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Dogs Are Smarter Than People via Anchor

Dogs Are Smarter Than People via Anchor

By Carrie Jones
Welcome to Dogs are Smarter Than People with NYT and internationally bestselling quirky human author Carrie Jones, her slightly more normal husband, Shaun, and their dogs. Life tips. Writing tips. Dog noises. It's all here.
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How To Invest In The Most Important Thing In Your Writing Career
Here’s the spoiler: The Most Important Thing You Have In Your Writing Career Is You We know! We know! You were probably hoping for a cool app, or the perfect book about plot beats, but nope. It’s you. You can’t write if you don’t exist. You write best when you’re doing pretty fine. So here are the ways to actually invest in yourself. Stay healthy for your brain It’s pretty hard to write when you feel like crap because when your brain is all broken. As Harvard Healthbeat says, “First it is important to remember that you need a healthy body to have a healthy brain.” How do you do that? According to Harvard: Step 1: Eat a plant-based diet Step 2: Exercise regularly Step 3: Get enough sleep Step 4: Manage your stress Step 5: Nurture social contacts Step 6: Continue to challenge your brain Stay happy or at least okay. Relationships matter. Stay happy or at least okay. Relationships matter. Your relationships with other people are really important. They help you evolve. There’s a thing called the dependency paradox. As Kyle Benson writes, “Our partners powerfully affect our ability to thrive in life. They influence how we feel about ourselves, what we believe we are capable of, and they ultimately impact our attempts to achieve our dreams. “Even Mr. Self-Actualization (Abraham Maslow) himself argued that without bonds of love and affection with others, we cannot go on to achieve our full potential as human beings. “Once we choose a partner, there is no question about whether dependency exists or not. It always does. “Countless studies show that once we become intimately attached to another human being, the two of us form one physiological being. “Our partner regulates our blood pressure, our heart rate, our breathing, and the level of hormones in our blood. The emphasis of independence in adult relationships does not hold water from a biological perspective.” There’s a link to Kyle’s post in our notes and it’s just so good, but the part that really rings true for writers and other creatives is this: “When a partner is supportive, we are more willing to explore and our self-esteem and confidence gets a boost, which allows us to go after our deepest desires. This not only improves the quality of our lives, but it also deepens and enhances our satisfaction within the relationship and our physical health. “But as many of us know, sometimes our exploration leads to failure, rejection, and painful experiences. When these bad events happen, our biological programming creates anxiety that leads us to seek proximity (physically and/or psychologically) with the person we love. “If they are supportive during this stage, our stress will go down and we cope with our problems faster, which ultimately leads us to overcome the problem and continue to go after our deepest desires.” So find those supportive partners and get rid of the rest! The rest of the hints are over here!  SHOUT OUT! The music we’ve clipped and shortened in this podcast is awesome and is made available through the Creative Commons License. Here’s a link to that and the artist’s website. Who is this artist and what is this song?  It’s “Summer Spliff” by Broke For Free.
21:13
November 24, 2020
Make Your Books Like Wedgies and Commitment is Not a Dirty Word or Is It?
Seriously. The best books are like wedgies. You can’t ignore them. They get right up inside you and into places they aren’t supposed to go. And sometimes it’s hard to get them out. This week Carrie talked to a lot of her writers about how if you don’t long to write your scenes, your readers probably aren’t going to long to read those scenes either. And recently the New York Times talked to Steve Martin (actor, writer, comedian) about books. He’s allegedly addicted to audiobooks, which is cool. He said, “I’m also a sucker for the magic of opening paragraphs. I’ll never understand what the sorcery is in literature and movies that engages you immediately and makes it impossible to look away.” A wedgie engages you immediately. And a book can do that too, sometimes. But sometimes it’s not like a wedgie; it’s more like a bad 8-hour Zoom meeting about land use ordinances and setback requirements in a town you’ll never visit. So how do you keep your book from being boring? You wedgify it. Yes, we made up that word. HOW DO YOU WEDGIFY A BOOK? You go all in. Make the conflict as big as possible. You have dynamic scenes where things happen. Not just the character’s meandering thoughts about Zoom meetings. You make us care. Wedgies matter because your bum matters. WRITING TIP OF THE POD Go all in with your stories. Make the conflict (internal or external) huge, presidential huge. But more than that, make us care about who the conflict is happening to. DOG TIP FOR LIFE Won't fit here! Go check it out here But it's all about commitment. Shaun gets testy!  SHOUT OUT! The music we’ve clipped and shortened in this podcast is awesome and is made available through the Creative Commons License. Here’s a link to that and the artist’s website. Who is this artist and what is this song?  It’s “Summer Spliff” by Broke For Free.
22:40
November 17, 2020
Is Passion a Bad Choice? A Job A Career or a Calling.
This week during the blitz of U.S. election news, there was an article gaining some traction called “Seven Life Lessons Everyone Should Learn Sooner Rather Than Later” by Nicholas Cole who Carrie wants to call Nicholas Cage because she is old like that. Carrie has a tendency to hate these kind of articles because she thinks they are trite and insipid. But his first point hit home. It was, “If you want to ‘do what you love,’ you have to work three times as hard as everyone else.” N.Cole“Most people do not get to spend their lives doing whatever it is they love. Instead, they do what they are told they should do or what their parents or town or friends or peers suggest that they do. Or they simply pursue nothing close to their heart at all.” Is this you? Do you love something? Do you do it? He said, “But if you want to do what you love, you need to see that as a privilege, not an expectation.” Which is interesting. What does that mean, right? Carrie does what she loves. But to be fair, Carrie loves everything she does whether it’s being a YMCA gymnastics coach, a church secretary, a student, a newspaper editor. “I love all the things,” Carrie says. Cole never says anything about his assertion that you have to work three times harder to do what you love. And we're not sure where that comes from because he doesn’t source anything. It might just be a generalization, but we wanted to make sure. WORST CAREER ADVICE EVER? Despite an exhaustive internet search of five minutes, we couldn’t find anything that backed Cole’s assertion, but we did find an article by Jeff Haden, which said the worst career advice is to do what you love. He quotes Cal Newport, Georgetown University professor and author of So Good They Can't Ignore You: Why Skills Trump Passion in the Search For Work You Love. Cal Newport"Telling someone to follow their passion--from an entrepreneur's point of view--is disastrous. That advice has probably resulted in more failed businesses than all the recessions combined... because that's not how the vast majority of people end up owning successful businesses. "Passion is not something you follow," he adds. "Passion is something that will follow you as you put in the hard work to become valuable to the world." According to Haden, passions are a bad choice because: They take time to cultivate. It’s rare to actually have a career passion. Passion is a side effect of mastery at something. Working hard and improving your skills is more important than finding the perfect job. Haden“Roughly speaking, work can be broken down into a job, a career, or a calling. A job pays the bills; a career is a path towards increasingly better work; a calling is work that is an important part of your life and a vital part of your identity. (Clearly most people want their work to be a calling.) “According to research, what is the strongest predictor of a person seeing her work as a calling? “The number of years spent on the job. The more experience you have the more likely you are to love your work. “Why? The more experience you have the better your skills and the greater your satisfaction in having those skills. The more experience you have the more you can see how your work has benefited others. And you've had more time to develop strong professional and even personal relationships with some of your employees, vendors, and customers.” For the rest of the podcast notes (which don't fit here), check out www.carriejonesbooks.blog
23:08
November 10, 2020
Be Brilliant About Money When It Scares You
ou will find a lot of popular content all about how to make money. There are a lot of random blog articles about HOW I MADE 8 TRILLION DOLLARS IN PASSIVE INCOME A MONTH or 22 AWESOME PASSIVE INCOME IDEAS. Which is lovely. But a lot of us writers are thinking, “What are these even talking about?” What Is Passive Income? Passive income is money that happens and builds from things that already exist. They can be from investments (like you rent a room in your house or an entire house or you open a savings account or CDs). It can also come from the investment of effort and time in something you build. This could be a YouTube channel or your eBook once it’s up and running. It could be affiliate marketing or selling prints of your art. What is Active Income? Active income is money that someone pays you when you do something for them that’s a service. It can be your salary at the grocery store. It could be an hourly wage at a bookstore. It could be a commission. It could be a tip. So what’s all this have to do with writing? According to a study by the Authors Guild, the average full-time writer’s median pay was $20,300 in 2017. That’s full-time. For most of us that’s not a big ton of money. There’s no real standardization of pay and that number doesn’t account for pay discrepencies for sex and race. We go way more into this over on the blog with helpful hints.   SHOUT OUT! The music we’ve clipped and shortened in this podcast is awesome and is made available through the Creative Commons License. Here’s a link to that and the artist’s website. Who is this artist and what is this song?  It’s “Summer Spliff” by Broke For Free. HELP US AND DO AN AWESOME GOOD DEED Thanks to all of you who keep listening to our weirdness on the DOGS ARE SMARTER THAN PEOPLE podcast as we talk about random thoughts, writing advice and life tips. We’re sorry we laugh so much… sort of. Please share it and subscribe if you can. Please rate and like us if you are feeling kind, because it matters somehow. There’s a new episode every Tuesday! HANG OUT WITH US! HEY! DO YOU WANT TO SPEND MORE TIME TOGETHER? JUST CLICK ON THIS LINK AND FIND OUT HOW WE CAN. CARRIE’S TEACHABLE CLASS! I have a quick, pre-recorded Teachable class designed to make you a killer scene writer in just one day. It’s fun. It’s fast. And you get to become a better writer for just $25, which is an amazing deal.
