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New Species

New Species

By New Species Podcast

Just a fraction of the species on our planet are known to science, but more are described and published every day. This podcast talks to the authors of these new species to get the behind-the-scenes stories of how new species are found and named, as well as why these discoveries should matter to everyone, not just scientists. Join us on our journey to better understand the wonderful biodiversity of our planet!

Be sure to follow New Species on Twitter (@PodcastSpecies), and support the podcast at www.patreon.com/NewSpeciesPod
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Episode 21: The Taxonomic Impediment: a special episode in which we talk about the need for more evolutionary biologists!

New Species

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A New Species of Afrotropical Ant with Kiko Gómez
A New Species of Afrotropical Ant with Kiko Gómez
'When it comes to ants,' Dr. Kiko Gómez says, 'it’s important to know what you don’t know.' The ant genus Pheidole contains over 1,000 species, and is found across the world. But what does it mean to find a new species in this genus? In this episode, Kiko shares his experience collecting and identifying Pheidole ants in the Ivory Coast. He tells us what it’s like to visit the amazing Taï National Park, how myrmecologists differentiate between worker, soldier, and other ant designations, and what makes his group of ants unique from the rest. Do you want to share your thoughts on the podcast? Please do so here: https://forms.gle/fnXUuiNknRFadXWj6 I really appreciate the responses, and I’m working hard to make them happen. Expect bonus content, episode transcripts, a website, and more coming soon. If you’d like to support the podcast, please consider giving us a review on Spotify or Apple Podcasts, or supporting us on Patreon to get access to that bonus content. Even $1-2 a month really helps keep the podcast going! https://www.patreon.com/NewSpeciesPod Book mentioned: Journey to the Ants by Bert Hölldobler and E. O. Wilson Found here: https://bookshop.org/p/books/journey-to-the-ants-a-story-of-scientific-exploration-edward-o-wilson/6711464?ean=9780674485266 Kiko Gómez’s paper Pheidole klaman sp. nov.: a new addition from Ivory Coast to the Afrotropical pulchella species group (Hymenoptera, Formicidae, Myrmicinae) is in the June 20th 2022 issue of Zookeys. It can be found here: https://doi.org/10.3897/zookeys.1104.81562 New Species: Pheidole klaman Episode image courtesy of Kiko Gomez Find Kiko on Instagram: @netodejulilla Virtual 3D data of the major worker holotype (CASENT0764691) and two minor worker paratypes (CASENT0764692 & CASENT0745509) can be found on Dryad (doi: 10.5061/dryad.mpg4f4r1k) Be sure to follow New Species on Twitter (@PodcastSpecies) and like the podcast page on Facebook (www.facebook.com/NewSpeciesPodcast) Music in this podcast is "No More (Instrumental)," by HaTom (https://fanlink.to/HaTom) If you have questions or feedback about this podcast, please e-mail us at NewSpeciesPodcast@gmail.com If you would like to support this podcast, please consider doing so at https://www.patreon.com/NewSpeciesPod
28:06
January 24, 2023
A New Species of Mud Dragon with Maria Herranz
A New Species of Mud Dragon with Maria Herranz
Have you ever heard of Mud Dragons? They’re actually a group of marine invertebrates that can be found in oceans across the globe. And, as Dr. María Herranz tells us in this interview, collecting and processing them is a unique challenge. Listen in to find out how a piece of copy paper and Madonna in the early 90s are connected to these fascinating creatures! María Herranz’s paper “Expanding the Echinoderes coulli group (Kinorhyncha: Cyclorhagida) with a new species from the Chuuk Islands, Micronesia” is in Volume 302 of Zoologischer Anzeiger. It can be found here: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jcz.2022.11.010 New Species: Echinoderes inaequalis Episode image courtesy of María Herranz Follow María on twitter: @Maríaherranz___ Check out María’s website: https://www.Maríaherranzm.com/ And visit the Natural History Museum of Denmark’s Collections Portal: https://collections.snm.ku.dk/en Be sure to follow New Species on Twitter (@PodcastSpecies) and like the podcast page on Facebook (www.facebook.com/NewSpeciesPodcast) Music in this podcast is "No More (Instrumental)," by HaTom (https://fanlink.to/HaTom) If you have questions or feedback about this podcast, please e-mail us at NewSpeciesPodcast@gmail.com If you would like to support this podcast, please consider doing so at https://www.patreon.com/NewSpeciesPod
22:24
January 10, 2023
20 New Species of Frogs with Mark Scherz
20 New Species of Frogs with Mark Scherz
The frogs are back! In a year of episodes rich in amphibians, New Species rounds out 2022 with Dr. Mark Scherz and his paper describing 20 new species of frogs from Madagascar. This paper has everything! Barcode fishing, large-scale scientific collaboration, and plenty of fascinating frog facts. The real question I should have asked Mark is how he became an expert in Brygoomantis calls - as you’ll hear in this episode, he’s very accomplished. Do you want to share your thoughts on the podcast? Please do so here: https://forms.gle/fnXUuiNknRFadXWj6 Mark Scherz’s paper “An inordinate fondness for inconspicuous brown frogs: integration of phylogenomics, archival DNA analysis, morphology, and bioacoustics yields 24 new taxa in the subgenus Brygoomantis (genus Mantidactylus) from Madagascar” is in Volume 7 Issue 2 of Megataxa. It can be found here: https://doi.org/10.11646/megataxa.7.2.1 New Species: M. ambohimitombi marefo, M. ambohimitombi miloko, M. mahery, M. steinfartzi, M. incognitus, M. jonasi, M. katae, M. kortei, M. riparius, M. fergusoni, M. georgei, M. jahnarum, M. marintsoai, M. grubenmanni, M. gudrunae, M. augustini, M. bletzae, M. brevirostris, M. eulenbergeri, M. glosi., M. stelliger, M. manerana, M. manerana fotaka, and M. manerana antsanga. Episode image (M. stelliger) courtesy Miguel Vences Find Mark on twitter: @MarkScherz Or on Mastedon: @MarkScherz @EcoEvo.social Or how about Tumblr: MarkScherz.tumblr.com Or check out his website: MarkScherz.com Mark’s other content includes: Anatomy Insights: www.youtube.com/AnatomyInsights Squamates Podcast: http://squamatespod.com/ Be sure to follow New Species on Twitter (@PodcastSpecies) and like the podcast page on Facebook (www.facebook.com/NewSpeciesPodcast) Music in this podcast is "No More (Instrumental)," by HaTom (https://fanlink.to/HaTom) If you have questions or feedback about this podcast, please e-mail us at NewSpeciesPodcast@gmail.com If you would like to support this podcast, please consider doing so at https://www.patreon.com/NewSpeciesPod
28:58
December 27, 2022
A New Species of Australian Native Bee with Kit Prendergast
A New Species of Australian Native Bee with Kit Prendergast
It’s possible that you’ve heard about a new species of bee from Western Australia that has a snout like a dog. But did you know it specializes on just a few species of plant from the Fabaceae (legume) family? And how did it get named L. zephyr? And what does it mean to be a “plasterer bee?” Hear about all of this and more as we get a behind the scenes look into the wonderful world of native bees with Dr. Kit Prendergast. Kit Prendergast’s paper “Leioproctus zephyr, an oligolectic new bee species with a distinctive clypeus” is in Volume 93 of the Journal of Hymenoptera Research. It can be found here: https://doi.org/10.3897/jhr.93.85685 New Species: Leioproctus zephyr Episode image courtesy of Kit Prendergast Follow Kit onTwitter: @BeeBabette Or on Instagram: @bee.babette_performer Kit also has Facebook: @The Buzz on Wild Bees Be sure to follow New Species on Twitter (@PodcastSpecies) and like the podcast page on Facebook (www.facebook.com/NewSpeciesPodcast) Music in this podcast is "No More (Instrumental)," by HaTom (https://fanlink.to/HaTom) If you have questions or feedback about this podcast, please e-mail us at NewSpeciesPodcast@gmail.com If you would like to support this podcast, please consider doing so at https://www.patreon.com/NewSpeciesPod
23:37
December 13, 2022
A New Species of Gecko With Javier Lobon Rovira
A New Species of Gecko With Javier Lobon Rovira
Imagine this: you’re hiking in the savannah of western Angola when you spot the silhouette of a gecko in the brush. You pick it up, expecting to find your old friend Kolekanos plumicaudus, a little brown patterned gecko with a feather-like tail. But when you look at this gecko, its tail is entirely different, spines instead of feathery plumes. When his colleague brought him the first four specimens, Javier Lobon Rovira knew immediately that they had found a new species. Listen in as he shares his tips for finding geckos, how special this species is to him, and how important it is to give attention to understudied areas like the Angolan savannah. Javier Lobon Rovira’s paper “A new species of feather-tailed leaf-toed gecko, Kolekanos Heinicke, Daza, Greenbaum, Jackman, Bauer, 2014 (Squamata, Gekkonidae) from the poorly explored savannah of western Angola” is in the November 2nd issue of Zookeys. It can be found here: https://doi.org/10.3897/zookeys.1127.84942 New Species: Kolekanos spinicaudus Episode image courtesy of Javier Lobon Rovira Check out Javier’s stunning photography! www.javierlobonrovira.com Follow Javier on Instagram: @javilbn_wildphotography Be sure to follow New Species on Twitter (@PodcastSpecies) and like the podcast page on Facebook (www.facebook.com/NewSpeciesPodcast) Music in this podcast is "No More (Instrumental)," by HaTom (https://fanlink.to/HaTom) If you have questions or feedback about this podcast, please e-mail us at NewSpeciesPodcast@gmail.com If you would like to support this podcast, please consider doing so at https://www.patreon.com/NewSpeciesPod
19:35
November 29, 2022
Seven New Species of Medetera Flies with Marc Pollet
Seven New Species of Medetera Flies with Marc Pollet
