Skip to main content
Bite-Size Jazz

Bite-Size Jazz

By Bite-Size Jazz
A short podcast with a taste of new albums and new artists
Where to listen
Apple Podcasts Logo

Apple Podcasts

Google Podcasts Logo

Google Podcasts

Overcast Logo

Overcast

Pocket Casts Logo

Pocket Casts

RadioPublic Logo

RadioPublic

Spotify Logo

Spotify

Richard Shelton: An Englishman In Love in LA - Ep 78
As the “world’s leading dramatic interpreter of Frank Sinatra,” Richard Shelton certainly holds a unique relationship to the legend. He’s portrayed Sinatra in the critically acclaimed shows Rat Pack Confidential and Sinatra: Raw. But it doesn’t stop there: he’s got a crooning voice of his own that swings superbly through original music. An Englishman in Love in LA holds a little something for everyone. Old favorites from Frank Sinatra are mixed with masterful new tunes by LA bassist and composer Alex Frank, and former BBC ‘Young Composer of the Year’ Alex Rudd. Whether it’s a sorrowful melody about the double-edged sword of love or a song about the courage to chase your dreams: Richard Shelton’s voice is a perfect fit. Listen to the full episode to check out the new music from Richard Shelton. You’ll learn more about his early connection to Frank Sinatra, the stories behind the original music, and also hear about his acting career (hint: he’s been on some TV shows you might recognize). Hit play to find out! Resources:  Learn more about Richard Shelton on his website, Facebook, Instagram, or Twitter. An Englishman in Love in LA is available anywhere you stream music. It’s also available for purchase through Amazon Music. Stay tuned to Bite-Size Jazz in by following us on Facebook, Instagram, TikTok, or Twitter. And if you’d like to support Bite-Size Jazz and our mission to spread great stories about amazing music, you can buy me a coffee :)  Thanks for listening!
09:30
October 03, 2022
Bryan Carter: I Believe - Ep 77
Meet Bryan Carter, a drummer, singer, composer, and arranger extraordinaire. His latest album, I Believe, isn’t your typical straight-ahead jazz album. It’s a mixtape of his many musical influences, or in other words, “Black American Music through the lens of a jazz musician.” Not only does I Believe groove the heck out of each song — it’s also a deeply personal coming of age and coming out story. But the story is subtly told through the lyrics of well-known songs. Listen closely to the words, and you’ll catch Bryan’s meaning. Get to know Bryan Carter and the experiences that made him the musician he is today. Bryan dives into the composition process of each tune and what they mean to him. Most importantly, he opens up about his personal journey of learning to accept and love himself. Resources:  Learn more about Bryan Carter on his website. You can find I Believe anywhere you stream music, and it’s available for purchase through Bryan’s website or through Amazon Music. Stay tuned to Bite-Size Jazz in by following us on Facebook, Instagram, TikTok, or Twitter. And if you’d like to support Bite-Size Jazz and our mission to spread great stories about amazing music, you can buy me a coffee :)  Thanks for listening!
11:55
September 26, 2022
Roxy Coss: Disparate Parts Ep. 76
Roxy Coss is a saxophonist, Composer, Bandleader, Recording Artist, Educator and Activist (Founder and President of WIJO). Sounds busy, huh? We didn’t even mention that she recently became a new mother! Anyone with even half as busy a life could testify that it’s easy to get caught up in so many different roles. Without hardly noticing, you start to compartmentalize. Pre-pandemic and pre-baby, Roxy Coss was feeling a separation between various parts of her life. She was working on new music, and the more it emerged, the more she realized it was a manifestation of these “Disparate Parts.” Ultimately, it became a four movement suite: “The Body,” “The Mind,” “The Heart,” and “The Spirit.” Tune in to hear Roxy’s take on each movement and how she’s learned to accept herself and the many facets of her life. Plus, Roxy shares the personal impact of the late pianist Harold Mabern and how he inspired the song “Mabes.” Resources: Learn more about Roxy Coss on her website or social media. You can find Disparate Parts anywhere you stream music. It’s also available for purchase through Amazon Music. Stay tuned to Bite-Size Jazz in by following us on Facebook, Instagram, TikTok, or Twitter. And if you’d like to support Bite-Size Jazz and our mission to spread great stories about amazing music, you can buy me a coffee :)  Thanks for listening!
11:43
September 19, 2022
Liam Forde: Great To Be Here - Episode 75
Meet Liam Forde: a connoisseur of all things music, elegance, and food. He’s a hopeless romantic with one foot in 2022 and one foot in the world of the 1930s nightclubs. One listen to his latest album Great To Be Here and you’ll be floating back in time to old New York where grand hotels and chique elegance reign supreme. A middle-class child from a modest home, Liam found himself drawn to the grandiose world of music by a next-door neighbor who taught him how to make tomato sauce and pie dough — love classical music. Later, he found himself entirely captivated by his sister’s CD of Ella Fitzgerald’s “The Best of the Songbook.” The sweeping melodies, chromatic harmonies, and grandiose performances captured his imagination as a young boy - and hasn’t stopped since. In Great To Be Here, Liam sings about grandeur monuments, like the “Plaza Hotel” and “Paris When It’s Grey.” He also opens up about artists’ insecurities — and learning to love your music whether or not the audience does — in the song “I Don’t Know.” Additionally, Liam comments on finding happiness in little things during a worldwide pandemic in “When My Word’s in Tune” and “Gratitude Song.” Get to know Liam Forde in this episode of Bite-Size Jazz! He talks about his favorite dishes, his love for France, and finding confidence in your music. He also talks about getting started in New York, his acting career, and what makes a great teacher. Take 10 minutes to check out Liam Forde’s new music! You can also hear Liam Forde LIVE at Birdland in New York on June 13th @ 8:30 PM EST! Purchase tickets here to reserve your seat today. Resources: Learn more about Liam Forde on his website, Instagram, or Facebook. You can find Great To Be Here wherever you stream music. It’s also available for purchase from Amazon Music or his website. Enjoying Bite-Size Jazz? You can support the podcast by Buying Me a Coffee! You can also leave a review, subscribe on your favorite podcast platform, or follow us on Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter. I’d love to connect with you!
08:27
May 16, 2022
Natalie Cressman & Ian Faquini: Auburn Whisper - Episode 74
If you love Brazilian music, you’ll love Natalie Cressman and Ian Faquini's most recent album, Auburn Whisper. Auburn Whisper showcases their myriad of talents. Not only are they exceptional on their individual instruments (trombone and guitar), but they are also tasteful lyricists and songwriters. Together they weave the story of disappointment, acceptance, and resilience in the face of a worldwide pandemic — all with the wonderful flavor of Brazil. Their original songs carry the longing for loved ones in another country, hope in the midst of darkness, and tales of Brazilian goddesses. Tune in to learn more! They talk about how they met, the lyricist they teamed up with, their unique recording process, and of course, the inspiration behind their original music. Get to know Natalie Cressman, Ian Faquini, and their latest album, Auburn Whisper in less than 10 minutes in this episode of Bite-Size Jazz. Resources Learn more about Natalie Cressman and Ian Faquini on their social media pages. You can find Auburn Whisper wherever you stream music. It’s also available for purchase from Amazon Music or Bandcamp. Enjoying Bite-Size Jazz? You can support the podcast by Buying Me a Coffee! You can also leave a review, subscribe on your favorite podcast platform, or follow us on Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter. We’d love to connect with you!
07:35
May 04, 2022
Grace Fox: Eleven O' Seven - Episode 73
At 19 years old, Grace Fox is already a force to be reckoned with. She’s already formed her own big band, recorded her first album, and performed as a trumpeter and bandleader at one of the most respected jazz clubs in NYC, Birdland. We don’t want to give too many details away, but in this episode of Bite-Size Jazz, Grace dives into the mishaps of recording — like when singers back out of recordings at the last minute — and the inspiration behind her original songs, including procrastinated homework assignments that later became killer big band charts. She also opens up about the struggles of starting a music degree and trying to launch a career during a worldwide pandemic. Tune in to get to know Grace Fox and her debut album, Eleven O’ Seven. Resources:  Learn more about Grace Fox on her social media. You can stream Eleven O' Seven on Spotify or Apple Music, it's also available for purchase on Amazon Music, Bandcamp, and iTunes.  Enjoying Bite-Size Jazz? You can support the podcast by Buying Me a Coffee! You can also leave a review, subscribe on your favorite podcast platform, or follow us on Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter. We’d love to connect with you!
09:27
April 18, 2022
Vanessa Perea: It Had To Be You - Episode 72
You’ve heard of piano-vocal duos and guitar-vocal duos. But what about trombone-vocal duos? Vanessa Perea and husband Robert Edwards are trendsetting this unique instrumentation. They first showcased it on their album Home Life in 2021, which was a purely vocal and trombone album. Now their latest album, It Had To Be You, brings that same playful interaction — and adds guitarist Tony Davis and bassist Dylan Shamat. Vanessa and Robert first met during their undergrad years at New Jersey City University. A move across the river into New York City proved fruitful to both of their careers. Calls were coming in and their schedules stayed busy. That is, until the pandemic hit. With nothing but time to kill, Vanessa and Robert started exploring the idea of playing with what they had — a voice and a trombone — and spent hours working out arrangements (much to the chagrin of their downstairs neighbors). When social distancing restrictions were lifted, they were happy to add a few more band members to their project. It Had To Be You is a delightful offering of musicians pushing the boundaries of traditional instrumentation. Listen to this Bite-Size Jazz episode featuring Vanessa Perea to get to know a vocalist with a style all her own. She talks about learning to coordinate vocal-trombone performing, the process of recording the album, and her musical background. Resources: Learn more about Vanessa Perea on her website, Instagram, or Facebook. You can find It Had To Be You anywhere you stream music. It's also available for purchase on Amazon Music or Bandcamp. Enjoying Bite-Size Jazz? You can support the podcast by Buying Me a Coffee! You can also leave a review, subscribe on your favorite podcast platform, or follow us on Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter. We’d love to connect with you!
07:18
April 04, 2022
Melissa Errico: Out of the Dark - Episode 71
Loneliness. Heartache. Emptiness. Isolation. Everything that describes film noir also describes the pandemic.  When Melissa Errico first fell down the YouTube rabbit hole of film noir, she didn't expect to find a new passion. After watching hours of tragic femme fatale actresses fall trap to their fate and lonely heroes become disillusioned with society — she realized that the themes of the 1940s weren't so far away after all. A collaboration with the French Institue Alliance Francaise for a film festival further cemented this love for film noir, and most especially for the music these movies featured.  Out the Dark presents 17 tracks arranged with the very heart of film noir. Songs like "Laura," "On Vit, On Aime," and "Silent Partner" capture the mystery and intrigue of those classic films. "Farewell My Lovely" showcases a beautiful lyrical setting to the tune of "Marlo's Theme," originally written by David Shire for the movie Farewell My Lovely. And, Melissa gets to star in her very own novella in the music video for "Angel Eyes" — a seven-minute watch that you don't want to miss.   Listen to the full episode to hear the stories behind each track on Out of the Dark. Melissa Errico shares how her collaboration with the French Institute began, her vision for the album, and the intriguing tale behind her brand new music video.  Resources Learn more about Melissa Errico on her website and about Out of the Dark on The Film Noir Project website. You can find Out of the Dark anywhere you stream music. It's also available for purchase on Amazon Music.  Enjoying Bite-Size Jazz? You can support the podcast by Buying Me a Coffee! You can also leave a review, subscribe on your favorite podcast platform, or follow us on Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter. We’d love to connect with you!
10:31
March 29, 2022
Anna Laura Quinn: Open the Door - Episode 70
If you’re looking for a fresh take on a familiar tune, Anna Laura Quinn has the song for you. Each recording on her debut album Open the Door is a delightful surprise. “Wouldn’t It Be Loverly” is reinvented as a bluesy, groove track. “Open the Door,” is cloaked in beautiful, ethereal sound. And “Love for Sale” gets the dark, mysterious makeover its lyrics have been waiting for. Anna Laura is a stunning vocalist, but she’s also a genius arranger. When her visual art career didn’t provide the fulfillment she’d imagined, Anna Laura took a leap of faith — all the way to New Orleans. Step by step she’s grown into the confident band leader she is today. From a master's program at UNO, to jam sessions, to her debut album, Anna Laura has been on a journey to discover her sound — and invites you to listen on Open the Door. Listen to this Bite-Size Jazz episode featuring Anna Laura Quinn to get to know an incredible young vocalist. She talks about her musical journey, the creativity behind each arrangement, and why she loves New Orleans. Resources Learn more about Anna Laura Quinn on her website. You can find her album Open the Door anywhere you stream music. It’s also available for purchase on Amazon Music. Enjoying Bite-Size Jazz? You can support the podcast by Buying Me a Coffee! You can also leave a review, subscribe on your favorite podcast platform, or follow us on Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter. We’d love to connect with you!
