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The Brand Shepherd Podcast

The Brand Shepherd Podcast

By Brand Shepherd
Each episode of The Brand Shepherd Podcast focuses on a topic connected to or part of creating positive, memorable brand experiences.

Brand Shepherd is a brand experience agency meaning, while Brand Development is our broad expertise, our work is about crafting how your brand will be experienced.

We use our Vibe, Tribe, and Why™ approach to give your brand's Tribe positive, memorable experiences.

This podcast is hosted by Brand Shepherd's managing partner, Daniel Crask.
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The Unlikely Brand That Is Growing A Thriving Tribe
There’s a brand of products I am particularly impressed with because of how obsessed they are with their customer experience. Their official Facebook Group is the unlikely means by which they serve their customers, and they do it so masterfully, I have to tell you about it because I believe this brand is showing every other product brand out there that an energized, active, loyal Tribe of customers is still possible today. This brand uses their Facebook group to… Have an ongoing, open dialogue with customers every hour of the day and night. Topics range from how their products are used in everyday life, to how their products fit into their niche interests, birthdays, birth announcements, vacations, shipping challenges, order questions, sales questions. Handle customer service initiation questions about products, orders, and shipping out in the open, for all to see. Get new product ideas from customers – at least once per day! Announce upcoming new products, promos, and flash sales. So, what’s the product that people are so engaged in? Flashlights. You read that right. 112,000+ people – 90% of which are men – are engaged in a Facebook group for a flashlight brand. As in 250+ posts per day…10,000 posts per month…313 new group members last week…engaged. The brand is Olight. Olight is a global brand estimated to be $80mil/year that designs, manufactures, and expertly sells flashlights to extremely devoted customers around the world. Listen to this episode for an assessment of how Olight uses Facebook Groups to grow their thriving Tribe.  You can also read the complimentary blog post here: https://brandshepherd.com/the-unlikely-brand-that-is-growing-a-thriving-tribe/
30:43
November 19, 2021
Refocused: How We Are Correcting Our Pandemic Pivot • The Brand Shepherd Podcast
by Daniel Crask, Managing Partner & Co-Owner, Brand Shepherd In March 2019, after a long journey and a fantastic book, we announced that we were going to embrace who we authentically are: A product-focused branding agency. For the rest of 2019 and all of 2020, that pivot reverbed into the most profitable, enjoyable stretch of work we have ever had. But then COVID happened. And then the government-mandated lockdowns happened. A Pandemic Pivot Out of fear, a decision was made by me – Daniel Crask, managing partner and co-owner of Brand Shepherd – to retreat from the product pivot, and go back to being focused on no brand type in particular. A return to "all are welcome." What I was witnessing at the time was… Our longtime retainer accounts were drastically cutting budgets because they were the first to feel the supply chain chaos. We were losing clients due to lockdowns. I believed that broadening our appeal was the best thing to do. This has proved to be the most disastrous decision in our business' history, and I'm here to talk candidly about it in this episode of the podcast. 2021 has been a year of frustration. In a very general sense, "frustration" is the overarching theme of everything in business. Yet what I have been frustrated with most is how to talk about Brand Shepherd. Over and over, with the Brand Shepherd team, I tried to figure it out. Lots of experimentation with our Pandemic Pivot, yet nothing resonated within or with prospective clients. I even thought we had to embrace the hyper-local economy. We tried going all-in with being a neighborhood agency. Once again, a flop. Something was missing, not aligned with our Why, our true brand. Epiphany But while my family and I were at a Church service recently, it hit me like a wave washing over me: The problem is that I abandoned what we love…Product Brands. This explains everything. When we dropped our focus on products, people no longer had something to grab onto in terms of what we do for their brand. Worse, we were attracting a tribe of brands that were a mismatch. Yet during this stretch of time, we still attracted product brands and those relationships remain intact and are thriving. In fact, despite a messy Pandemic Pivot, we still helped bring 41 products to market and 17 more are in development as I write this. So I am being open about all of this, and embracing the lessons learned as we return to our roots: Brand Shepherd is a product-obsessed creative agency. Listen to this episode and hear all about it. Then, if you are part of a brand that makes a product, now would be a great time to work with us because we're in a very generous state of mind as we turn away service-only brands, and embrace the work with products we love so much.