24:46
October 20, 2020
Writing Pet Peeves and Why You Don't Want Writing Tips From Stephen King
Carrie’s number one writing pet peeve is when authors write, "I thought to myself." Seriously. You are always thinking to yourself, sweet writer, unless you’re telepathically communicating to a zombie hamster and then all bets are off. But the thing is that I, Carrie, get why authors like myself do this. It’s because: We’re worried that the reader isn’t going to get what we’re saying. We’re padding our daily word count totals for NaNoWriMo, national novel writing month where you try to write a 50,000-word novel in November. But here’s the thing. Your readers are smart or smart enough to know that when your characters are thinking, they are doing that to themselves and not anyone else. Cut those words, sweeties. Trust the readers. Trust your writing. If you say, “I think” or “I thought,” everyone knows it’s to yourself… unless, you know, telepathic zombie hamsters. So how about you? What are your writing pet peeves? In the podcast we also talk about the "me and my" issue and how you really don't want to say, "I am nauseous."  WRITING TIP OF THE POD Trust your readers. Don’t write down to them. Believe in your words. DOG TIP FOR LIFE You don’t need to be insecure. Be proud of what you’re doing, who you are and what you’re putting down for the world to hear. SHOUT OUT! The music we’ve clipped and shortened in this podcast is awesome and is made available through the Creative Commons License. Here’s a link to that and the artist’s website. Who is this artist and what is this song?  It’s “Summer Spliff” by Broke For Free. HELP US AND DO AN AWESOME GOOD DEED Thanks to all of you who keep listening to our weirdness on the DOGS ARE SMARTER THAN PEOPLE podcast as we talk about random thoughts, writing advice and life tips. We’re sorry we laugh so much… sort of. Please share it and subscribe if you can. Please rate and like us if you are feeling kind, because it matters somehow. There’s a new episode every Tuesday! Thanks so much for being one of the 252,000 downloads if you’ve given us a listen! CHILL WITH US HEY! DO YOU WANT TO SPEND MORE TIME TOGETHER?  JUST CLICK ON THIS LINK AND FIND OUT HOW WE CAN! NEW BOOK ALERT! My little novella (It’s spare. It’s sad) is coming out October 1 and if you pre-order it now, you can get the Ebook for .99 before the price goes up to $2,99. It is a book of my heart and I am so worried about it, honestly. There’s a bit more about it here.
28:02
October 13, 2020
ARE YOU TENSE? Getting the Tension Out of Your Life and Into Your Story
This is a continuation of this week's blogs about adding tension and suspense in your writing. It's a bit short today. Sorry. Or maybe that's a good thing.... Here goes: Is My Voice a Little Tense? Tension in writing can also come from your voice. Not your speaking voice, but your writing voice, your style and your pacing. Author Justine Larabeister has a series of posts on her blogs about how she alternates action-packed scenes/chapters with more introspective scenes. Author William Reynolds calls it a roller coaster ride and says, “It works for pacing your writing as well as your scenes.” I’ve talked about this before especially when I critique things. Sentence length and sound impact the reader’s experience of action and introspection. While we’re having nice introspective wonderings about things to give the reader a break and/or a build-up we can have long, winding sentences wondering if anyone is actually reading this blog post at all and we can also natter on about it for a bit with no white space, and with long-long paragraphs. But… Action comes. And as Reynolds points out: “Sentences are short. Paragraphs too. Maybe there isn’t even time to – Get the picture?” WRITING TIP OF THE POD Short sentences. Short paragraphs. White space. Action verbs. That's what makes it tense, baby. DOG TIP FOR LIFE Don't be tense. Don't add tension to other people's lives. Know how your presence makes other people feel. HEY! DO YOU WANT TO SPEND MORE TIME TOGETHER? JUST CLICK ON THIS LINK AND FIND OUT HOW WE CAN.
17:47
October 6, 2020
Stop Giving a F-Word and Succeed, Writers and Humans
The other night Shaun and I imbibed some alcohol and I declared that to not have a who-gives-a-swear-word attitude is to be compliant. This made Shaun really happy. I said it because I was talking about authors and politics and being afraid to say what you think because you are afraid of backlash. I’ve been listening to a lot of entrepreneurs and marketers who all preach putting your authentic self out there so that your group of supporters are supporting the real you, not some fake, shadow version that’s trying to appeal to everyone. Shaun said “Google authors who struggled and said, ‘F-it, did a 360, and found success.” This was hard to do, actually. There was no nice search results for that. But one thing it brought up was the infamous book called, “The Subtle Art of Not Giving a F*&k.” In the article of the same name (Link is in the podcast notes), Mark Manson wrote, “Chances are you know somebody in your life who, at one time or another, did not give a f- and went on to accomplish amazing feats. Perhaps there was a time in your life where you simply did not give a f- and excelled to some extraordinary heights. I know for myself, quitting my day job in finance after only six weeks and telling my boss that I was going to start selling dating advice online ranks pretty high up there in my own “didn’t give a f-” hall of fame. Same with deciding to sell most of my possessions and move to South America. F-s given? None. Just went and did it.” Our notes are too long to fit here, but you can see them on Dogs are Smarter Than People or Carrie's website.  SHOUT OUT The music we’ve clipped and shortened in this podcast is awesome and is made available through the Creative Commons License. Here’s a link to that and the artist’s website. Who is this artist and what is this song?  It’s “Night Owl” by Broke For Free.
17:22
September 29, 2020
Mayo vs Miracle Whip Ruth Bader Ginsberg and Chill
Ruth Bader Ginsberg died last week and our timelines lit up with people mourning her death and some people exulting in it. Politics are often polarizing, but grief is often communal with people experiencing different amounts and aspects of it, but shared grief can be such a powerful thing. Kindness matters. Even to the dead. Action and beliefs matter. Especially to the still living. No matter what you think of her court decisions, which were meant to heal the ‘fractures in federal law,’ Ginsberg has some very good advice about marriage and words, which is why we’re talking about her now. Back in 2016, Justice Ginsberg wrote about her mother-in-law’s life advice. Ginsberg“’In every good marriage,’ she counseled, ‘it helps sometimes to be a little deaf.’ I have followed that advice assiduously, and not only at home through 56 years of a marital partnership nonpareil. I have employed it as well in every workplace, including the Supreme Court. When a thoughtless or unkind word is spoken, best tune out. Reacting in anger or annoyance will not advance one’s ability to persuade.” Ginsberg talked about how both her mother’s push for her to be independent and her professor’s focus on language influenced her, propelling her to rise in the ranks to become a Supreme Court justice. Ginsberg“At Cornell University, my professor of European literature, Vladimir Nabokov, changed the way I read and the way I write. Words could paint pictures, I learned from him. Choosing the right word, and the right word order, he illustrated, could make an enormous difference in conveying an image or an idea.” Words influence thought influence action. Putting them in the right order? It makes all the difference. She also spoke about the dynamics on the court where nine justices sit, saying, Ginsberg excerpted in the NYT“Despite our strong disagreements on cardinal issues — think, for example, of controls on political campaign spending, affirmative action, access to abortion — we genuinely respect one another, even enjoy one another’s company. “Collegiality is crucial to the success of our mission. We could not do the job the Constitution assigns to us if we didn’t — to use one of Justice Antonin Scalia’s favorite expressions — ‘get over it!’” That might be the best marriage advice of all. WRITING TIP FOR LIFE Your word choice and word order matter. Be selective. DOG TIP FOR LIFE Getting over it allows you to feel better and make your relationships stronger. Dwelling is never a good move. And selective hearing? Giving yourself time to react so that you don't act rashly? Always a wise choice. SHOUT OUT The music we’ve clipped and shortened in this podcast is awesome and is made available through the Creative Commons License. Here’s a link to that and the artist’s website. Who is this artist and what is this song?  It’s “Summer Spliff” by Broke For Free.
