020
Ayin Beis Chapter 39: Chochma: Essential Wisdom (1) with Rabbi Simon Jacobson
Chochma: Essential Wisdom (1) Cause and Effect Type I: Intellect and Emotions Ayin Beis Volume 1, Discourse 10, Chapter 39, p. 66-67 Short Summary: Chochma grasps the essence of the subject; binah just its expression. Chochma is higher than the cosmic progression, which is possible only on the expressive level. Two types of progression of cause and effect: 1) The cause and the effect are two different entities, 2) They are one entity. Long Summary: The primary difference between chochma and binah ia that chochma grasps the essence of the subject; binah just its expression. The essence of something has no dimensions with which to grasp it. Chochma is higher than the cosmic progression (seder hishtalshilus), which is possible only on the expressive level, where there are gradations. Explanation (which concludes in chapter 40): There are two types of progression of cause and effect (ilah ve'olul): 1) The cause and the effect are two different entities, yet one is born out of the other, like a child emerging from a womb, 2) They are one entity, like a branch growing out of a tree. An example of the former are the feelings that are born out of cognitive contemplation. Emotions and intellect are fundamentally two different entities. Yet, the emotions are conceived through an understanding and appreciation of the object (that one will have an emotional relationship with). Indeed, the emotions actually begin to take shape within the mind and the cognitive process. These are called the emotions within the intellect (midos she'be'mochin), the stirrings of feelings and excitement in the mind about a particular object. Obviously, these emotions are far more subtle and conceptual than than the full blown and sensory emotions, yet they are still in the category of emotions that are a different entity than intellect, which is fundamentally detached and unemotional. For the primary element of emotions is its subjective nature -- that I am attracted to the object and it's good for me. The emotions within the intellect comprehend the objective, not the subjective value of the object. But this objective feeling (about the value of the object) is the source that gives birth to the subjective emotions that feel the personal value in this object. As such, being a separate entity, when these emotions emerge from the mind, that are an expression only of the extension and external intellect. Elsewhere is explained that the emotion in the intellect (appreciating and getting excited about the value of something), and the birth of the emotions in the heart are a reflection of the mind which bear the feelings. According to this we can say that the effect is a reflection of the cause (the second form of progression mentioned above). Concepts: Chochma and Binah. Intellect and Emotions. Cause and Effect The Map of Existence -- Internal Energy (chapters 1-48)
01:58:39
September 07, 2020
Ayin Beis Chapter 38: Cause and Effect with Rabbi Simon Jacobson.
Cause and Effect  Ayin Beis Volume 1, Discourse 10, Chapter 38, p. 64-66 Short Summary: The vertical structure of the spheres-- with one being higher than the other -- is due to the unique personality of each level and its inherent and essential qualities. Long Summary: [In the previous chapters we discussed the hierarchy of the spheres and worlds based on their relationship with each other -- how they evolve from one another -- that their status (higher or lower) is defined by the measure of energy flowing from one level to the next, with the lower levels receiving a diminished degree of energy. Now, in this chapter, we discover that the quality of each level, whether it is higher or lower, is defined by its essential personality (not by the measure of energy). On the contrary: the measure of energy results from the essential quality of each respective level. in other words: the distinction between sphere and world and the next is not relative but absolute]. The "vertical" hierarchy of the sefirot -- with one being higher than the other -- is not due merely to the relative flow of energy from one level to the next (with the lower levels being defined by their diminished energy, including the concealment that takes place in each level even before it transmits to the next level), but to the unique personality of each level and its inherent and essential qualities. Indeed, this fundamental state of each level is the cause for its degree of energy. The upper spiritual worlds above Atzilus are fundamentally higher than Atzilus: They manifest and relate to the essence (atzmus u'mhus) of the kav, while Atzilus only manifests and relates to its reflection, its existence, but not its inner personality. Beyond that, Adam Kadmon is inherently superior to the worlds beneath it, since it manifests the primordial desire for existence. So too in the sefirot, Chochma is fundamentally higher than Binah, because though it is in the cognitive realm (unlike Keter, desire), it is higher than comprehension and expresses a dimension that is beyond reason.
01:59:04
August 31, 2020
Ayin Beis Chapter 37: Measures of Energy with Rabbi Simon Jacobson
Measures of Energy Ayin Beis Volume 1, Discourse 10, Chapter 37, p. 62-64 Short Summary: The vertical structure of the spheres is defined by the measure of emanating energy/light. Long Summary: The "vertical" hierarchy of the sefirot is defined by the measure of revealed energy: The more the energy, the higher the level; the less the energy, the lower the level. And the amount of energy is determined by the "closeness" and "distance" of the entity to its source. Thus, "higher" refers to the levels that are "closer" to the top of the kav and receive the most revealed amount of its energy; "lower" are the levels that are "farther" from the top and receive more diminished and concealed amounts of energy from the kav, like the difference between someone who is close or distant from the light of a flame. This explains the gradations of the light in the sefirot, as the Etz Chaim writes that in Chochma the light shines "up close," in Binah from "a distance," in Z"a "through a window" and in Malchut "through a hole." This is referring to spiritual/conceptual (not  physical) space, based on the levels of revealed energy: the point of Chochma contains an abundance of intellectual energy, which gets diminished and concealed in the comprehension of Binah. In the emotions (Z"a) the energy gets further diminished, like sunlight shining through a window in contrast to the unfettered light outdoors -- similar to the summary of a legal ruling that is a result of extensive arguments and discussions, yet they are all concealed in the final ruling (like the Mishne compared to the Gemara). In Malchut the energy is further concealed, like loving words (or words that come from love) that conceal the intensity of the feeling (which could not be expressed when one is in the throes of the emotion).  [The following chapters continue to dissect the cause for the hierarchical structure of the spheres, including the difference between Chochma and Binah, and in chapter 43 he concludes the explanation (that begins in this chapter) in the words of the Etz Chaim that in Chochma the light shines "up close," in Binah from "a distance"].  Concepts: Higher and Lower. Measures of Energy. The Map of Existence -- Internal Energy (chapters 1-48) Sources: Maamorei Admur Hazakon Inyanim p. 33. 40. (Partially printed also in Maamorei Admur Hazakon 5567 p. 95). Imrei Binah Shaar HaKeriyas Shema chs. 35-36. Sefer HaMaamorim 5627 p. 324. 5629 p. 347.
01:28:49
August 24, 2020
Ayin Beis Chapter 36: Who Shapes the Hierarchy? with Rabbi Simon Jacobson
Who Shapes the Hierarchy? Ayin Beis Volume 1, Discourse 9, Chapter 36, p. 60-62 Short Summary: The hierarchical structure of the cosmic order is shaped primarily through the energy -- the kav. Long Summary: In truth, the hierarchical structure of the cosmic order, the worlds and the spheres, is shaped not just by the containers, but primarily through the energy -- the kav. And even the shape of the containers (though they have their own distinct root, which is higher than energies, and in the root the definitions of the containers precedes that of the energies, yet in the process they are) actualized through the "thickness" of the energies. As explained in Etz Chaim, the kav (line of light/energy) shapes the diversity of the structure: Like a line that extends from the top down (not quite reaching the bottom of the circle), the kav defines what is higher and what is lower. The levels that emerge from the "upper" part of the kav contain greater energy, defining them as a higher dimension, while the levels emergng from the "lower" part of the kav radiate with less energy, signifying their lower status. In truth, both the energy and the containers shape the structure: Initially, the process begins with the energy (the kav) measuring and defining the levels, including fashioning the containers. Then, as the containers are refined they draw down additional energy commensurate to their parameters. All this is possible only in integrated energy (ohr pnimi), in which defined energies manifest in defined containers -- the diverse structure of the ten sefirot, which consist of a hierarchical order both from the perspective of the energies and the containers. Concepts: Energies and Containers. Kav.
01:38:36
August 17, 2020
Ayin Beis Chapter 35: Structure of the Worlds with Rabbi Simon Jacobson
Structure of the Worlds Ayin Beis Volume 1, Discourse 9, Chapter 35, p. 59-60 Short Summary: The structure of the cosmic order -- like the body -- is defined by three levels, which are distinguished by the proportion between energy and container. Long Summary: Just like the ten spheres the "worlds" (dimensions) of the cosmic order (seder histalshilus) consist of a graded structure, a hierarchy of higher and lower levels, defined by the balance between energy and container, with the general rule being that fewer and smaller containers signify greater energy, and more and substantive containers signify less energy. The cosmic order is defined in general by three worlds and levels: Beriyah, Yetzirah and Asiya. Similar to the the structure of the human body, which is defined by three levels: Head, Body, Leg (rosh guf regel): The leg comprises the largest part of the body (largest container), but its quality and intensity of life energy is least revealed. The body is smaller, and it contains primary life energy organs (heart and lungs), and has more qualitative revealed life force energy than the leg. Though the hands are outer functions like the legs, yet they are able to express more sublime energy (through writing, drawing, crafting) than the power of walking in the legs and their ability to hold up the body. The head is the smallest part of the body, and has the greatest amount of revealed energy -- the mind and the superior senses (sight, sound). Similarly with the worlds of the cosmic order: Beriyah, with its minute containers that are just beginning to develop, has the greatest amount of energy. Yetzirah, where the containers have substance, has lesser energy. More containers -- less energy. Less containers -- more energy. Therefore Ezekial who saw the chariot of Yetzirah elaborates more than Isaiah who saw the chariot of Beriyah.