22:58
November 02, 2021
Brands That Make A Stand • Interview with Michael Graber • The Brand Shepherd Podcast
"Good" brands can be polarizing, but the market winners know the immense value created take making a stand for their ethics. Consumers are demanding action and smart companies know they prosper better than their brand is aligned to a purpose and purpose is aligned to their actions at every level. Yet, one might ask, "How would my brand even begin to start this change?"  That is precisely what we delve into in this jam-packed conversation.  Here are some of the points we cover in today's episode: Old model of business and branding. Shifts into the emerging era. Examples of purposeful brands and companies that have made a purposeful transformation. How you can initiate this conversation at your organization—benefits include employee retention and engagement, more brand loyalty, increased revenue, and market share.
43:04
September 28, 2021
Interview with "Warrior Entrepreneur" author, Zachary Green • The Brand Shepherd Podcast
Zachary Green's new book, Warrior Entrepreneur, is a book written for the times we live and work in due to the continued challenges and fallout from COVID-19. Every business is experiencing some kind of challenge due to the pandemic and the responses to it. Warrior Entrepreneur is a book that speaks to the entrepreneurs who are making their way through these challenging times and reminds them (us!) that they (we!) are not alone – that there are myriad lessons to be learned from fellow warriors. This was a conversation that wasted no time getting into some heavy topics like the seasons of trials - what the book calls Crucibles - entrepreneurs face, what it means to "never give up," and how to wield fear in the favor of the true Warrior Entrepreneur. Zachary is not an aloof author writing from the sidelines. He's a fellow entrepreneur in the trenches with us and offers us insights and hope from the perspective of the Warrior Entrepreneur.
29:34
September 14, 2021
Innovation & Authenticity: Friends or Foes?
Innovation! is the rallying cry of brands, businesses, orgs, and causes today.  One cannot flick through their LinkedIn feed more than a few posts without seeing some kind of content about Innovation.  At the same time, our culture - especially consumer culture - wants authenticity.  Yet that which is authentic tends to come from longevity: doing the same thing or making the same thing the same way, reliably, for a long time.  So there should be tension between innovation and authenticity, right? The classic tension between the old and the new.  To sort this out, Jon Hirst is our guest on the Brand Shepherd Podcast.  Jon is the Chief Innovation Officer for SIL International, an org that "works with local communities to develop language solutions that expand possibilities for a better life."  Did you know that Jon and his team work with 7,000+ languages worldwide and that roughly every 40 days a language dies with the deaths of great-grandparents? So innovation is the tip of the spear for SIL and Jon has the kind of perspective to help us navigate how Innovation and Authenticity work together in a very pragmatic way.  This episode is packed with practical tasks you can do to implement an innovation strategy for your brand, business, org, or cause so be ready to take plenty of notes.  Want to be a guest on the Brand Shepherd Podcast? Let's chat.
30:43
August 23, 2021
2020 Year In Review
Below are the notes used for the 2020 Year In Review podcast episode. The best way to understand these points is via the audio podcast which you can listen to through the player above or on your favorite podcast app. 2020 Year In Review Key Takeaways ECommerce wins big. Brands saw lockdowns first as an opportunity. Post-POTUS election, they braced for tax hikes. Startups, startups, startups! Normalization of the Brand Shepherd model. Three trends to watch for in 2021: Buying convenience gets top priority, even for B2B. Ecomm, low/no-touch, tech — it’s all on the table. The decentralized brand has footing, now it thrives both products/services and teams. Less is more for website copy, packaging copy, and UX microcopy. The SEO mix now requires an expert. No longer a DIY addendum. How 2020 changed Brand Shepherd Honed focus on products paid off big time. They benefitted from working with us from idea development to production to marketing. Fast and efficient. Yet we welcomed back former clients who don’t have products because the pandemic made us valuable. Onward is our mantra moving forward into 2021 and beyond. Focus on brand and if that means services need our help, we’re here. Onward. It’s where we go from here.