You’ve probably seen these organisms before. They’re green, shiny, and “quite nervous” according to Dr. Marc Pollet, who has been studying Dolichopodidae, long-legged flies, for decades. But there’s so much more to this group than what meets the eye. Take a deep dive into the fascinating world of flies with Marc, and learn a secret or two about the beauty of taxonomy, the importance of names, and what might be waiting to be discovered in your own backyard. Dr. Marc Pollet’s paper “Discovery of a Lineage of Soil-Dwelling Medetera Species with Multi-Coloured Eyes in Southern Europe” can be found in volume 13 issue 11 of Insects. An open access link is available here: https://doi.org/10.3390/insects13111012 New Species: Medetera aglaops, Medetera corsicana, Medetera gibbosipyga, Medetera hispanica, Medetera lusitana, Medetera parva, and Medetera rectipyga. Episode image courtesy of Andreas Stark Find Marc’s work on his INBO Page: https://pureportal.inbo.be/en/persons/marc-pollet Be sure to follow New Species on Twitter (@PodcastSpecies) and like the podcast page on Facebook (www.facebook.com/NewSpeciesPodcast) Music in this podcast is "No More (Instrumental)," by HaTom (https://fanlink.to/HaTom) If you have questions or feedback about this podcast, please e-mail us at NewSpeciesPodcast@gmail.com If you would like to support this podcast, please consider doing so at https://www.patreon.com/NewSpeciesPod
31:09
November 16, 2022
Re-Release: Happy Face Spiders with Rosemary Gillespie
Re-Release: Happy Face Spiders with Rosemary Gillespie
Many parts of the world are celebrating all things spooky this time of year, and spiders are getting their time to shine. Whether you’re a spider lover or not, you have to admit that spiders have some stunning diversity and fascinating natural history. To celebrate that, this is a re-release of an episode we originally published on February 9th of 2021. It’s a wonderful interview with Dr. Rosemary Gillespie who studies “Happy Face Spiders,” spiders from the Hawaiian Islands with unique colors and patterns. Dr. Gillespie is a professor of Environmental Science, Policy & Management, professor in the Division of Insect Biology, and Director of the Essig Museum of Entomology at the University of California - Berkeley. She and Brian, creator of the podcast, discuss why these spiders are called Happy Face spiders, how they got to Hawaii, and why they are important in the Hawaiian ecosystem. Rosemary Gillespie’s paper “A happy family: systematic revision of the endemic Theridion spiders of the Hawaiian Islands” is in the January 5th 2021 edition of Invertebrate Systematics. It can be found here: https://doi.org/10.1071/IS20001 To learn more about Dr. Gillespie, follow her on Twitter @Berkeley_Evolab or Instagram @berkeley.evolab. You can also check out her website at  https://vcresearch.berkeley.edu/faculty/rosemary-g-gillespie. Follow the first author on the paper, Adrià Bellvert, on Twitter @AdriaBellvert, or follow the senior author, Dr. Miquel Arnedo, on Twitter @MiquelArnedo. Be sure to follow New Species on Twitter (@PodcastSpecies) and like the podcast page on Facebook (www.facebook.com/NewSpeciesPodcast) Music in this podcast is "No More (Instrumental)," by HaTom (https://fanlink.to/HaTom) If you have questions or feedback about this podcast, please e-mail us at NewSpeciesPodcast@gmail.com If you would like to support this podcast, please consider doing so at https://www.patreon.com/NewSpeciesPod
32:37
November 01, 2022
A New Species of Homalopsid Snake with Justin Bernstein
A New Species of Homalopsid Snake with Justin Bernstein
Mud snakes may not look as exciting as some of their other snake relatives, but in this episode Dr. Justin Bernstein tells us just a few of the fascinating details he and his team have uncovered while studying them. How do you compare the genetic makeup of snake populations? Why should you turn off your headlamp while collecting in Mangrove forests? Learn all of this and more as Justin tells us stories from his travels and helps us unravel the mysteries of these fantastic snakes. Justin Bernstein’s paper “Undescribed Diversity in a Widespread, Common Group of Asian Mud Snakes (Serpentes: Homalopsidae: Hypsiscopus)” is in Volume 110, Issue 3 of Ichthyology and Herpetology. It can be found here: https://doi.org/10.1643/h2022015 New Species: Hypsiscopus murphyi Episode image courtesy of Bryan Stuart Follow Justin on twitter: @JustBernstein And check out his website: https://justinbernstein.org/ Be sure to follow New Species on Twitter (@PodcastSpecies) and like the podcast page on Facebook (www.facebook.com/NewSpeciesPodcast) Music in this podcast is "No More (Instrumental)," by HaTom (https://fanlink.to/HaTom) If you have questions or feedback about this podcast, please e-mail us at NewSpeciesPodcast@gmail.com If you would like to support this podcast, please consider doing so at https://www.patreon.com/NewSpeciesPod
22:19
October 18, 2022
Three New Species of Ground Snake with Alejandro Arteaga
Three New Species of Ground Snake with Alejandro Arteaga
Have you heard of snakes in the genus Atractus? They’re the largest snake genus in the world, and recently they received three new members found in an unexpected place. In this episode, Alejandro Arteaga shares the story of how he and his team found three new species of fossorial snakes in the Andes mountains of Ecuador, and what this discovery has to say about the conservation of biodiversity in this unique region of the world. Alejandro Arteaga’s paper “Leaving no stone unturned: three additional new species of Atractus ground snakes (Serpentes, Colubridae) from Ecuador discovered using a biogeographical approach” is in the September 15th issue of Zookeys. It can be found here: https://doi.org/10.3897/zookeys.1121.89539 New Species: Atractus discovery, Atractus zgap, and Atractus michaelsabini Episode image courtesy of Alejandro Arteaga For more coverage of Ale and his work, check out the Khamai foundation’s press release: https://www.khamai.bio/news/three_new_ground_snakes.html Follow Ale on instagram: @alejandroartheagath Be sure to follow New Species on Twitter (@PodcastSpecies) and like the podcast page on Facebook (www.facebook.com/NewSpeciesPodcast) Music in this podcast is "No More (Instrumental)," by HaTom (https://fanlink.to/HaTom) If you have questions or feedback about this podcast, please e-mail us at NewSpeciesPodcast@gmail.com If you would like to support this podcast, please consider doing so at https://www.patreon.com/NewSpeciesPod
29:46
October 04, 2022
A New Species of Thyreophoran Dinosaur with Facundo Riguetti
A New Species of Thyreophoran Dinosaur with Facundo Riguetti
New Species: Jakapil kaniukura Did you know that there are still new dinosaurs being identified? In this episode, hear from Facundo Riguetti, a PhD student of the Universidad Maimónides-CONICET and a fellow of the Fundación de Historia Natural Félix de Azara, both in Buenos Aires. He'll tell us how his new species of dinosaur was collected, what makes it different from others of its clade, and even some theories on key morphological features which make it unique from other similar genera. It's the first of its kind to be found in South America, making it an especially important discovery! Facundo Riguetti’s paper “A new Cretaceous thyreophoran from Patagonia supports a South American lineage of armoured dinosaurs” is in the August 11th issue of Scientific Reports, volume 12 article 11621. It can be found here: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-022-15535-6 New Species: Jakapil kaniukura (Riguetti, Apesteguía & Pereda-Suberbiola) Episode image courtesy of Facundo Riguetti And a bonus! Facundo's new species has been imagined to life through an animation by Gabriel Díaz Yanten, Mauricio Alvarez, and Lautaro Rodríguez Blanco. Watch their clip below, and follow @PaleoGDY on twitter or the artists on instagram for more of their work. Animation: https://twitter.com/PaleoGDY/status/1557819385946988544?s=20&t=wa4k41TzTZk8WZLLYf_6PA https://www.instagram.com/lautarorodriguezblanco/ (Lautaro Rodríguez Blanco; sculpture)   https://www.instagram.com/paleogdy/ (Gabriel Díaz Yanten; 3D models and renders) https://www.instagram.com/mauricio_alvarez_art/ (Mauricio Alvarez; illustration and skin of models) Be sure to follow New Species on Twitter (@PodcastSpecies) and like the podcast page on Facebook (www.facebook.com/NewSpeciesPodcast) Music in this podcast is "No More (Instrumental)," by HaTom (https://fanlink.to/HaTom). If you have questions or feedback about this podcast, please e-mail us at NewSpeciesPodcast@gmail.com If you would like to support this podcast, please consider doing so at https://www.patreon.com/NewSpeciesPod
14:15
September 13, 2022
A New Species of Ambrosia Beetle with Rachel Osborn
A New Species of Ambrosia Beetle with Rachel Osborn
 What's an ambrosia beetle? How do you go about finding one? Learn all of this and more as we interview Dr. Rachel Osborn of the A.J. Cook Arthropod Research Collection at Michigan State University. She'll take us on an adventure with a tribe of beetles about the size of a grain of rice, and reveal a newly-discovered clue to their evolutionary history. Dr. Rachel Osborn’s paper “New Xyleborine (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae) Genus With an Afrotropical-Neotropical Distribution” is in Volume 6, Issue 4 of Insect Systematics and Diversity.  It can be found here: https://doi.org/10.1093/isd/ixac016 New Species: Xenoxylebora pilosa, Xenoxylebora addenda, Xenoxylebora calculosa, Xenoxylebora hystricosa, Xenoxylebora serrata, and Xenoxylebora sulcata (Osborn, Smith & Cognato). Episode Image courtesy of Rachel Osborn If you would like to learn more about Dr. Osborn and her work, you can follow her on twitter @rachelkosborn Be sure to follow New Species on Twitter (@PodcastSpecies) and like the podcast page on Facebook (www.facebook.com/NewSpeciesPodcast) Music in this podcast is "No More (Instrumental)," by HaTom (https://fanlink.to/HaTom).  If you have questions or feedback about this podcast, please e-mail us at NewSpeciesPodcast@gmail.com If you would like to support this podcast: https://www.patreon.com/NewSpeciesPod
23:12
August 30, 2022
S02 Episode 9: A new spring-snail species from the Belasitsa Mountains!