01:23:43
August 10, 2020
Ayin Beis Chapter 34: Spatial Structure of the Spheres with Rabbi Simon Jacobson
Spatial Structure of the Spheres (2) Ayin Beis Volume 1, Discourse 9, Chapter 34, p. 57-59 Short Summary: The manifestation and internalization of the energies within the containers are also the cause of the parameters -- higher and lower -- which define the ten spheres.
01:30:32
August 03, 2020
Ayin Beis Chapter 33b: Spatial Structure of the Spheres with Rabbi Simon Jacobson
Spatial Structure of the Spheres Ayin Beis Volume 1, Discourse 9, Chapter 33 (2), p. 56-57 Short Summary: The manifestation and internalization of the energies within the containers are also the cause of the parameters -- higher and lower -- which define the ten spheres. Long Summary: In divine service, when one is contemplating G-dliness, his focus on the concept does not allow for the emergence of an emotional reaction. The attraction to G-dliness -- the feeling that being close to G-d is good for the person -- is a result of the contemplation on G-dliness. But it can only be aroused by concealing -- moving away -- from the intensity of the intellectual idea. Any emotional excitement and impact is outside of the essential experience, i.e. distant from the essence. While you are in the experience, you don't feel the need to be drawn to it. Within the cognitive this is similar to the distinction between chochma and binah; the spark of the idea is experienced in silence; the comprehension in details is experienced with excitement and passion (like the difference between the Kohanim and the Levites). But in general, intellect is bittul, suspension of self, in contrast to the emotions. The emotions are necessary to implement the concept in active mitzvot and to refine the animal soul. But from the perspective of awareness and revelation, the mind is greater than the emotions, being that its bittul generates a higher energy than do the emotions which are self-oriented and connected more to existence. Concepts: Energies and Containers. Spatial Relations: Degrees of Energy The Map of Existence -- Internal Energy (chapters 1-48)
01:05:01
July 27, 2020
Ayin Beis Chapter 33: Spatial Structure of the Spheres with Rabbi Simon Jacobson
Spatial Structure of the Spheres Ayin Beis Volume 1, Discourse 9, Chapter 33 (1), p. 54-56 Short Summary: The manifestation and internalization of the energies within the containers are also the cause of the parameters -- higher and lower -- which define the ten spheres. Long Summary: The manifestation and internalization of the energies within the containers (which are rooted in the ten hidden spheres) are also the cause of the parameters -- the diverse (conceptual) spatial structure and relations, higher and lower, which define the ten spheres (unlike the infinite Divine which does not have any parameters of higher and lower), with chochma being the highest level, and malchut the lowest; intellect higher than emotions. This is due to the fact that the ten spheres consist of energies that are integrated in the containers and function and radiate in direct proportion to the nature of the containers. Higher and lower levels are defined by degrees and gradations of energy as they are generated by their respective containers. [In spiritual or conceptual space, "higher" and "lower" is defined by the intensity of its energy: a sphere evolves from an abstract, ethereal state to successively coarser and more substantial forms. The "distance" of one incarnation from another is the measure of its position and state, as well as its proximity to the other spheres].  Thus, a more subtle, ethereal and refined container generates a higher quality and degree of energy, which turns this into a "higher" level, and a "coarser" container generates a lower level of energy. As evidenced by the soul's faculties: the container of chochma -- the spark of a concept -- is far more ethereal than binah; it is merely a concentrated point in contrast to the elaborate expression and details of binah. As such, the concept in chochma (the point) is most intense and sublime (abstract) and of the highest quality, which gets seriously diminished and diluted in the comprehensive binah comprehension process. (Following binah comes the summary of the idea, which is also a concentrated point, which reintroduces the subtlety of chochma within binah, but not quite with the same sublimity). The containers of the emotions are even less sublime: In contrast to the mind. which is driven by bittul, to go beyond one'd self interest, the essence of an emotion is subjective self-interest -- what's in it for me. Love and fear (and the other emotions) are predicated on a sense of self; they are stimulated by the attraction or repulsion to the object of the emotion.
01:28:19
July 20, 2020
Ayin Beis Chapter 32: From Source to Destination with Rabbi Simon Jacobson
Energy: From Source to Destination Ayin Beis Volume 1, Discourse 8, Chapter 32, p. 52-53 Short Summary: Energies manifests in containers due to the "ten sefirot" that exist in the root of the energy. Long Summary: [This chapter summarizes the last 20 chapters (12--31), which explain the process how energies, rooted in the ten hidden spheres, manifest in containers]. Though the energies take on shape as they manifest in the containers, the root cause  for this manifestation is not due to the containers alone, but to the fact that the energies fundamentally contain ten sefirot and are rooted in the ten hidden spheres -- in the divine energy that envisioned this ten sphere structure (as in  the example of the chesed./gevurah distinction between Shammai and Hillel's understanding of the same concept, which is rooted in the original concept; as well as the distinct features of each human faculty, which is rooted in the soul's energy). Yet, on their own the energies in their source are abstract and all together, and through the tzimtzum they first transmit and emerge as distinct entities in the kav (line), yet still formless as they are under the effect of the transcendence of their source, and then, at the end of the transmission process, as they manifest in containers (the plane), they reveal the finite structure which was concealed in their source. [Conclusion of discourse:] This explains the verse (opening of Balak) Who can count the dust of Jacob or number the seed -- or the fourth -- of Israel? The "seed" refers to Torah and mitzvot that seed and fertilize the souls of Israel (tzaddikim), and elevate them from the level of energy within containers (level one) to energy beyond containers (level two), from the three worlds of Biy"a to the fourth world of Atzilus, to transcend from a finite number that can be counted (ten distinct spheres in defined containers) to beyond number (the ten spheres without substance). "The dust of Jacob" refers to the work of teshuvah to transform the negative impurities and purify them (dust like the ashes of the red heifer, see end of chapter 28) -- which elevates the soul to the highest level of energies in their source, the ten hidden spheres (level three), "You are one but not in the numerical sense," until they even reach the infinite energy that is beyond all. Concepts: Energies and Containers. Souls, Mitzvos and Teshuvah. The Map of Existence -- Internal Energy (chapters 1-48)
01:32:35
July 13, 2020
Ayin Beis Chapter 31: Point Line Plane with Rabbi Simon Jacobson
Point Line Plane Ayin Beis Volume 1, Discourse 8, Chapter 31, p. 50-51 Short Summary: The three levels of energy are like the point, line and plane. Long Summary: The three levels of energy are like the point, line and plane (nekudah, kav, shetach): 1. The root of the energies (in the ten hidden spheres) is like the point -- completely shapeless and amorphous, utterly unified and part of the essence, without any expression and definition. 2. The energies as they emerge post-tzimtzum are like the line, that extends and transmits (length) from the point, yet is still relatively formless. this can be explained in two ways: a) The line is transmitting the energy in gradations, reaching to the lowest levels, like an ideas that is being conveyed from teacher to student, with examples and contexts that reach all levels, even the beginner student. b) The line is made up of points -- it only reveals the essential and formless nature of the point as it stands abstract in the teacher's mind (but does not bring it down to lower levels), and remains relatively shapeless. Like the Mishne, which reveals the point of the written Torah, yet remains amorphous compared to the Gemara. The line is like the word of nekudim -- a line made up of many points -- compared to akudim, where all the energies were bound in one point. 3. The third level in the energies, how they manifest in the containers, is like the plane, where the energies are totally integrated and internalized, to the point that they actually assume definition and personality, commensurate with the containers, and as such have the power to create the lower worlds of Beriyah, Yetzirah, Asiyah (biy"a). This explains the level of Atzilus: the spirit of Moses was imparted upon the elders, and that allowed for the transmission of meat (Numbers Chapter 11). Two steps were necessary for this to happen: the imparting of Moses' spirit, since all transmissions come from Moses; the manifestation in this energy in the containers (the elders), which allows for the transmission even of meat. Concepts: Point, Line, Plane. Atzilus The Map of Existence -- Internal Energy (chapters 1-48)