24:27
December 30, 2020
Legal Guidance For Starting A New Brand with Attorney Derrick Davis • The Brand Shepherd Podcast
Attorney Derrick Davis is our guest on this episode of the Brand Shepherd podcast.  TOPIC: COVID-19 will spur a lot of new entrepreneurs, new businesses. Legal Guidance For Starting A New Brand. New businesses will need to develop a brand for themselves, which we have covered in the 5 Ingredients podcast. New businesses will also need legal guidance as they start or expand. We will talk about what that looks like. STARTING OUT: navigating legalities of getting started Type of business (LLC, Sole Prop, etc.). Naming for a new business or brand extension. Protect the IP. Mystery Solved: TM or © ®?! When to do what. GROWTH: businesses/brand that is using this time to work ON their brands/businesses Naming the brand extension(s) — what’s taken, when to accept risk. MITIGATE RISK & TROUBLE Every business takes on risk — what are some common risks a new business or new brand growth will want to be cautious about? Trouble: what value does someone like you bring to the table when a cease and desist letter arrives, or some other kind of trouble? Trouble: similarly, what if another new business steals your IP? HOW TO REACH DERRICK dmdavis@qcflaw.com | 865-524-1873
38:06
April 28, 2020
Ingredient #5: The Chef • The 5 Key Ingredients To Creating An Exceptional Product Brand • by Brand Shepherd
SEASON 2 of the Brand Shepherd Podcast:  The 5 Key Ingredients To Creating An Exceptional Product Brand by Dan Crask, Creative Director & Co-Owner, Brand Shepherd Brand development is an exercise of examining what the brand is and is not, and then codifying the discoveries in a way that the brand owner(s) and stakeholder(s) can easily leverage to grow the brand. Here are what I know to be the second of the 5 key ingredients for building a brand: -- INGREDIENT 5: The Chef These 4 ingredients we have covered so far are vital to brand development, but there is a 5th ingredient that needs to be mentioned as well:  A chef (aka, guide, shepherd) to help work through the process of brand development. That would be us, Brand Shepherd. Having a chef to guide brand development is obviously important from an expertise level. Brand and business stakeholders use experts for anything, from HVAC service to CPAs to facility maintenance and, yes, brand development. Yet a guide is also important because having a mind from outside the brand will give the development process the perspective it needs to be successful. Read the accompanying post to this episode on our website here »  -- Questions & Feedback? Contact Brand Shepherd Today: brandshepherd.com
21:42
April 23, 2020
Ingredient #4: The Brand's "Why?" • The 5 Key Ingredients To Creating An Exceptional Product Brand • by Brand Shepherd
SEASON 2 of the Brand Shepherd Podcast:  The 5 Key Ingredients To Creating An Exceptional Product Brand by Dan Crask, Creative Director & Co-Owner, Brand Shepherd Brand development is an exercise of examining what the brand is and is not, and then codifying the discoveries in a way that the brand owner(s) and stakeholder(s) can easily leverage to grow the brand. Here are what I know to be the second of the 5 key ingredients for building a brand: -- EPISODE 4: The Brand "Why?" Over the last decade, Simon Sinek's "Start with 'Why?'" TEDx talk has created a mandate for brands to know Why they exist and then communicate it to customers at every level. Tall task, right? Well, no. In this episode, we will give the "Why?" question its due respect, but also demystifying it. As always, a simple how-to is also included so you can put this information to work for your brand today. Read the accompanying post to this episode on our website here »  -- Questions & Feedback? Contact Brand Shepherd Today: brandshepherd.com
11:57
March 27, 2020
Ingredient #3: The Brand Identity • The 5 Key Ingredients To Creating An Exceptional Product Brand • by Brand Shepherd
SEASON 2 of the Brand Shepherd Podcast:  The 5 Key Ingredients To Creating An Exceptional Product Brand by Dan Crask, Creative Director & Co-Owner, Brand Shepherd Brand development is an exercise of examining what the brand is and is not, and then codifying the discoveries in a way that the brand owner(s) and stakeholder(s) can easily leverage to grow the brand. Here are what I know to be the second of the 5 key ingredients for building a brand: -- EPISODE 3: The Brand Identity The brand identity is made up of a mix of vital elements that customers identify with your brand. These proprietary elements are each important, and collectively (Gestalt Theory, anyone?), they make up your entire brand identity. Read the accompanying post to this episode on our website here »  -- Questions & Feedback? Contact Brand Shepherd Today: brandshepherd.com
22:59
March 20, 2020
Ingredient #2: Customer Personas • The 5 Key Ingredients To Creating An Exceptional Product Brand • by Brand Shepherd