S02 Episode 9: A new spring-snail species from the Belasitsa Mountains!
Dilian Georgiev is an Associate Professor in the department of Ecology and Environmental Protection at The Paisii Hilendarski University of Plovdiv. In this episode, he tells Zoe about his recent paper in volume 44 of Historia naturalis bulgarica, in which he and his coauthors describe a new species of spring-snail from the Belasitsa Mountains in South-West Bulgaria. He describes spring-snail evolution, tells us some stories about caving, and shares some wise words about the importance of conservation. The title of the paper is "Bythinella fabiae n. sp., a new spring-snail species (Gastropoda: Rissooidea) from the Belasitsa Mountains, South-West Bulgaria." The paper can be found here: https://doi.org/10.48027/hnb.44.041 Be sure to follow New Species on Twitter (@PodcastSpecies), like the podcast page on Facebook (https://www.facebook.com/NewSpeciesPodcast), and music in this podcast is "No More (Instrumental)," by HaTom (https://fanlink.to/HaTom). If you have questions or feedback about this podcast, please e-mail us at NewSpeciesPodcast@gmail.com If you would like to support this podcast: https://www.patreon.com/NewSpeciesPodcast
22:01
June 21, 2022
S2, E08: Two episodes in one! First, a new Taylor Swift millipede, then ectoparasites and mites!
S2, E08: Two episodes in one! First, a new Taylor Swift millipede, then ectoparasites and mites!
Dr. Derek Hennen works for the Virginia Department of Agriculture as the Slow the Spread Coordinator monitoring the spongy moth populations in the state. He talks to co-host Brian Patrick about his paper inthe April 15th issue of ZooKeys in which he and his coauthors describe 17 new species of millipedes from the eastern United States. We discuss this massive work on millipedes from eastern US, and particularly the group restricted to the Appalachians, how to find millipedes, and how a species named after Taylor Swift got its name! The title of the paper is “A revision of the wilsoni species group in the millipede genus NannariaChamberlin, 1918 (Diplopoda, Polydesmida, Xystodesmidae).” The paper is currently available here: https://zookeys.pensoft.net/article/73485/ To learn more about Derek, follow him on Twitter, @derekhennen, or his millipede account, @DearMillipede. Ricardo Bassini-Silva is an acarologist and post-doctoral researcher in the Department of Pathology at the Universidade Estadual Paulista in Saő Paulo, Brazil. In this episode, he tells us about the new genus of mites he and his coauthors have published in their recent paper in the April issue of the Journal of the Proceedings of the Entomological Society of Washington. We discuss the diversity of mites, the process of taxonomic reclassification, and the wonderful world of ectoparasitism. The title of the paper is “A New Genus for Euschoengastia chisosensis Wrenn, Baccus, and Loomis, 1976 (Trombidiformes: Trombiculidae).” The paper is currently available here: https://doi.org/10.4289/0013-8797.123.4.693 To learn more about Ricardo Bassini-Silva and his work, follow him on instagram @RicardoBassini. Be sure to follow New Species on Twitter (@PodcastSpecies), like the podcast page on Facebook (https://www.facebook.com/NewSpeciesPodcast), and music in this podcast is "No More (Instrumental)," by HaTom (https://fanlink.to/HaTom). If you would like to support this podcast: https://www.patreon.com/NewSpeciesPodcast
37:00
May 31, 2022
S2, E07: New species of vampire worms from the deep ocean!
S2, E07: New species of vampire worms from the deep ocean!
Kaila Pearson just graduated with her Master’s from the Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California San Diego. She’s here today to talk to me about her paper in the April 22nd issue of Zootaxa in which she and her coauthor describe three new species of deep sea vampire worms. We discuss how life exists without any sunlight, how to collect worms that are a mile (or two!) deep in the ocean, the difference between a deep ocean vent and a seep, why they’re called vampire worms, and how these species got their names! The title of the paper is “Vampire Worms: A revision of Galapagomystides (Phyllodocidae, Annelida), with the description of three new species.” The paper is currently available here: https://www.mapress.com/zt/article/view/zootaxa.5128.4.1 To learn more about Kaila, follow her on Instagram, @kailacoconut. Be sure to follow New Species on Twitter (@PodcastSpecies), like the podcast page on Facebook (https://www.facebook.com/NewSpeciesPodcast), and music in this podcast is "No More (Instrumental)," by HaTom (https://fanlink.to/HaTom). If you would like to support this podcast: https://www.patreon.com/NewSpeciesPodcast
30:49
May 25, 2022
S2, E06: A new spider from Madagascar!
S2, E06: A new spider from Madagascar!
Brogan Pett is our guests and he talks about his recent paper in which he and his coauthor describe a new species of spider from Madagascar in the March 14th issue of Zootaxa. Brogan is a doctoral researcher in the Centre for Ecology and Conservation at the University of Exeter in the UK. Additionally, Brogan serves as the research director of SpiDervERse, a workgroup of the Belgian nonprofit organization Biodiversity Inventory for Conservation (BINCO). We discuss these unique spiders, their less explored habitat, and the incredible undescribed diversity of this group of spiders in Madagascar! The title of the paper is “A new species of Copa (Araneae: Corinnidae: Castianeirinae) from dry forests in the north west of Madagascar.” The paper is currently available here: https://www.mapress.com/zt/article/view/zootaxa.5115.2.7 To learn more about Brogan Pett, follow him on Twitter, @broganConBio, and follow the Biodiversity Inventory for Conservation (BINCO), @BINCOnpo. Be sure to follow New Species on Twitter (@PodcastSpecies), like the podcast page on Facebook (https://www.facebook.com/NewSpeciesPodcast), and music in this podcast is "No More (Instrumental)," by HaTom (https://fanlink.to/HaTom). If you would like to support this podcast: https://www.patreon.com/NewSpeciesPodcast
28:49
April 27, 2022
S2, E05: A new species of underground frog with a nose like a tapir!
S2, E05: A new species of underground frog with a nose like a tapir!
In this episode, Zoe interviews Germán Chávez, Associate Researcher at the Instituto Peruano de Herpetologia and the Centro de Ornitología y Biodiversidad in Lima, Peru. His newly described frog is in the paper “A needle in a haystack: Integrative taxonomy reveals the existence of a new small species of fossorial frog (Anura, Microhylidae, Synapturanus) from the vast lower Putumayo basin, Peru” in the February 16th issue of the Journal of Evolutionary Systematics. (Link: https://evolsyst.pensoft.net/article/80281/element/8/4930//). Germán describes the special adaptations of fossorial frogs, the epic journey he and his team took to collect their first specimens, and how this special little frog was named by its community. To learn more about Dr. Chávez and his work, follow his institutions on Twitter: Instituto Peruano de Herpetologia (@IPHperu) and the Centro de Ornitología y Biodiversidad in Lima (@PeruCORBIDIteam). Be sure to follow New Species on Twitter (@PodcastSpecies), like the podcast page on Facebook (https://www.facebook.com/NewSpeciesPodcast), and music in this podcast is "No More (Instrumental)," by HaTom (https://fanlink.to/HaTom). If you would like to support this podcast: https://www.patreon.com/NewSpeciesPodcast
27:29
April 14, 2022
S2, E04: Huge woolly flying squirrels from the Himalayas!
S2, E04: Huge woolly flying squirrels from the Himalayas!
Zoe interviews Kris Helgen, Chief Scientist and Director of the Australian Museum Research Institute. They discuss how one species became three, what makes these animals unique, and what other questions scientists could ask about them in the future. This paper is in the Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society’s February 2022 issue, “Across the great divide: revision of the genus Eupetaurus (Sciuridae: Pteromyini), the woolly flying squirrels of the Himalayan region, with the description of two new species.” A copy of the paper is available here: https://academic.oup.com/zoolinnean/article/194/2/502/6287636 To learn more about Kris, follow him on Twitter: @khelgen Be sure to follow New Species on Twitter (@PodcastSpecies), like the podcast page on Facebook (https://www.facebook.com/NewSpeciesPodcast), and music in this podcast is "No More (Instrumental)," by HaTom (https://fanlink.to/HaTom). If you would like to support this podcast: https://www.patreon.com/NewSpeciesPodcast
29:09
March 15, 2022
S2, E03: New crustaceans from Africa and a new frog species from Panama!
S2, E03: New crustaceans from Africa and a new frog species from Panama!