01:39:57
July 06, 2020
Ayin Beis Chapter 30: Three Levels in Energy with Rabbi Simon Jacobson
hree Levels in Energy (2) Ayin Beis Volume 1, Discourse 8, Chapter 30, p. 49-50 Short Summary: The three levels of energy, with the third level requiring the higher level to achieve unity. Long Summary: The first two levels in the the energies are the two expressions: 1) Ha'melech ha'meromom levado mi'oz (King, who alone is elevated from aforetime) - referring to the ten hidden spheres, the root of the energies as they are encompassed and one in their pre-tzimtzum source, where they are utterly unified and part of the essence, not yet even a source to the spheres that will emerge post-tzimtzum. Though this level envisions the ten spheres, it has not in any form of transmission, and it is only an envisioning of the energies not the containers.  2) V'ha'misnaseh me'yemos olam (exalted from the days of creation) - the energies as they emerge after the tzimtzum as distinct entities, yet have not yet manifested in containers. They therefore still retain the formlessness of their source, and are thus exalted and shapeless relative to the structure, the energies within the containers (the days of creation, yemos olam).  These two levels are Atik (the tem hidden spheres), and Arich. 3) The third level in the energies is how they manifest in the containers, totally integrated and internalized, to the point that they actually assume definition and personality, commensurate with the containers (not just that they appear as such, like colorless liquid in tinted glasses). Since the energies assume the personality of chesed and gevurah (as in the difference between the comprehension of Shammai and Hillel), though they are transcendent by nature, they require a higher revelation (from the source) to allow for their role reversal, interconnectivity, unity and connection with their source. This third level is Ant Hu d'koshir lon u'meyached lon (You are he who binds them together and unites them). Concepts: Three Levels of Energy The Map of Existence -- Internal Energy (chapters 1-48)
01:41:02
June 29, 2020
Ayin Beis Chapter 29b: Three Levels in Energy with Rabbi Simon Jacobson
Three Levels in Energy Ayin Beis Volume 1, Discourse 8, Chapter 29 (2), p. 48-49 Short Summary: The first two of three levels of energy: 1) In the source, and 2) revealed outside of the source. Long Summary: There are in general three levels in the energies (ohros): 1) The root of the energies as they are encompassed and one in their source pre-tzimtzum. The level of Ant Hu chad v'lo b'chushban (You are one but not in the numerical sense) -- absolute and essential oneness (yochid) and formlessness (peshitus). 2)  The energies as they emerge after the tzimtzum as distinct entities, yet they still retain the formlessness of their source, and are thus shapeless relative to the energies as they manifest in the containers. The levl of Ant Hu chakim v'lo c'chochma yediya (You are wise but not with a knowable wisdom). Concepts: Three Levels of Energy The Map of Existence -- Internal Energy (chapters 1-48)
01:43:37
June 22, 2020
Ayin Beis Chapter 29a: Energy Meets Container with Rabbi Simon Jacobson
Energy Meets Container Ayin Beis Volume 1, Discourse 8, Chapter 29 (1), p. 47-48 Short Summary: How the energies manifest in containers. Long Summary: According to the above we can understand how the energies manifest in containers: On one hand, energy and container are proportionately distant from one another, like the distance of a soul and a body. Unlike the container which is not consciously and in any revealed fashion connected to its source (and is thus like a new entity in relation to its source), the energy is always connected to its source, and is only diminished (miyut) by the tzimtzum (and is thus only revealing the concealed, not a new entity). Even compared to the infinite energy light, which is removed (siluk), the finite energy is not an entirely new entity, being that the energy is always connected to its source. On the other hand, because the energy from its very root contains ten sefirot, it is able to manifest in containers and become shaped by them into tangible attributes. Concepts: Energy, Containers The Map of Existence -- Internal Energy (chapters 1-48)
01:39:07
June 15, 2020
Ayin Beis Chapter 28b: Reaching the Infinite with Rabbi Simon Jacobson
Reaching the Infinite Ayin Beis Volume 1, Discourse 7, Chapter 28 (2), p. 46-47 Short Summary: The bridge between existence and transcendence Long Summary: The above explains the opening verse of Parshat Chukas about the red heifer, which purifies from the impurity of death: The divine is concealed in existence (Elokim). In the Garden of Eden there was divine revelation (Havaya, chochma). Through human efforts -- "to serve and protect," Torah, mitzvot and offerings -- we draw down additional divine energy from keser (the 620 pillars of light), rooted in the impression of the infinite energy (sovev) within the finite energy (memaleh).  The service of the the poroh adumah (red heifer), which purifies from impurity, was all done "outside" (of the temple), referring to the work of teshuvah -- "burning" the desires of the evil inclination, breaking it down to ash, the core power of desire (koach ha'misaveh), harnessing and transforming it to the sacred. This teshuvah reaches and draws energy from the synergistic transcendental energy within the ten hidden sefirot, and beyond that -- the infinite energy (the higher Havaya). Concepts: Hidden sefirot; Parah Adumah; Infinite Energy The Map of Existence -- Internal Energy (chapters 1-48) Ten Hidden Sefirot (chapters 18-28)
03:19
June 08, 2020
Ayin Beis Chapter 28: Dual Nature of Light with Rabbi Simon Jacobson
Dual Nature of Light (Kav)  Ayin Beis Volume 1, Discourse 7, Chapter 28, p. 44-45 Short Summary: The dual properties of the kav -- finite and infnite, structure and transcendence. Long Summary: [This chapter concludes the discussion that began in chapter 18, that the kav, (according to the opinion that it is) rooted in the finite energy, is only revealing what was concealed in the ten hidden sefirot (and not a new entity), because the tzimtzum in the kav was only a form of diminishment, not total concealment, like that of the infinite energy]. Thus there are two tzimtzums allowing for the emergence of the distinct sefirot: 1) The tzimtzum of the infinite energy within the finite energy, which is total concealment (siluk), allowing for the finite energy to emerge. 2) The tzimtzum of the finite energy, which separates the individual sefirot from being all joined together as one, allowing for each specific sefirah to manifest. Because the root of the energy of the sefirot is in the finite energy (of the ten hidden sefirot), this tzimtzum is only one of diminishment (miyut), the chochma of the revealed conscious sefirah is fundamentally one with chochma as it stands in its hidden unconscious state, yet it can only emerge after a diminishing of the energy. Based on this we can understand how the kav (according to the opinion in this discourse) is only revealing what was concealed in the ten hidden sefirot (and not a new entity), which was only diminished. But compared to the infinite light -- the synergistic transcendent energy (which needed to be totally concealed) -- the kav is like a new, infinitely distant, entity. And yet, even as the the infinite energy is totally concealed from the finite energy (of the ten hidden sefirot), an impression (reshimu) of the infinite energy remains, and is somewhat revealaed, in the finite energy, and is in turn passed on to the kav. [This impression is not the same reshimu that remains in the letters after the tzimtzum -- the root of the finite power of the containers, which is completely concealed]. One can say that this impression is the transcendent consciousness of chochma (explained in the note in Tanya ch. 35). According to this -- that the kav is both finite energy and also has the impression of the infinite -- we can understand (also according to the opinion discussed here that the kav is rooted in the finite energy) the dual nature and antithetical properties of the kav: The kav not only defines the parameters of existence, but also connects and unites all the detailed components of the structure. Concepts: Hidden sefirot; Malchut of Ein Sof The Map of Existence -- Internal Energy (chapters 1-48) Ten Hidden Sefirot (chapters 18-28) Sources: Two tzimrzums - Maamorei Admur Hazokon Ketzorim p. 440. Inyanim p. 45. Ohr HaTorah Inyanim p. 103.