SEASON 2 of the Brand Shepherd Podcast:  The 5 Key Ingredients To Creating An Exceptional Product Brand EPISODE 2: Customer Personas by Dan Crask, Creative Director & Co-Owner, Brand Shepherd Brand development is an exercise of examining what the brand is and is not, and then codifying the discoveries in a way that the brand owner(s) and stakeholder(s) can easily leverage to grow the brand. Here are what I know to be the second of the 5 key ingredients for building a brand: Part 2: The Brand's Customer Personas Equally important to the brand's voice is the customer persona the brand is talking to. Brands that lack focus are not successful brands. You need to know who you are talking to, what their buying habits are, lifestyle choices, etc. The brand voice will be compelling and even familiar when it speaks the sub-cultural language of its customers. So, What Are Customer Personas Mix demographics and habits together, and we get a customer persona. The persona is an average, an ideal person that would love to buy from the brand. The customer persona has all the demographic and habitual data that makes our brand’s offering attractive and needed. It’s always best that a customer persona is written out, and documented as part of any brand guidance resources. Just as the visual parts of the brand have guidelines, so should the brand’s ideal customer(s) be documented in quick, brief write-ups of what the customer persona is made up of. An example might look like this: Jack Doe is a blue-collar man, aged between 32-45 years old, who drives a pickup truck, loves to hunt, and is fiercely patriotic. As part of Jack’s daily rituals, he loves a good meaty meal. He will prefer a steak, brisket, pulled pork, or a hamburger over a salad any day of the week. Jack’s living spaces are populated with products that use simple visual branding – he doesn’t go for loud, clever, or modern/minimalist design. He likes bold, earthy simple colors and is proud to display logos that align with his values. A good example is the sport of basketball. I sometimes love watching and listening to basketball because I have no idea what the announcers and advertisers are talking about. It's a sport full of language and assumptions that make absolutely no sense to me. Yet it makes a lot of sense to its fans, and those fans become customers. Customer personas will help identity the age, location, lifestyle, buying habits, values, and more of the people who we want to become loyal to the brand. [FTR: I came of age in the greater Chicagoland area watching Jordan win 6 rings with Da Bulls. Today's basketball product is a vastly inferior product compared to yesteryear; once I've had steak, it's hard to chew on cheap ground chuck.] In the next segment, I'll cover Part 3: The Brand's "Why", where I will tackle the big question of "Why does our brand and products exist?," which has become entirely more complicated than it needs to be. In Part 3, I will simplify it for you. If this has helped you identify that your product brand needs to define its voice, please get in touch. Brand Shepherd would be delighted to consider working alongside your product brand. -- Questions & Feedback? Contact Brand Shepherd Today: brandshepherd.com
11:56
February 26, 2020
Ingredient #1: The Brand's Voice • The 5 Key Ingredients To Creating An Exceptional Product Brand • by Brand Shepherd
SEASON 2 of the Brand Shepherd Podcast:  The 5 Key Ingredients To Creating An Exceptional Product Brand EPISODE 1: The Brand's Voice The brand is always speaking, always communicating. Product brands are always persuading, selling, and providing delight for their users. But what is the tone of voice the brand uses? What words, specifically, make up its lexicon? Would the brand use humor or maturity to describe itself? Does the product brand know what is important to its users – what they find valuable? Speaking of value, does the product brand share the same current values that its users do? While it's true that the brand should reflect the values and even personalities of its key stakeholders, the brand ought to present as an entity of its own: Its own personality, unique value propositions, and tone of voice. Developing the brand voice is done through a number of exercises with key stakeholders, product managers/owners, and user research – all with guidance from experts who know how to sort and organize the information into useful, actionable data. Let's get into some of these exercises in this foundational episode to creating an exceptional product brand. -- Questions & Feedback? Contact Brand Shepherd Today: brandshepherd.com
14:13
January 14, 2020
Part 5: Love It Or Leave It • 5 Ways To Get The Best Work From Your Creative Team • Brand Shepherd
Love It Or Leave It No matter what, at the end of the product project, you have to love what is created. Maybe "love" is too strong a word. You need to believe in the final thing that is created. The creative team is there to bring ideas to life and to solve problems. A competent, mature creative team will offer their recommendations throughout the process. Yet, at the end of the process, you need to believe in what has been created. If you don't believe in it, you will start using something that doesn't have your full buy-in, and your customers will smell it a mile away. Solution: Before you make a final decision on approving that which your creative team has created, take at least a day, preferably longer, to sleep on it, and be sure you believe in it. This is aided by taking good notes during the process so you can instantly revisit why the process yielded what it did. Example:
 “We've done great work together. Now, I just need a day or two before we consider it final. I want to be 100% our brand believes in this new direction.” Important note: we're not looking for a purely emotional response here. Believing in the creative direction is more than that. It's a knowing, a gut-sense that it's the right call. If you're a data-driven person, this will drive you nuts because this advice is the X-factor that a lot of successful entrepreneurs use in everything they do. Wrap Up We created this series to help people who hire creative teams to get the best work from them. As Creative Director for Brand Shepherd, everything I, Dan, wrote and said in this series is what I put to use every day. Consider working with a creative team that knows and works with the guidance in this series. Contact us today - let's talk about building, branding, guiding better products.