15:49
September 22, 2020
Dear Bully, You Are Ruining Things Because We Are Awesome And You Are Not
About nine years ago, DEAR BULLY, the anthology of authors telling their stories of being bullied, or standing by, or being bullies was released. Carrie was the co-editor for this anthology. And I am so proud of all the authors in there. HEY YOU! AUTHORS! I AM PROUD OF YOU! For a lot of them, it was a big act of bravery to tell their stories. For a lot of them, it was a big act of bravery just to survive. I was thinking about that right now because our country (The U.S.) is having some major difficulties and bullying is the norm despite all the efforts and advocacy that happened back in 2009. And there are truths in every single story of that anthology that resonate. Those truths are that pain is real, that actions and words can shatter us, that it's hard to remember how awesome you are when people are telling you that you aren't. And there are differences in the experiences too. Some authors hurt more than others. Some used the experience to try to become stronger. For every one of us, the story is our own, and it is different. But one of the biggest, and greatest truths in those stories is that each and every one of us survived. We all lived to tell our stories. And if you are reading this right now or listening on the podcast that means that you have lived through too. And here's the thing. You must keep on living and fighting and trying to remember that you are awesome even when people are hating on you. People hating you doesn't change that you have worth. People being violent towards you, doesn't mean you don't deserve respect, and tolerance and love. People ignoring you on purpose, doesn't mean that you don't deserve to exist. And the opposite is true. You don't get to hate, to decide other people's worth, to be violent and disrespectful either. We have to be the shiny light that we want in our lives. Writing Tip of the Pod What's this have to do with writing? Well, it was an anthology of true stories from writers that Carrie co-created, but it's also about what makes the best stories. Hint: It's not just having a beginning, a middle, and an end. It's about having a point. It's about believing in something. It's about being honest and having something to say, something that might be hard to say but needs to be out there. Dog Tip for Life Treat everyone the way you want to be treated. It's as simple as that. SHOUT OUT! The music we’ve clipped and shortened in this podcast is awesome and is made available through the Creative Commons License. Here’s a link to that and the artist’s website. Who is this artist and what is this song?  It’s “Summer Spliff” by Broke For Free.
21:19
September 15, 2020
Why You Gotta Hate Like That Bad Guys In Our Writing and Our Lives
This week we’re revisiting the idea of bad guys in our lives and in our writing because lots of us actually have bad people in our writing and our lives. These antagonists run the gamut from people who make us scream at their Facebook posts of Fakeness to actually physically hurting us and our community. Politics is full of making the other party the bad guy. People at work tend to make other employees or bosses the bad guys. We make bad guys everywhere. Sometimes we make entire groups of people the bad guy like this week on Facebook a guy who manages an inn had a post that said, I have a couple staying with us, celebrating their 50th wedding anniversary. The woman came to tell me how she loves the Inn, but has been treated horribly by so many locals. Being told “go home” and have had obscenities shouted at her and her husband. I’ve seen posts in this group and others from people discouraging tourism. My question is.. .Do we want our town to be known as openly hostile towards visitors? Is this how the level of discourse is supposed to be? And the responses were all over the locals. People saying locals were the bad guys. People accepting and expecting that those tourists’ side of the story was right and the locals were the bad guys. This might be true. It might not. It’s like everyone just took one story, without verifying it, accepted it as truth and then jumped on the bad guy wagon. THE QUESTION IS WHY? WHY DO WE DO THIS? I’m sure the original poster believes that woman and that woman may absolutely telling the truth or at least her version of it, but why do we all jump in and take it as reality when it’s hearsay and just that woman’s side of the story. I mean, she obviously doesn’t want to think, “Hey, all these people are swearing at me. Maybe I’m actually doing something wrong.” Instead, she cast herself as the victim and the others as being the bad guys. Which could be entirely accurate. We don’t know. And that’s just it. In real life, a lot of the time, we don’t know. Things aren’t always as simple as good and evil; absolute right and absolute wrong. Although, sometimes it really is. There are certain things that are just evil. One of the biggest questions a lot of new writers have is this: DO I NEED A BAD GUY? Yes. But your bad guy can be yourself or your main character. Like in our random thoughts, Carrie is often showing that she is her own worst enemy. Watching tv gives her anxiety, but she almost always watches tv at night for a couple of hours. HERE ARE THE STEPS: Figure out what your goal or your main character’s goal is. The bad person is whatever stands in the way of your character (or you) achieving your goal. So, in life Carrie is her own antagonist because her goal is to not feel anxious at night, yet she still watches television for an hour or two. That’s an example of an inner-antagonist or bad guy. Also in life, when Carrie doesn’t let Shaun watch American Pickers and makes him watch Pen15 or Teenage Bounty Hunters? She’s Shaun’s external bad guy, keeping him from his goal to chill with those picker guys. WRITING TIP OF THE POD Every story needs conflict. Sometimes that conflict and opposing force (what’s keeping your character from their goal) comes from the character themself. DOG TIP FOR LIFE There are enough bad guys in the world. You don’t have to make them up. The music we’ve clipped and shortened in this podcast is awesome and is made available through the Creative Commons License. Here’s a link to that and the artist’s website. Who is this artist and what is this song?  It’s “Summer Spliff” by Broke For Free.
18:10
September 8, 2020
Flour Tattoos and Hyperbole is the Biggest Danger in the World (That's Hyperbole right there)
So, this woman, Aileen Weintraub on the Huffington Post, has an article that’s headline is, “I’m a Grown Woman and I Still Sleep with a Stuffed Animal.” Aileen Weintraub“George is my deep, dark secret, and I’m sharing our story now in the time of COVID-19 because many of us are quietly struggling.” And the article is sweet and lovely, and poor Aileen had COVID-19 and was terribly sick and was even more stressed because George, her stuffed dog has been with her for thirty years and she didn’t know if her stuffed animal would be able to go with her if she had to come to the hospital. And she was ashamed because stuffed animals are allegedly “transitional objects.” God bless this lady because if George, the stuffed animal in her bed, is her deep dark secret? What a nice life she’s had. WHAT IS HYPERBOLE? Hyperbole is basically defined as an exaggeration that people use to emphasize an effect. It’s extravagant. It’s bullshit. It comes from the Greek word for “excess.” I’m not sure if this ‘deep dark secret’ is hyperbole, but it sure feels like one. And the problem with hyperbole? Is that it’s not truth. It’s inauthentic. It’s the tool of politicians and apparently op-ed writers and we’re all freaking too used to it. We don’t examine the extravagant claims of influencers, writers. Headlines and tweets and speeches and email subject lines are full of them. All the notes for this podcast won't fit here, but if you'd like to see them head over to https://carriejonesbooks.blog/ WRITING TIP OF THE POD Write truth. Write things that resonate. Hyperbole is a great tool, but it shouldn’t be your go-to response. DOG TIP FOR LIFE Don’t hyperbolize the simple stuff. SHOUT OUT The music we’ve clipped and shortened in this podcast is awesome and is made available through the Creative Commons License. Here’s a link to that and the artist’s website. Who is this artist and what is this song?  It’s “Summer Spliff” by Broke For Free.
17:43
September 1, 2020
Marriage is Gross and Just Say Yes!
Carrie has talked about this in her blog before, but we decided that it’s time to talk about it in the podcast thanks to an inspiring presentation writer Sami Main made for the Writing Barn last week. It’s about one of the basic tenents of improv comedy and how you can use that for your writing and/or your life. Do both! Overachieve. Anyway, it's amazing how Patricia Ryan Madson's Improv Maxims, apply to writing and life and love and all that sexy stuff. Her first maxim in Improv Wisdom (New York: Belltower, 2005) is basically, "Say Yes." In improv, when two characters are doing a scene, both characters have to be positive, to say yes to each other's suggestions. If one guy stands up there and says, "Let's go party." And then the other guy says, "No way." Well... the scene falls on its face and everyone goes home saying they hate improv and the improvers think they suck and everything is just BAD, BAD, BAD. So, writing is like that too. When our characters want to take us to new unexpected places in the plot, we just have to go with it. If we don't, our story stagnates. We have to be willing to say "yes," to take risks with our characters and our plots and our language. According to Madson, "Saying 'yes' is an act of courage and optimism; it allows you to share control. It is a way to make your partner happy. Yes expands your world." I could go on about this forever. Like, how we get in ruts. Such as, my characters always have a love interest. And it's always a boy. How cool would it be if the love interest were a cat? Or a hamster? Or a fig tree? Okay. I know. Banned book. Or, how we get into habits with our writing just like we get into habits with our lives. How cool would it be to break a writing habit and make a better writing habit? To get out of the safety of routine, change our process and expand? To just say yes? Writing Tip of the Pod Say yes to new ideas. Don't be in a writing rut or hold to your preconceived notions of what your story or writing life should beDog DOG Tip for Life Try new things. Eat food off the floor. Go for it, humans! SHOUT OUT The music we’ve clipped and shortened in this podcast is awesome and is made available through the Creative Commons License. Here’s a link to that and the artist’s website. Who is this artist and what is this song?  It’s “Night Owl” by Broke For Free. COME WRITE WITH CARRIE! She is a writing coach, has a community/class, and edits for you. Find out more here.  WHERE TO FIND OUR PODCAST, DOGS ARE SMARTER THAN PEOPLE. The podcast link if you don’t see it above. Plus, it’s everywhere like Apple Music, iTunes, Stitcher, Spotify, and more. Just google, “DOGS ARE SMARTER THAN PEOPLE” then like and subscribe. Join the 251,000 people who have downloaded episodes and marveled at our raw weirdness. You can subscribe pretty much anywhere.