Two interviews in this episode! First, Agata Szwarc from the University of Gdansk in Poland talks about her recent paper in the December 9th(2021) issue of Zookeys in which she and her coauthors describe two new species of ostracod crustaceans from Africa! She talks with cohost Zoe Albion about these unusual crustaceans that live in temporary pools of water (very fast lives!), why they’re important to the southern Africa food chain, their asexual lifestyle, and how to find these unique and tiny organisms. The title of her paper is “Two new Cypridopsinae Kaufman, 1900 (Crustacea, Ostracoda) from southern Africa.” The paper is currently available Open Access here: https://zookeys.pensoft.net/article/76123/ The second interview with Dr. Abel Batista discusses a new species of rainfrog from Panama published in the January 10th issue of the ZooKeys. Dr. Batista is a researcher at Universidad Autonoma de Chiriqui in Panama and was the guest for Season 1, Episode 15! During this interview, we talk about cloud forests in Panama, frogs guarding eggs, and the difficulties of finding these frogs. The title of the paper is “A new rainfrog of the genus Pristimantis (Anura, Brachycephaloidea) from central and eastern Panama.” The paper is currently available Open Access here: https://zookeys.pensoft.net/article/63009/ To learn more about Dr. Batista, follow him on Twitter, @abelbatistapty, or multiple places on Instagram (@abelbat, @fundación_los_naturalistas, @goherpingpanama). Be sure to follow New Species on Twitter (@PodcastSpecies), like the podcast page on Facebook (https://www.facebook.com/NewSpeciesPodcast), and music in this podcast is "No More (Instrumental)," by HaTom (https://fanlink.to/HaTom). If you would like to support this podcast: https://www.patreon.com/NewSpeciesPodcast
28:29
March 01, 2022
S2, E02: A new amphipod from Japan!
S2, E02: A new amphipod from Japan!
Dr. Kris White and Sally Sir are our guests as they talk about their paper in which they describe a new species of amphipod from Japan in the February 1st issue of Zootaxa. Ms. Sir is an undergraduate at Georgia College and State University, and Dr. White is an Assistant Professor of Biology in the Department of Biological and Environmental Sciences at GCSU.  We discuss what an amphipod is (because not everybody seems to know that!), where they generally live, how they were found, their role in ecosystems as food and bioindicators, and the joys of dissecting very tiny specimens to draw pictures! The title of the paper is “Maerid amphipods (Crustacea: Amphipoda) from Okinawa, Japan with description of a new species.” The paper is currently available here: https://www.mapress.com/zt/article/view/zootaxa.5000.5.6 Be sure to follow New Species on Twitter (@PodcastSpecies), like the podcast page on Facebook (https://www.facebook.com/NewSpeciesPodcast), and music in this podcast is "No More (Instrumental)," by HaTom (https://fanlink.to/HaTom). If you would like to support this podcast: https://www.patreon.com/NewSpeciesPodcast
26:35
February 15, 2022
S2, E01: Two new species of frogs from Ecuador!
S2, E01: Two new species of frogs from Ecuador!
Dr. Juan Reyes-Puig is a Coordinator of Ecological Reserves with the Fundacion EcoMinga Red de Protection des Bosques Amenazados in Ecuador. He talks to me about his paper published in the January 10th issue of the ZooKeys in which he and his coauthors describe two new species of frogs! We discuss where these frogs live, how they were found, the importance of ecological reserves in Ecuador, and frog life without tadpoles! The title of the paper is “Strong differentiation between amphibian communities on two adjacent mountains in Upper Rio Pastaza watershed of Ecuador, with descriptions of two new species of terrestrial frogs.” The paper is currently Open Access and available here: https://zookeys.pensoft.net/article/71488/ Be sure to follow New Species on Twitter (@PodcastSpecies), like the podcast page on Facebook (https://www.facebook.com/NewSpeciesPodcast), and music in this podcast is "No More (Instrumental)," by HaTom (https://fanlink.to/HaTom). If you would like to support this podcast: https://www.patreon.com/NewSpeciesPodcast
22:08
February 01, 2022
Episode 30: Planthoppers are the mosquitoes of the plant world, and collecting in Costa Rica!
Episode 30: Planthoppers are the mosquitoes of the plant world, and collecting in Costa Rica!
Dr. Brian Bahder is an Assistant Professor at the University of Florida’s Fort Lauderdale Research and Education Center. He talks to me about his paper published in the September 6 issue of the Zootaxa in which he and his coauthors describe a new species of planthopper! We discuss what planthoppers are, how they can spread plant diseases, planthoppers as the mosquitoes of the plant world, how easy it is to find new planthopper species, and the strange joke behind the name of this new species! The title of the paper is “A new species of planthopper in genus Herpis (Hemiptera: Derbidae) from lowland tropical rainforest in Costa Rica.” The paper is currently Open Access and available here: https://www.mapress.com/zt/article/view/zootaxa.5032.1.7 To learn more about Dr. Brian Bahder, visit his lab’s website: https://www.bahderlab.com/ For pictures of leafhoppers and planthoppers, check out these links: Planthopper: https://uwm.edu/field-station/acanalonia-planthoppers/ Leafhopper: https://citybugs.tamu.edu/test-home-page/leafhopper-2/ To learn more about the Fort Lauderdale Research and Education Center, follow them on Twitter (@UFIFASftlaudREC), Facebook (https://www.facebook.com/UF.IFAS.FLREC), or their website (https://flrec.ifas.ufl.edu/). Be sure to follow New Species on Twitter (@PodcastSpecies), like the podcast page on Facebook (https://www.facebook.com/NewSpeciesPodcast), and music in this podcast is "No More (Instrumental)," by HaTom (https://fanlink.to/HaTom). If you would like to support this podcast: https://www.patreon.com/NewSpeciesPodcast
29:57
September 14, 2021
Episode 29: Fossil mammaliaforms that walked the Earth with dinosaurs!
Episode 29: Fossil mammaliaforms that walked the Earth with dinosaurs!
Dr. Elsa Panciroli, a Leverhulme Early Career Research Fellow at the Oxford University Museum of Natural History in England, and associate researcher at National Museums Scotland, is my guest this week. She’s also the author of a new book called Beasts Before Us: the Untold Story of Mammal Origins and Evolution, which is coming out in the US on September 7th, 2021. She talks to me about her paper published in the Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society in which she and her coauthors describe a species of an extinct mammaliaform, as well as a new genus, all from the British Isles! We talk about early mammals that roamed Earth with dinosaurs, what the world may have looked like when these organisms and dinosaurs roamed the planet, the joys of looking for fossils on the Isle of Skye, how to see bones embedded in rock, teeth that look like mountains, “mammals the size of pit bulls” that ate baby dinosaurs, pictures of a book in a nook! The title of the paper is “New species of mammaliaform and the cranium of Borealestes (Mammaliaformes: Docodonta) from the Middle Jurassic of the British Isles.” The paper is currently available open access in the August 2021 issues of the Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society: https://academic.oup.com/zoolinnean/article-abstract/192/4/1323/6118471?redirectedFrom=fulltext To learn more about Dr. Elsa Panciroli, follow her on Twitter (@gsciencelady), or visit her website: https://elsapanciroli.wordpress.com/ For a quick video about this work, be sure to watch this: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KmvN0DrXTTc Be sure to follow New Species on Twitter (@PodcastSpecies), like the podcast page on Facebook (https://www.facebook.com/NewSpeciesPodcast), and music in this podcast is "No More (Instrumental)," by HaTom (https://fanlink.to/HaTom). If you would like to support this podcast: https://www.patreon.com/NewSpeciesPodcast
34:18
August 31, 2021
Episode 28: A new species named because of this podcast (!!) and another after the father of modern medicine!
Episode 28: A new species named because of this podcast (!!) and another after the father of modern medicine!
Alireza Zamani is a Ph.D. candidate at the University of Turku in Finland. He talks to me about his paper published in ZooKeys on August 3 in which he and his coauthor describe a new genus and ten new species of spiders from Iran! We talk about his “habit” of describing new species, why so many undescribed species sit on museum shelves for decades before they’re described, how to assemble a species list for an entire country, a new species named because of this podcast (!!), and a species named after the father of modern medicine! The title of the paper is “A new genus and ten new species of spiders (Arachnida, Araneae) from Iran.” The paper is currently available open access in ZooKeys: https://zookeys.pensoft.net/article/70408/ To learn more about Alireza Zamani, follow him on Twitter (@PersonSpiders), Instagram (alireza.zamani.spider), or visit his website: http://alireza-zamani.com/ Be sure to follow New Species on Twitter (@PodcastSpecies), like the podcast page on Facebook (https://www.facebook.com/NewSpeciesPodcast), and music in this podcast is "No More (Instrumental)," by HaTom (https://fanlink.to/HaTom). If you would like to support this podcast: https://www.patreon.com/NewSpeciesPodcast
30:24
August 17, 2021
Episode 27: Tiny spiders from Central America and a brief discussion of “spider porn” and a species named after a Brazilian soccer team!
Episode 27: Tiny spiders from Central America and a brief discussion of “spider porn” and a species named after a Brazilian soccer team!