07:20
March 23, 2022
Leonor Falcón: Imaga Mondo Vol. II - Episode 69
Leonor Falcón is no stranger to the violin or viola — she’s been studying them since her childhood placement in a Venezuelan music charter school. Every morning, she attended traditional academic classes, while her afternoons were filled with orchestra and small ensemble rehearsals. The central focus was mastering the instrument to reach the top orchestra. And though her school days were filled with classical music — her home was filled with the sounds of rock, jazz, and pop. Eventually, these genres called her to New York to study jazz and improvisation. While in New York, Leonor discovered a love for all types of improvisation — not just jazz. She found the Avant-Garde scene and other unique sounds that defy typical genre placement. Leonor also realized that learning to improvise was almost like learning a different instrument. Rather than focusing on correct notes and rhythms, she learned to let expression lead her technique. Leonor learned to accept herself and the sounds she produced in each moment. Listen to this Bite-Size Jazz episode to learn more about Leonor Falcón and the stories behind each song on her new album, Imaga Mondo Vol. II. She talks about the fables that influenced her preceding album, Imaga Mondo Vol. I, the images that inspired songs like “Nita” and “The Monks,” and how to improvise freely within a group. Resources Learn more about Leonor Falcó on her website. You can find her album Imaga Mondo Vol. II anywhere you stream music. Enjoying Bite-Size Jazz? You can support the podcast by Buying Me a Coffee! You can also leave a review, subscribe on your favorite podcast platform, or follow us on Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter. We’d love to connect with you!
06:59
March 14, 2022
Spencer Day: Broadway by Day - Episode 68
“If it was on VHS I got to see it” Spencer Day credits his mother and the local video store for igniting his love of musicals. He grew up in a small, conservative town that didn’t have much in the way of live musical theater performances. But there was a video store that carried G-rated movies — and classic films. The music from shows like Oklahoma, Singin’ in the Rain, and South Pacific planted big dreams of traveling the world inside his young heart. However, it took some time before he realized that singing would be his ticket around the globe. Now Spencer Day is a #1 Billboard jazz/pop singer and songwriter that has played in venues like the Lincoln Center, the Hollywood Bowl and London’s West End. He’s been praised by Time Out New York, Washington Post, New York Public Radio, and SF Chronicle. But it certainly wasn’t a straight trajectory getting to this point. Between a joke audition for Star Search that actually landed him on the show, playing in piano bars, signing and getting dropped by labels, there’s been many twists and turns on his path to success. He laughs about performing in the Hollywood Bowl in the same week he played for six people in a blizzard in Ohio. The artist’s life is never easy — but it’s worth it. Listen to the full interview to get to know Spencer Day and his music! He talks about the ups and downs of building a music career, why sacrifices of an artist’s lifestyle is worth it, and the creative process behind his latest album Broadway by Day. Resources Learn more about Spencer Day on his website. You can find his album Broadway by Day anywhere you stream music. It’s also available for purchase on Amazon Music. Enjoying Bite-Size Jazz? You can support the podcast by Buying Me a Coffee! You can also leave a review, subscribe on your favorite podcast platform, or follow us on Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter. We’d love to connect with you!
08:30
March 08, 2022
Jim Caruso & Billy Stritch: The Sunday Set - Episode 67
Jim Caruso and Billy Stritch’s friendship began almost 40 years ago, way before they ever set foot in New York City. Jim was living and performing in Dallas, Texas, when his manager asked if a young vocal trio from Houston could sing a few songs before one of his shows. That trio was Sharon Montgomery, Rebecca Plant, and Billy Stritch. Jim thought “Oh sure, give these kids a break.” Their performance blew everyone away, including Jim, who said “They were one of the best vocal groups I’d ever heard, I wanted to kill myself. In lieu of that, we became best friends.” Now, Jim and Billy spend every Monday night together at the Birdland Theater in New York hosting “Jim Caruso’s Cast Party” — one of the best open mics in the city. Every week for 18 years they’ve brought people on stage to share their talents with the audience. The best part? You never know who might walk in the door But you can’t make it to New York to hang out with Jim and Billy, you can bring them into your home every day with their album The Sunday Set. It opens up with a sunny medley of “Whistle While You Work” and “Give a Little Whistle,” and is followed by a 60s swingin’ arrangement of “You Are My Sunshine.” You’ll be laughing while they sing “What Did You Do To Your Face?” and grabbing for a beer during their “Sinatra Saloon Medley” Listen to the full interview with Jim Caruso and Billy Stritch to hear all the details of their newest album, The Sunday Set. They laugh about the crazy adventures of hosting an open mic night, explain how their album came together, and describe the process of arranging tunes for The Sunday Set. Resources Learn more about Jim Caruso and Billy Stritch on their websites. You can find their album The Sunday Set anywhere you stream music. It’s also available for purchase on Amazon Music. Enjoying Bite-Size Jazz? You can support the podcast by Buying Me a Coffee! You can also leave a review, subscribe on your favorite podcast platform, or follow us on Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter. We’d love to connect with you!
09:47
March 01, 2022
The Baylor Project: Generations - Episode 66
“Never compare your season to someone else’s.” Jean and Marcus Baylor have experienced many different seasons during their lives. Jean found success in the 90s as half of the duo Zhane. Marcus rose to prominence in the early 2000s as the drummer for the Yellowjackets. And now they’re in a new season of musical creation — together this time — as The Baylor Project. Since 2017, they’ve started their own label, Be a Light, released two albums, been nominated four times for a Grammy (the latest for their album, Generations), and recently partnered with the legendary Motown Gospel label. Marcus notes that it’s a good thing you take the journey one step at a time. If you knew at the beginning what kind of work it would take to get where you are now — would you have had the bandwidth to say yes? Whatever you’re trying to achieve, it’s all about persistence and staying consistent. It’s as true for a musical vision as it is for a marriage. Jean and Marcus Baylor have been together for 20 years now, and they say it’s important to both love and like each other (there is a difference). They’ve built their marriage on a foundation of friendship that carries them through the inevitable ups and downs of any relationship. But how did it all start? Jean and Marcus lightheartedly banter over the story of how they met — but you’ll have to tune in to hear all the details. Listen to the full interview to get to know Jean and Marcus Baylor. They talk about how The Baylor Project began, how they are bringing together Generations of musicians through their album, and the creative process behind their original songs. Resources Learn more about The Baylor Project on their website. You can find their album Generations anywhere you stream music. It’s also available for purchase through their website or Amazon Music. Enjoying Bite-Size Jazz? You can support the podcast by Buying Me a Coffee! You can also leave a review, subscribe on your favorite podcast platform, or follow us on Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter. I’d love to connect with you!
45:12
February 15, 2022
Christiane Karam: Nar - Episode 65
Vocalist and composer Christiane Karam fuses a world of influences in her latest album, Nar. We hear western harmony, eastern melodies, Balkan rhythms, Hungarian folk tunes, and a few surprising influences like Pink Floyd and David Bowie. Christiane’s music melds these sounds together to unfold the shared experiences of humanity. Some of those experiences are quite universal, like the heartache from a breakup. Others are shared by many around the globe, like the immigrant journey. And there are other experiences that no one would wish upon another, but still too many undergo — the tragedies brought by war and violence. Born and raised in war-torn Beirut, Lebanon, Christiane is all too familiar with the calamities of conflict. But nothing could have prepared her for the pain inflicted by the August 2020 explosion in Beirut. It wasn’t just another newscast about a place a world away — those were Christiane’s family and friends. When the shock subsided and the tears finally flowed, it was her music that brought healing and peace. Listen to the full episode to learn more about Christiane Karam and her latest album, Nar. Christiane opens up about her emotional journey while writing the song “Beirut,” describes the influences that shaped her music, and explains why the artist’s role is essential during a crisis. Resources: Learn more about Christiane Karam on her website. Nar is available for purchase online. Enjoying Bite-Size Jazz? You can support the podcast by Buying Me a Coffee! You can also leave a review, subscribe on your favorite podcast platform, or follow us on Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter. I’d love to connect with you!
09:35
February 02, 2022
Deanna Witkowski: Force of Nature - Episode 64
Deanna Witkowski was first drawn to the pianist Mary Lou Williams in 2000 when she was invited to perform at the Kennedy Center for the Mary Lou Williams Festival. Of course she said yes, but she also realized that she was unfamiliar with Mary Lou’s music. That initial listening dive sparked a 20-year exploration of Mary Lou Williams' life and music, now showcased in a book, Mary Lou Williams: Music for the Soul, and an album, Force of Nature. Force of Nature is the perfect phrase to describe Mary Lou Williams. She was not only an amazing composer and pianist in her own right — musicians like Thelonious Monk, Charlie Parker, and Dizzy Gillespie learned harmony and composition from her caring mentorship. The names of her students get thrown around in history classes more often than we hear of Mary Lou. But perhaps she deserves a bit more credit than what’s given — especially when we hear startlingly similar harmonies in the compositions of her pupils. The bridge of Monk's "Well You Needn't" is practically interchangeable with the bridge of Mary Lou’s tune “Gjon Mili Jam,” written years earlier.  Additionally, Mary Lou described herself as an experimentalist, someone who was always doing something new. While critics sometimes decried her exploratory styles, Mary Lou took it as a badge of honor. When critics said, “The problem with Mary Lou is that we can’t pin her down into one category,” she just said, “That’s the point.” Deanna Witkowski shares more about Mary Lou’s life and music in this interview with Bite-Size Jazz. Deanna talks about her connection with Mary Lou as a fellow adult convert to Catholicism, their jazz masses, and digs into Mary Lou’s “Zodiac Suite.” Resources: Learn more about Mary Lou Williams in Deanna Witkowski’s book, Mary Lou Williams: Music for the Soul. You can find Deanna’s album Force of Nature anywhere you stream music, it’s also available for purchase from Deanna’s website. Loving the podcast? Subscribe on your favorite podcast platform and to follow us on Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter. We’d love to connect with you!
08:38
February 02, 2022
Nick Finzer: Out of Focus - Episode 63
Everybody has heard solo piano concerts and solo guitar gigs. But how often do you listen to solo trombone music? After listening to Nick Finzer’s latest album Out of Focus, you'll think about listening to solo trombone more often. Whether it’s a solo arrangement of Duke Ellington’s “A Single Petal of a Rose” or a 15 trombone arrangement of “Mood Indigo” (with all parts except bass trombone played by Finzer), Out of Focus gives the trombone a whole new dimension. But how do you write for 15 trombones anyways? Or how do you add texture to an arrangement for a single-note instrument? As jazz musicians, it’s easy to fall into a trap of cramming as much as you can into any given song. But the truth is, you probably don’t need to play 17 choruses on that ballad. Nick reminds us that sometimes stripping a song back to the original melody IS unique — and maybe it’s all you really need. Listen to the full interview with trombonist Nick Finzer to hear his input on great arranging. He also discusses how his company, Outside in Music, is helping artists release music without breaking the bank, and why setting aside time to be creative matters. Resources Learn more about Nick Finzer or his company Outside in Music on their websites. You can find Out of Focus wherever you stream music — it’s also available for purchase from Amazon music.  Enjoying Bite-Size Jazz? You can support the podcast by Buying Me a Coffee! You can also leave a review, subscribe on your favorite podcast platform, or follow us on Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter. I’d love to connect with you!