15:25
August 18, 2020
What The Heck Do Men Want
So, over at the Good Men Project, they have a story called “Five Traits Men Want in a Partner That We Never Say Out Loud.” As a woman, I (Carrie) find this pretty frustrating. Why do men not say these things aloud? Paul Marsh of the Good Men Project writes: Most of us are just terrified of vocalizing what we want and 1) being laughed at or ridiculed in some capacity, 2) not having our desires taken seriously, or 3) not getting whatever it is we’re seeking. Marsh’s article which is anecdotal and not data-sourced is saying similar things as an earlier article in 2015 by Anthony D’Ambrosio that was in Elite Daily. D’Ambrosio had seven traits/characteristics to Marsh’s five. Marsh writes: The world is realizing that, while we’re deeply flawed, men also have a sensitive side, one chock-full of rich emotions that extend beyond those usually associated with us — like anger. Even companies like Old Spice are rolling out scented bodywashes with lavender and other naturally-derived ingredients that have long been associated with femininity. HERE IS WHAT MARSH SAYS THAT MEN WANT: Tenderness Global listening skills A kind talker Respect which he defines as “being considerate about the desires, feelings, and traits of another person Someone who ‘fights for you.’ D’Ambrosio’s article has reliability and being a best friend on the list as well as being self-aware and a communicator (kind talker and listener). He writes: Remember: You don’t need a “life partner,” “soulmate,” or “the one” to make you a complete, happy, healthy person. You are enough, all on your own. But if you’re dating someone you love, and you’re wondering if they’re your ever after, look out for these seven traits. And Also Remember: These articles are massive generalizations. Not all men want the same things. Not all men have a hard time articulating what they want. Difference and diversity are good things. WRITING TIP OF THE POD What does this have to do with writing? Think about your characters and their entanglements. How do they react when other characters aren’t respectful, tender, good listeners or in their corner? Why does it matter to them? Why doesn’t it? DOG TIP FOR LIFE Be kind. It’s what it’s all about really. SHOUT OUT The music we’ve clipped and shortened in this podcast is awesome and is made available through the Creative Commons License. Here’s a link to that and the artist’s website. Who is this artist and what is this song?  It’s “Night Owl” by Broke For Free. For more about Carrie, check out www.carriejonesbooks.blog
19:41
August 11, 2020
GROWING UP WITH GRIT A BONUS PODCAST INTERVIEW WITH CHANTAL WATTS
Award-winning news producer, blogger, podcaster, human, Chantal Watts is a bit of a force and she joins us on the podcast today and talks about her growing up, which reminds me so much of Jared Leto, and also how to be gritty and strong. She's amazing and I hope you'll check it out. Chantal's Links of Awesome. Chantal's Instagram Full Frontal Nerdity! WHERE TO FIND OUR PODCAST, DOGS ARE SMARTER THAN PEOPLE. The podcast link if you don’t see it above. Plus, it’s everywhere like Apple Music, iTunes, Stitcher, Spotify, and more. Just google, “DOGS ARE SMARTER THAN PEOPLE” then like and subscribe. Join the 251,000 people who have downloaded episodes and marveled at our raw weirdness. You can subscribe pretty much anywhere. This week's episode about poop, dentists, surgery, flavored alcohol and Jung. LAST WEEK’S EPISODE about slug bait, sages and archetypes. Last week’s bonus podcast with Jessica Burkhart! A link to our podcast about fatal errors, scenes, and ghost reaper sauce SHOUT OUT The music we’ve clipped and shortened in this podcast is awesome and is made available through the Creative Commons License. Here’s a link to that and the artist’s website. Who is this artist and what is this song?  It’s “Night Owl” by Broke For Free. COME WRITE WITH ME! I coach, have a class, and edit things. Find out more here. 
21:39
July 30, 2020
Poop, Hate, Dentists, Flavored Booze and Jungian Archetypes
Over the past couple of months, we’ve been talking a lot about archetypes and how you can use them in writing and life, but we’ve failed to discuss where all this talk stems from. It’s all from Carl Jung who is an old, dead, psychology pioneer who didn’t agree with another old dead guy, Sigmund Freud. Jung was about the ‘collective unconsciousness.’ And he thought that in humanity’s collective unconsciousness there were basically twelve archetypes of character. It’s like if we are all part of a video game and the programmer only made twelve basic characters. According to “Exploring Your Mind,” Exploring Your MindTo define his 12 archetypes of personality, Jung studied the symbols and myths of many different cultures. These archetypes represent behavior patterns that make up different ways of being. They’re also cultural symbols and images that exist in the collective unconscious. He defined the 12 Jungian archetypes as an innate tendency to generate images with intense emotional meaning that express the relational primacy of human life. They’re imprints that are buried in our unconscious. These terms define the particular traits that we all have. So here’s the basic rundown of those twelve as related to poop found in the middle of the driveway because how else can you take a new spin on this? Every single psych major has blogged about archetypes. We’re going to do the first six in this podcast and the next six next week. Cool right? It’s like a cliffhanger. Let’s start. Get ready for poop talk. THE SAGE It’s all about being smart and thinking. If someone poops, the sage is going to want to examine the poop, analyze the poop, and probably create a witty yet analytical tweet about the poop. THE INNOCENT The innocent is optimistic that the poop randomly sitting in the middle of their driveway is meant for good. They will be happy that someone was capable of pooping out in the open like that. They will tweet about the goodness of pleasing others and possibly create a self-help book about poop or at least look for one which they will not download illegally but instead buy from a nice local independent bookstore. They might even put up a sign that says, “Feel free to come inside and use the bathroom next time, but no judgement.” For the rest of the text that goes with this podcast, check out Carrie's website. SHOUT OUT The music we’ve clipped and shortened in this podcast is awesome and is made available through the Creative Commons License. Here’s a link to that and the artist’s website. Who is this artist and what is this song?  It’s “Night Owl” by Broke For Free. WHERE TO FIND OUR PODCAST, DOGS ARE SMARTER THAN PEOPLE. The podcast link if you don’t see it above. Plus, it’s everywhere like Apple Music, iTunes, Stitcher, Spotify, and more. Just google, “DOGS ARE SMARTER THAN PEOPLE” then like and subscribe. Join the 250,000 people who have downloaded episodes and marveled at our raw weirdness. You can subscribe pretty much anywhere.
22:34
July 28, 2020
Slug Bait or Sage What Are You
The Sage It’s not the herb; it’s the archetype in writing and maybe in life, although they don’t seem all that common in the real world. Super common in the tarot and astrology and numerology emails Carrie gets. So, what’s a sage? It’s a smarty pants. But it’s also a bit more. According to the individualogist.com, individualogist.com“Unlike other archetypes, the Sage archetype’s education doesn’t cease after graduation. They’re constantly applying themselves and enriching themselves throughout their entire lives. “What drives the Sage archetype is their goal of knowing the truth behind everything. For that reason, majority of the conversations that they have revolve around their questions. This can be disadvantageous for them as they’ll take any form of misinformation as a form of deception. With that being said, they take lies very personally and feel emotionally affected when they discover that what they learned or believed in turns out to be wrong.” According to a page on Masterclass, the sage is: Masterclass“A wise figure with knowledge for those who inquire. The mother figure or mentor is often based on this archetype.” They are smart, curious; they learn their whole life, use their intuition and are sort of addicted to information. Weakness: These people think they know more than the rest of us and they often do and that makes them stubborn in their ideas and a little condescending sometimes. Their challenges? According to the individualogist again, “The Sage archetype needs to confront their fear and hatred for ignorance. It’s important for this archetype to realize that not everyone is able to learn at the pace and with the passion that they possess…. The Sage archetype needs to exercise humility and alter their perceptions of people in general.” They are bit slow to act. The Masterclass site gives examples as:  “Athena (The Odyssey), Obi-Wan Kenobi (Star Wars), Hannibal Lecter (The Silence of the Lambs), The Oracle (The Matrix).” Do you have a Hannibal in your life? WRITING TIP OF THE POD: Use the familiarity of archetypes or subvert them to draw your reader into your story. DOG TIP FOR LIFE: Don’t be a condescending bastard. SHOUT OUT The music we’ve clipped and shortened in this podcast is awesome and is made available through the Creative Commons License. Here’s a link to that and the artist’s website. Who is this artist and what is this song?  It’s “Night Owl” by Broke For Free.