Dr. Thiago da Silva Moreira is an Adjunct Faculty at George Washington University in Washington, DC. He talks to me about his recent paper published in the Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society and his descriptions of six new species from Central America and the Caribbean. We discuss common names for linyphiid spiders, web structure, sexual selection of the genitals of these spiders, spider porn as a pickup line (!!), what it’s like trying to find tiny spiders in tropical habitat, a spider named after famed author Neil Gaiman, a species named after a famous Brazilian soccer team, and how describing new species is a scientific hypothesis! The title of the paper is “Systematics of the Neotropical spider genera Jalapyphantes and Selenyphantes and the circumscription of the Pocobletus clade (Araneae: Linyphiidae).” The paper is currently available here: https://academic.oup.com/zoolinnean/article-abstract/192/3/896/6070718?redirectedFrom=fulltext To learn more about Dr. Thiago da Silva Moreira, follow him on Twitter, @tsmoreira, or check out his faculty page or Research Gate page: https://biology.columbian.gwu.edu/thiago-da-silva-moreira https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Thiago-Da-Silva-Moreira Be sure to follow New Species on Twitter (@PodcastSpecies), like the podcast page on Facebook (https://www.facebook.com/NewSpeciesPodcast), and music in this podcast is "No More (Instrumental)," by HaTom (https://fanlink.to/HaTom). If you would like to support this podcast: https://www.patreon.com/NewSpeciesPodcast
33:56
August 03, 2021
Episode 26: The taxonomic impediment, Part II, an interview with the founder of Pensoft Publishing!
Episode 26: The taxonomic impediment, Part II, an interview with the founder of Pensoft Publishing!
Dr. Lyubomir Penev is the Managing Director and Founder of Pensoft Publishing and a Professor of Ecology at the Bulgaria Academy of Sciences in Sofia, Bulgaria. He talks to me about the founding of Pensoft Publishing and the books and journals published by Pensoft, like ZooKeys, a journal often cited in this podcast! We discuss the importance of biodiversity discovery, the causes of and possible solutions to the taxonomic impediment (see Episode 21 for Part I), XML publishing in biodiversity, and the joy of doing science! To learn more about Dr. Lyubomir Penev and Pensoft Publishing, follow Pensoft on Twitter, @Pensoft, or on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Pensoft and visit his biography page: https://pensoft.net/lyubomir_penev Be sure to follow New Species on Twitter (@PodcastSpecies), like the podcast page on Facebook (https://www.facebook.com/NewSpeciesPodcast), and music in this podcast is "No More (Instrumental)," by HaTom (https://fanlink.to/HaTom). If you would like to support this podcast: https://www.patreon.com/NewSpeciesPodcast
32:47
July 20, 2021
Episode 25: Four new species of armored scale insects and working on groups of organisms on which few others want to work!
Episode 25: Four new species of armored scale insects and working on groups of organisms on which few others want to work!
Dr. Scott Schneider is a Research Entomologist in the Systematic Entomology Lab at the USDA’s Agricultural Research Service in Beltsville, MD, USA. He talks to me about his paper published in the June 24 issue of the ZooKeys in which he and his coauthors describe a four new species of armored scale insects! We discuss how these insects can be legless, their economic importance, the possibility that any of us could have inhaled (!!) one of their larvae, why only males can fly, a species who’s nearest relative is found in Africa, how to look at specimens that are 1 mm (or less!) long on microscope slides, and the wise choice to work on a group of organisms that doesn’t interest other people! The title of the paper is “Four new species of Aspidiotini (Hemiptera, Diaspididae, Aspidiotinae) from Panama, with a key to Panamanian species.” The paper is currently Open Access and available here: https://zookeys.pensoft.net/article/68409/ To learn more about Dr. Scott Schneider, visit his website or his Research Gate site: https://www.ars.usda.gov/people-locations/person?person-id=52126 https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Scott-Schneider Be sure to follow New Species on Twitter (@PodcastSpecies), like the podcast page on Facebook (https://www.facebook.com/NewSpeciesPodcast), and music in this podcast is "No More (Instrumental)," by HaTom (https://fanlink.to/HaTom). If you would like to support this podcast: https://www.patreon.com/NewSpeciesPodcast
31:60
July 06, 2021
Episode 24: Huntsman spiders from Madagascar, David Bowie, and collecting spiders the size of dinner plates!
Episode 24: Huntsman spiders from Madagascar, David Bowie, and collecting spiders the size of dinner plates!
Dr. Peter Jaeger is the Head of Arachnology at the Senckenberg Research Institute and Natural History Museum in Frankfurt, Germany. He talks to me about his paper published in the June 10 issue of the Zootaxa in which he describes two new genera and two new species of huntsman spiders! We discuss the large amount of size variation in these spiders, a species named after David Bowie, a specimen collected about the time he was born, the fun of collecting in the jingles of southeast Asia, and why we need to keep looking for new species! The title of the paper is “Two new enigmatic genera of huntsman spiders from Madagascar (Araneae: Sparassidae).” The paper is currently Open Access and available here: https://www.mapress.com/zt/article/view/zootaxa.4984.1.24 To learn more about Dr. Peter Jaeger, visit his website: https://www.senckenberg.de/en/institutes/senckenberg-research-institute-natural-history-museum-frankfurt/division-terrestrial-zoology/section-arachnology/arachnology_team/ Be sure to follow New Species on Twitter (@PodcastSpecies), like the podcast page on Facebook (https://www.facebook.com/NewSpeciesPodcast), and music in this podcast is "No More (Instrumental)," by HaTom (https://fanlink.to/HaTom). If you would like to support this podcast: https://www.patreon.com/NewSpeciesPodcast
30:53
June 29, 2021
Episode 23: Reefs built by a new species of oyster instead of being built by corals!
Episode 23: Reefs built by a new species of oyster instead of being built by corals!
Dr. Graham Oliver is an Honorary Research Fellow at the National Museum of Wales in the UK. He talks to me about his paper published in the June 15 issue of the ZooKeys in which he and his coauthors describe a new species of reef-building oyster! We discuss oyster-built versus coral=built reefs, cementing bivalves (true oysters), oyster clumps that look like cows, whether this new species is invasive to the Arabian Gulf, the difficulty in identifying oysters, and the reluctance to challenge orthodoxy! The title of the paper is “Molecular and morphological systematics of a new, reef-forming, cupped oyster from the northern Arabian Gulf: Talonostrea salpinx new species.” The paper is currently Open Access and available here: https://zookeys.pensoft.net/article/66992/ To learn more about Dr. Graham Oliver, visit his website: https://museum.wales/staff/112/Graham-Oliver/ Be sure to follow New Species on Twitter (@PodcastSpecies), like the podcast page on Facebook (https://www.facebook.com/NewSpeciesPodcast), and music in this podcast is "No More (Instrumental)," by HaTom (https://fanlink.to/HaTom). If you would like to support this podcast: https://www.patreon.com/NewSpeciesPodcast
31:46
June 22, 2021
Episode 22: Four new beetle species and why the term “adventive” should be used more!
Episode 22: Four new beetle species and why the term “adventive” should be used more!
Dr. Adam Brunke is a Research Scientist with Agriculture and Agri-food Canada and the Canadian National Collection of Insects, Arachnids, and Nematodes. He talks to me about his paper published in the June 3 issue of the ZooKeys in which he and his coauthors describe four new species of aleocharine staphylinid rove beetles! We discuss what a rove beetle is, the hyper diversity of rove beetles, the amazing diversity of habitats in which they are found, synonymies in taxonomy, elementary school students finding new species at school, explaining to police about midnight beetle collecting, and getting lost on mountains! The title of the paper is “Integrative taxonomy of Nearctic and Palearctic Aleocharinae: new species, synonymies, and records (Coleoptera, Staphylinidae).” The paper is currently Open Access and available here: https://zookeys.pensoft.net/article/64460/ To learn more About Dr. Adam Brunke, follow him on Twitter, @aj_brunke, or visit his website: https://profils-profiles.science.gc.ca/en/profile/dr-adam-j-brunke Be sure to follow New Species on Twitter (@PodcastSpecies), like the podcast page on Facebook (https://www.facebook.com/NewSpeciesPodcast), and music in this podcast is "No More (Instrumental)," by HaTom (https://fanlink.to/HaTom). If you would like to support this podcast: https://www.patreon.com/NewSpeciesPodcast
31:50
June 15, 2021
Episode 21: The Taxonomic Impediment: a special episode in which we talk about the need for more evolutionary biologists!
Episode 21: The Taxonomic Impediment: a special episode in which we talk about the need for more evolutionary biologists!
Dr. Jason Bond is the Schlinger Chair in Insect Systematics at the University of California - Davis. He talks to me about a special topic of concern—something called the taxonomic impediment, which is the shortage of trained taxonomists and curators needed to identify, describe, catalog, curate, and organize species and species collections around the world. We talk about why there’s an impediment, and possible ways to overcome the impediment. You can follow Dr. Jason Bond on Twitter, @Jason_E_Bond, or visit his faculty page (https://entomology.ucdavis.edu/people/jason-bond) lab’s webpage to learn more about him and the research in his lab: https://www.bondlab.org/ Be sure to follow New Species on Twitter (@PodcastSpecies), like the podcast page on Facebook (https://www.facebook.com/NewSpeciesPodcast), and music in this podcast is "No More (Instrumental)," by HaTom (https://fanlink.to/HaTom). If you would like to support this podcast: https://www.patreon.com/NewSpeciesPodcast
39:05
June 08, 2021
Episode 20: New millipedes from the northwestern US—eighteen (!!) new species in three new genera!
Episode 20: New millipedes from the northwestern US—eighteen (!!) new species in three new genera!