29:24
January 18, 2022
Charles Goold: Rhythm in Contrast — Episode 62
Drummer Charles Goold has been playing gigs for a long time — since he was 11, in fact. It started with sitting on his father's gigs at Small's Jazz Club. His dad, Ned Goold, is an acclaimed saxophonist, best known for playing in Harry Connick Jr.'s band. When they couldn't find a babysitter, Ned would bring Charles and his brother to the smoke-filled club to watch his gigs with the great jazz musicians of the 90s. Ned let Charles sit in on a tune here and there at first, but by the time he was 13, Charles held the drum chair for those weekly gigs. Now he's getting ready to release his second album, Rhythm in Contrast. The general concept of the album is exactly how it sounds: music with contrasting rhythms and styles. As you listen through the full album, you’ll notice that no two tracks sound the same, with styles switching between every song — sometimes even switching during the song, like in the tune "Resisting Arrest." "Resisting Arrest" pulls together multiple styles for a pan-African groove. Charles explains that people within the African diaspora and community tend to draw lines to separate themselves from one another. People from Africa separate themselves from African Americans. Caribbeans separate themselves from Africans and African Americans. Even within the Caribbean, Latinos separate from those with darker skin. “But at the end of the day when you’re pulled over or you’re going through something with the police, they don’t see all those differences. They just see African, dark skin, Latino — and they’re gonna say, ‘He or she was resisting arrest’” Charles blends styles like a 6/8 bembe and West African groove, a bluesy, swing groove, and a Caribbean/Latin groove. The song brings a unification of sound and style that he hopes society can find among themselves. "Lo's Lament" is dedicated to a dear friend and mentor, the late Lawrence "Lo" Leathers. Lawrence was known as the first-call drummer for Cecile McLorin Salvant, a friend to all on the New York jazz scene, and a big brother to Charles. "Some people say, 'What would Jesus do?' I ask myself when I'm on a gig, 'What would Lawrence do?'" "Lo's Lament" captures the cool, smooth vibe that Lawrence brought wherever he went. Resources Learn more about Charles Goold on his website, and check out "Lo's Lament" and "Resisting Arrest." Enjoying Bite-Size Jazz? You can support the podcast by Buying Me a Coffee! You can also leave a review, subscribe on your favorite podcast platform, or follow us on Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter. I’d love to connect with you!
08:05
January 04, 2022
2021 Wrap Up
THANK YOU listeners for supporting Bite-Size Jazz and these amazing artists! Thanks for joining the Bite-Size Jazz community and watching the podcast grow over these last 12 months. And THANK YOU to the wonderful artists who opened up about your lives, careers, and compositions and willingly shared your wisdom with listeners around the globe.  This week's episode shares just a few highlights from the interviews during 2021. It's not even close to capturing all the incredible interviews — but we would love for you to peruse the episodes available and see if there's anyone you missed. Find someone you're not familiar with, check out their music on Spotify or Apple Music. Or better yet, support their music by buying their album!  The highlights featured are from: Cyrille Aimée & Michael Valeanu - Episode 40 Lucy Yeghiazaryan & Vanisha Gould - Episode 50 Ulysses Owens Jr. - Episode 36 Jeremy Pelt - Episode 44 Jazzmeia Horn - Episode 51  Find all our episodes on the Bite-Size Jazz website or your favorite podcast streaming service.
02:33
December 29, 2021
Olivia Van Goor: When The Shadows Fall - Episode 61
Jazz vocalist Olivia Van Goor says one of the best pieces of advice she’s ever received is, “In the beginning, no one will be asking you to do things, so you just have to do them yourself.” Previously, she was under the impression that she needed to be asked to do things like record, or maybe she would just get a lucky break. This piece of advice gave Olivia the motivation to save up money for studio time, form her own jazz group, experiment with arrangements, line up a recording engineer and a mixing and mastering engineer — and this was just the start. Working as an independent artist isn’t easy, but Olivia knows she’s earned every ounce of praise the album has received. You hear Olivia’s original imprint most on her arrangement of “Hershey Bar.” She was inspired by Anita O’Day’s recording on the album Cool Heat — and her own sweet tooth. Musicians have a rap for vices like drugs and alcohol. But the only substance Olivia can’t get enough of is chocolate. She says the obsession has toned down a bit over the years, but she still carries some with her at all times. It’s become a running joke at jam sessions. Someone will ask, “Hey, you got some chocolate?” and she immediately starts passing it around. Olivia is the first musician to put lyrics to the tune of “Hershey Bar,” and she says they came pretty easily. The lyrics compare the sweetness of chocolate to the sweetness of love. Another standout tune on the album is Oliva’s recording of “Lilac Wine.” The song is originally from a failed Broadway musical, but a recorded version by Nina Simone captured Olivia’s attention. While the Broadway interpretation was a quite literal translation of the lyrics, Nina’s version hinted at a deeper, darker meaning. A few weeks before the recording date, Olivia realized that she needed to find her own deeper meaning to the song. She practiced an exercise from Jazzmeia Horn’s book Strive From Within: The Jazzmeia Horn Approach. She read the lyrics like a monologue, recording herself until the meaning of the song seeped into the words and she uncovered her own personal story hidden in the lyrics. Olivia says she can hear herself getting emotional when she listens back to that recording. She carries that story into the music whenever she performs. Resources Learn more about Olivia Van Goor on her website. You can find When the Shadows Fall anywhere you stream music. It’s also available for purchase from Amazon Music or Bandcamp. You can stay up to date with Olivia’s musical journey by following her on social media! Enjoying Bite-Size Jazz? You can support the podcast by Buying Me a Coffee! You can also leave a review, subscribe on your favorite podcast platform, or follow us on Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter. We’d love to connect with you!
36:47
December 20, 2021
Steven Feifke & Benny Benack III - Episode 60
Steven Feifke and Benny Benack III don’t have a typical arranger-singer relationship. That’s because they’re not just a typical arranger or singer — Benny also is an incredible trumpet player who writes his own lead sheets for his quartet, and Steven is an incredible pianist and composer (check out his recently released big band album, Kinetic). Thus, it’s not “singer who stands in front and has nothing to do with composing” and “arranger who just cranks out charts without any artist preferences.” Their album, Seasons Swinging Greetings, showcases the intertwining talents of composing, arranging, and writing lyrics. For instance, Steven tweaked the form on Benny’s original song “My Girlfriend is an Elf.” Normally, he’s much more conservative about changing the form of someone’s song. But because he and Benny are such close friends, he wasn’t afraid to propose the change that made the orchestration line up better. When Steven was hitting a wall for the lyrics on his original composition “When Christmas Time Comes Around,” he turned to Benny. Benny listened to Steven’s idea and found the words to bring the story to life. They help complete each other’s musical ideas without sacrificing the original vision. This rare musical partnership was forged from years of living as roommates. Benny remembers the days when Steven was so busy writing charts that he would only emerge from his room to make more coffee. Finally, after three days he would sit on the couch with a sigh of relief and say, “I just had to arrange 12 big band charts.” Steven remembers when Benny would come home from a gig and immediately begin practicing again. It’s one thing if you’re getting home from a gig at 7pm. When you get home from a gig at 11pm — that means you’re practicing until two or three in the morning. Clearly, they both have an outstanding drive and work ethic. Listen to the full interview with Steven Feifke and Benny Benack III to learn more about their latest album, Seasons Swinging Greetings. They talk about the inspiration behind their original tunes, why they were excited about including several Hanukkah songs, and what they love about working together. Plus, they share their favorite holiday traditions and we debate about which Christmas movie is better: Elf or Home Alone. Resources Learn more about Benny Benack III and Steven Feifke on their websites. Physical copies of the music are available now. The digital version will be available December 22. Enjoying Bite-Size Jazz? You can support the podcast by Buying Me a Coffee! You can also leave a review, subscribe on your favorite podcast platform, or follow us on Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter. We’d love to connect with you! Episode Rewind Nicolas King - Episode 31 & James Hudson - Episode 29
42:21
December 15, 2021
Todd Mosby: Aerial Views - Episode 59
Todd Mosby’s love for Indian music was born in a small shop near his home. After school he would hang out in the store, smelling the sweet incense and listening to records from great Indian artists. The chance of a lifetime came when the legendary sitarist Imrat Khan moved to Todd’s hometown of St. Louis, Missouri. What Bach’s family did to western classical music — Imrat’s family did to Indian music. They totally changed its course. Todd jumped at the opportunity to take lessons with Imrat, which led to a 13-year intense study of Classical North Indian Music. Todd describes it as a student-disciple model, learning the philosophy, history, spirituality of the music. It may have cost more than any post-graduate education — but Todd wouldn’t trade it for anything. A few years into these lessons, Todd recognized he needed a new instrument to blend the eastern styles he was learning with the western music he’s always known. Together with Imrat Khan and luthier Kim Schwartz, the trio came up with a new type of instrument to combine the best features of a sitar and a guitar. The new Imrat Guitar has contemporary harp guitar strings pitched above the 1st string, rather than below the 6th string, 11 sympathetic strings, 2 necks, 3 chikara strings, 4 playing strings, and Javari. The result is a beautiful, inspiring sound. You can hear Todd play the Imrat Guitar on his latest album, Aerial Views. The music was inspired by many hours spent flying with his father, who was a pilot. Songs like “Gliding” and “Into Starlight” lift you into the clouds, soaring effortlessly through the sky without being tied down to earth. Todd reminisces on the breathtaking views from a small plane 10,000 feet up — views we usually miss on the commercial planes, which fly much higher. Aerial Views invites you to let go and freely soar on the wings of Todd's music. Resources Learn more about Todd Mosby on his website, You can find Aerial Views anywhere you stream music. It’s also available for purchase from Amazon Music.  Enjoying Bite-Size Jazz? You can support the podcast by Buying Me a Coffee! You can also leave a review, subscribe on your favorite podcast platform, or follow us on Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter. We’d love to connect with you! Episode Rewind Jacques Schwarz-Bart - Episode 32 & Aaron Goldberg/Yes! Trio - Episode 08 
29:36
December 07, 2021
Alex Hamburger: And She Spoke - Episode 58
Alex Hamburger’s latest album And She Spoke is inspired by many powerhouse women in history. But first and foremost, And She Spoke is inspired by Alex’s grandmother, a stalwart educator, and activist during the military dictatorship in Paraguay. Her grandmother built a school all by herself at the age of 20 to teach children in a poor, rural community with no other chance for education. She outright refused to teach what the dictator told her to, and when soldiers came to take away teachers, she refused again. Her grandmother started a nationwide movement for academic integrity, which became part of the general movement for social justice in the country. Talk about an incredible woman. When Alex came across a book of poetry her grandmother had written, she knew she had to do something with it. “La Desesperación es la Pasión Verdaderamente Humana” captures the essence of her grandmother’s poetry: deep and on the edge of being dark. The poem that inspired “La Desesperación” says that desperation is true human passion. Only human beings feel such deep emotion that is so tragic and beautiful at the same time. Alex’s grandmother’s poetry is joined by words from Maya Angelou, Sylvia Plath, and more. Alex also includes compositions from trailblazing women in jazz such as Mary Lou Williams and Geri Allen. Alex contemplates the parallels between the two: strong, black women from different generations who were THERE, backbones of a scene, and passing on the music through education — and yet so few people know their names. Women like Mary Lou Williams and Geri Allen created a space for jazz musicians to continue creating to this day. Alex pays homage to them through recordings of “What’s Your Story Morning Glory” and “Unconditional Love.” Listen to the full interview with flutist, composer, and vocalist Alex Hamburger to learn more about the stories and poetry behind her music. She also discusses her year-long artist residency in Switzerland just before recording this album, the incredible musicians in her band, and what it means to her to be a strong woman. Resources Learn more about Alex Hamburger on her website, You can find And She Spoke anywhere you stream music. It’s also available for purchase from Amazon Music. Enjoying Bite-Size Jazz? You can support the podcast by Buying Me a Coffee! You can also leave a review, subscribe on your favorite podcast platform, or follow us on Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter. We’d love to connect with you! Episode Rewind Emmet Cohen: Future Stride - Episode 25 & Gretchen Parlato: Flor - Episode 21 
26:17
November 30, 2021
Michael Feinberg: Hard Times - Episode 57
Bassist Michael Feinberg's latest album takes you through the wild ride of the pandemic. Waking up “Every. Damn. Day” to the horrible news cycle of police brutality and out-of-control politicians, feeling a little “Janky in the Middle” of it all, and mostly just hoping you can see the light at the end of these “Hard Times.” But Michael’s music finds order in the chaos. Take the aforementioned tune “Every. Damn. Day. (Burn it Down Blues)” as an example. It’s forged from two seemingly unrelated themes, which build into a musical mayhem. However, the most chaotic section is also the part that feels the most constant. In between each repetition of the theme, there’s a wide range of emotions: sweet, harsh, or aggressive. But in the end, the music always returns to the same theme. There's a consistency in the disarray — just the same as we must start the day over, and over, and over again amidst the turmoil of life. Michael explains that there is a constant duality in life. In order for balance to exist, you must have an equal amount of all ingredients. If you have sections of loud dynamics, you need sections of quiet sensitivity. When you have long moments of tonal music, you crave the sound of dissonance. In life, you must taste bitter to know the sweet. And while the album takes us through the ups and downs of life, it ends on a positive note with the title track. This soulful recording celebrates coming to the end of “Hard Times” — making it through the trauma to experience achievement and success. The harder you work for it, the sweeter the reward. Listen to the full interview with Michael Feinberg to learn more about his album Hard Times. He talks in-depth about his phenomenal band, his compositional process, and why he’s dressed as a cowboy on the album cover. Resources Learn more about Michael Feinberg on his website, You can find Hard Times anywhere you stream music. It’s also available for purchase from Amazon Music. Enjoying Bite-Size Jazz? You can support the podcast by Buying Me a Coffee! You can also leave a review, subscribe on your favorite podcast platform, or follow us on Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter. We’d love to connect with you! Episode Rewind Lezlie Harrion: Soul Book Vol. 1 - Episode 33 & Jane Monheit: Come What May - Episode 27
25:55
November 23, 2021
Freda Payne: Let There Be Love - Episode 56
Fame can be a pleasant surprise When Freda Payne recorded “Band of Gold” for Invictus Records in 1969, she didn’t think much of it — until it catapulted her to the top of the charts in 1970. Even today, it’s still considered one of the top 100 songs of the 70s. But Freda Payne’s roots are in jazz — she recorded her very first album for Impulse! Records (known for recording jazz legends such as John Coltrane and Duke Ellington) and ever since 2014, she’s returned to those roots with her recordings. Her latest album Let There Be Love features jazz masters of today like Kurt Elling and Dee Dee Bridgewater, along with long-time legend Johnny Mathis and R&B, soul, and jazz star Kenny Lattimore. Arrangements for Let There Be Love were crafted by Grammy Award-winning composer and bandleader Gordon Goodwin, with some suggestions from Freda Payne. When Gordon presented his original arrangement of the title track, Freda said, “This one’s going to be a duet with Kenny Lattimore, a real R&B star. I want it to be FUNKY, put some spice in it.” Gordon re-arranged the tune once more — the way you hear it on the album now. Freda also contributed the idea of piecing together “Moanin” by Bobby Timmons and John Hendricks with “Doodlin” by Horace Silver. The clever interplay comes to life in a duet with jazz vocalist Dee Dee Bridgewater. Freda doesn’t shy away from scatting either — “It’s All Right With Me” features Freda trading melodies with the big band, and “Our Love is Here to Stay” showcases a stunning scat battle between Kurt Elling and Freda. Listen to the full Bite-Size Jazz interview to hear Freda’s stories about coming up on the jazz scene in New York in her early 20s, traveling the world, and the healthy habits that have kept her voice powerful even into her late 70s. Birdland Jazz Club will present Freda Payne in her album release concert “Let There Be Love” for one show only on Monday, November 22 at 7:00 PM ET. For reservations, please call (212) 581-3080 or visit www.BirdlandJazz.com. Resources Learn more about Freda Payne on her website, You can find Let There Be Love anywhere you stream music. It’s also available for purchase from Amazon Music. Enjoying Bite-Size Jazz? You can support the podcast by Buying Me a Coffee! You can also leave a review, subscribe on your favorite podcast platform, or follow us on Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter. We’d love to connect with you!