27:16
July 14, 2020
Torturing Barbie: Archetype, Stereotype, or Cliché?
n the past month, we’ve been talking a lot about archetypes and someone asked us what the difference is between an archetype and a stereotype. So here you go, listeners! FIRST UP, ARCHETYPES! According to masterclass.com when it comes to writing an archetype is, Masterclass“An emotion, character type, or event that is notably recurrent across the human experience. In the arts, an archetype creates an immediate sense of familiarity, allowing an audience member to relate to an event or character without having to necessarily ponder why they relate. Thanks to our instincts and life experiences, we’re able to recognize archetypes without any need for explanation.” SO, WHAT’S A STEREOTYPE? It can be positive. It can be negative. But it’s freaking simplistic. And even positive stereotypes can be negative like if you say, “Women are good mothers,” it can be harmful because all women don’t want to be mothers and women aren’t unhappy if they aren’t mothers and some women’s biology doesn’t work for mothering and that doesn’t mean they are unhappy either.  If you go one step further, it equates a woman’s value and role to that biological use. It also makes the assumption that all women are more nurturing and have those motherly positive attributes which means that men don’t. AND WHAT’S A CLICHÉ? It’s something you see so many times in tv, stories, life, that it becomes ultra banal, ultra boring and ultra predictable. The mad scientist. The nerdy, but secretly sexy librarian. The rich old cranky lady. The egotistical warrior. How do you stay away from clichés or stereotypes? You can parody them. You can deconstruct them. You can think about how to subvert them into something unexpected. Can the old rich lady actually be kind and not wear high heels and have a small dog? Can the egotistical warrior not be egotistical and self-effacing and neurotic? Can the nerdy librarian not be secretly sexy but actually overtly sexy in a glam way? WRITING TYPE OF THE POD Think about your main character and the other major ones in your story. Are they normal? Typical? How can you tweak that and surprise the reader? DOG TYPE FOR LIFE How are you a cliché? Are you fulfilling society’s expectations? How can you step out of your role and people’s expectations? SHOUT OUT The music we’ve clipped and shortened in this podcast is awesome and is made available through the Creative Commons License. Here’s a link to that and the artist’s website. Who is this artist and what is this song?  It’s “Night Owl” by Broke For Free. NEW SESSION OF WRITE! SUBMIT! SUPPORT! Write. Submit. Support. for Novelists with Carrie Jones ONLINE These six-month courses offer structure and support not only to our writing lives but also to the roller coaster ride of submissions. We offer support whether you’re submitting to agents or, if agented, you’re weathering submissions to editors. We discuss passes that come in, submissions requests, the feedback we aren’t sure about, where we are feeling directed to go in our writing lives, and more.
29:47
July 7, 2020
Ghost Reaper Hot Sauce Fatal Errors and Scenes Heck Yeah
For all the great stuff about scenes, check out this link or go to carriejonesbooks.blog Writing Tip of the Pod Think about what kind of scene you're building in your story. Do you have too many character or theme scenes in a row? Dog Tip for Life Think about your life. Do you have too many plot scenes going on? Is it all drama? Is there some theme in there too? SHOUT OUT The music we’ve clipped and shortened in this podcast is awesome and is made available through the Creative Commons License. Here’s a link to that and the artist’s website. Who is this artist and what is this song?  It’s “Night Owl” by Broke For Free.
22:39
June 30, 2020
Creators, Dirty Feet, and Archetypes
or the past few weeks, we’ve been talking about writing archetypes for our characters and how they also apply to the real life humans we used to meet and interact with before Covid-19. There are lists out there all over the place about this. Most have slight variations on the number of archetypes or the names of the archetypes. Oh! If you haven’t heard in our past episodes, an archetype is according to MasterClass: MasterClass PeopleAn archetype is an emotion, character type, or event that is notably recurrent across the human experience. In the arts, an archetype creates an immediate sense of familiarity, allowing an audience member to relate to an event or character without having to necessarily ponder why they relate. Thanks to our instincts and life experiences, we’re able to recognize archetypes without any need for explanation. Last week we talked about the seducers, the week before we talked about the misfits and mavericks. This week, we’re going easy on you with the creator. According to MasterClass, the creator is, “A motivated visionary who creates art or structures during the narrative.” They make things! Like writers! They usually have willpower. They are sometimes self-involved. Or they suck at practical things. To read the rest of the notes for this podcast head over to www.carriejonesbooks.com SHOUT OUT The music we’ve clipped and shortened in this podcast is awesome and is made available through the Creative Commons License. Here’s a link to that and the artist’s website. Who is this artist and what is this song?  It’s “Night Owl” by Broke For Free. DOG INSPIRATION Every weekday, our dogs have inspirational or motivating tweets on Carrie’s Twitter. Go check it out and be her Twitter friend.
26:54
June 23, 2020
Are You a Seducer or Do You Fall Out of Cars?
Ah, yes, the archetype. Last week we talked about the misfits and the mavericks because they are sexy as hell. Again, Merriam-Webster says archetype are: Good ole Merriam-Webster“The original pattern or model of which all things of the same type are representations or copies.” Archetypes, according to Tami Nantz, help us understand what makes our characters tick. She says to ask: Tami NantzWhat does he fear? What motivates him? What does he care about most? And while I’m afraid to talk about this on the podcast with Shaun because his mind goes . . . places, this week we’re talking about the seductress. Over on the Reedsy blog, the seductress is explained pretty well. Reedsy blog“I’ll give you whatever you want,” is the refrain of the seductress — a character that comes in all shapes, sizes, and genders. They might offer power, sex, love, money, or influence but remember, these things always come with strings attached. If a seductress is involved, the moral of the tale is almost always, “Don’t believe anything that’s too good to be true.” Strengths: Allure, charisma, lack of morals. Weaknesses: The emptiness of their promises. Desires: Control. Examples: Mephistopheles in Faust, Delilah from Samson and Delilah, 90% of the female characters in The Odyssey. Some more examples would be Mystique in X-Men and Meg in Hercules. Valeria Black, writing for The Writing Cooperative had a very definite take on the Seductress, which seems a wee bit reductive. She said, The Seductress cares deeply about being in the spotlight. She loves attention and the way people fall head-over-heels for her. But most of all, she loves being the most admired woman in the room. Valeria Black If you dig deep enough, she is a child and a dreamer at heart who craves constant stimulation in the quest for her one true love. This hidden quest for lasting love is the main reason why it seems like she strings people along. But in reality it’s because she just gets bored quickly. And this is so cool to think about if you have one of these characters or one of these people in your life. And I think we all know one of these seducer or seductresses, the person who is all about the sexual and physical validation, and doesn’t know what to do without it. Their self-worth comes from capturing as many admiring looks or hearts as possible. They are dependent on other people’s affection and attention. And that makes it hard sometimes for both them and their friends. Their dark side is like the femme fatale like Sharon Stone in Basic Instinct, right? More notes on carriejonesbooks.blog SHOUT OUT The music we’ve clipped and shortened in this podcast is awesome and is made available through the Creative Commons License. Here’s a link to that and the artist’s website. Who is this artist and what is this song?  It’s “Night Owl” by Broke For Free.
27:35
June 16, 2020
Are You a Misfit? What's Your Archetype, Baby?
The Misfits and the Mavericks A lot of writers use archetypes in their stories. Sometimes we don't even realize that we're doing it, actually. There’s something really compelling about the heroes that don’t quite fit in especially the mavericks. The Huck Finns and Han Solos of the world and/or universe. For whatever reason, the mavericks have turned away from civilization. Maybe it’s to find out what happened to their missing mom. Maybe it’s because their own elite family oppressed them and their quirks. Maybe it’s because they are doing a Thoreau and they wanted to see what it was like to be Spartan and nonconformist in a society that stresses conformity above all else. Literary critic, Northrop Frye wrote about mavericks as heroes in novels in the U.S. and said, Northrop Frye“Placed outside the structure of civilization and therefore represents the force of physical nature, amoral or ruthless, yet with a sense of power, and often leadership, that society has impoverished itself by rejecting.” To conform or to not conform has often been the question. Apologies to Shakespeare. And it’s been a question both in American society and in its books, right? How the main character fits into mainstream society is often the subject of some really good and compelling books like Gone With the Wind or To Kill a Mockingbird. They reject conforming. They strike out on their own. The maverick is a character archtype. Here’s the definition of an archetype from studiobinder.com studiobinder.com“An archetype is a consistent and typical version of a particular thing. It can be human, an object, or a particular set of behaviors, but the point is that it fits into a time-tested mold that embodies a pure form.” Anyways, though that site is about scriptwriting, I think it has a lot of great information about writing characters. It asks: studiobinder.com again.“Why do character archetypes exist? “Human beings tend to find their place within a group dynamic based around their strongest personality traits. “You may have a group of friends with similar interests... “But often one will be the “social butterfly” while another will be the "homebody." “Your friends will begin to identify each other by these consistent traits. “You’ve now defined yourself by a character archetype.” The maverick archetype is obviously one of many, but what of their key motivations is the act of self-preservation. They break the rules to get their goals. Brave. Competent. Sometimes a bit snippy. Their temper is a bit fiery. That pull between convention and autonomy has the possibility of making a story truly stick out as something extraordinarily special. Don’t be afraid to lean into it. Are you a maverick? Do you write them?  What's your archetype? We'll be looking at different ones the next few months. It's fun. Writing Tip of the Pod: Don’t make all your characters mavericks, but don’t avoid them either. Have you mixed up the archetypes in your story? Dog Tip For Life: It’s okay to cultivate your own inner maverick. SHOUT OUT The music we’ve clipped and shortened in this podcast is awesome and is made available through the Creative Commons License. Here’s a link to that and the artist’s website. Who is this artist and what is this song?  It’s “Night Owl” by Broke For Free.