08:07
May 21, 2019
Part 4: "Realistic Timing" • 5 Ways To Get The Best Work From Your Creative Team • Brand Shepherd
It's worth mentioning that timing is one of the top relationship killers between creative teams and those they serve. Some clients have a tendency to drop big projects on their team without asking how much time it will take, while assuming they know how long something will take to create. Similarly, creative teams often operate out of a position of fear of losing the account and do not establish firm timing expectations at the start and throughout the relationship. If the creative team is too afraid to lead the timing expectations, and push back when they are challenged, it leaves plenty of room for the client to make unrealistic assumptions. Solution: As part of an on-boarding process for new relationships and on-going projects, make timing its own talking point. This is a top-level priority, folks, so give it the space to be sorted out by the client and creative team alike. Example:
 “Let's talk about timing for this project: Ideally we need it by [date], but I don't work in this space – what is realistic to produce the best possible work?” By taking this approach, you show that you respect the time needed to create greatness for your product, and this show of respect will make your creative team think of you/your brand as their favorite to work with.
08:15
May 16, 2019
Part 3: "Ask The Right People" • 5 Ways To Get The Best Work From Your Creative Team • Brand Shepherd
Ask The Right People This one is touchy because once it happens, it’s a diplomatic tightrope for professional creatives to walk: As we build, brand, and guide better products, we need feedback to measure effectiveness. Whom we get feedback from is equally important as getting the actual feedback, so it is important to ask the right people for feedback. There is a temptation, however, to ask the nearest trusted warm-body: The spouse, co-worker, best friend, trusted advisor, etc. The problem is that these people are almost always not the people you need feedback from. They are not short on opinions, but unfortunately, their opinions don't matter when it comes to creative work. Why? Because when we're creating, we're communicating something to your product's audience - it's customer personas - and it is their feedback we need. The Solution: By gut-check or by data, take a look at your product's most loyal customers and ask them for feedback. Believe it or not, inviting them to be part of the betterment of the brand is reward enough for soliciting their feedback. However, sometimes asking for feedback gets more quality and quantity if it has an incentive. Your call. Avoid the insanity of asking your spouse, family member, co-worker, or friend what they think about the ideas unless they are part of your customer persona. However, sometimes asking for feedback gets more quality and quantity if it has an incentive. Your call. Avoid the insanity of asking your spouse, family member, co-worker, or friend what they think about the ideas unless they are part of your customer persona. The advice here is to avoid asking your spouse, family member, co-worker, or friend what they think about the ideas unless they are part of your customer persona. Example:
 “We have two great creative directions here. Let's get them in front of our most loyal customers for feedback. We'll also get fresh feedback to help us take one of these ideas o the finish line.” If I had to create a litmus test for brand owners who 'get it,' and those who do not 'get it' when it comes to product branding, this is the test: whom do they get their key feedback from. Pros don't ask people whose opinions don't matter. It's really that simple. By taking this approach, you avoid the echo chamber of people you already know and get the feedback from the right people: your customers.
08:18
May 07, 2019
Part 2: "Know Thyself" • 5 Ways To Get The Best Work From Your Creative Team • Brand Shepherd
by Dan Crask, Creative Director & Co-Owner, Brand Shepherd “I'll know it when I see it” is a phrase creatives hear a lot, and it’s a phrase we can usually resonate with quite well. Sometimes we don’t know, specifically, what we are about to create. We just have a hunch, intuition, or shadow of an idea. The end result will show itself along the way. We completely understand the "I'll know it when I see it" mentality. It is a perfectly normal creative process. But it’s also the most time-consuming because, well, it’s the longer route to a destination. The problem is that some people who buy creative services for products want this approach, but also want the budget of an “I know exactly what I want” project. Those two things are allergic to each other, and cannot co-exist for the long-term. Solution: Come to the table with ideas to run with for your product, or a larger budget for exploration. As you do, follow the guidance provided in Part 1 about being directional instead of executional. Example: “Here’s what I know: this product’s main benefit is that it’s portable. It needs to appeal to kids, but in order to get to kids, it has to appeal to parents too. This is a product that’ll mostly be used outdoors in the summer and early autumn. We know our competitor brands well, and what we want to highlight for this product. Let's see some ideas within these parameters." Now we’re cooking! You don’t precisely know what you want, but you do know your goal. The professional creative is now equipped to create some options that will blow your mind and increase sales. It's really that simple.