25:35
November 15, 2021
Jim Snidero: Strings - Episode 55
“It was an intense record — you can hear that in the music. The musicians really had something to say that day” The reissuing of Strings celebrates 20 years since the original recording — and memorializes 20 years since the attack on the Twin Towers, an attack that affected the recording in unprecedented ways. Saxophonist Jim Snidero was headed to the recording studio for this album on September 11, 2001. When he descended into the subway tunnels at 8:30 that morning, the twin towers were still standing. When he arrived in Brooklyn, the air was filled with smoke and floating work documents from the decimated offices. It was obvious they would have to reschedule. When they regrouped two months later, it was a somber meeting and the emotion everyone held in their hearts seeped into the music. Song titles like “Forever Gone,” “On the Banks of the Hudson,” and “The Talk of the Town,” suddenly held much different meanings than they previously anticipated. You would never guess from listening, but saxophonist Jim Snidero had never written for strings before this album. He originally planned to record the project for a label that would connect him with an arranger, but when the label dropped the project, he decided to dig into string arranging himself. Jim delved into recordings from musicians like Clare Fischer and Nelson Riddle, listening closely to the way they created different textures through voicings. Through it all, he learned to paint musical pictures for songs like “River Suite, Pt. 1: Dawn,” “River Suite, Pt.2: On the Banks,” and “River Suite, Pt.3: Torrent.” For example, “River Suite, Pt.1: Dawn” is written in the key of Db, which he refers to as the calmest key in music. Above sustaining chords, he plays a curious melody that characterizes the mysterious calm in the world as the sun rises each morning on the Hudson River. In “River Suite, Pt. 3: Torrent,” drummer Billy Drummond kicks up a whirlwind that portrays the chaos of storms blowing in from the ocean to Manhattan. Jim wrote “Forever Gone,” in the key of Eb minor, which he says is the saddest key in music, and cites Mozart's Requiem as another heartbreakingly beautiful piece in Eb minor. There’s much more to learn from Jim about his composition techniques. Listen to the full Bite-Size Jazz interview with jazz saxophonist Jim Snidero to hear more about the inspiration behind the songs of his newly reissued album Strings, how he used texture, voicings, and chord changes to represent emotions, and the album’s connection to 9/11. Resources Learn more about Jim Snidero on his website, You can find Strings anywhere you stream music. It’s also available for purchase from Amazon Music. Enjoying Bite-Size Jazz? You can support the podcast by Buying Me a Coffee! You can also leave a review, subscribe on your favorite podcast platform, or follow us on Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter. We’d love to connect with you!
33:45
November 09, 2021
Miki Yamanaka: Stairway to the Stars - Episode 54
The sound of big bands brewed a love for jazz that carried Miki Yamanaka from her home in Japan all the way to New York City. Miki Yamanaka was no stranger to jazz during her formative years — apparently, you can’t even go into a noodle shop in Japan without hearing John Coltrane. Her own parents were avid jazz fans, enrolling Miki in an after-school music program with a jazz band. That musical passion was further cemented during a five-day visit to New York where Miki Yamanaka watched Cedar Walton play at Dizzy’s Club. When the night was over, there was only one thought left in Miki’s mind: I have to live here. The level of jazz that she had only imagined was possible was played everywhere in New York. Miki packed up her bags again, saying she would stay in New York for just a year — now it’s been nine years and she has no intention of leaving anytime soon. October 2021 saw the release of Miki’s third album as a leader, Stairway to the Stars, recorded in the midst of a pandemic from her own apartment. When it became obvious that her original plan of a live recording would be impossible, she had the recording equipment brought to her home for a DIY studio. It was the first time playing with guests for months and the excitement is palpable. She includes stellar arrangements of tunes like “Cheryl” and “My Melancholy Baby,” and originals, “Wonder” and “Oatmeal” (inspired by her oatmeal-loving husband and sister-in-law). Listen to the full interview to learn more about Miki Yamanaka’s music and experience as a musician in New York. She opens about moving to New York, becoming fluent in both English and music, the tough love she received at jam sessions and now dishes out as the host, which aspects of Japanese culture she misses and which ones she truly does not — and, of course — the music from her new album Stairway to the Stars. Resources Learn more about Miki Yamanaka on her website, You can find Stairway to the Stars anywhere you stream music. It’s also available for purchase from Amazon Music. Enjoying Bite-Size Jazz? You can support the podcast by Buying Me a Coffee! You can also leave a review, subscribe on your favorite podcast platform, or follow us on Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter. We’d love to connect with you!
33:13
November 02, 2021
Three of a Kind - Episode 53
“In this setting, it can feel like you have to fill in the space — like filling in an awkward pause in a conversation. But actually, if you leave the space it makes the notes much more meaningful” - Clovis Nicolas Playing without a drummer leaves a lot of extra room in your soundscape. It can seem natural to fill it up with comping, melodic fills, or rhythmic hits — but Michael Valeanu, Clovis Nicolas, and Jon Boutellier do the opposite. Rather than constantly churning out notes, the guitar-bass-saxophone trio leaves ample room for a three-way conversation on their latest album, Three of a Kind. Inspired by the Jimmy Guiffre and Jim Hall trio, Michael opted for a drumless trio where he could better control his dynamics and textures within a group. It’s easier to hear yourself without a drummer, and Michael felt there was more he could convey to the audience in that setting. Clovis and Jon loved the unique instrumentation and jumped on board for the one-day recording session. Clovis, Jon, and Michael are certainly “three of a kind” — they share a love for jazz, composition, a childhood in France, and a current home in New York City. They compare the two jazz scenes, and amidst the discussion we come to the conclusion: while jazz is more common-place in New York, you certainly don’t have to live there to become a great jazz musician. Thanks to modern technology and the widespread availability of recordings, students across the world are discovering musical giants like Miles Davis and John Coltrane. Join the conversation with Michael Valeanu, Jon Boutellier, and Clovis Nicolas to learn more about the original compositions and arrangements from their new album, Three of a Kind. Michael Valeanu describes the five-year process of composing “Miroirs,” Jon Boutellier shares his process of unraveling Duke Ellington’s “Reminiscing in Tempo,” and Clovis Nicolas discloses the connection between his song “Minor Thing” and Ellington's classic “It Don’t Mean a Thing.” Resources Learn more about Michael Valeanu, Jon Boutellier, and Clovis Nicolas on their websites, You can find Three of a Kind anywhere you stream music. Enjoying Bite-Size Jazz? You can support the podcast by Buying Me a Coffee! You can also leave a review, subscribe on your favorite podcast platform, or follow us on Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter. We’d love to connect with you!
27:57
October 27, 2021
Tom Cohen: My Take - Episode 52
“Philly’s got its own way of swing — it’s a deep-rooted, down-home feeling” Drummer Tom Cohen must have had flames coming off his sticks when he finished recording his latest record. Short but mighty, My Take features five burning tracks with Philadelphia greats like Hammond B3 organist Dave Posmontier and guitarist Steve Warfield, tenor saxophonists Tim Warfield and Ralph Bowen, and Joey DeFrancesco, also on the Hammond B3 of course. Musicians rotate through Tom’s interpretations of five classic jazz tunes. Tom Cohen reminisces about his early days on the Philly jazz scene, hanging out at Gert’s Lounge with jazz organ masters like Herbie Nicks and Shirley Scott.  Though there was barely enough room between the stage and the bar to squeeze in two people, the music was so toe-tapping that people couldn’t help but get up and dance. Philadelphia has rightly earned its reputation as a B3 town, especially considering the players that have come out of that city: the aforementioned Herbie Nicks and Shirley Scott, Don Patterson, Trudy Pitts, and Joey DeFrancesco. Listen to the full Bite-Size Jazz interview to learn more about Tom Cohen’s love for the Philly jazz scene, his experience as a versatile studio musician, and his collaboration with Joey DeFrancesco for his latest album My Take. Resources Learn more about Tom Cohen on his website. You can find My Take anywhere you stream music. It’s also available for purchase on Amazon Music. Enjoying Bite-Size Jazz? You can support the podcast by Buying Me a Coffee! You can also leave a review, subscribe on your favorite podcast platform, or follow us on Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter. We’d love to connect with you!
23:07
October 19, 2021
Marc Cary: Life Lessons - Episode 51
“No matter how good you get — if you don't listen, then it’s nothing because listening is 99% of what we do” Jazz pianist Marc Cary shares the wisdom he’s gained from years as a professional musician in his latest album Life Lessons. The first lesson he shares is that in order to truly understand jazz, you have to dig deep — real deep. The roots of this music go back farther than American history — across the ocean, and across continents even. All great musicians were influenced by the places they traveled and the sounds they heard, especially from indigenous groups. Marc opens up about his own Native American ancestry and how his music was influenced by their sound and turbulent history. In addition to his fascination with and influence from indigenous music, Marc’s compositions are also quite lyrical, no doubt impacted by his time spent with vocalists like Betty Carter and Abbey Lincoln. Marc laughs about the time Abbey Lincoln told him it was alright if he couldn’t make her gigs once in a while so he could pursue his own interests — and then fired him the first time he said he was unavailable. While that year-long hiatus from her band may have disgruntled him at first, it propelled him to record his first album as a bandleader, for which he was grateful. His latest album Life Lessons includes two Abbey Lincoln songs, “It Was Supposed to Be Love” and “Learning to Listen,” where Marc opens up about the issue of domestic abuse and why listening is essential to making music. Listen to the full Bite-Size Jazz interview with pianist Marc Cary about his new album Life Lessons to learn more about his passion for indigenous music, the inspiration behind songs like “Not a Good Day to Die,” and his collaboration with artists like Roy Hargrove and Abby Lincoln. Resources Learn more about Marc Cary on his website. You can find Life Lessons anywhere you stream music. It’s also available for purchase on Amazon Music. Enjoying Bite-Size Jazz? You can support the podcast by Buying Me a Coffee! You can also leave a review, subscribe on your favorite podcast platform, or follow us on Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter. We’d love to connect with you!