Dr. Bill Shear is a Professor Emeritus in the Department of Biology at Hampden-Sydney College in Virginia. He talks to me about his paper published in the May 24 issue of the Zootaxain which he and his coauthor describe three new genera and eighteen new species of millipedes from the US! We talk about the difference between millipedes and centipedes, the “poor man’s rainforest” in temperate leaf litter, chemical defenses in millipedes, the wonderful biodiversity in soil, the wonderful biodiversity waiting to be discovered just in the US, and about problems with humans removing predators of whitetail deer! The title of the paper is “Three new genera and eighteen new species of miniature polydesmid millipedes from the northwestern United States (Diplopoda, Polydesmida, Polydesmidae).” The paper is currently Open Access and available here: https://www.mapress.com/j/zt/article/view/zootaxa.4975.1.3 Be sure to follow New Species on Twitter (@PodcastSpecies), like the podcast page on Facebook (https://www.facebook.com/NewSpeciesPodcast), and music in this podcast is "No More (Instrumental)," by HaTom (https://fanlink.to/HaTom). If you would like to support this podcast: https://www.patreon.com/NewSpeciesPodcast
33:18
June 01, 2021
Episode 19: New Species—of orchids from Australia that trick gnats into sex!
Episode 19: New Species—of orchids from Australia that trick gnats into sex!
Dr. Noushka Reiter is a Senior Research Scientist at the Royal Botanic Gardens Victoria in Melbourne, Australia. She talks to me about her paper published in the May 13 issue of Phytotaxa in which she and her coauthors describe two new species of orchids from Australia! We talk about why orchids are so popular, gnats trying to have sex with flowers, why orchids need fungi to grow, how to get small wasps to try to mate with random items in your house, and the challenges of finding orchids in southern Australia! The title of the paper is “Two new species of Pterostylis (Orchidaceae; Orchidoidea) from the Sunset Country, Victoria, Australia.” The paper is currently available Open Access here: https://www.mapress.com/j/pt/article/view/phytotaxa.500.3.1 Be sure to follow New Species on Twitter (@PodcastSpecies), like the podcast page on Facebook (https://www.facebook.com/NewSpeciesPodcast), and music in this podcast is "No More (Instrumental)," by HaTom (https://fanlink.to/HaTom). If you would like to support this podcast: https://www.patreon.com/NewSpeciesPodcast
35:13
May 25, 2021
Episode 18: New Species—of semi-aquatic mice from Africa, and getting DNA from a mouse captured 100 years ago!
Episode 18: New Species—of semi-aquatic mice from Africa, and getting DNA from a mouse captured 100 years ago!
Dr. Tom Giarla is an Assistant Professor of Biology at Siena College in Albany, NY. He talks to me about his paper published in the May issue of the Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society in which he and his coauthor describe two new species of semi-aquatic mice from Africa! We talk about catching semi-aquatic mice, a possibly extinct species from which he collected DNA, how to prepare a mammal specimen for a museum collection, and species named after the first prime minister of the Democratic Republic of Congo who was assassinated! The title of the paper is “Integrative taxonomy and phylogeography of Colomys and Nilopegamys (Rodentia: Murinae), semi-aquatic mice of Africa, with descriptions of two new species.” The paper is currently available here: https://academic.oup.com/zoolinnean/article-abstract/192/1/206/5918308?redirectedFrom=fulltext To learn more about Dr. Tom Giarla, follow him on Twitter (@TomGiarla), or visit his website: https://www.tomgiarla.com Be sure to follow New Species on Twitter (@PodcastSpecies), like the podcast page on Facebook (https://www.facebook.com/NewSpeciesPodcast), and music in this podcast is "No More (Instrumental)," by HaTom (https://fanlink.to/HaTom). If you would like to support this podcast: https://www.patreon.com/NewSpeciesPodcast
30:29
May 18, 2021
Episode 17: New Species—of ant spiders from Iran and Turkmenistan, and collecting in mine fields!
Episode 17: New Species—of ant spiders from Iran and Turkmenistan, and collecting in mine fields!
Alireza Zamani is a Ph.D. candidate at the University of Turku in Finland. He talks to me about his paper published in ZooKeys on April 27 in which he and his coauthor describe 17 new species of ant spiders from Iran and Turkmenistan! We talk about names derived from the Persian language, collecting spiders in mine fields, names of new species derived from Persian and Kurdish history, and the amazing biodiversity of Iran! The title of the paper is “Revision of the spider family Zodariidae (Arachnida, Araneae) in Iran and Turkmenistan, with seventeen new species.” The paper is currently available open access in ZooKeys: https://zookeys.pensoft.net/article/65767/ To learn more about Alireza Zamani, follow him on Twitter (@PersianSpiders), Instagram (alireza.zamani.spider), or visit his website: http://alireza-zamani.com/ Be sure to follow New Species on Twitter (@PodcastSpecies), like the podcast page on Facebook (https://www.facebook.com/NewSpeciesPodcast), and music in this podcast is "No More (Instrumental)," by HaTom (https://fanlink.to/HaTom). If you would like to support this podcast: https://www.patreon.com/NewSpeciesPodcast
29:33
May 11, 2021
Episode 16: New Species—of elfin saddle fungus from Mexico!
Episode 16: New Species—of elfin saddle fungus from Mexico!
Dr. Roberto Garibay-Orijel is a researcher at the Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico. He talks to me about his paper published in Phytotaxa on April 23 in which he and his coauthors describe a new species of elfin saddle cup fungus from high altitudes in central Mexico! We talk about edible mushrooms, the difficulties of identifying new species of mushrooms, where monarch butterflies hide during the winter, lightning storms at the top of mountains, how dried mushrooms can look like skulls and bones, and ballistic spores! The title of the paper is “Helvella jocatoi sp. nov. (Pezizales, Ascomycota), a new species from H. lacunosa complex with cultural importance in central Mexico Abies religiosa forests.” The paper is currently available open access in Phytotaxa: https://www.mapress.com/j/pt/article/view/phytotaxa.498.1.1 To learn more about Dr. Garibay-Orijel, visit his website: http://ib.unam.mx/directorio/58 or his Research Gate page: https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Roberto-Garibay-Orijel Be sure to follow New Species on Twitter (@PodcastSpecies), like the podcast page on Facebook (https://www.facebook.com/NewSpeciesPodcast), and music in this podcast is "No More (Instrumental)," by HaTom (https://fanlink.to/HaTom). If you would like to support this podcast: https://www.patreon.com/NewSpeciesPodcast
31:40
May 04, 2021
Episode 15: New Species—of harlequin toad from Panama and the troubles to get one specimen!
Episode 15: New Species—of harlequin toad from Panama and the troubles to get one specimen!
Dr. Abel Batista is a researcher at the Universidad Autonoma de Chiriqui in Panama. He talks to me about his paper published in Zoological Research in which he describes a new species of harlequin toad! We talk about the challenges of finding these environmentally sensitive organisms, the dangers of field work in areas where “narcos” and armed guerilla fighters roam, we listen to the call of this new species, and how threatened and endangered harlequin toads help us understand climate change! The title of the paper is “A new species of Atelopus (Amphibia: Bufonidae) from eastern Panama.” The paper is currently available preprint in Zoological Research: http://www.zoores.ac.cn/en/article/doi/10.24272/j.issn.2095-8137.2020.319 To learn more about Dr. Batista, follow him on Twitter, @abelbatistapty, or multiple places on Instagram (@abelbat, @fundación_los_naturalistas, @goherpingpanama). Be sure to follow New Species on Twitter (@PodcastSpecies), like the podcast page on Facebook (https://www.facebook.com/NewSpeciesPodcast), and music in this podcast is "No More (Instrumental)," by HaTom (https://fanlink.to/HaTom). If you would like to support this podcast: https://www.patreon.com/NewSpeciesPodcast
30:23
April 27, 2021
Episode 14: New Species—of flying tarantulas with eleven eyes that can live for 20 years behind secret doors!
Episode 14: New Species—of flying tarantulas with eleven eyes that can live for 20 years behind secret doors!
Dr. Rebecca Godwin is an Assistant Professor of Biology at Piedmont University in Demorest, Georgia, USA. She talks to us about her paper published in ZooKeys in which she describes 33 new species of trapdoor spiders! We talk about flying tarantulas, the challenges of finding spiders that live underground behind a secret door, the reactions of people in university mailrooms to shipments sent to spider researchers, trapdoor spiders with eleven (or sometimes five?) eyes, and the amazingly long lives of female trapdoor spiders! The title of the paper is “Taxonomic revision of the New World members of the trapdoor spider genus UmmidiaThorell (Araneae, Mygalomorphae, Halonoproctidae).” The paper is in the April 4 issue of ZooKeys: https://zookeys.pensoft.net/issue/3229/ To learn more about Dr. Rebecca Godwin, follow her on Twitter, @8leggedyogi, or Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/rebeccalgodwin, and you can visit her website: https://rgodwin5.wixsite.com/rebecca-godwin Be sure to follow New Species on Twitter (@PodcastSpecies), like the podcast page on Facebook (https://www.facebook.com/NewSpeciesPodcast), and music in this podcast is "No More (Instrumental)," by HaTom (https://fanlink.to/HaTom). If you would like to support this podcast: https://www.patreon.com/NewSpeciesPodcast
32:29
April 20, 2021
Episode 13: New Species—of high mountain jaguar moths and caterpillars that glow (fluoresce, actually)!
Episode 13: New Species—of high mountain jaguar moths and caterpillars that glow (fluoresce, actually)!