01:56:44
June 01, 2020
Ayin Beis Chapter 27: Two Tzimtzums with Rabbi Simon Jacobson
Two Tzimtzums Ayin Beis Volume 1, Discourse 7, Chapter 27, p. 43-44 Short Summary: The two concealments allowing the emergence of the spheratic structure. Long Summary: The ten hidden sefirot, besides containing the energy of the entire image of existence (the sefirot), also contain the infinite energy that is beyond the ten sefirot (the level which allows for infinite sefirot), like the transcendent synergistic energy in a word, which comes from a higher intelligence than the words meaning and conceiving the idea itself. Two tzimtzums therefore allow for the emergence of the specific sefirot in Atzilut: 1) The "removal" (siluk) of the infinite energy within the finite energy, 2) The concealment of the finite energy, in which all the sefirot are joined together as one, to allow for individual sefirot to manifest. The ten hidden sefirot, the root of the permeating energy (memalo kol almin), is the level that "arose in His will" (alos ha'ratzon), in which the Source envisions and prepares within himself the power to emanate a finite structure. And this level is connected with and encompassed in the infinite energy, the root of the transcendent energy (sovev kol almin), which precedes this "will" (kodem alos ha'ratzon). Similar to the strands of tzitzit (ohr pnimi, 32 channels of chochma), which extend from the garment (the makif of talit) and are of the same material as the garment (min konof), but are not part of the garment itself (unlike the root of the containers in the finite power before the tzimtzum, which are just letters alone, without a sense of transcendence), the hidden sefirot (root of the finite energies) are connected with and encompassed in -- and similar to -- the transcendence of the infinite light. The process, thus, works like this: In the "lowest" level of the infinite energy arises the "will" which envisions the finite energy (ten hidden sefirot). The two tzimtzumim allow for the individual sefirot to emerge. This explains the seemingly bewildering term used to describe the ten hidden sefirot, atik of a"k, mlachut of ein sof, as the "last" and "lowest" of ein sof (before the tzimtzum): The pre-tzimtzum energy has no parameters, no beginning or end, no top or bottom? Answer: "Last" refers to the final step in which the infinite energy envisions the finite energy of existence. This can be understood from what we discuss later in discourse 110 (p. 938). Concepts: Hidden sefirot; Malchut of Ein Sof; Two Tzimtzumim Points to Consider: On p. 43 he specifically states that according to the explanation in this discourse that the root of the finite energies (memaleh) is nor literally in the infinite energy (sovev), though it is transmitted from there and is connected and united with the infinite light. But on p. 44 he explains the meaning of the encompassing of the ten hidden sefirot (the finite energy) in the infinite energy as follows: the infinite energy envisioned the finite transmission. Which appears as if finite energy does indeed originate in the infinite energy, and is not just "passing through." Yet, upon further reflection we must conclude that the finite energy has its own root in the Divine will, because from where else does it receive (what else embeds in it) its "programming instructions" to be the vision of a finite structure? That finite element cannot  be extending solely form the infinite energy, i.e. on its own infinite energy does not contain the "programming" of a defined vision. Something other than itself must be telling it to "stop" and restrict the flow so it become a defined vision. And yet, even this finite "program" is transmitted through the infinite energy -- its is connected and made of the same material, while being a separate entity (min kanaf). The Map of Existence -- Internal Energy (chapters 1-48) Ten Hidden Sefirot (chapters 18-28)
01:02:25
May 25, 2020
Ayin Beis Chapter 26: What's in a Word with Rabbi Simon Jacobson
What's in a Word? The Wisdom of the Wordsmith Ayin Beis Volume 1, Discourse 7, Chapter 26, p. 41-43 Short Summary: The higher intelligence in composing words. Long Summary: The Tanya (Shaar Hayichud V'Hemunah ch. 12) writes: "for every letter is a flow from an individual, particular life-force and power, and when many letters are combined to form a word, then in addition to the numerous kinds of powers and life-forces which issue forth according to the number of letters in the word, there is, in addition, transcending all [the particular powers], the flow of a higher power and general life-force which contains and is equivalent to all the various individual powers and life-forces of the letters and transcends them all; it unites them and combines them." "Every letter is a flow from an individual, particular life-force and power" apparently includes not just the energy within each actual letter, but also the "spirit" and content of each letter. The "transcending" force that emerges when letters are combined in a word, which "unites them and combines them," apparently is referring not merely to the meaning of the word (which is more than the sum of its individual letters), but to a higher intelligence that has the power to combine letters in particular configurations. This is demonstrated by the fact that: 1) The same concept can be expressed with different letters and words. 2) A child can understand an idea but not have letters with which to express the idea. 3) In order to convey a concept to a student the teacher needs to change the letter configurations - the word context -- with which he understands the concept to letters that combine into words that the student can comprehend. 4) Some people understand an idea and cannot convey it to others. All this shows that the power of the wordsmith to form words out of particular letters comes from a higher intelligence than conceiving the idea itself. The "synergy" -- ohr ha'oleh al kulonah -- of a word, is greater than the synergy of the word's meaning. This higher synergetic power comes from the chochma of the soul (whereas the meaning of the word itself comes from bina), a mature intelligence that comes withe years, and is rooted in yechida of the soul.    Concepts: Words and Letters; Combinations The Map of Existence -- Internal Energy (chapters 1-48) Ten Hidden Sefirot (chapters 18-28)
01:27:36
May 20, 2020
Ayin Beis Chapter 25b: Division and Interconnectivity with Rabbi Simon Jacobson
The Map of Existence -- Internal Energy (chapters 1-48) Ten Hidden Sefirot (chapters 18-28) Division and Interconnectivity Ayin Beis Volume 1, Discourse 6, Chapter 25 (2), p. 39-41 Short Summary: Two types of diversity: 1) Leading to interconnectivity, 2) Leading to divisiveness. Long Summary: There are two types of diversity (hischalkus): 1) One leads to and is the cause of interconnectivity (hiskalilut). 2) the second is the cause of and leads to divisiveness (pirud). This explains the Mishne which distinguishes between an argument that is for the sake of heaven (l'shem shomayim), which will endure, and one that is not for the sake of heaven, which will die. The former -- the argument between Shammai and Hillel -- is a division (resulting from the diminished state of light of the sefirot compared to their root in the ten hidden sefirot) that is aligned with its true purpose (for the sake of heaven): interconnectivity (of the sefirot of Atzilus); harmony within diversity. And it is l'shem shomayim -- integrating malchut, the recipient (shem) and z"a, the transmitter (shomayim), with the difference being whether this is from the bottom up (Shammai) or from the top down (Hillel). It therefore endures, being aligned with the divine purpose. In stark contrast, the argument of Korach and his gang is the latter division, of Tohu (where the energy shines intensely as it is in its source), which leads to divisiveness (separating between shem and shomayim), and thus cannot endure. Analysis: Tohu essentially is a distorted version of the ten hidden sefirot manifesting without structure and order that results from a misaligned diminishment of these energies. Tikkun (Atzilus) on the other hand corrects this flaw through the proper balanced diminishment of the ten hidden sefirot, allowing the energies to fulfill their true purpose and manifest inside containers, and then join in one symbiotic and interconnective web, reflecting divine unity and completeness. Though not mentioned specifically, this discussion is clearly related to the earlier explanation (in chapter 13) of Shammai and Hillel as Chesed and Gevurah of Atzilus, which are both rooted in the abstract concept (of their teachers), which allows them to, at times, exchange roles. But as explicitly stated there, the discussion there is specifically not about hiskalilus (interconnectivity), but about the ethereal state of the idea in its root, as it precedes diversity. Whereas here is is speaking about interconnectivity that follows diversity. An additional point: Here he adds the point that Shammai's perspective (gevurah) is from the bottom up and Hillel's (chesed) if from the top down. This is consistent with theme developed later in the hemshech about the two aspects of the interface, two types of unity -- from the bottom up (prayer) and from the top down (Torah). Concepts: Revealed and Hidden Sefirot
01:40:33
May 11, 2020
Ayin Beis Chapter 25: Ideas and Details with Rabbi Simon Jacobson
The Map of Existence -- Internal Energy (chapters 1-48) Ten Hidden Sefirot (chapters 18-28) Ideas and Details: Sefirot in their Root Ayin Beis Volume 1, Discourse 6, Chapter 25, p. 38-40 Short Summary: A second example for the emanation of the ten revealed sefirot from their root in the ten hidden sefirot Long Summary: Details of an intellectual concept is a second example (similar to the example of the letters of a word) to understand the relationship between the ten revealed sefirot to their root in the pre-tzimtzum ten hidden sefirot: Every idea is comprised of details, and it must be transmitted from teacher to student piecemeal, detail by detail. The teacher comprehends the entire concept and is able to see the big picture in every detail. However the student comprehends only the specific detail, not the entire picture and not how this detail is part of the big concept. Even if he understand the bigger picture, it is limited and defined compared to the pristine perspective of the teacher.  This example can explain the ten sefirot: The Source -- the Divine Emanator -- has an inner purpose which is fulfilled through the emanation of Atzilus and its ten sefirot. [Overall, the purpose is to bestow goodness on the creatures, and they recognize His majesty and cling to Him, or that the divine powers should be actualized]. The hidden sefirot (before the tzimtzum) are completely encompassed in, and are simply an expression of, this inner purpose; all the sefirot sense, like the idea in the mind of the teahcer, only the utterly formless divine pre-tzimtzum energy. By contrast, when a single sefirah emerges after the tzimtzum, it only senses, like the student, the energy within this detail, within this specific sefirah. The detailed sefirah does indeed reflect its part of the entire concept, and it even reveals to us the higher purpose of the sefirot in the root of the energies (which is to allow Him to be known; ohr pnimi), but in a diminished form compared to the revelation of the hidden sefirot of energy prior to the tzimtzum. The first example (of the letter beis in the word boruch) teaches us that the detailed letter reflects the diminished energy in one specific sefirah compared to its source (the entire word). While the second example demonstrates the diminished awareness of the higher purpose of the sefirot: 1) that He be known, 2) that the world should understand and feel the divine, 3) the interconnectivity of the sefirot reflect the all-complete and all-perfect divine. 