33:33
October 14, 2021
Jazzmeia Horn: Dear Love - Episode 50
“We need to get back to love, the love that was lost” Jazz vocalist Jazzmeia Horn’s latest album Dear Love is a love letter to her community, family, friends, and future lover. Her music spreads warmth and positivity, encouraging us to be the eye of the hurricane by finding balance and peace amidst the chaos of society. “Can’t Buy Me Love” reminds us that all the money in the world can’t fill the gap of genuine love. The original verses she added are a perfect pairing with the Beatles’ classic tune. “Let Us Take Our Time” teaches that love can be beautiful, romantic, even sexy, without “letting all of you hang out.” Love is most liberating when it’s dedicated. Jazzmeia openly shares the story behind “Where We Are,” a mantra she sang to keep afloat during her darkest days. It’s also a dedication to the women who brought her to this point and women all around the world working to bring the next generation forward. Her original songs paired with stunning poetry offer a unique album — according to her research, Jazzmeia is the first female vocalist to write, arrange, and lead an entire big band album. Rather than give up when multiple labels turned down her idea, Jazzmeia started her own label: Empress Legacy Records. Armed with complete artistic freedom, she learned to write for a big band for the first time and recorded previously unreleased tracks that were turned down by other labels —and which are now receiving record airplay. Listen to the full interview with jazz vocalist Jazzmeia Horn on Bite-Size Jazz to learn about her compositional process — including singing all the parts for the big band and then transcribing — finding a balance amid career and family responsibilities, and more stories behind the music of her new jazz album, Dear Love. Resources Learn more about Jazzmeia Horn on her website. You can find Dear Love anywhere you stream music. It’s also available for purchase on Amazon Music. Enjoying Bite-Size Jazz? You can support the podcast by Buying Me a Coffee! You can also leave a review, subscribe on your favorite podcast platform, or follow us on Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter. I’d love to connect with you!
34:26
October 05, 2021
Lucy Yeghiazaryan & Vanish Gould - Episode 49
“Modern feminism encourages harder, more masculine elements in women and makes you feel sort of funny about being soft and gentle. I think that’s the opposite of what we need to do — I think we should embrace the fact that women are softer, more gentle, and caring, and love is at the center of all of that. To me, being a woman means embracing that, not trying to act more masculine so I can fit into society” - Lucy Yeghiazaryan In Her Words tells the story of what it means to be a woman through original songs and jazz standards. While most of the world is telling women they have to be tough, masculine, and hard, Lucy Yeghiazaryan and Vanisha Gould have another idea. They believe the key to being a woman is embracing what makes them unique: the softer, gentler, and loving side. It also means embracing the fact that as women, we talk about love, romance, and men — a lot Songs on their new album range from 'Gypsy Feet", a Vanisha Gould original about a non-committal woman leaving a string of broken hearts in her wake and in turn breaking her own, to Lucy Yeghiazaryan’s arrangement of Billie Holiday’s "My Man", where Lucy opens up about the domestic abuse she witnessed in the community of Armenia where she grew up. They also talk about the whims of women checking out cute men on the sly through "Cute Boy" and the flirtations of men on city streets through "Hey Baby." Vanisha and Lucy also discuss the spoken and unspoken challenges of navigating the tough landscape of competitive musicians as a woman in New York City. They talk about why being kind makes a huge difference to musicians, even though tough love is still necessary for musical and personal development. Resources Learn more about Vanisha Gould on her social media pages and about Lucy Yeghiazaryan on her website.  You can find In Her Words anywhere you stream music. It’s also available for purchase on Amazon Music. Enjoying Bite-Size Jazz? You can support the podcast by Buying Me a Coffee! You can also leave a review, subscribe on your favorite podcast platform, or follow us on Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter. I’d love to connect with you!
47:56
September 28, 2021
Sasha Dobson: Girl Talk - Episode 48
“If you do something that matters to yourself, then all the extra stuff — whether people like it or not — has less importance. If it’s self-fulfilling, you can’t lose.” Growing up with parents like singer Gail Dobson and the late pianist Smith Dobson, Sasha Dobson nurtured a love for jazz from a young age. However, she wasn’t afraid to embrace other genres on her musical journey. When her father suddenly passed away in a tragic car accident, the personal history and weight attached to jazz felt too heavy for Sasha to sing. Looking for a new avenue, Sasha started flirting with the idea of playing the guitar. It blossomed into a love for songwriting and Americana music — even starting the band Puss n Boots along with Norah Jones and Catherine Popper. But all those years of curating a love for jazz stirred up a renewed interest in Sasha, and she’s returned to her jazz roots with her latest album, Girl Talk. Listen to the full interview with jazz vocalist Sasha Dobson to learn more about her diverse musical journey, why it’s never too late to try something new, and the inspiration behind her original tunes “You’re the Death of Me” and “Better Days.” Resources Learn more about Sasha Dobson at www.sashadobson.com. You can find Girl Talk anywhere you stream music. It’s also available for purchase on Amazon Music. Enjoying Bite-Size Jazz? You can support the podcast by Buying Me a Coffee! You can also leave a review, subscribe on your favorite podcast platform, or follow us on Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter. I’d love to connect with you!
29:23
September 21, 2021
Terence Thompson: If I Only Had A Band - Episode 47
“It IS a good morning. No matter what it is or what’s going on in life — there’s always someone else in a different situation.” Terence Thompson brings his positivity and joy for life into his album If I Only Had A Band. Whether it’s embracing the day through his track “Good Morning,” or feeling welcomed into a warm, inviting restaurant like in “Yassie’s Cafe,” If I Only Had A Band will have you feeling good for all 20 tracks. It’s not just the message that feels good — each tune really grooves. Terence combines his rap and R&B influence into this pseudo-jazz offering. While rap might seem like a far cry from jazz, Terence says they’re really not so different — he even calls them intertwined. Each genre carries similar themes, both are continually trying to push the envelope creatively, and they’re both truly American art forms. And, as he says, great music is great music. Terence Thompson is also a notable and versatile producer for hundreds of independent artists and has collaborated with some major artists — he worked with producer Teddy Riley on the song “Heaven Can Wait” on Michael Jackson’s Invincible album, and can also be heard on Monifah’s “Too Late” and “How Ya Gonna Luv Me.” He brings that expertise to his own songwriting, along with a team of wonderful musicians. Listen to the full interview with Terence Thompson to learn more about how he transitioned from DJing as a teenager to a versatile producer, what his role as producer entails, and the stories behind his album If I Only Had A Band. Resources Learn more about Terence Thompson at www.mrterencethompson.com. You can find If I Only Had a Band anywhere you stream music. It’s also available for purchase on Amazon Music. Enjoying Bite-Size Jazz? You can support the podcast by Buying Me a Coffee! You can also leave a review, subscribe on your favorite podcast platform, or follow us on Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter. I’d love to connect with you!
30:06
September 13, 2021
Samara Joy - Episode 46
“I wasn’t sure how far I would actually go, I was just happy to be somewhere singing” Samara says she only started listening to jazz four years ago, but since then she’s won the Sarah Vaughn International Jazz Vocalist Competition (2019), played all over NYC, and performed in Europe. I wish I could say that much about myself by the time I was 23! But getting started as a late bloomer wasn’t easy, and Samara often felt discouraged — it seemed like everyone on the New York City jazz scene already had their clique. Plus, watching everyone at school have it all together when she felt so new to the music made her want to quit. So what kept her going? Encouraging words from audience members, fellow musicians, friends, and professors. Someone else believing in you can give you the power to believe in yourself. Now Samara has released her first album, backed by the Pasquale Grasso Trio. The playful interaction between guitar and vocals, joined by bass and drums, brings new life to a timeless set of standards. This debut album is just the first of many, I’m sure. Listen to the full interview with jazz vocalist Samara to learn more about her experience coming up on the jazz scene in NYC, what kept her going when it was hard, and the inspiration behind the song choices of her self-titled debut album. Resources Learn more about Samara Joy at www.samarajoy.com. You can find Samara Joy anywhere you stream music. It’s also available for purchase on Amazon Music. Enjoying Bite-Size Jazz? You can support the podcast by Buying Me a Coffee! You can also leave a review, subscribe on your favorite podcast platform, or follow us on Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter. I’d love to connect with you!
26:56
September 06, 2021
Andrew Renfroe: Run in the Storm - Episode 45
“If you know anything about being on a boat, it’s that you can't be still — if you get sideways then you capsize. You literally have to make sure you’re pointed into the waves so you won’t sink. In life, you also have to keep trucking, keeping moving forward, and keep a forward vision” The title of guitarist Andrew Renfroe’s latest album was inspired by a family history legend. When he was a kid, his family was caught in a terrible thunderstorm off the coast of Florida — so bad that the whole family almost drowned. But, they survived due to one key principle — when the waves are rocky, you can’t be still. You have to “run” headfirst into the waves. Only by staying in constant motion were they able to live to share their story. When Andrew found himself in the stormy waters of his life — including ending a long-term relationship, among other big life changes — he knew had to do the same thing. Keep trucking, keep moving ahead, always maintaining that forward motion. In this episode of Bite-Size Jazz, guitarist Andrew Renfroe opens up about the inspiration behind his album Run in the Storm and his compositional process. From harmonies inspired by Olivier Messiaen, to learning how to incorporate electric sounds in an acoustic band, Andrew’s music carries a unique sound. Listen to the full interview to learn more! Resources Learn more about Andrew Renfroe at www.andrewrenfroe.com. You can find Run in the Storm anywhere you stream music. It’s also available for purchase on Amazon Music. Enjoying Bite-Size Jazz? You can support the podcast by Buying Me a Coffee! You can also leave a review, subscribe on your favorite podcast platform, or follow us on Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter. I’d love to connect with you!
26:32
August 30, 2021
Rebecca Angel: Love, Life, Choices - Episode 44
“There’s so much outside of our control, but there’s a lot we can control to move forward and not let circumstances control our destiny” Love, Life, Music. Jazz vocalist Rebecca Angel’s latest album reflects her journey through the last year. Love — Rebecca was one of the brave brides to get married during the pandemic. Life — is about rolling with the punches and learning how to cope with the tragedies of the last year. Choices — choosing to move forward in these trying times and focusing on how we can change instead of lamenting what is beyond our control. Each song, whether it’s reggae, bossa nova, pop, or jazz, drives the theme of the album. And Rebecca Angel isn’t afraid to open up about the stories behind her music. In this episode of Bite-Size Jazz, Rebecca talks about how the song “Just the Two of Us” brought her and her now-husband together, the dream that sparked the lyrics for Erik Satie’s “Gymnopdie,” and how the lyrics to “Summer Song” came to her while she was brushing her teeth. Listen to the full interview to learn more about Rebecca Angel and her album Love, Life, Choices. And if you have three minutes, we would LOVE for you to leave us a review on Apple Podcasts. Just click this link, then click on “Listen on Apple Podcasts.” It will open a new page in either iTunes or Apple Podcasts, then you can scroll to the bottom and tell us what you think! Subscribe on your favorite podcast platform to stay up to date with our interviews! Resources Learn more about Rebecca Angel at www.rebeccaangel.net You can find Love, Life, Choices anywhere you stream music. It’s also available for purchase on Amazon Music.  Enjoying Bite-Size Jazz? You can support the podcast by Buying Me a Coffee! You can also leave a review, subscribe on your favorite podcast platform, or follow us on Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter. I’d love to connect with you!