National Geographic Explorer Joe Martinez is a Ph.D. student in the McGuire Center for Lepidoptera and Biodiversity in the Florida Museum of Natural History at the University of Florida. He talks to us about his paper published in ZooKeys in which he describes six new species of jaguar moths! We talk about why these are called “jaguar” moths, why do they fluoresce (they glow!) in UV light, and what these moths are doing at high altitudes! The title of the paper is “A new Andean genus, Lafontaineana, with descriptions of four new species and two new Neotropical species of Panthea (Noctuidae, Pantheinae).” The paper is in the April 6 issue of ZooKeys: https://zookeys.pensoft.net/article/56784/ To learn more about Joe Martinez, follow him on Twitter, @Jose_IMartinez, on Instagram @owletmothman, or Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ismaelmartinez.papilioslayer/ Be sure to follow New Species on Twitter (@PodcastSpecies), like the podcast page on Facebook (https://www.facebook.com/NewSpeciesPodcast), and music in this podcast is "No More (Instrumental)," by HaTom (https://fanlink.to/HaTom). If you would like to support this podcast: https://www.patreon.com/NewSpeciesPodcast
28:50
April 13, 2021
Episode 12: New Species—of peacock spider named after a famous fish!
Episode 12: New Species—of peacock spider named after a famous fish!
Joseph Schubert is the Legacy Registration Officer for Entomology and Arachnology at Museums Victoria in Australia. He talks to us about his paper published in Evolutionary Systematics in which he describes a new species of peacock spider! We talk about why these are called “peacock” spiders, how social media platforms like Facebook are helping find new species, and how to find and collect these interesting little jumping spiders! The title of the paper is “Maratus nemo: A new wetland species of peacock spider from South Australia (Araneae, Salticidae, Euophryini).” The paper is in the March 25th issue of the Evolutionary Systematics: https://evolsyst.pensoft.net/article/64922/ To learn more about Joseph Schubert, follow him on Twitter, @arachno_joe, or visit: https://museumsvictoria.com.au/about-us/staff/joseph-schubert/ The first video about peacock spiders by Jürgen Otto: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9GgAbyYDFeg Be sure to follow New Species on Twitter (@PodcastSpecies), like the podcast page on Facebook (https://www.facebook.com/NewSpeciesPodcast), and music in this podcast is "No More (Instrumental)," by HaTom (https://fanlink.to/HaTom). If you would like to support this podcast: https://www.patreon.com/NewSpeciesPodcast
27:12
April 06, 2021
Episode 11: New Species—of African bats and how they help control pests, and how bats help make tequila!
Episode 11: New Species—of African bats and how they help control pests, and how bats help make tequila!
Dr. Bruce Patterson is the MacArthur Curator of Mammals at the Field Museum of Natural History in Chicago. He talks to us about his paper published in the April issue of the Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society in which he and his coauthors describe two new genera and three new species of pipistrelle-like bats! We talk about the ecological importance of bats for pest control, how bats help make tequila, and how we might learn from bats how to live longer! The title of the paper is “A revision of pipistrelle-like bats (Mammalia: Chiroptera: Vespertilionidae) in East Africa with the description of new genera and species.” The paper is in the April issue of the Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society: https://academic.oup.com/zoolinnean/article-abstract/191/4/1114/5903787?redirectedFrom=fulltext To learn more about Dr. Bruce Patterson, visit https://www.fieldmuseum.org/about/staff/profile/66 Be sure to follow New Species on Twitter (@PodcastSpecies), like the podcast page on Facebook (https://www.facebook.com/NewSpeciesPodcast), and music in this podcast is "No More (Instrumental)," by HaTom (https://fanlink.to/HaTom). If you would like to support this podcast: https://www.patreon.com/NewSpeciesPodcast
29:33
March 30, 2021
Episode 10: New Species—of muscid flies from North America, and the thrill of naming new species!
Episode 10: New Species—of muscid flies from North America, and the thrill of naming new species!
Dr. Jade Savage is a Professor of Biology in the Department of Biological Sciences at Bishop’s University in Quebec, Canada. She talks to us about her recent paper published on March 15th in ZooKeys! Dr. Savage and her coauthor, Dr. Vera Sorokina, described 4 new species of muscid flies! We talk about where these flies are found, how she determined that these were new species, how she chose names for the new species, and the pure joy of discovering new species! The title of the paper is “Review of the North American Fauna of Drymeia Meigen (Diptera, Muscidae) and evaluation of DNA barcodes for species level identification in the genus.” The paper is Open Access and in the March 15 issue of ZooKeys: https://zookeys.pensoft.net/article/60393/element/8/3498// To learn more about Dr. Jade Savage, visit her faculty page at Bishop’s University: https://www.ubishops.ca/academic-programs/faculty-of-arts-and-science/natural-sciences-and-mathematics/biological-sciences/faculty/name/jade-savage/ Be sure to follow New Species on Twitter (@PodcastSpecies), like the podcast page on Facebook (https://www.facebook.com/NewSpeciesPodcast), and music in this podcast is "No More (Instrumental)," by HaTom (https://fanlink.to/HaTom). If you would like to support this podcast: https://www.patreon.com/NewSpeciesPodcast
34:12
March 23, 2021
Episode 9: New Species—17 of them—of ant-like spiders from the Afrotropical region.
Episode 9: New Species—17 of them—of ant-like spiders from the Afrotropical region.
Episode 9: New Species—17 of them—of ant-like spiders from the Afrotropical region. Ruan Booysen is a Ph.D. student at Free State University in South Africa. He talks to us about his recent paper published on March 4th in Zootaxa! Mr. Booysen and his coauthor, Dr. Charles Haddad, described 17 new species of ant-like spiders, including one with female reproductive structures that look like a smiley face! We talk about the Afrotropical region, how to name 17 different species, and why these spiders hang around with ants to much that they look like them! The title of the paper is “Revision and molecular phylogeny of the spider genus Micaria Westring, 1851 (Araneae: Gnaphosidae) in the Afrotropical Region.” The paper is in the March 4 issue of Zootaxa:  https://www.mapress.com/j/zt/article/view/zootaxa.4940.1.1  To learn more about Ruan Booysen, visit him on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/booysenruan. Be sure to follow New Species on Twitter (@PodcastSpecies), like the podcast page on Facebook (https://www.facebook.com/NewSpeciesPodcast), and music in this podcast is "No More (Instrumental)," by HaTom (https://fanlink.to/HaTom). If you would like to support this podcast: https://www.patreon.com/NewSpeciesPodcast
26:27
March 16, 2021
Episode 8: New Species—of daddy longlegs named after a Warhammer 40k character, a Twitter challenge for listeners, and new genera and families!
Episode 8: New Species—of daddy longlegs named after a Warhammer 40k character, a Twitter challenge for listeners, and new genera and families!
Dr. Shahan Derkarabetian is a Postdoctoral Fellow in the Department of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology and the Museum of Comparative Zoology at Harvard. He talks to us about his upcoming paper to be published in the next issue of Invertebrate Systematics! Dr. Derkarabetian and his coauthors describe not only two new species, but each new species is in a new genus, and each genus is in a new family! Moreover, we talk about how these species got their names, including a new species named after Abaddon the Despoiler in Warhammer 40,000, acquiring DNA from specimens collected at the time of the signing of the truce of the American Civil War, and why people should care about these small predators of the leaf litter! Dr. Derkarabetian also issues a Twitter Challenge! He wants listeners to send him pictures of daddy longlegs from around the world and he’ll try to identify all of them! Tag him with @sderkarabetian and he’ll try to ID your daddy longlegs! Listen to the challenge at the end of the podcast. The title of the paper is “Phylogenomic re-evaluation of Triaenonychoidea (Opiliones: Laniatores), and systematics of Tiaenonychidae, including new families, genera, and species.” The paper is available free as Open Access through the month of March: https://www.publish.csiro.au/IS/IS20047 To learn more about Dr. Derkarabetian, follow him on Twitter, @sderkarabetian. Be sure to follow New Species on Twitter (@PodcastSpecies), like the podcast page on Facebook (https://www.facebook.com/NewSpeciesPodcast), and music in this podcast is "No More (Instrumental)," by HaTom (https://fanlink.to/HaTom). If you would like to support this podcast: https://www.patreon.com/NewSpeciesPodcast
31:46
March 09, 2021
Episode 7: New Species—of slime-producing hagfishes, including the “ghost” hagfish, from the Galapagos Islands!
Episode 7: New Species—of slime-producing hagfishes, including the “ghost” hagfish, from the Galapagos Islands!
Dr. Doug Fudge, an Associate Professor in the Schmid College of Science and Technology at Chapman University where he heads the Comparative Biomaterials Lab, is our guest for this episode. He talks to us about his paper available as early access in the journal the Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society. Dr. Fudge explains how to find and catch hagfish the important ecological roles of hagfishes, how they produce buckets—yes, buckets!—of slime! The title of the paper is “Review of the hagfishes (Myxinidae) from the Galapagos Islands, with descriptions of four new species and their phylogenetic relationships.” The paper by contacting Dr. Fudge, or by purchasing it from here: https://academic.oup.com/zoolinnean/advance-article-abstract/doi/10.1093/zoolinnean/zlaa178/6125275?redirectedFrom=fulltext To learn more about Dr. Fudge, follow him on Twitter @DouglasFudge, visit his webpage at https://sites.chapman.edu/fudge/. Be sure to follow New Species on Twitter (@PodcastSpecies), like the podcast page on Facebook (https://www.facebook.com/NewSpeciesPodcast), and music in this podcast is "No More (Instrumental)," by HaTom (https://fanlink.to/HaTom). If you would like to support this podcast: https://www.patreon.com/NewSpeciesPodcast
33:39
March 02, 2021
Episode 6: New Species—of cockroach from Tasmania (and they’re huge!)!