01:35:25
May 04, 2020
Ayin Beis Chapter 24: Wordless Letters with Rabbi Simon Jacobson
The Map of Existence -- Internal Energy (chapters 1-48) Ten Hidden Sefirot (chapters 18-28) Wordless Letters Ayin Beis Volume 1, Discourse 6, Chapter 24, p. 37-38 Short Summary: What remains after the word and idea is concealed Long Summary: How can we apply the example of letters in a word to the to the "ten hidden sefirot" when they are the root of the energies? The example works well according to the opinion that they are the root of the containers: Like distinct letters the containers emerge when the energy (of the idea within the word) is concealed. But according to the explanation in this discourse that they are the root of the energies, what exactly remains once the energy (the idea) is concealed? Two answers: 1) Energy has an inner and outer dimension. In the "ten hidden sefirot" the letters are combined and appreciate the inner energy. After the idea is concealed pnly the outer energy remains. 2) The letters that remain are the names that serve as bridge between the energies and containers. Concepts: Revealed and Hidden Sefirot
46:49
April 28, 2020
Ayin Beis Chapter 23: One Letter with Rabbi Simon Jacobson
The Map of Existence -- Internal Energy (chapters 1-48) Ten Hidden Sefirot (chapters 18-28) One Letter Ayin Beis Volume 1, Discourse 6, Chapter 23, p. 36-37 Short Summary: Revealed and hidden sefirot like separate letters of a word Long Summary: We can understand the concealment of the "ten hidden sefirot" in order to allow for the emergence of the energy of "revealed sefirot" with the example of a word which is comprised of several letters. The combination of these letters together create a word, like boruch (blessing), that conveys a profound idea. But when we look at one single letter of of the word -- like when we teach a child the letter beis of boruch -- we do not comprehend the concept of the entire word in context. Yet, the letter beis is exactly the same letter beis that, combined with the other letters of the word, expresses the entire profundity of the concept, and is appreciated by the wise who understand the meaning of the word, even while the child relates only to the the letter beis. So too the "ten hidden sefirot" (before the tzimtzum) are like the combined letters of a word, which on their own cannot be contained by our existence due to their being all joined as one, in an abstract and formless state, brimming with the intensity of the divine infinite pre-tzimtzum light. Chochma as a distinct entity, like a single letter, emerges by concealing the "word' and its meaning in its full intensity. Yet, even as a distinct entity chochma is exactly the same chochma as it is part of the larger word and its depth, albeit in a tangible form and in state of diminished energy. Concepts: Revealed and Hidden Sefirot
01:05:25
April 20, 2020
Ayin Beis Chapter 22: Evolution of Energy with Rabbi Simon Jacobson
The Map of Existence -- Internal Energy (chapters 1-48) Ten Hidden Sefirot (chapters 18-28) Evolution of Energy Ayin Beis Volume 1, Discourse 6, Chapter 22, p. 35-36 The ten hidden sefirot as they stand within the Divine essence (without any tzimtzum concealment) could not be contained by existence (even the loftiest levels). If they were revealed as is they would all transmit as one, without any organized structure and order (like the revelation of the concealed faculties at a celebration). There would be no manifestation of energies in containers (ohr pnimi) and no progressive system ("hishtalshilut') or interconnectivity ("hitkalilut'). This would not fulfill the purpose of existence, which is to have a structured system. The tzitmtzum concealed the energy of the ten hidden sefirot, allowing them to emerge as distinct individual sefirot, with its energy in a diminished state, preparing them to enter into the containers. But even as they emerge after the tzimtzum, the energies retain their fundamental personalities (with revealed chochma being an extension of hidden chochma). Unlike the containers that are infinitely distant from their source in the finite power before the tzimtzum.
01:20:23
April 17, 2020
Ayin Beis Chapter 21: Shapeless Energy with Rabbi Simon Jacobson
Shapeless Energy Ayin Beis Volume 1, Discourse 6, Chapter 21, p. 33-34 How can we say that the ten hidden sefirot are completely seamless and shapeless? The very fact that they are ten suggest definition and parameters, which is antithetical to indivisibility. Answer: Based on the discussion earlier that the energy of the sefirot is not like the power of the finite (which manifests in containers), but is essentially light/energy that is always bound to and reflects its source, and just as the source is shapeless, so too is the energy. "(Hidden) Sefirot" before the tzimtzum refers to revelation (all revelation is a form of sefirot, whether it is infinite revelation of unlimited sefiriot, or finite revelation of the ten hidden sefirot). And more specifically, the hidden sefirot are only the expression of the divine thought to create a structure, not actually any form of sefirah. Similar to Adam Kadmon, which is the divine level of thought that encompasses all of existence, but on its own primordial kadmon level. Analysis: The addition of this chapter to ch. 18-19 is that the hidden sefirot don't just reside together (due to their abstract and ethereal state), but that they are essentially light, which is first and foremost an expression of its source. Only here the light, by direction of the source, has taken on the role of sefirot. These sefirot therefore don't just reside together they are actually one and indivisible, as a seamless expression of their source.  Concepts: Hidden Sefirot
01:36:17
April 08, 2020
Ayin Beis Chapter 20: The Mistake of the Scouts with Rabbi Simon Jacobson
The Map of Existence -- Internal Energy (chapters 1-48) Ten Hidden Sefirot (chapters 18-28) The Mistake of the Scouts Ayin Beis Volume 1, Discourse 5, Chapter 20, p. 32-33 Torah (structured like "man,' ohr pnimi) has in it three levels: desert, city, field. The "desert" within Torah is (chochma of) the hidden sefirot, which are higher than structure, reason, and pleasure -- the secrets of Torah. "City" (inhabited by people) is the comprehension of Torah. "Field" (which is outside of the city but an accessory and extension of it) refers to the intentions of mitzvot, which have some comprehension. Moses sent the scouts, the level of comprehension and distinction, to stimulate the essential power within mitzvot, which are preformed simply because they are the Divine Will, without any reason and pleasure, and thus reach the essence. The bittul of Moses (mah) was meant to permeate the scouts in their mission and infuse bittul within all three levels - desert, city and field. The desert (bittul) of Torah would bring out the essential power of the mitzvot. But the scouts did not fulfill their role. Analysis: The story of Moses and the scouts demonstrates the interface role of Torah (internal energy), rooted in the hidden sefirot -- which are structure but in a formless state -- to reveal the essence. The scouts were in effect missing the connection to the ten hidden ethereal sefirot, and were consumed with their own distinct levels of revelation and expression. Concepts: Levels in Torah, Mitzvot
01:18:23
March 23, 2020
Ayin Beis Chapter 19 (2): Sinai Synesthesia with Rabbi Simon Jacobson
The Map of Existence -- Internal Energy (chapters 1-48) Ten Hidden Sefirot (chapters 18-28) Sinai Synesthesia Ayin Beis Volume 1, Discourse 5, Chapter 19, p. 30-32 Human faculties in the soul are in an ethereal and subtle state, with no tangible form, and can therefore reside side by side with other even contradictory faculties. For this reason, at Mattan Torah, when there was a revelation from beyond the structure of existence, the revelation of the essential soul faculties, "all the people saw the sounds -- they saw what is ordinarily heard, and they heard what is ordinarily seen," because on the level of essence their is no distinction between the faculties. However, this faculty substitution seems to be more than just two different/opposite faculties residing together. Ostensibly, we can say that their role reversal is due to their ethereal state, in which the distinctions between sight and sound (that sight senses the physicality of an object, and sound only its spirit) are not yet developed. But we cannot say that, because the distinction between them is also on their core level: sight grasps the essence of an object; whereas sound only captures its external being (and that is why they are distinct faculties). Sinai thus actually caused a reversal of their functions also in their essence. There is another interpretation that Sinai allowed them to see the divine energy which is usually invisible to the eye and is only perceived like sound from a distance ("they saw what is ordinarily heard"), and they perceived the yesh (existence), which is usually visible, like sound from a distance ("they heard what is ordinarily seen"). According to this (we better understand the virtue of seeing the sound, but) there was no reversal of faculties. However, according to the first interpretation (in which the primary breakthrough was in the fact that they heard the sights) there was an actual reversal of function (even on the essential level), with them being able to hear the essence which is ordinarily seen. This is due to the revelation at Mattan Torah of the Divine Essence, which is higher than the ten hidden sefirot, which caused the faculties not only to reside together but to reverse roles. At Sinai they were able to see the essence and hear/comprehend the essence (not just know of its existence).