24:30
August 24, 2021
Jeremy Pelt, Griot: This is Important! - Episode 43
“You can’t act like what came before you didn’t exist, or try to lessen the impact of those influences so that you seem more hip” The term “griot” originates from a West African tradition of a traveling storyteller, poet, or musician. They journeyed abroad sharing tales of those who came before in order to pass on their ancestor's traditions. Trumpeter, educator, producer, and now author Jeremy Pelt has become a griot for the tradition of jazz in America. Jeremy Pelt composed his latest album Griot: This is Important! as a companion to his book Griot: Examining the Lives of Jazz’s Greatest Storytellers Vol.1. The 15 interviews contained in the book candidly discuss the history of jazz, of black musicians in America, and the importance of passing on the tradition. Listen to the full Bite-Size Jazz interview to learn more about Jeremy Pelt’s compositional process, the people he interviewed for the book, and why understanding the history of jazz is essential to understanding the music. Resources Learn more about Jeremy Pelt at www.jeremypelt.net. You can find Griot: This is Important!  anywhere you stream music. It’s also available for purchase on Amazon Music.  Enjoying Bite-Size Jazz? You can support the podcast by Buying Me a Coffee! You can also leave a review, subscribe on your favorite podcast platform, or follow us on Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter. I’d love to connect with you!
38:22
August 16, 2021
James Brandon Lewis: Jesup Wagon - Episode 42
“It’s like creating the soundtrack to a movie. Except there’s no movie.” James Brandon Lewis found the inspiration for his latest album in the scientist and inventor George Carver Washington. Jesup Wagon depicts the journey of Carver and his mobile classroom among the poor farmers of the south on his mission to help them build better lives. People say you have to experience something in order to play it. While James Brandon Lewis couldn’t literally step in the shoes of Mr. Carver — he did immerse himself in Carver’s published writings and personal letters in order to carry the essence of Carver’s life and mission into his music. In songs like “Experiment Station,” you can hear the innate curiosity of one of America’s most prominent black scientists. “Lowlands of Sorrow” carries the weight of this country’s dark racial history. Listen to the full interview to learn more about what James Brandon Lewis discovered as he researched George Washington Carver, James’s process of composing and improvising, and the musicians that join James on his musical journey. Resources Learn more about James Brandon Lewis at JBLewis.com. You can find Jesup Wagon anywhere you stream music — it's also available for purchase on Amazon Music.  Enjoying Bite-Size Jazz? You can support the podcast by Buying Me a Coffee! You can also leave a review, subscribe on your favorite podcast platform, or follow us on Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter. I’d love to connect with you!
18:24
August 09, 2021
Billy Stritch: Billy's Place - Episode 41
“It's always a great lyric, but the more you perform, the more you live, and the more experience you have — the more meaning it takes on.” Singer-Pianist Billy Stritch has been performing professionally for over 40 years. His talent as an accompanist has taken him all over the world — especially during his 25 years playing with Liza Minnelli, ducking from paparazzi, staying with celebrities like Frank Sinatra, and learning how to cope when the power goes off right before your show at the Hollywood Bowl. But Billy is also a talented entertainer in his own right, and his latest venture of weekly live streams has been documented in his album Billy’s Place. Every Thursday night at 8 pm he invites the public into his “virtual speakeasy” for an hour of music and cocktails — as long as you make it yourself. The album Billy’s Place brings us 12 of his most beloved tunes, recorded in Nashville for Club44 Records. Listen to the full interview to hear more from Billy Stritch about what makes a great accompanist, how to memorize hundreds of tunes, and his adventures playing around the world. Billy is also celebrating the album release with a run of concerts at Birdland August 5-7, so you can see him live instead of just through a webcam! Link to tickets below. Resources Birdland tickets are available at www.BirdlandJazz.com. You can also continue watching his live stream concerts Thursday night at 8:00 pm EST on his Facebook page. Learn more about Billy Stritch on his website, www.billystritch.com.  Enjoying Bite-Size Jazz? You can support the podcast by Buying Me a Coffee! You can also leave a review, subscribe on your favorite podcast platform, or follow us on Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter. I’d love to connect with you!
32:20
August 03, 2021
Molly Miller: St. George - Episode 40
“I’m not someone who’s like ‘I just play this genre.’ I play music. I play the guitar.” Guitarist Molly Miller released St. George, which is hailed by some as a jazz album. But she’s also played with the Black-Eyed Peas and is the go-to guitarist for Jason Miraz. So where does that put her musically? Molly would say distinctions don't matter; for her, it’s all just music. Molly also says her trio is trying to bring the instrumental back. While there is no singing on the album, you can hear the story in the emotion in her songs, whether it’s inspired by a breakup, touring, or the street she runs on every day. Listen to the latest episode of Bite-Size Jazz to hear Molly talk about how bassist Jennifer Condos and drummer Jay Bellerose brought clarity to her music, how she deals with performance nerves, and why she chose the name St. George (hint: It’s not because of Utah) Resources Learn more about Molly Miller on her website, and find her album anywhere you stream music. It's also available for purchase on iTunes and Amazon Music. Check out her latest music video, "Spry."  Enjoying Bite-Size Jazz? You can support the podcast by Buying Me a Coffee! You can also leave a review, subscribe on your favorite podcast platform, or follow us on Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter. I’d love to connect with you!
23:48
July 27, 2021
Cyrille Aimée & Michael Valeanu - Episode 39
“What’s special is that we don’t play it the same way twice. If we do it means we’re not really connected, we’re not really present.” Cyrille Aimée and Michael Valeanu say their work as a duo started when their band couldn’t make it to a gig in Ohio because of a snowstorm - but after the response from the audience, they realized they could keep it going. One time in Milan, they had four encores as a duo! Their album I’ll Be Seeing You reflects their collaboration and relationship over the last decade. In this interview, Cyrille Aimée and Michael Valeanu open up about their creative process. They talk about how they came up with arrangements for tunes like “Bye Bye Blackbird,” “Softly As In a Morning Sunrise” and “How Deep is the Ocean.” They also discuss the importance of listening and communicating through the music, what it means to be vulnerable and present, and how they keep the music fresh every time. Resources You can learn more about Cyrille Aimée at CyrilleMusic.dom, and Michael Valeanu at MichaelValeanu.com. I’ll Be Seeing You is available for purchase on Amazon Music and Apple Music. Enjoying Bite-Size Jazz? You can support the podcast by Buying Me a Coffee! You can also leave a review, subscribe on your favorite podcast platform, or follow us on Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter. I’d love to connect with you!
24:00
July 20, 2021
Caity Gyorgy: Now Pronouncing - Episode 38
“My writing is a reflection of what I’m listening to and what I’m experiencing in my day-to-day life” At 23-years-old, Caity Gyorgy is already an adept lyricist, songwriter, arranger, and bandleader. Her latest EP Now Pronouncing showcases her talents along with her hand-picked 10 piece band. Inspired by the music and cinema of the 50s and 60s, her original tunes fit right within the vein of the Great American Songbook. Caity’s music varies from sweet love songs, to nostalgic remembrances, to witty sarcasm. In this episode of Bite-Size Jazz, Caity Gyorgy digs into who and what inspired each song - including how she and her long-time boyfriend met as teenagers, the house she left behind after her parent’s divorce, and the person who inspired the “diss track” on the album. Listen to the full interview to hear more! Resources Learn more about Caity on her website caitygyorgy.com and find the full album anywhere you stream music. Enjoying Bite-Size Jazz? You can support the podcast by Buying Me a Coffee! You can also leave a review, subscribe on your favorite podcast platform, or follow us on Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter. I’d love to connect with you!
23:34
July 13, 2021
Jonathan Karrant: Shadows Fall - Episode 37
“Don’t have a fallback plan, because then you’ll fall back on it.” Jonathan Karrant didn’t grow up in the heart of Manhattan or Los Angeles, but that didn’t stop him from pursuing his dream career. Though he may be from a small town in Arkansas, he didn’t hesitate to move to New York City straight out of high school, where he found himself on the stage of the Metropolitan Opera and American Ballet Theater, before striking out for California and finally settling into the show business of Las Vegas. Jonathan Karrant has received numerous awards, including the New York City Jazz Honors, “Best Singer” for the Bravo California Awards, and was named one of Downbeat’s top 12 rising jazz vocalists. His latest release, Shadows Fall, features duo arrangements with his longtime friend and musical collaborator, pianist Joshua White. Resources Learn more about Joshua on his website, www.jonathankarrant.com, and find the full album anywhere you stream music. Enjoying Bite-Size Jazz? You can support the podcast by Buying Me a Coffee! You can also leave a review, subscribe on your favorite podcast platform, or follow us on Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter. I’d love to connect with you!
19:18
July 06, 2021
Simon Moullier: Countdown - Episode 36
“We’re trying to transcend our instruments. I think all musicians in general are trying to get to that point. When you get to a great way of expression you don’t really think about the medium, the instrument, anymore. You’re just in full expression and connection with the music.” Vibraphonist Simon Moullier brings full expression to his latest album, Countdown. It's his second album, featuring drummer JK Kim and bassist Luca Allemanno. While his first album Spirit Song is mostly originals, Countdown explores jazz standards arranged so creatively, they almost sound like originals.  In this episode, we break down the amount of work it takes to bring a great arrangement to your band, how Simon Moullier finds new ideas for songs, and how Berklee's community outreach program changed the way he sees music.  Resources Learn more about Simon Moullier on his website. You can find Countdown anywhere you stream music. It's also available for purchase on Amazon Music.  Enjoying Bite-Size Jazz? You can support the podcast by Buying Me a Coffee! You can also leave a review, subscribe on your favorite podcast platform, or follow us on Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter. I’d love to connect with you!
21:02
June 30, 2021
Ulysses Owens Jr: Soul Conversations - Episode 35
Ulysses Owen’s Jr.’s latest album Soul Conversations brings us the energy of a live big band packed with the best in the business. The band is unique in bringing together veterans of the jazz scene with up-and-coming musicians and showcasing music written by band members throughout the album. In this episode, Ulysses Owens Jr. dives into the creative process of his own original tunes from the groove to the bass lines, to the harmonies, and why he prefers writing with a friend. We also discuss why music and activism are intertwined, how he deals with critics, and his new book “The Musician's Career Guide." Resources Learn more about Ulysses Owens Jr. on his website. You can find Soul Conversations anywhere you stream music. It's also available for purchase on Amazon Music.  Enjoying Bite-Size Jazz? You can support the podcast by Buying Me a Coffee! You can also leave a review, subscribe on your favorite podcast platform, or follow us on Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter. I’d love to connect with you!
37:00
June 22, 2021
Alexa Tarantino: Firefly - Episode 34
Alexa Tarantino's album Firefly is her third recording as a leader in the last three years. But she's not only busy writing music for her own quartet, she's been involved with groups like the Jazz at Lincoln Center Jazz Orchestra, Sherrie Maricle & The DIVA Jazz Orchestra, Cecile McLorin Salvant’s OGRESSE Ensemble and Arturo O’Farrill & The Afro-Latin Jazz Orchestra.  In this episode, she walks us through the composition process on tunes like "The Firefly Code," "Surge Capacity" and "Daybreak" while also talking about the unique process of recording during a pandemic. We also discuss the difference between playing in an all-woman group vs. an ensemble where she's the only female, what changes when you play with people you're comfortable with on a personal level, and her educational program "The Alexa Approach."  The Alexa Tarantino Quartet is rounded out with Behn Gillece on vibraphone, Rudy Royston on drums, Art Hirahara on piano and Boris Kozlov on bass.  Resources Learn more about Alexa Tarantino on her website. You can listen to Firefly anywhere you stream music. It's also available for purchase from Amazon Music.  Enjoying Bite-Size Jazz? You can support the podcast by Buying Me a Coffee! You can also leave a review, subscribe on your favorite podcast platform, or follow me on Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter. I’d love to connect with you!
26:43
June 15, 2021
Osmond Chapman Orchestra - Episode 33
David Osmond and Caleb Chapman's new album More Where That Came From mixes the Great American Songbook with pop and original tunes into what they call a "New American Songbook." Laugh along with David and Caleb as they tell us the story of how their album came together and how they became the dynamic duo they are today (even accidentally becoming next-door neighbors at one point).  With Caleb's extensive jazz background (previous President of the Jazz Education Network and director of the Crescent Super Band, which has won many prestigious jazz awards), and David's background in show business (yes, he's part of THE Osmond family, nephew to Donny and Marie), they seemed like a bit of an odd couple at first. But Caleb says it was the perfect way to take world-class musicians and arrangements and pair them with a vocalist who could take the music in a whole new direction.  Along with snippets from the album, you'll get to hear about their collaborative effort with songwriter Roger Brown from Nashville, the award-winning musicians they perform with from Caleb's music program The Sound House, and why both quality music and entertainment matter.  Resources You can listen to More Where That Came From anywhere you stream music. It's also available for purchase through Amazon Music.  Enjoying Bite-Size Jazz? You can support the podcast by Buying Me a Coffee! You can also leave a review, subscribe on your favorite podcast platform, or follow me on Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter. I’d love to connect with you!