08:19
April 30, 2019
Part 1: "Directional > Executional" • 5 Ways To Get The Best Work From Your Creative Team • Brand Shepherd
If there’s one thing professional creative teams loathe, it’s being hired for a gig, then being directed, step-by-step, how something should look or function. At best, it sends contradictory messages. You’re paying product professionals who live and breathe the daily work of solving challenges by design. So, why direct them to tackle minutia like making the logo 20% bigger or the photo on the right side instead of where the creative put it? It's best to lean into the hired professional. It's best to assume these hired professionals know what they're doing. However, that is not to say you have to stay quiet and take whatever is given. There are plenty of creative teams who live up to that way-too-true stereotype. There's a way to balance the process. Solution: Be informative by telling your creative team what isn’t working and what you are trying to achieve. This is called being "directional" with your feedback rather than "executional." We use the word "executional" for when someone gives outright creative direction that they're not qualified to give, or if they are just being a classic micro-manager. The best way is to be "directional" – communicate why the design isn't quite right. Creatives love this type of feedback! It adds another layer to the challenge. Creatives get bored and mentally check-out when they're given color-by-the-numbers, direct instructions. And let's be frank: You're likely unqualified to be giving professional creative direction. And that's a big deal. Would you instruct your architect how to design a "better" space? Would you instruct your hired kitchen and bath designer how to design a better space? Heck, would you tell your mechanic how best to change the oil in your vehicle? So stop telling professional creatives how to create. It's foolish. We know it's foolish, and it just makes us respect you less. Over time, this builds up and the relationship will end on a sour note. Example: Here is how to be directional in your feedback. “The font choices in the logo options aren’t working for this because we want to attract a more sophisticated buyer, and these look too simplistic.” By taking this approach, you have just equipped the creative to do what they do best: Create. You’ve just sparked a fire in the imagination of your pro. You’ll get a lot more bang for your spend by approaching feedback this way.
08:43
April 22, 2019
Introduction • 5 Ways To Get The Best Work From Your Creative Team • Brand Shepherd
Whether you have hired an agency, or are working with an in-house department, there are ways to get the best work from your creative team. You have expectations of getting ideas brought to life for the betterment and profitability of the brand, and your creative team wants to unleash their power on your brand to make it worthy of their portfolio and bragging rights. It should be a win-win thing, right? Yet how many times have I spoke with a business owner or brand manager who felt like their previous creative team just didn’t produce their best work? Over the years I have noticed that the best work is usually not produced for one glaring reason: The process broke down. Maybe the creative team didn’t communicate any kind of process at all, maybe the client didn’t abide by the process, or maybe it was a “make it up as we go” thing. The common thread in any scenario is that the process was broken, and so it’s the elements of the creation process I will be tackling over the next 5 posts. How This Benefits You Ok, ok… enough about us, the creatives. You’re the one paying the invoices, so let’s get on with how reading the next 5 posts is going to benefit you. Just as you want to get the most out of anything else you invest in, this is no different. Yet I’m willing to assume that you can easily wrap your mind around how to get the most out of energy efficiency in your office building, or an office printer that doesn’t waste ink, or even a CPA that offers tax prep services too. However, when it comes to managing a team of professional creatives, there are few prior experiences that can prepare you to get the best work from them. Over the next 5 posts, I am going to share what I know to be true about getting the best work from creative teams so that you can get the best possible ROI. Context I want to preface everything by sharing my favorite quote about my profession. It comes from Walter Gropious, founder of the Bauhaus school of design in the early 1900s. Gropious said, “Art is self-expression; Design is problem-solving.” Did you catch the distinction? As a professional creative, I am not an artist. My team and I do not create “art” for our clients. Art is what we do on our own time to keep us creatively sharp, our self-expression. It’s the music we write and perform, the photographs we take, the paintings we paint, the poetry we write, and so on. That is art. Design is where we set out to solve a problem. The thing isn’t selling. The thing is new and needs a brand identity. The service needs a better website. The brand needs to tell a story with video. That is systematic problem-solving, aka, design. We solve the challenges by design. We create by a process of design. All of this is shared so that you know where I am coming from as a professional creator, agency owner, and creative director.
11:07
April 15, 2019