01:01:01
March 16, 2020
Ayin Beis Chapter 19 (1): Ten Hidden Sefirot with Rabbi Simon Jacobson
The Map of Existence -- Internal Energy (chapters 1-48) Ten Hidden Sefirot (chapters 18-28) Ten Hidden Sefirot (1) Ayin Beis Volume 1, Discourse 5, Chapter 19, p. 29-30 The ten hidden sefirot (before the tzimtzum) are not in any way a defined independent state, rather they are completely submerged and encompassed in the source, and as such do not have any distinction and do not add any multiplicity. In truth this paradox (ten sefirot, which include opposites like love and severity, water and fire, and yet they are all united as one) is beyond our comprehension. We can only intuit their unity. Yet, we do have some examples that help us relate to this idea on our terms: 1) The essential elements of, say, fire and water, as they stand in their essential source,   can dwell together because in the archetypal quintessence they do not have tangible form. Only when they extend and express themselves do they assume form, which does not allow these two opposites to reside side by side. 2) An abstract concept can contain two opposite interpretations, which dwell together in the teacher's mind. Only after the idea manifests in the containers of the student do they take on shape and form which contradicts the opposing opinion. 3) Human faculties in the soul are in an ethereal and subtle state, with no tangible form, and can therefore reside side by side with other even contradictory faculties. Only after these faculties manifest in their respective organs and containers do they take on shape, with each faculty defined by its unique personality. Concepts: Ten Hidden Sefirot Analysis: We can learn volumes from the Rebbe Rashab's words, that the paradox of the "ten hidden sefirot" is "in truth beyond our comprehension. But we can sense and feel with our intuitive intelligence their unity." (And then later "that this is based on our understanding and comprehension of  the paradox of fire and water only in terms of hot and cold, and thus negate that from the essential state of these entities"). Firstly, this answers a fundamental question: Since the "ten hidden sefirot" are on the pre-tzimtzum level, how can we possibly have any comprehension of them and their state of being? The total concealment of the tzimtzum was necessary for our independent consciousness to emerge; should even the smallest glimmer of pre-tzimtzum consciousness have remained, existence as we know it could never have taken hold. So how can we in any way relate to the pre-tzimtzum ten hidden sefirot? By qualifying the issue with stating that this state of being is "in truth beyond our comprehension" it is clear that we cannot in any rational way understand this type of all encompassing and omnipresent unity. "Yet, with can sense and feel with our intuitive intelligence their unity,"1) through extrapolation, i.e. process of elimination, 2) because the kav, after all, is a ray of light that originated in the ten hidden sefirot of pre-tzimztzum consciousness and (after the tzimtzum) "returned and radiated" a glimmer of this pre-tzimztzum consciousness into post-tzimtzum consciousness, 3) As explained earlier, once the tzimtzum allowed for the containers to emerge, now they can begin integrating the transcendent energy, and as they continue to be refined and expand, they can ultimately integrate even pre-tzimtzum consciouness, via the kav.
01:23:17
March 09, 2020
Ayin Beis Chapter 18: The Tzimtzum's Impact on the Kav with Rabbi Simon Jacobson
The Map of Existence -- Internal Energy (chapters 1-48) Ten Hidden Sefirot (chapters 18-28)  The Tzimtzum's Impact on the Kav Ayin Beis Volume 1, Discourse 5, Chapter 18, p. 28-29 The Etz Chaim asks the question: Why was was it necessary for the great tzimtzum to conceal the entire energy; why could it not have just concealed most of the energy, and just leave the think ray of the kav? Inferred from this question is that the kav on its own could have remained without being concealed by the tzimtzum. But how is that possible: if even some the light remained, an independent structured existence could not emerge (like a teacher who has to conceal all his wisdom before transmitting to a student)? However, based on the above -- that  the kav (the thin line of energy that emerges after the tzimtzum) is rooted in the ten hidden sefirot (the defined energy) that are concealed in the energy before the tzimtzum -- we can understand the meaning of the Etz Chaim's question: Since the kav is finite not infinite energy (according to the opinion discussed here), why did all the energy before the tzimtzum need to be concealed; the ten hidden sefirot (the root of the kav), being finite energy, could have remained without annihilating the structure of existence that emerged after the tzimtzum? And the Etz Chaim answers, that the total eclipse of the tzimtzum was in order for the containers to come into being. Had even the ray of the kav remained, the containers could not have emerged. Once there was a total concealment, then the emerging could retain the energy. But we need to understand: Since the tzimtzum affected and concealed also the kav (even according to the Etz Chaim), how can we say that the kav is only revealing what was concealed in the ten hidden sefirot (and not a new entity)? Answer: According to the opinion that the kav is rooted in the finite energy we have to conclude that the tzimtzum in the kav was only a form of diminishment, not total concealment (like that of the infinite energy). By contrast, according to the opinion that the kav is rooted in the infinite light, the tzimtzum totally concealed also the root of the kav.
01:22:02
March 02, 2020
Ayin Beis Chapter 17: Finite and Infinite Energy with Rabbi Simon Jacobson
The Map of Existence -- Internal Energy (chapters 1-48) Divine Structure: The Supernal Man of Atzilus (chapters 5-17) Finite and Infinite Energy (2) Ayin Beis Volume 1, Discourse 4, Chapter 17, p. 26-27 The creation of the human in the "Divine Image and Form" refers to the two levels of energy/kav (image) and container/reshimu (form), both -- also the energy -- consisting of a shape and structure of sefirot. In contrast to the Infinite Divine energy which is beyond any image and form of sefirot. And this too consists of two levels: The dimension of energy that has infinite sefirot, and the essence of the energy (in its source) which has no sefirot at all. These two levels of energy before the tzimtzum - finite (the root of the kav in the ten hidden sefirot) and infinite -- are reflected after the tzimtzim in Keter, which also has two levels: 1) The essence of Keter is beyond parameters and can express in infinite sefirot. Compared to this level the energy of Chochma and Atzilut is like a new entity (yesh m'ayin), infinitely distant. 2) The sefirot in keter are the root of the energies of Atzilut, and compared to this level the energies are close and revealing what is concealed (gilui ha'helem). Concepts: Finite and Infinite Energy; two levels of Havaya
01:29:25
February 25, 2020
Ayin Beis Chapter 16: Finite and Infinite Energy vs. Finite Containers with Rabbi Simon Jacobson
The Map of Existence -- Internal Energy (chapters 1-48) Divine Structure: The Supernal Man of Atzilus (chapters 5-17) Finite and Infinite Energy vs. Finite Containers Ayin Beis Volume 1, Discourse 4, Chapter 16, p. 25-26 The root of the kav energy (the ten hidden sefirot), which, relative to the essence, is the root of defined energy, is not the same level as the divine finite power, the reshimu, which is the root of the containers. In the Divine names the difference between them is like the difference between Havaya, the essential name, which reflects and is united with the divine essence, and the other divine names (like E-l, Elokim), which express particular divine functions, and are like "separate" faculties.  Havaya itself consists of two levels: 1) The root of the finite energy of the cosmic structure (memaleh), the ten hidden sefirot. 2) The desire that precedes the structure, the infinite energy (root of sovev), which is beyond any sefirot. Concepts: Finite and Infinite Energy; two levels of Havaya
01:14:06
September 23, 2019
Ayin Beis Chapter 15: The Hidden Spheres with Rabbi Simon Jacobson
The Map of Existence -- Internal Energy (chapters 1-48) Divine Structure: The Supernal Man of Atzilus (chapters 5-17) The Hidden Spheres Ayin Beis Volume 1, Discourse 4, Chapter 15, p. 24-25 The root of the relatively formless energy is in the ten hidden sefirot (eser sefiros ha'genuzos) (the Pardes holds that the ten hidden sefirot are the root of the containers, which means that the energies are entirely formless. But according to the discussion here the energies have some abstract form, and thus are rooted in the ten hidden sefirot). But above the ten hidden sefirot is the infinite divine energy that has no shape and form at all, and is beyond any sefirot (even in their most abstract form). This answers a question about an apparent contradiction between the Zohar (Idra) where uit appears that Atik is the Divine Essence, and the Arizal who states that there are level higher than Atik (A"k and akudim), even higher than the Atik above A"k. And also, that in Zohar it states that Atik has a structure (of a skull, eyes, mind, which reflect ten sefirot) -- how can that be if Atik is Atzmus, which is beyond all sefirot? This is answered according to the above: Atik of A"k is the level of the ten hidden sefirot (yechida of A'k, with the kav being chaya or neshama, and the circles and line being nefesh and ruach of A"k), which are all encompassed in the divine infinite light, ayn sof, before the tzimtzum (and the kav emerges from its lowest level, malcuht of malchut of ayn sof), and are therefore Atik is called Atzmus. But it still contains structure (the ten sefirot), being the source of the defined kav. Unlike the higher levels of the divine infinite light that reveals the essence, which has no relationship with sefirot. Concepts: Ten Hidden Sefirot; Atik and Atzmus