Episode 6: New Species—of cockroach from Tasmania (and they’re huge!)!
Shasta Henry, a Ph.D. candidate in entomology in the Discipline of Geography and Spatial Science at the University of Tasmania, is my guest! We discuss the significance of the name given to this new species, why it took 79 years to give this new species a name, how they shoot defensive stuff from their butts, and the importance of cockroaches in natural environments! The title of the paper is “Polyzosteria cockroaches in Tasmania (Blattodea: Blattidae: Polyzosteriinae) represent a new, endemic species, with allopatric alpine and coastal sub-populations.” The paper is published in Zootaxa: https://www.mapress.com/j/zt/article/view/zootaxa.4926.3.4 To learn more about Shasta Henry, you can follow her on Twitter and Instagram, @hybopterashasta. To learn more about Tasmanian Aboriginal names, you can visit http://tacinc.com.au/official-aboriginal-and-dual-names/. To get a copy of this paper, contact Shasta through Research Gate, here: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/349156779_Polyzosteria_cockroaches_in_Tasmania_Blattodea_Blattidae_Polyzosteriinae_represent_a_new_endemic_species_with_allopatric_alpine_and_coastal_sub-populations Be sure to follow New Species on Twitter (@PodcastSpecies), like the podcast page on Facebook (https://www.facebook.com/NewSpeciesPodcast), and music in this podcast is "No More (Instrumental)," by HaTom (https://fanlink.to/HaTom). If you would like to support this podcast: https://www.patreon.com/NewSpeciesPodcast
34:54
February 23, 2021
Episode 5: New Species-- actually, 403 (yes, 403!!) new species of braconid parasitoid wasps from Costa Rica!
Episode 5: New Species-- actually, 403 (yes, 403!!) new species of braconid parasitoid wasps from Costa Rica!
Our guest for this episode, Dr. Michael Sharkey, is a Professor Emeritus. He talks to us about his paper published February 2nd in ZooKeys wherein he describes 403—yes, 403!!!—new species of braconid parasitoid wasps from Costa Rica! Dr. Sharkey explains to us what a braconid wasp is, what a parasitoid is, how he and his coauthors could find 403 new species for a single paper, how to come up with so many names for so many species, and why we all need to know more about these amazing little wasps! The title of the paper is “Minimalist revision and description of 403 new species in 11 subfamilies of Costa Rican braconid parasitoid wasps, including host records for 219 species.” The paper is available free as Open Access: https://zookeys.pensoft.net/article/55600/element/8/2105// To learn more about Dr. Sharkey, visit his webpage at http://www.sharkeylab.org/sharkeylab/MainPage.html. Be sure to follow New Species on Twitter (@PodcastSpecies), like the podcast page on Facebook (https://www.facebook.com/NewSpeciesPodcast), and music in this podcast is "No More (Instrumental)," by HaTom (https://fanlink.to/HaTom). If you would like to support this podcast: https://www.patreon.com/NewSpeciesPodcast
28:21
February 16, 2021
Episode 4: New Species-- of Happy Face spiders in Hawaii!
Episode 4: New Species-- of Happy Face spiders in Hawaii!
Our guest for this episode, Dr. Rosemary Gillespie, is a professor of Environmental Science, Policy & Management, professor in the Division of Insect Biology, and Director of the Essig Museum of Entomology at the University of California - Berkeley. She talks to us about her paper that will be published in the next issue of Invertebrate Systematics wherein she and her coauthors describe *eight* new species of Happy Face spiders from Hawaii. We talk about why these spiders are called Happy Face spiders, how they got to Hawaii, and why they are important in the Hawaiian ecosystem. The title of the paper is “A happy family: systematic revision of the endemic Theridion spiders of the Hawaiian Islands” The paper is available free as Open Access through the month of February at https://www.publish.csiro.au/IS/IS20001. To learn more about Dr. Gillespie, follow her on Twitter @Berkeley_Evolab or Instagram berkeley.evolab, or find her at https://vcresearch.berkeley.edu/faculty/rosemary-g-gillespie. Follow first author on the paper, Adrià Bellvert, on Twitter @AdriaBellvert, or follow the senior author, Dr. Miquel Arnedo, on Twitter @MiquelArnedo. You can also follow Dr. Arnedo’s lab on Twitter @spidersysevo. Be sure to follow New Species on Twitter (@PodcastSpecies), like the podcast page on Facebook (https://www.facebook.com/NewSpeciesPodcast), and music in this podcast is "No More (Instrumental)," by HaTom (https://fanlink.to/HaTom). If you would like to support this podcast: https://www.patreon.com/NewSpeciesPodcast
32:23
February 09, 2021
Episode 3: New Species-- a 60 million year old fossil "alligator" from Texas, USA!
Episode 3: New Species-- a 60 million year old fossil "alligator" from Texas, USA!
Our guest for this episode, Dr. Adam Cossette, is a vertebrate paleontologist and an Assistant Professor of Anatomy working in the College of Osteopathic Medicine at the New York Institute of Technology in Jonesboro, Arkansas.  Dr. Cossette talks to us about his recent description of a 60 million year old fossil that is a new species of “alligator,” Bottosaurus fustidens. We talk about how this fossil from Texas was found in an Iowa museum collection, how fossils form, why calling this an “alligator” isn’t technically correct, how the new species got its name, and how a vertebrate paleontologist becomes an anatomy professor for medical students.  The paper was published in the January issue of the Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society, and the title of the paper is “A new species of Bottosaurus (Alligatoroidea: Caimaninae) from the Black Peaks Formation (Palaeocene) of Texas indicates an early radiation of North American caimanines.”  You can see the abstract of the paper at https://academic.oup.com/zoolinnean/article-abstract/191/1/276/5815831?redirectedFrom=fulltext, or contact Dr. Cossette through his university profile page and ask for a copy that he assure me he is willing to give you for free! https://www.nyit.edu/bio/acossett  Be sure to follow New Species on Twitter (@PodcastSpecies), like the podcast page on Facebook (https://www.facebook.com/NewSpeciesPodcast), and music in this podcast is "No More (Instrumental)," by HaTom (https://fanlink.to/HaTom).  If you would like to support this podcast: https://www.patreon.com/NewSpeciesPodcast 
29:48
February 02, 2021
Episode 2: New Species-- daddy long legs from New Caledonia!
Episode 2: New Species-- daddy long legs from New Caledonia!
Our guest for this episode, Dr. Gonzalo Giribet, is an invertebrate biologist working at the Museum of Comparative Zoology at Harvard, where he is Curator of Invertebrates and Professor of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology. Gonzalo is the first author of a recent paper about four new species of daddy long legs (also called harvestmen or opilionids) from New Caledonia! We learn that these harvestmen are—at the most—only a couple of millimeters long, how new species are named, and why we should care about new species—even ones that are so small! The paper was published in Invertebrate Systematics (Vol 35, pages 59-89), with the title "A revised phylogeny of the New Caledonian endemic genus Troglosiro (Opiliones: Cyphophthalmi: Troglosironidae) with the description of four new species." The paper may be viewed here, and downloaded for free for the month of February, 2021: https://www.publish.csiro.au/IS/IS20042 For more information about Dr. Giribet, you can follow him on Twitter (@ggiribet), visit his website (https://oeb.harvard.edu/people/gonzalo-giribet), or read about him on Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gonzalo_Giribet)! Be sure to follow New Species on Twitter (@PodcastSpecies), like the podcast page on Facebook (https://www.facebook.com/NewSpeciesPodcast), and music in this podcast is "No More (Instrumental)," by HaTom (https://fanlink.to/HaTom). If you would like to support this podcast: https://www.patreon.com/NewSpeciesPodcast
29:47
January 26, 2021
Episode 1: New Species-- or new genus? Tiny frogs from Southeast Asia!
Episode 1: New Species-- or new genus? Tiny frogs from Southeast Asia!
Our guest for this episode, Dr. Mark Scherz, is one of the authors of a recent paper about a new genus (!!) of tiny frogs, Nanohyla, from Southeast Asia, the "pygmy narrow-mouthed frogs."  We learn about these amazing frogs that are 10 - 15 millimeters (about a half inch) long, get to listen to the call of a possibly new species of frog, and talk with Dr. Scherz about how to decide that a new genus is needed for this group of frogs.  Additionally, Dr. Scherz discusses why it's important for people to know about these frogs, and some possible applications of the knowledge of such tiny animals may provide!   The paper was published in Zoosystematics and Evolution (Vol 97(1), pages 21-54), with the title "Consequences of parallel miniaturisation in Microhylinae (Anura, Microhylidae), with the description of a new genus of diminutive South East Asia frogs." The paper may be viewed and downloaded for free (open access) here: https://zse.pensoft.net/article/57968/   You can follow Dr. Scherz on Twitter (@MarkScherz) or visit his website (http://www.markscherz.com), and follow his podcast, Squamates (@SquaMatesPod), on Twitter, or visit his podcast website, squamatespod.com.   Be sure to follow New Species on Twitter (@PodcastSpecies), like the podcast page on Facebook (https://www.facebook.com/NewSpeciesPodcast), and music in the Introduction of this podcast is "No More (Instrumental)," by HaTom (https://fanlink.to/HaTom).   If you would like to support this podcast: https://www.patreon.com/NewSpeciesPodcast  
34:14
January 20, 2021