21:44
June 9, 2020
We dogs smell poop the way sommeliers smell wine. It's about nuance.
RANDOM THINGS YOU LEARN ABOUT EACH OTHER DURING LOCKDOWN So, in this house we’ve learned a few random things that we didn’t know before we had to isolate ourselves because of the Covid-19 pandemic and these things include some things that were mentioned on Buzzfeed and some that weren’t including: Treasure Hunting For Gray Hair In Other People’s Hair Is Fun. People Hook Up on the Scrabble app and Words With Friends. Sometimes Your Relatives Don’t Close Cabinets. How Much Noise Your Fellow Family Members Including Dogs Make. Your Husband Is More Southern Than You Thought. So, Buzzfeed had this article called, “17 Delicious Cookout Recipes That Will Impress Your Southern Friends and the first thing I thought was, “Do I have southern friends?” And then I remembered I have an entire Southern family and then I was ashamed. But the article was not all that Southern. Do writers think Northern people don’t have BBQ pulled pork, buttermilk fried chicken, BBQ baby back ribs, corn on the cob, fried fish, burgers, baked mac and cheese? And why would Southern people be more impressed by that than Northerners? Like where did this regionally specific food divide even come from? The only southern thing that was on there that Carrie (from the North) didn’t grow up with were collard greens. She even had peach ice tea. They had baked beans on there. Dudes, they are called Boston Baked Beans for a reason. They had potato salad on there. And someone in the comments actually wrote: “This post should probably be changed to the perfect SOUTHERN cookout. Most of these things aren't gonna fly at a cookout in Maine!” All you all, don’t talk about Maine if you’ve never been here. Similarly, give shout-outs to the origins and history of the foods that you’re blogging about because erasure isn’t a cool thing and that goes for socio-economic erasure and ethnic erasure. The foods of different cultures sustain us, build us, bind us, and also reflect our histories–the good and horrible parts. What does this have to do with writing? When you write about regions, think about it from more than your perspective. When you want to add some authenticity into your stories, think about the strange things you learn about your own house and family during lockdowns. Those details and nuance? That’s what makes a story authentic, not a bullshit blog post about how to impress your Southern friends at a cookout or a food post about Kimchi that never mentions it’s a Korean food. Writing Tip of the Pod Be smart. Be detailed. Be full of empathy, but don’t be so full of yourself that you forget the backs and lives and hearts of the people who came before you. That goes not just for writers, but for regular humans, too. Dog Tip for Life Dogs are all about origins and details. According to Sparty, our dog, “We dogs smell poop the way sommeliers smell wine.” It’s all about the nuance. Be about the nuance not the generalization. That’s true about writing and thinking. Smell the bouquet, appreciate the differences. SHOUT OUT The music we’ve clipped and shortened in this podcast is awesome and is made available through the Creative Commons License. Here’s a link to that and the artist’s website. Who is this artist and what is this song?  It’s “Night Owl” by Broke For Free.
23:34
May 19, 2020
Jokes, Stuffies, Imposter Syndrome, And Using Your Weirdness for Good, An Interview with Jose De La Roca
Hey! Welcome to a bonus interview episode of Dogs are Smarter Than People, the usually quirky podcast that gives writing tips and life tips. I’m Carrie Jones and with me today is podcaster, actor and definitely a writer, the amazing Jose De La Roca. Jose has a new book out, START PODCASTING: THE SECRETS OF A RADIO BROADCAST ENGINEER. Jose has more than 17 years of radio broadcasting experience and now he shares with you all the secrets he knows about podcasting. Jose say he is a dad first, talking monkey second, and a writer. He wrote a great book called How to be a Dad without a Dad and he’s worked for radio stations and streaming apps and I’m a little intimidated. His YouTube Channel has a lot of stuffies and he's in charge of Dad without a Dad Productions. He's super cool, super smart, and super fun. Jose: Why are teddy bears never hungry? Because they are always stuffed. We talk about imposter syndrome, being a doer, the state of the radio industry and using humor as a coping mechanism. Jose: According to the IRS, I'm an actor, voice-over actor, sound engineer and a writer, but all I want to do is provide a better future for my son. You should definitely check out the interview and Jose's links. Jose on YouTube where he is hysterical. Jose on Instagram where his pictures are stunning. Jose on Twitter, which is where I met him. Score! Link to Jose's interview.  SHOUT OUT The music we’ve clipped and shortened in this podcast is awesome and is made available through the Creative Commons License. Here’s a link to that and the artist’s website. Who is this artist and what is this song?  It’s “Night Owl” by Broke For Free. NEW BOOK OF AWESOME I have a new book out!!!!!! It’s an adult mystery set in the town where we live, which is Bar Harbor, Maine. You can order it here. And you totally should. And if you click through to this link, you can read the first chapter! And click here to learn about the book’s inspiration and what I learned about myself when I was writing it.
25:36
May 7, 2020
Fart Jokes, Zoom Fatigue and Coronavirus
What do you call a person who never farts in front of other people?  A private tooter. What do you call it when someone eats refried beans and onions? Tear gas. Success is like a fart. It only bothers people when it’s not their own. How do you say “fart” in German? “Farfrompoopin.” These jokes are from Fatherly https://www.fatherly.com/play/21-best-funniest-fart-jokes-kids/ Hey! Our episode notes are too big for this platform, so check out carriejonesbooks.blog Writing Tip of the Pod Fart jokes last longer than most other things, just like farts. Dog Tip For Life Right now, we need more fart jokes and less Zoom meetings. We need to engage with the people we’re isolated with and notice the nuance, the pauses, the gaps. SHOUT OUT The music we’ve clipped and shortened in this podcast is awesome and is made available through the Creative Commons License. Here’s a link to that and the artist’s website. Who is this artist and what is this song?  It’s “Night Owl” by Broke For Free.
27:05
April 28, 2020
Sam Spellacy Friend of Awesome, Jackson Lab Research Technologist, Animal Rescuer Interview
You know how sometimes you need a real-life friend of awesome who torments you so that you evolve? And sometimes you don't know how to say that friend's last name. That's Sam for me. Sam is a research technologist at the Jackson Laboratory in Bar Harbor and she joins me to talk about evolving, being brave, and how hard it is to be my friend. Just kidding! Just kidding! Sort of. Sam does some pretty exciting research with Ron Korstange and the lab itself is doing tons of research and testing related to Covid-19. For more about me and stuff, check out carriejonesbooks.blog
25:54
April 23, 2020
Wild Poet Woman - How to Be a Poet with Fiona Cameron Mackintosh
Hey! Welcome to a bonus interview episode of Dogs are Smarter Than People, the usually quirky podcast that gives writing tips and life tips. I’m Carrie Jones and with me today is Fiona Cameron Mackintosh is a poet from Toronto and manages Elderwood Coaching who doesn’t believe in tame language for wild things, which is possibly the best thing I’ve ever heard. What do we talk about? You'll want to listen but here's a heads-up: Poetry. Why do you think people are so scared of it? What was the first poem that you remember that rocked your world? Is it okay to misquote poetry? How do you become a poet? Fiona is absolutely amazing. You'll definitely want to listen. Fiona's very cool website and coaching collective. Direct Link to Fiona's Interview!  Another podcast with Fiona Fiona on Facebook. This week's regular episode - The Two Second Relationship Rule
30:02
April 17, 2020
Don’t End Up With a Troll - The Two Question Rule and Relationships
Okay. We’re married, but we weren’t always married, right? Like it didn’t happen when we were two and the first people we married were cough definitely not each other. But we’re going to talk about dating anyway. And there is this concept that’s on Shallon Lester’s YouTube videos called the Two Question Rule. Lester is kind of a gossip columnist and sex advice person, but we’re going to be okay with that for this podcast. This is not related to the five-second rule where you get to eat food if it’s only fallen on the floor for five seconds. I am so sorry Shaun. Here’s the rule, simplified thanks to a Medium article by Emma Austin. “When you’re getting to know a guy, especially if you’re flirting or seeing where things are going, pay attention to how many questions you’re asking him and how many questions he’s asking you in return. If you routinely ask more than two questions without him asking you any, take it as a sign that he’s not interested in you.” There are exceptions: 1.  He’s telling a story 2.  You’re telling a story and not giving a pause for questions. Here’s the thing. We all want to think that the other person is actually interested in us and so we ignore the signs that they aren’t. What are those signs? 1.  They don’t ask any questions about you. 2.  They only talk about themselves and are all preeny like a peacock 3.  They don’t answer your calls or texts for days. 4.  They tell you. We are creatures of hope and sometimes we’re so desperate to feel loved that we end up with douchebags because we’ve blown off all the signs. As Austin says, “And a lot of times, you just like someone and it makes you a little too hopeful. You really want them to like you back, so you look for all the little signs that they do — and ignore the bigger signs that they don’t. You project your feelings on them a bit and you find yourself making excuses for their behavior. Because at least the excuses feel better than the truth. You don’t want them to not be interested in you — you’d rather they were just too busy or going through something or having a weird day.” Writing Tip of the Pod When you’re having your characters interact and it’s a romance? Remember this rule. Don’t let your heroine do all the questioning? Don’t make her love interest a douchebag who only talks about themselves and never ask about her. Dog Tip for Life Try to remember that it isn’t always all about you. Don’t be the douchebag. Give love as well as accepting the treats. SHOUT OUT The music we’ve clipped and shortened in this podcast is awesome and is made available through the Creative Commons License. Here’s a link to that and the artist’s website. Who is this artist and what is this song?  It’s “Night Owl” by Broke For Free.