01:16:48
September 16, 2019
Ayin Beis Chapter 14: Unconscious Mind with Rabbi Simon Jacobson
The Map of Existence -- Internal Energy (chapters 1-48) Divine Structure: The Supernal Man of Atzilus (chapters 5-17) Unconscious Mind Ayin Beis Volume 1, Discourse 4, Chapter 14, p. 22-24 The idea of relative formless energy above will be understood from the Divine declaration (in response to the challenge "is this Torah and is this its reward?" regarding the brutal deaths of the Ten Martyrs) "Silence! Thus it arose in My thought:" We cannot say that the decree had no reason at all (it would be sacrilegious to say that G-d was being "obstinate"). It had a reason in the unconscious mind (mocha sti'maah), where there is intelligence, but that higher intelligence is considered to be without reason from the perspective of the logic and reason of the conscious mind. (Similar to the incomparability of physical intelligence, of the material mind, in relation to the spiritual intelligence of the unconscious intelligence within the soul). The energy of chochma is rooted in the unconscious mind, which is also chochma, but in a nebulous and formless state (like the abstract energy of wisdom flowing out of the teacher which contains in abstract form both chesed and gevurah), which is incomparable to the tangible container of chochma, where the wisdom gets defined in a distinct fashion (as it enters the containers of Shammai and Hillel). Thus we find that the energies of Atzilus are both defined but formless, relative to the form they assume when they enter the containers. They therefore can exchange their roles, something the containers cannot do. Concepts: Unconscious intelligence
01:13:31
September 09, 2019
Ayin Beis Chapter 13: Role Reversal with Rabbi Simon Jacobson
The Map of Existence -- Internal Energy (chapters 1-48) Divine Structure: The Supernal Man of Atzilus (chapters 5-17) Role Reversal Ayin Beis Volume 1, Discourse 4, Chapter 13, p. 20-22 Additionally, we can deduce that the energy of Atzilus has defined properties (shape) from the concept of "achlifu duchtayu" -- the role reversal between energy and container, that the energy of chesed manifests at times in the container of gevurah, and vice versa. If the energy was utterly devoid of form no role reversal is necessary for it to change containers. We can understand this with the example of Shammai and Hillel, who both heard the same concept from their teacher (Shemaya and Avtalyon), yet Shammai, whose container (personality) was from gevurah, derived a strict ruling from this idea and Hillel, from chesed, derived a lenient ruling. And yet in some instances Shammai is lenient and Hillel stringent, because when the energy leaves the containers and returns to the unshaped source -- as in a student who revisits an idea -- it can change it position from chesed to gevurah or from gevurah to chesed. We learn from this three things: 1) As it manifests in containers the energy (the idea) itself assumes the properties of chesed and gevurah (unlike the example of water in colored glasses, in which the water itself remains colorless). 2) The role exchange -- that in some instances Shammi is lenient and Hillel stringent -- is a result of the energies, not the containers. The essential personality of the containers remains unchanged (Shammai remains gevurah and Hillel chesed), even when Shammai is lenient and Hillel stringent. While the energy (though it also has these features) is amorphous relative to the static containers, and as a result of their fluidity, which is rooted in the unshaped state of the concept in the source (their teachers), has the capacity to hear the idea again and change its role. 3) The role reversal is caused by the teacher, i.e. by the idea as it flows from its source, where the concept contains the root of chesed and gevurah, but in a relatively formless state. Concepts: Achlifu duchtayu (role reversal)
02:13:26
August 27, 2019
Ayin Beis Chapter 12: The Shape of Energy with Rabbi Simon Jacobson
The Map of Existence -- Internal Energy (chapters 1-48) Divine Structure: The Supernal Man of Atzilus (chapters 5-17) The Shape of Energy Ayin Beis Volume 1, Discourse 4, Chapter 12, p. 18-20 Question: Even the energy of Atzilus is infinitely distant from the source (as it says that wisdom (including the energy of wisdom, not just the container) comes from "ayin"). How then can we explain that the transcendent energy (the sefirot), which is connected with and reveals its source, is shapeless, bli mah (in contrast to the containers which are infinitely distant from the source)? Answer: We must say that also the energy in Atzilus has a shape and the properties of ten sefiros, and is not entirely shapeless like the shapelessness (peshitus) of the actual divine infinite light (like in atik and akudim, where the ten sefiros are only on the energy level). Because if the energies were was truly infinite and shapeless they could not manifest and be contained by the finite containers. Infinity cannot fit into the finite. Elsewhere is explained that the containers are not actually finite but "finite power," but this finite power does impose parameters on the energy, causing it to be defined by an identity (chochma, chesed etc.), as well as limiting its flow outside of Atzilus, in contrast the "finite power" (the reshimu) as it is before the tzimtzum, which is 1) one with the divine infinite, 2) completely submerged and concealed in the infinite energy. Concepts: Atzilus, energy and containers of Atzilus
01:54:21
August 19, 2019
Ayin Beis Jacobson Chapter 11: Conscious and Connected Energy with Rabbi Simon Jacobson
The Map of Existence (chapters 1-48) -- Internal Energy / Divine Structure: The Supernal Man of Atzilus (chapters 5-17) Ohr: Conscious and Connected Energy The Advantage of Container over Energy Ayin Beis Volume 1, Discourse 3, Chapter 11, p. 17-18 By contrast, energy is consciously and visibly connected to its source, a revealed manifestation of the Source. The energies in Atzilut are connected to the kav (the ray of light that returns after the tzimtzum); and the kav is connected (albeit in diminished form) to its source in the light preceding the tzimtzum. The containers have an advantage over the energies due to the fact that the tzimtzum did not affect the letters of the reshimu (from which the containers originate), as it did the energy/light of the kav (like the sparks that come from the actual coal, while the flame does not). The power of the containers (rooted higher than the energies) causes the energy to descend into the container. The sublimation (bittul) of the containers reaches higher than the energies -- iskafya (refrain) greater than ishapcha (transformation) -- therefore naseh (we will do) is greater than nishma (we will hear). And the preparation to the Divine essence revelation at Mattan Torah is through the bittul of the containers, that all the people rested at Sinai united "like one person." Concepts: Ohr/energy; kav; rehimu, tzimtzum, sinai
01:30:09
August 12, 2019
Ayin Beis Chapter 10: Containers as Sparks with Rabbi Simon Jacobson
The Map of Existence (chapters 1-48) -- Internal Energy / Divine Structure: The Supernal Man of Atzilus (chapters 5-17) Containers as Sparks: Energy but Apart The "Closeness" and "Distance" of Containers Ayin Beis Volume 1, Discourse 3, Chapter 10, p. 16-17 Even though the containers of Atzilus are divine, yet their expression is not one of revelation (revealing the divine), but one that is separate and apart, like the spark of a flame, whose personality is the same as the flame (fire), yet the sparks shoot out of the flame and are separate from the actual flaming torch.  Even according to the explanation elsewhere that the containers themselves are close to the divine power of the finite, the reshimu (and only their coming into being is through distance), they still are infinitely distant from the infinite power and even from the pre-tzimtzum root of the reshimu.
01:02:41
August 06, 2019
Ayin Beis Chapter 9: The Supernal Man of Atzilus with Rabbi Simon Jacobson
The Map of Existence (chapters 1-48) -- Internal Energy / Divine Structure: The Supernal Man of Atzilus (chapters 5-17) The "Distance" of Containers: Ayin Beis Volume 1, Discourse 3, Chapter 9, p. 15-16 We now understand that Atzilus' infinite distance from the divine is from the perspective of the containers of Atzilus, which came into being through the distance and concealment of the tzimtzum, and the containers have a distant and concealed relationship with their source (the reshimu). This distance is also understood from the Etz Chaim, which explains that the containers came into being through the clash between the "direct energy" (ohr yoshor) and the "refracted energy" (ohr chozer).