24:47
June 08, 2021
Lezlie Harrison: Soul Book Vol. 1 - Episode 32
Vocalist Lezlie Harrison's debut album Soul Book Vol. 1 brings new life to favorites from the 70s. Lezlie says though she loves the Great American Songbook, that wasn't the music of her childhood. She grew up on music from Stevie Wonder, Earth Wind and Fire, Marvin Gay and the Delfonics. Lezlie's fresh takes on songs like Bill Wither's "Ain't No Sunshine" and Steve Wonder's "Lately" groove with Saul Rubin on guitar, Ben Paterson on organ, and Russell Carter on the drums.  Lezlie's also had quite the career. Fresh out of college, she started working for WBGO, the #1 jazz radio station, then explored France as a model and singer, then came back to New York to pursue a singing career and wound up back at WBGO where you can hear her now.  Resources Learn more about Lezlie Harrison on her website. You can listen to Soul Book Vol. 1 anywhere you stream music. It's also available for purchase from Amazon Music.  Enjoying Bite-Size Jazz? You can support the podcast by Buying Me a Coffee! You can also leave a review, subscribe on your favorite podcast platform, or follow me on Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter. I’d love to connect with you!
26:57
June 02, 2021
Jacques Schwarz-Bart - Episode 31
"There is something uplifting even in the most quiet pieces. It wants to express finding peace and balance within yourself."  Sone Ka-La 2: Odyssey is the sequel to Jacques Schwarz-Bart's album Sone Ka-La, released in 2005. Where the first album digs into the pain of the slave experience, the second celebrates triumph over struggle. Jacques says it's about finding the resolve to overcome.  Raised mainly on the island of Guadalupe in the French Caribbean, Jacques says the history of slavery there was similar to the history of the US. Slavery was first abolished in 1794, but then re-instated by Napolean I between 1802 and 1848. It was a tumultuous time, when slaves that had been free for 8 years were enslaved again after a revolt and a bloody clash between free slaves and Napolean I.  While that may sound dismal, the music on the album does not, celebrating the strength to rise above. Jacques integrates elements from Gwoka music, native to his island of Guadalupe, with more modern groove and instrumentation for a perfectly blended and unique style. Jacque credits his time with artists like Roy Hargrove, D'Angelo and Chucho Valdez for giving him a taste for many music styles. The combination of these different colors blends together to create a beautiful new mosaic that you can enjoy on Sone Ka-La 2: Odyssey.  Resources Learn more about Jacques Schwarz-Bart on his website. You can listen to Sone Ka-La 2: Odyssey anywhere you stream music. It's also available for purchase from Amazon Music.  Enjoying Bite-Size Jazz? You can support the podcast by Buying Me a Coffee! You can also leave a review, subscribe on your favorite podcast platform, or follow me on Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter. I’d love to connect with you!
27:38
May 25, 2021
Nicolas King: Act One - Episode 30
"Most kids go with their grandparents to bake pies...My grandmother took me to gigs." ⁠ ⁠Nicolas King's latest album, Act One, celebrates 25 years as a recording artist. And at 30-years-old, yes, that means his first recording came at age 5. From hanging out backstage at his grandmother's gigs, to starring on Broadway, to touring the US with Liza Minnelli and then starting his own act as a nightclub singer, Nicolas has had one heck of a career so far. And it's only Act One! ⁠ ⁠Check out the interview to hear Nicolas' story, bits of his music, and the importance of staying humble during your career! ⁠ ⁠Resources Learn more about Nicolas King on his website. You can listen to Act One anywhere you stream music. It's also available for purchase from Amazon Music.  Enjoying Bite-Size Jazz? You can support the podcast by Buying Me a Coffee! You can also leave a review, subscribe on your favorite podcast platform, or follow me on Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter. I’d love to connect with you!
21:57
May 18, 2021
Mandy Barnett/Sammy Nestico - Episode 29
"I don't know if someone like that ever retires, you never stop being a musician." At age 95, Sammy Nestico started writing music for what would become his last project, the album Every Star Above featuring Mandy Barnett.  Sammy Nestico wrote for musicians like Frank Sinatra, Buddy Rich, Bing Crosby, Michael Buble, and of course, the legendary Count Basie orchestra. Mandy Barnett says "He just exuded warmth, which you could hear in his arrangements. You could tell what kind of person he was by the music he wrote." Mandy is a legend of her own as well. Though her career up to this point mainly focused on the country and bluegrass music she grew up hearing in East Tennessee, she's never forgottenthe big band music her grandmother used to play. When presented with an opportunity to record music from the Billie Holiday album Lady in Satin, Mandy leapt at the chance, saying it's one of her favorite records.  The combination of talent from Sammy Nestico, Mandy Barnett, and the 60-piece orchestra behind her is simply stunning. Listen to the full episode to hear more from Mandy about what it was like working with Sammy Nestico, the recording process, and how she went from country to the Great American Songbook.  Resources Learn more about Mandy Barnett on her website. You can listen to Every Star Above anywhere you stream music. It's also available for purchase from Amazon Music.  Enjoying Bite-Size Jazz? You can support the podcast by Buying Me a Coffee! You can also leave a review, subscribe on your favorite podcast platform, or follow me on Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter. I’d love to connect with you!
20:30
May 11, 2021
James Hudson: Tomorrow - Episode 28
London-based jazz vocalist James Hudson says his goal with music is to bring a bit of joy to someone's day, and he certainly does that with his debut album Tomorrow. Along with his musical collaborators Nick Fitch and Joe Hill, James bring a pleasant twist to classic standards like "Pennies from Heaven," "Tomorrow" and "Almost Like Being in Love," that remind us to keep our chins up. He balances it out with a mournful bossa nova version of "It Had to Be You," and a somber treatment of "Someone to Watch Over Me," with a beautiful arco bass. James Hudson's takes on songs that have lasted over 100 years are a sure sign that they're bound to last a 100 more in the hands of great musicians.  Resources Learn more about James Hudson on his website. You can listen to Tomorrow anywhere you stream music. It's also available for purchase through Amazon Music. Enjoying Bite-Size Jazz? You can support the podcast by Buying Me a Coffee! You can also leave a review, subscribe on your favorite podcast platform, or follow me on Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter. I’d love to connect with you!
19:17
May 04, 2021
John Pizzarelli: Better Days Ahead - Episode 27
"It actually kept me sane too, I lost both my parents literally a year ago, April 1st and April 8th. It was one of those things where, I had nowhere to go, I wasn't sleeping, so I would wake up at 6 am, think about what Pat Methany tune I wanted to learn and then go learn it." ⁠ John Pizzarelli released the first solo guitar album of his career on April 16th - Better Days Ahead - with 13 acoustic versions of Pat Methany tunes. John says that the album was recorded at the beginning of the pandemic, when the world was reeling from the revelation of an international pandemic, and he was reeling from the sudden death of both his parents. Those early morning practice sessions became not only a much needed lifeline, they became his next album. ⁠ Resources Learn more about John Pizzarelli on his website. You can listen to Better Days Ahead anywhere you stream music. It's also available for purchase through Amazon Music. Enjoying Bite-Size Jazz? You can support the podcast by Buying Me a Coffee! You can also leave a review, subscribe on your favorite podcast platform, or follow me on Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter. I’d love to connect with you!
18:54
April 27, 2021
Jane Monheit: Come What May - Episode 26
"Come What May, it's like, here we are, we're all doing our best, we're not gonna let anything stop us, we're still making music, and we're still recording. It's really just about us doing our best to hang in there and stick around, come what may!" ⁠ Jazz vocalist Jane Monheit celebrated her 20th year as a best-selling recording artist with the album Come What May. The past two decades have taken her across the globe singing to audiences in every corner of the world.  While Jane is accustomed to traveling constantly — she knows the best spots in almost any airport — the pandemic has brought a unique change of pace. Rather than falling asleep in airplanes every night, Janes sings, "Let's Take A Walk Around the Block." Come What May features 10 of Jane's favorite songs, polished from performance after performance. Some are lighthearted, such as "On the Sunny Side of the Street," others celebrate her long-time love of Brazilian music such as, "Sambo Do Aviao," Jane's luscious voice caresses songs like, "The Nearness of You" and "Lush Life." Jane has sung many tunes over the years, but only recently has she felt ready to sing a song such as "Lush Life." Jane says, "I’m like a privileged suburban white lady. I don’t get to just sing 'Lush Life' without thinking about it really carefully, making sure I’ve lived enough and had enough experience to do justice to the material. It's really important to be aware of who we are and bring honesty and sincerity to the music — and never affecting the experience of someone else that we haven’t had." Listen to the full interview with Jane Monheit to learn how she sings with honest expression. She also talks about her favorite places to travel, how she chooses her music, and much more. Learn more about Freda Payne on her website, You can find Let There Be Love anywhere you stream music. It’s also available for purchase from Amazon Music. Resources You can learn more about Jane Monheit on her website. You can listen to Come What May anywhere you stream music. It's also available for purchase through Amazon Music.  Enjoying Bite-Size Jazz? You can support the podcast by Buying Me a Coffee! You can also leave a review, subscribe on your favorite podcast platform, or follow us on Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter. I’d love to connect with you!
18:16
April 13, 2021
Le Dad and The Ninos: Nowhere Else I'd Rather Be - Episode 25
Based out of Salt Lake City, the band Le Dad and The Ninos say they were influenced by genres such as R&B, soul and jazz. Their music is a mesh of styles, kind of like their name, a purposely non-sensical mix of French, English and Spanish. They recently released a single, "Nowhere Else I'd Rather Be," which they say is dedicated to Le Mom (who they're still looking for, by the way).  They also give us a preview of their next single "I Won’t Wait," a musical tribute to a dear friend and fellow musician who passed away far too young. “No one spoke music like Brooks did. It was like he put all his pain and darkness into the music and it came straight through the instrument.” The song serves as a reminder of the limited time available in this life, and emphasizes the importance of showing we care while we still can.  They plan to release the full album in late summer, recording tracks in the meantime from the drummer’s basement and a friend’s studio and dreaming of touring the US, the world, then possibly Mars and the universe they tell me.  Resources Enjoying Bite-Size Jazz? You can support the podcast by Buying Me a Coffee! You can also leave a review, subscribe on your favorite podcast platform, or follow us on Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter. I’d love to connect with you!
15:42
April 06, 2021
Emmet Cohen: Future Stride - Episode 24
"I'm concerned with the lineage, and excited by the lineage of the music and the lineage of humanity, knowing that in order to understand what's going to happen in the future, we have to understand and excavate things about the past."  ⁠Emmet Cohen discusses the importance of understanding the history and music of the jazz greats, before pushing the music forward into the future. His album Future Stride does just that, resurrecting 20s classics like "Dardanella" but also using modern techniques such as overdubbing on originals like "Little Angel." ⁠ Emmet Cohen is a serious student of the lineage of jazz. Jazz is a bit of a paradigm — it leans heavily on the influence of its predecessors, but encourages musicians to endlessly test its limits. However, one must clearly understand the history before beginning to push forward. Emmet's album Future Stride does just that. Stride is considered a piano technique of the past, but he isn't afraid to embrace modern techniques while playing it. For example, he resurrects the 20's classic, "Dardanella" — a right of passage for early pianists. Rather than play it solo as many virtuoso pianists have done before, Emmet gives it a modern twist by arranging it for his trio. Rounded out with Kyle Poole on drums and Russell Hall on bass, this trio gives the song new life. Additionally, Emmet includes original compositions like "Little Angel," "Reflections at Dusk," and "Toast to Lo." "Toast to Lo" is dedicated to Lawrence 'Lo' Leathers, a dear friend and mentor. To give some context, Lawrence was the drummer for two of Cécile McLorin Salvant's Grammy Award-winning albums. Unfortunately, he passed away while still in his prime, leaving a whole in the hearts of many New York musicians. Lawrence encouraged Emmet during his early days in New York, telling him, "It doesn't matter if the other musicians know more than you. If you come in with heart, passion, and some fire — you'll be great." Listen to the full interview with Emmet Cohen to learn more about the inspiration behind his latest album, Future Stride. Resources: earn more about Emmet Cohen at his website. You can find Future Stride anywhere you stream music. It's also available for purchase from Amazon Music.  Enjoying Bite-Size Jazz? You can support the podcast by Buying Me a Coffee! You can also leave a review, subscribe on your favorite podcast platform, or follow us on Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter. I’d love to connect with you!