27:50
April 14, 2020
Pants-drunk, Geico, Stinky Beer, Government Cheese - Things get weird
When you think about people getting drunk in their underwear, you tend to think of Joe Exotic and the people on Tiger King, the hot-AF Netflix documentary, but the people who are masters at getting completely sloshed at home are the Finns. Yes, the Finns. They have a word for it and that word is kalsarikännit. That word means pantsdrunk They even have emojis depicted half-dressed emoji people holding a beer or a wine glass that they send each other when they are solo drinking in their undies. And that’s what is happening to America in the time of Covid-19. Believe me, this is such a thing that it’s a trending Instagram tag and even the Barefoot Contessa is getting involved. Here’s the thing. People in northern, isolated, winter-dark, sun-absent climates know all about staying at home. They know about facing the darkness and drinking in their undies. Yes, undies. Not sweatpants. Undies. Part of being pantsdrunk is stripping down. On Harper Collins’s website for Miska Rantanen’s book about the cultural phenomenon, it states: According to an article by Claudia Alarcon in Forbes, Claudia Alarcon"Pantsdrunk is one of the cornerstones of drinking culture in Finland,” says Partanen (an actual Finnish person she quotes). “The Finns are very reserved people, which is why there are jokes in Finland about how social distancing simply means that we keep doing what we've always been doing: avoiding physical contact and keeping at least a meter distance from others.” When you are undergoing constant stress and anxiety, it increases your risk for both physical and mental health issues. You don’t want that. We don’t want that for you. So, it’s okay to find some joys even as the horrifying happens. Build a fort. Sing in the shower. Read books. Snuggle with puppies. What’s this got to do with writing other than the fact that the tradition has been immortalized in a book? It’s about letting go, diving into your story and giving your anxiety a giant finger flip. It’s about tearing off your clothes and your devices and writing the raw, naked tipsy story without your internal critic or internal editor standing over your shoulder telling you to go get the seltzer water and put your clothes back on. That’s when you write cool stories. This time we are in now, this pandemic, this physical isolation? It can divide us or it can make us closer. We can choose to despair in our systemic issues and lack and we should recognize it, but is just as important to notice the moments of humanity, of how people still find ways to create and communicate and love. SHOUT OUT The music we’ve clipped and shortened in this podcast is awesome and is made available through the Creative Commons License. Here’s a link to that and the artist’s website. Who is this artist and what is this song?  It’s “Night Owl” by Broke For Free.“When it comes to happiness rankings, Finland always scores near the top.  Many Finnish phenomena set the bar high: the best education system, gender equality, a flourishing welfare state, sisu or bull-headed pluck.  Behind all of these accomplishments lies a Finnish ability to stay calm, healthy and content in a riptide of endless tasks and temptations.  The ability comes from the practice of "kalsarikanni" translated as pantsdrunk.”  More info at Carrie's website. 
25:12
April 7, 2020
Ric Flair Swag, Social Anxiety, and Indie Publishing! Bonus Interview w/ Writer Jordan Scavone!
Today is the big day when we start posting podcast interviews with all sorts of cool, random people. A lot of them will be in the book world, but some are just in the world world. Each interview talks a bit about being brave, being vulnerable, and the stuff we can't predict. And this first one? It also has a call out to Ric Flair. What else? We talk about: Book marketing Theater for the Young Indie publishing versus traditional publishing Marketing your book Social Anxiety Teaching preschool Writing brave things And did I mention Ric Flair? According to his website, author Jordan Scavone created his first picture book at about six years old. This first book, written and drawn (well, stenciled), was titled The Animals Look For Food. It was about, well, animals looking for food. . After receiving his undergraduate degree in Children's Literature and Theater for the Young from Eastern Michigan University, Jordan began working on his first picture book. This past April Jordan received his M.A. in Children's Literature from EMU. He currently lives in Michigan with his wife Chelsea (June 2016!) and cat, Lizbeth. Jordan's newest book, Night Warrior, just arrived! And he has a baby coming too! So, give him some love and check out the book on Amazon and his website. SHOUT OUT The music we’ve clipped and shortened in this podcast is awesome and is made available through the Creative Commons License. Here’s a link to that and the artist’s website. Who is this artist and what is this song?  It’s “Night Owl” by Broke For Free. Last week’s episode’s link. WHERE TO FIND US The podcast link if you don’t see it above. Plus, it’s everywhere like Apple Music, iTunes, Stitcher, Spotify, and more. Just google, “DOGS ARE SMARTER THAN PEOPLE” then like and subscribe.
30:58
April 2, 2020
Zoombombing, Tiger King, Kittens in Heat - Is Your Family Driving You Mad During Lockdown? This might be why
Now that we’re all home and living with our significant others because of CoVid-19 aka the coronavirus from Hell, it’s making some of go a little… Well, a little crazy. Why is this? Here we are housebound with the people we love with all our hearts and suddenly just listening to them breathe is making us want to throw knives when we really should just be so thankful that we’re not sick. Are you feeling this way and freaking out about it? Well, you are not alone. Not only is Covid messing with our anxieties, our livelihoods, our health and sending some of us into spirals of depression and grief, it’s also changing our routines and schedules and patterns and that can make us feel kind of vulnerable and off kilter. This is where attachment styles come in. In her essay “Coping With an Insecure Attachment Style” on VeryWellMind on carriejonesbooks.blog, Marni Feuerman talks about how our attachment styles can be either secure or insecure and how they arise from our childhood. She writes, Feuerman“A secure style comes from consistency, reliability, and safety in one's childhood. As an adult, those with a secure attachment style can reflect back on their childhood and see both the good and the bad that occurred, but in the proper perspective. Overall, they generally feel that someone reliable was always available to them in their formative years. In adulthood, they enjoy close, intimate relationships and do not fear taking risks in love.” Who are these magical, well-balanced people? They are the ones who are chill and not freaking out about how their significant other is loading the dishwasher, that’s who they are. The rest of us have three insecure attachment patterns, she explains, and those are avoidant, ambivalent, and disorganized. THE THREE INSECURE ATTACHMENT PATTERNS Feuerman again“Avoidant: Avoidant people have a dismissive attitude. They shun intimacy and have many difficulties reaching for others in times of need. Ambivalent: Those with an ambivalent pattern are often anxious and preoccupied. These people may be viewed as "clingy" or "needy," often requiring much validation and reassurance. Disorganized: The disorganized pattern is often the product of trauma or extreme inconsistency in one's childhood. Disorganized attachment is not a mixture of avoidant and ambivalent attachments—it is a far more serious state where a person has no real coping strategies and is unable to deal with the world.” I am ambivalent AF.  Gabby, our dog, is also ambivalent. What do attachment styles have to do with writing? Well, when you’re writing about relationships in a dystopian novel or apocalypse, you want to account for those different types of personalities and levels of attachment. We ran out of space on here, so for the rest of the notes check out carriejonesbooks.blog SHOUT OUT The music we’ve clipped and shortened in this podcast is awesome and is made available through the Creative Commons License. Here’s a link to that and the artist’s website. Who is this artist and what is this song?  It’s “Night Owl” by Broke For Free.