44:44
July 29, 2019
Ayin Beis Chapter 8: Atzilut: Interface between Heaven and Earth with Rabbi Simon Jacobson
The Map of Existence (chapters 1-48) -- Internal Energy Atzilut: Interface between Heaven and Earth Ayin Beis Volume 1, Discourse 2, Chapter 8, p. 12-14 Question: How do we reconcile between these two dimensions of Atzilus -- revealing the concealed and infinitely distant from the divine? Answer: As an interface between existence and transcendence, Atzilus has two dimensions: Amorphous and formless energies (bli mah) that represent the divine and defined and finite containers that represent existence. The energies are rooted in the kav, the thin ray of light that extended after the tzimtzum (the great concealment), which is rooted in the energy preceding the tzimtzum and retains its transcendent nature. Even though the kav emerged through the tzimtzum, nevertheless the primary purpose of the tzimtzum was to create the containers, which are rooted in the divine finite power and in the reshimu, which conceals its source and allows for the creating of the defined finite containers. Torah is the interface between the divine and existence, and just like Atzilus, it consists of two dimensions: the inner and outer Torah. Concepts: Atzilus, interface, energies and containers
01:08:22
July 15, 2019
Ayin Beis Chapter 7: Atzilus: Revelation and Distance (1) with Rabbi Simon Jacobson
The Map of Existence (chapters 1-48) -- Internal Energy Atzilus: Revelation and Distance (1) Ayin Beis Volume 1, Discourse 2, Chapter 7, p. 11-12 Like the faculties that reveal the soul's potential, Atzilus, which means imparting emanation (not a new creation), reveals the hidden potential of the divine. And yet, Atzilus is infinitely distant from the divine, even more than the distance between existence and Atzilus, which means that Atzilus does not exist in its source even in a concealed state.
01:02:25
April 15, 2019
Ayin Beis Chapter 6: The Purpose of Atzilus with Rabbi Simon Jacobson
The Map of Existence (chapters 1-48) -- Internal Energy The Purpose of Atzilus Ayin Beis Volume 1, Discourse 2, Chapter 6, p. 10-11 Energy and container work together in one symbiosis, with the containers channeling the energy to shape existence, and the energy directing the function of the containers, which in turn is possible due to the subjugation (bittul) of the container to the energy. Atzilus thus serves its true purpose as the interface that reveals and expresses the divine into existence (just as it serves to create existence). Without Atzilus we would have no knowledge of and feelings toward G-dliness. The first and primary revelation of Atzilus is in chochma (wisdom), the first of the ten attributes. Concepts: Atzilus, energy and container
52:47
April 01, 2019
Ayin Beis Chapter 5: The Map of Existence, with Rabbi Simon Jacobson
The Map of Existence (chapters 1-48) -- Internal Energy Divine Structure: Atzilus Ayin Beis Volume 1, Discourse 2, Chapter 5, p. 8-10 The human structure mirrors the structure of the divine "supernal man," in whose image the human was created. Though the Divine Essence is beyond structure, the divine chose to manifest in structure -- the energies and containers of Atzilus, with each energy permeating and integrating with its respective distinct container. Concepts: Atzilus, energy and container
54:40
March 26, 2019
Ayin Beis Chapter 4: Human Faculties (3) with Rabbi Simon Jacobson
The Map of Existence (chapters 1-48) -- Internal Energy Human Faculties: Distinct and defined (3) Ayin Beis Volume 1, Discourse 1, Chapter 4, p. 6-8
52:13
March 26, 2019
Ayin Beis Chapter 3: Human Faculties (2) with Rabbi Simon Jacobson
The Map of Existence (chapters 2-48) -- Internal Energy Human Faculties (2) Ayin Beis Volume 1, Discourse 1, Chapter 3, p. 5-6 The primary factor driving human faculties is their being fundamentally integrated and finite forces. The soul itself is indivisible and unlimited. Yet, it carries and contains the capacity to project defined and limited powers. Though these powers within the essential  are also unlimited, they undergo a tzimtzum, a concealment, that allows them to manifest in limited form as they are internalized in the human faculties. 
59:17
March 05, 2019
Ayin Beis Chapter 2: Human Faculties (1) with Rabbi Simon Jacobson
The Map of Existence (chapters 2-48) -- Internal Energy Human Faculties (1) Ayin Beis Volume 1, Discourse 1, Chapter 2, p. 3-5: To appreciate the role of the Keter/Will interface (between the Source and existence) we must first understand the structure of existence. The building blocks of the cosmic order -- all that exists -- is comprised of ohros and keilim, energies (lights) and containers. We can relate to this by observing the human being, whose faculties consist of particular forces manifesting in specific organs -- energy and container each precisely tailored to the other (i.e. the mind is in the brain, the power of sight in the eyes. The effect of one faculty on another is only a diminished reflection of the faculty's energy, not the energy itself which has it particular resting place). This is called ohr pnimi -- an internalized and integrated energy. Concepts: Ohr, Keli (energy, container); Ohr Pnimi Sources: Maamorei Admur HaEmtzoe Bamidbar vol. 1 p. 183. Hemshech Samach Vav p. 364 (the end of the chapter is an exact citation from there).
01:21:42
February 27, 2019
Ayin Beis Chapter 1: Keser - The Interface with Rabbi Simon Jacobson
 Keser: The Interface Ayin Beis Volume 1, Discourse 1, Chapter1, Pages 1-3  Questions on the opening verse: When Israel preceded [saying] "we will do" (naaseh) before "we will understand" (nishma), celestial angels descended and bound for them two crowns, one corresponding to "naaseh" and one corresponding to "nishma." What is the significance of these crowns? And how are they compared to the crowns mentioned in other texts? To understand all this we need to first delve into the level of the "crown" -- keser -- what is its overall significance? Keser (crown) -- the beginning of the cosmic order -- has three interpretations (as explained on the Pardes): 1) Pause/patience, which includes refrain and anticipation, preceding the revelation. 2) Literally: crown. The faculty that is the "head" of all of (the divine emanations of Atzilus), just like the crown is the highest garment, the "head" atop of all the bodily garments. 3) Surrounding, encompassing. Referring to the 620 (gematria of keser) pillars of lights, the concealed forces, that surround Atzilus. [The conclusion of the discussion about the three dimension of Keser is in chapters 126-127. But apparently the discussion that begins in chapter 127 is not specifically concluded. perhaps that would have been included in the end of the hemshech, which was never finished]. The explanation: Keser across the entire cosmic order is the level of desire/will which creates a connection between and entity -- the source -- and that which it desires. Keser is thus the initial interface between the source and existence. The source and essence on its own ("before," conceptually, anything arose in its will), is totally beyond and has no relationship with anything (even within itself). By willing and desiring existence the source established a connection with the object of its desire.
01:28:07
February 27, 2019
Centennial of a Revolution
Why are we here? What does the unconscious look like? Can we bridge the finite and the infinite? Where do heaven and earth meet? How to express the inexpressible? Can the rational mind speak to the impulsive heart? Is the mind driven by ego or by transcendence? How much potential do you have and how can you actualize it? How can we graduate from good to excellent? How can we balance the best and the worst in man -- the two extremes we witnessed in horror and in pride during the 20th century? Can we integrate transcendence and existence? These and many more fundamental life questions are addressed in a century year old text that has remained secret to this very day. One hundred years ago this week a visionary of the highest order began delivering a tour de force -- which can be described as the Mt. Everest of modern mysticism. This epic is called "Hemshech Ayin Beis" (after the Hebrew letters, ayin beis, that signify the year, 5672, in which its delivery began). It was written and delivered by the Rebbe Rashab, Rabbi Sholom Dovber, the 5th Chabad Rebbe, in a series of Chassidic discourses that spanned from 5672 to 5676 (1912--1915). 37 days after the Titanic sank, this Titanic began to rise. It was first published in 1977 (from its original Hebrew manuscript) in three large volumes, consisting of close to 1500 pages. Now for the very first time, as we honor the centennial of Ayin Beis on Shavuot, we invite you to partner with us in spearheading an effort to decipher, study and explore the revolutionary ideas in this pioneering work -- ideas that can spawn new modalities in education, science, psychology and many other schools of thought. Ideas that have the power to change us and the world in which we live. Ideas that can help us shape the future of our universe. Please join the Ayin Beis revolution. Discover ways and tools to access this trendsetting landmark. Be part of something truly magnificent and historical. Let us travel together and witness the unfolding of an exhilarating, groundbreaking journey.
03:49
February 27, 2019