18:54
March 30, 2021
Ramon Valle: Inner State - Episode 23
Jazz pianist Ramon Valle has a palpable enthusiasm for life — and more especially for jazz. Raised in Cuba, he was surrounded by the sound of improvised street music. Ramon's grandpa introduced him to the music of classical giants during the day, and his father played records by Dizzy Gillespie and Louis Armstrong while sharing milk and chocolate by night. Those recordings were Ramon's jazz piano teacher. He listened so many times that he could sing them by heart. When a chance encounter with a professional jazz musician lead to an invitation to Europe, Ramon jumped at the chance. After his first European tour, Ramon realized he needed to stay in order to pursue his musical dreams. He's made Holland his home ever since. Over the years, Ramon has learned many lessons about performing. The most important lesson? Surrendering to the music — let the music speak for itself. Ramon says, "When we play with ego, we play music from yesterday. You can't be present when you have an ego." Listen to the full interview with Ramon Valle to learn more about his musical path. He opens up about the music of his native Cuba and the inspiration behind his album Inner State.⁠ Resources Learn more about Ramon Valle at his website. You can find Inner State anywhere you stream music — it's also available for purchase from Amazon Music. Enjoying Bite-Size Jazz? You can support the podcast by Buying Me a Coffee! You can also leave a review, subscribe on your favorite podcast platform, or follow us on Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter. I’d love to connect with you!
16:39
March 23, 2021
Veronica Swift: This Bitter Earth - Episode 22
Veronica explained that the concept for this album started years in advance - she wanted to have a record that was a commentary on global issues, but not a political activism album. "This Bitter Earth" does just that, talking about issues like racism, sexism, and domestic abuse among others. She does so in a witty, sarcastic way that gives way to her real opinion. But, she as she sings in the title track, if we all come together in the end, "this bitter earth may not be so bitter after all." ⁠ ⁠And of course, Veronica will blow you away with her singing, as will the band with her! Tune in, you'll love hearing from Veronica! ⁠ Resources:  Enjoying Bite-Size Jazz? You can support the podcast by Buying Me a Coffee! You can also leave a review, subscribe on your favorite podcast platform, or follow us on Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter. I’d love to connect with you!
18:27
March 15, 2021
Patricia Brennan: Maquishti - Episode 21
Join me in conversation with vibraphonist Patricia Brennan as we discuss her solo album, Maquishti! ⁠We talk about the effects she uses in her music, her improvisation style, why she decided to do a solo album and more!⁠ Resources:  Enjoying Bite-Size Jazz? You can support the podcast by Buying Me a Coffee! You can also leave a review, subscribe on your favorite podcast platform, or follow us on Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter. I’d love to connect with you!
16:42
March 12, 2021
Gretchen Parlato: Flor - Episode 20
Gretchen Parlato, the award winning, Grammy-nominated, internationally touring jazz vocalist, just released a new album FLOR - available today - which is her first album in several years after taking a step back to focus on being a mom! ⁠ ⁠We talk about the songs on the album - why it was inspired by Brazilian Music, why she included a David Bowie song - and dive into her decision to focus on motherhood and how that changed her music!!  Resources Enjoying Bite-Size Jazz? You can support the podcast by Buying Me a Coffee! You can also leave a review, subscribe on your favorite podcast platform, or follow us on Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter. I’d love to connect with you!
17:13
March 05, 2021
Derrick Gardner: A Ride to the Other Side - Episode 19
Down to earth, good humored, talented; any of these adjectives would perfectly describe trumpeter Derrick Gardner. He's a professor at the University of Manitoba, as well as a gregarious bandleader and composer. Join me as we talk about his various projects with his past band, The Jazz Prophets, his latest project, the Big DIg Band.  Resources Enjoying Bite-Size Jazz? You can support the podcast by Buying Me a Coffee! You can also leave a review, subscribe on your favorite podcast platform, or follow us on Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter. I’d love to connect with you!
08:09
February 26, 2021
Melissa Aldana: Visions - Episode 18
Join me in conversation with Melissa Aldana as she talks about the life of artist Frida Kahlo and how it inspired the music of her album "Visions." We also talk about her experiences on the jazz scene in NYC, including the time she got to play with Roy Hargrove at a jam session.  Resources Enjoying Bite-Size Jazz? You can support the podcast by Buying Me a Coffee! You can also leave a review, subscribe on your favorite podcast platform, or follow us on Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter. I’d love to connect with you!
08:59
February 19, 2021
Jihee Heo: Are You Ready? - Episode 17
Join me in conversation with Jihee Heo as we laugh about the adventures of teaching piano, her love/hate relationship with New York City, and discuss the inspiration behind her latest album "Are You Ready?" Resources Enjoying Bite-Size Jazz? You can support the podcast by Buying Me a Coffee! You can also leave a review, subscribe on your favorite podcast platform, or follow us on Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter. I’d love to connect with you!
17:09
February 05, 2021
Rosana Eckert: Sailing Home - Episode 16
Rosana Eckert is an ambitious vocalist who is dedicated to both her music and her family - a balance she tells us is hard to find! Enjoy the stories behind an album full of relatable songs. Resources Enjoying Bite-Size Jazz? You can support the podcast by Buying Me a Coffee! You can also leave a review, subscribe on your favorite podcast platform, or follow us on Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter. I’d love to connect with you!
06:18
January 22, 2021
David L. Harris: More Than Love, to Be a Man - Episode 15
Listen to New-Orleans based trombonist and vocalist David L. Harris's story of  self-acceptance, and how he gained his perspective on what it means to be a man, as told through his latest album "More Than Love, to Be a Man."  Resources Enjoying Bite-Size Jazz? You can support the podcast by Buying Me a Coffee! You can also leave a review, subscribe on your favorite podcast platform, or follow us on Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter. I’d love to connect with you!
13:55
December 16, 2020
Gabrielle Cavassa - Episode 14
Tune in to hear the incredible New Orleans based vocalist Gabrielle Cavassa open up about her self-titled album and her personal journey through life and love Resources Enjoying Bite-Size Jazz? You can support the podcast by Buying Me a Coffee! You can also leave a review, subscribe on your favorite podcast platform, or follow us on Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter. I’d love to connect with you!
18:26
December 04, 2020
Steven Feifke: Kinetic - Episode 13
Feel the energy of Steven Feifke's new single "Kinetic" in an interview with this talented pianist, bandleader and composer! Resources Enjoying Bite-Size Jazz? You can support the podcast by Buying Me a Coffee! You can also leave a review, subscribe on your favorite podcast platform, or follow us on Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter. I’d love to connect with you!
10:13
November 29, 2020
Kenny Barron: Without Deception - Episode 12
Kenny Barron tells us all about the story behind his latest album with Dave Holland and Johnathan Blake! Resources Enjoying Bite-Size Jazz? You can support the podcast by Buying Me a Coffee! You can also leave a review, subscribe on your favorite podcast platform, or follow us on Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter. I’d love to connect with you!
09:23
November 14, 2020
Justin Nielson: Divine Colors - Episode 11
An inspirational musician and passionate educator, pianist Justin Nielson's opens up about his album "Divine Colors." Resources Enjoying Bite-Size Jazz? You can support the podcast by Buying Me a Coffee! You can also leave a review, subscribe on your favorite podcast platform, or follow us on Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter. I’d love to connect with you!
12:08
November 05, 2020
John Pizzarelli: For Centennial Reasons - Episode 10
Listen to John Pizzarelli talk about the adventures of growing up with a famous jazz guitarist for a father, and how his father's introduction to Nat King Cole's music changed his career! Resources Enjoying Bite-Size Jazz? You can support the podcast by Buying Me a Coffee! You can also leave a review, subscribe on your favorite podcast platform, or follow us on Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter. I’d love to connect with you!
05:58
October 25, 2020
Delfeayo Marsalis: Jazz Party - Episode 09
Join the "Jazz Party" with Delfeayo Marsalis and the Uptown Jazz Orchestra with their latest album! Delfeayo tells us all about the culture of jazz in New Orleans along with the stories behind his music that will get you dancing!  Resources Enjoying Bite-Size Jazz? You can support the podcast by Buying Me a Coffee! You can also leave a review, subscribe on your favorite podcast platform, or follow us on Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter. I’d love to connect with you!
12:20
October 09, 2020
Aaron Goldberg/Yes! Trio: Groove Du Jour - Episode 08
Pianist and philosopher Aaron Goldberg of the Yes! Trio walks us through their latest album "Groove Du Jour" and gives us compelling insight into both his music and studies.  Resources Enjoying Bite-Size Jazz? You can support the podcast by Buying Me a Coffee! You can also leave a review, subscribe on your favorite podcast platform, or follow us on Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter. I’d love to connect with you!
14:31
October 02, 2020
Roxy Coss: Quintet - Episode 07
Get a taste of Roxy's latest album "Quintet" while listening to her talk about the struggles of women in jazz and her organization to combat those issues, WIJO.  Resources Enjoying Bite-Size Jazz? You can support the podcast by Buying Me a Coffee! You can also leave a review, subscribe on your favorite podcast platform, or follow us on Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter. I’d love to connect with you!
07:30
August 23, 2020
Benny Benack III: A Lot of Livin' to Do - Episode 06
Benny Benack III gives us the inside scoop on his collaborations, arrangements and originals from his latest album, "A Lot of Livin' to Do!" Resources Enjoying Bite-Size Jazz? You can support the podcast by Buying Me a Coffee! You can also leave a review, subscribe on your favorite podcast platform, or follow us on Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter. I’d love to connect with you!
11:17
August 09, 2020
Catherine Russell: Alone Together - Episode 05
Listen to double-Grammy nominated vocalist Catherine Russell talk about her adventures as a backup singer for people like David Bowie, Steely Dan and Cyndi Lauper before launching her own solo career! Resources Enjoying Bite-Size Jazz? You can support the podcast by Buying Me a Coffee! You can also leave a review, subscribe on your favorite podcast platform, or follow us on Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter. I’d love to connect with you!
11:01
July 27, 2020
Rachael & Vilray - Episode 04
Check out a jazz duo with original music that sounds like it came straight out of the 30s & 40s! Resources Enjoying Bite-Size Jazz? You can support the podcast by Buying Me a Coffee! You can also leave a review, subscribe on your favorite podcast platform, or follow us on Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter. I’d love to connect with you!
09:06
July 09, 2020
Jamison Ross: All for One - Episode 03
The drummer for Snarky Puppy and winner of the 2012 Thelonious Monk Institute of Jazz Competition talks about his album All for One. Resources Enjoying Bite-Size Jazz? You can support the podcast by Buying Me a Coffee! You can also leave a review, subscribe on your favorite podcast platform, or follow us on Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter. I’d love to connect with you!
09:24
June 26, 2020
Arianna Neikrug: Changes - Episode 02
Listen to the winner of the 2015 Sarah Vaughn International Vocal Competition talk about her debut album Changes.  Resources Enjoying Bite-Size Jazz? You can support the podcast by Buying Me a Coffee! You can also leave a review, subscribe on your favorite podcast platform, or follow us on Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter. I’d love to connect with you!
06:50
June 26, 2020
Sara Gazarek: Thirsty Ghost - Episode 01
Check out the interview with Sara Gazarek about her double Grammy nominated album Thirsty Ghost. Hear all about her inspiration behind the album and her journey as a musician!  Resources Enjoying Bite-Size Jazz? You can support the podcast by Buying Me a Coffee! You can also leave a review, subscribe on your favorite podcast platform, or follow us on Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter. I’d love to connect with you!
07:08
June 26, 2020
Bite Size Jazz Trailer
Bite Size Jazz: A podcast with a taste of new albums and new artists! In less than 10 minutes you get an insider's look at each artist's life and music. Musicians include people like Sara Gazarek, Kenny Barron, Jamison Ross and more.  Resources Enjoying Bite-Size Jazz? You can support the podcast by Buying Me a Coffee! You can also leave a review, subscribe on your favorite podcast platform, or follow us on Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter. I’d love to connect with you!
01:15
June 11, 2020