28:44
March 31, 2020
Rebels Reading the Hobbit and Talking Heads Syndrome
A lot of time I’ll be reading scenes in books and it will be two characters talking and I’ll only have a vaguely general idea about where they are. Maybe I won’t have an idea at all. We call this evil beast the talking heads syndrome. Cue scary music here. WHAT IS TALKING HEADS SYNDROME? No, it's not about the iconic 1980s group. Sorry! It’s where there’s a lot of dialogue going on but there’s no actual anchor for the characters. It’s like they are floating in space blabbing at each other. There’s no physical world placement. This happens a lot and it’s because some of us are writers who really hear our scenes rather than see our scenes or live in our scenes. It’s also because we sometimes forget to get those anchors in there. How to Imagine Yourself in a Scene To do this exercise you have to step away from the keyboard for a second and stand up. We know! We know! Writers are all about sitting down and putting their butts in the chair and getting the work done, right? Well, give yourself five minutes and stand up in a quiet place preferably not in Starbucks or anything. Now close your eyes and think about your scene where there are talking heads. SMELL There you are with your characters. Maybe you can even imagine yourself as one of the characters. Possess them like they’re Zac Bagans and you’re filming Ghost Adventures. Inhale. What kind of smells are you smelling? Remember that. SOUND You’re still there with the characters standing in the setting. What do you hear? Remember that. TOUCH Your characters don’t stay completely still for the whole scene, do they? Have them move even if it’s to fidget. Let them touch things. What do those things feel like? Are they hot? Textured? Hands aren’t the only things that touch. Does their hair sweep over something? Does their foot kick against a table? Do their shoulders lean against the rough wood of the wall? TASTE What does it feel like inside their mouth? Dry? Coppery? Do they need to brush their teeth? Please make them floss. Everyone should floss. SIGHT This is the fallback for most writers and it can have some issues. We want to be able to visualize the setting and where things are happening, but we don’t need the buffer of the character seeing what’s happening. There are a lot of stories where it says, “Shaun looked over and saw the cat dangling from the curtain.” Don’t pad the details with distancing words. Don’t tell us that Shaun’s looking. Just have us see. Instead write, “The cat dangled from the curtain.” It’s so much more powerful. MOVEMENT Have the characters move. Give them actions and objective correlatives to their emotional states. What are the next steps to Banishing the talking heads? No, it's not casting David Byrne to an isolated bunker in Nebraska. It's also not putting him on SNL. It has nothing to do with him! I promise. The next step is incorporating what you imagined for tasting, smelling, hearing, seeing, movement into the actual scene. You have to have your characters’ perceptions of the outside world and setting incorporated into that dialogue and action. Don’t be afraid to dig deeper. The rest of the notes are at carriejonesbooks.blog SHOUT OUT The music we’ve clipped and shortened in this podcast is awesome and is made available through the Creative Commons License. Here’s a link to that and the artist’s website. Who is this artist and what is this song?  It’s “Night Owl” by Broke For Free.
23:47
March 24, 2020
How to Conquer Writer's Block in the Time of CoVid-19
So normally Carrie writes the podcast part of the podcast and this week she had no idea what to write. Should she write about Covid-19 and try to help people with things to do during their lock downs and times of social distancing? Should she totally ignore that and we go the other route with a happy, fun, dorky and totally non-informative episode? Should she cry? It turns out that Carrie was thinking too much and giving herself writer’s block. Writer’s block is something Carrie never gets. So, she had to overcome it, right? So here are some quick steps to overcoming writer’s block in the time of Covid-19. Go for a walk if you can go for a walk without coming into contact with anyone else going for a walk. Eliminate distractions. If there are other kids in the house or cats, lock them out of the room so you can focus. Read a book. Write something that isn’t what you’re pressured to write. Set a timer and tell yourself that you only have 15 minutes to write so you better hurry up. Disconnect your Wi-Fi. Close your eyes and listen to a song that you’ve never listened to before. Then open your eyes and write. Do a Graham Greene (old British author) and keep a dream journal. Every morning write what you’ve dreamt. This will come in handy some day and it counts as writing. Visualize scenes in your story without writing. Just sit and try to daydream. Can you do it? Allow yourself to make mistakes, jump around to scenes you can see. Writing does not have to be linear when you draft. Back in 2016, Maria Konnikova wrote “How to Beat Writer’s Block” for the New Yorker, which touches on the research into writer’s block and it’s pretty interesting. And way back in the 1950s, a man named Bergler wrote “Does Writer’s Block Exist?,” which was published in American Imago. Bergler said a writer “unconsciously tries to solve his inner problems via the sublimatory medium of writing.” A writer wasn’t lazy or bored. They hadn’t used up their muse and ideas. They just needed therapy. Later psychiatrists learned through studies that most writers blocked for three months or more were indeed unhappy. Was this correlative and how did the causation factors work? I can’t find that, but what they did determine was that these unhappy writers seemed to be one of four blocked groups: Anxious and Stressed Out Authors – Writing no longer gave joy because of emotional distress. They’re are the ‘nothing is good enough’ authors. Irritate AF Authors  - They were lashing out at others. These are the ‘I don’t want to be compared to others’ authors.’ Whatever Authors – Apathy rules and they figure there is no point. These are the no daydreams, rules are mean and constricts my creativity’ authors. I Am So Freaking Mad Authors – They aren’t sad. They’re really sick of it all and they are so angry and hostile. These are the ‘I am getting no attention’ authors. I (Carrie) just was teaching an online class to some writers and admitted that I don’t daydream anymore, which is a big deal for me because I used to daydream all the time. A lack of daydreaming is a symptom of a writer who is blocked. Other symptoms Of Writer's Block: Less able to form images in their brains Images they do form are more vague than in the past Less ambition Less joy Less creativity So work on creatively visualizing different things in your book and your life. Imagine what your character eats, what’s happening at the grocery story right now, the best kiss ever. Reawaken your creativity in ways that don’t involve judgement – yours or anyone else’s.
19:02
March 17, 2020
Don't Be a Punk. Coronavirus and People Being Liars
If you’re going to write or communicate, it’s really cool to know what you’re writing or talking about. What? I know, right? Here’s the thing. You think that you know everything until you realize that you don’t half as much as you thought you did. We live in a time period where everyone is yelling, ‘fake facts,’ and ‘false news’ and ‘liar.’ We live in a time period that’s amazing because so many of us have things like indoor plumbing, internet access, prescriptions, food. But we also live in a time where people think they are omniscient. None of us are omniscient. We all see things from our own perspectives built upon by our culture and our experience. Yet, some people think that they know everything and lay down these edicts about what the right way to vote, to write, to think, to create, to live is. But these same people don’t know the difference between unfazed and unphased. Don’t be one of those people. When you write, when you live, when you troll people on social media? Check your words and your facts. It makes your argument and your story and your opinion so much stronger when you can spell things correctly or when you have stats to back up your arguments. And there is nothing bad about realizing that you’re wrong, about growing as a human in your thoughts. Evolving is a good thing. We promise. Writing Tip of the Pod: It’s okay to break the rules, but know the rules you’re breaking. Study your craft before you start telling people there is only one right way to do things. Dog Tip for Life: Know what you’re barking at, man. Don’t call a blowing bag a squirrel. Free Write for Your Story Write about a character who thinks that he/she/they know everything about something but they are terribly wrong. Incorporate that into your story if you can.  SHOUT OUT The music we’ve clipped and shortened in this podcast is awesome and is made available through the Creative Commons License. Here’s a link to that and the artist’s website. Who is this artist and what is this song?  It’s “Night Owl” by Broke For Free. WRITING NEWS! I have a new book out!!!!!! It's an adult mystery set in the town where we live, which is Bar Harbor, Maine.  You can order it here. And you totally should. It's called the PLACES WE HIDE and it's scary and a first-person narrative and so much fun. 
19:01
March 10, 2020
Ride Hard. Seven Tips for Aspiring Writers
Tips for Aspiring Writers? Everyone gives them. But these are the essentials that were inspired by a hot-wings induced stupor. Shaun doesn't believe you can get drunk off hot sauce, but I'm here to tell you that I (Carrie) can. Seven Tips for Aspiring Writers Write your ideas down anywhere and everywhere. Don’t think that you’ll remember the amazing ideas you got while in a half-drunken stupor from too many Buffalo wings. Have a notebook or notes file on your phone. Write that stuff down. Ride hard for books. Not just your own books but other people’s too. Wait. That’s not good enough. Ride hard for words. Fall in love with them. Remember all stories have a beginning, a middle and an end where people (or hamsters or whatever) ride hard for something and there are obstacles blocking their way to get that something. Remember all stories have characters who have external wants (a good hot wing) and internal desire (to be admired for devouring that damn hot wing without doing a Will Ferrell and crying). Study people. Write people. Not card-board cut-outs. Don’t make your story an Instagram filter. Show people the quirks, the dirt, the torn hems on your skirt. Write. You aspire to write? Do it, my friend. Don’t just aspire. Do. Writing Tip of the Pod: If you want to write books, study people, study books, and experience as much as you can experience so you can use everything you do, see, and feel to communicate that to others. Dog Tip for Life: ` Channel your inner Yoda. There is no try. Just do. Or channel your inner Nike ad. Just do it. Don’t aspire. Work towards it. You’ve got it. SHOUT OUT The music we’ve clipped and shortened in this podcast is awesome and is made available through the Creative Commons License. Here’s a link to that and the artist’s website. Who is this artist and what is this song?  It’s “Night Owl” by Broke For Free. WHERE TO FIND US The podcast link if you don’t see it above. Plus, it’s everywhere like Apple Music, iTunes, Stitcher, Spotify, and more. Just google, “DOGS ARE SMARTER THAN PEOPLE” then like and subscribe. Big News! I just published a super cool adult novel. Gasp! I know! Adult! That’s so …. grown-up? It's called THE PLACES WE HIDE and it's super fun. It's got death,  strong women, strong men, falling in love, firefighters, cops and a Maine blizzard.  You can order it here. Please, please, order it.
14:10
February 25, 2020
Surviving Road Trips, K-Pop, Stranger Things, and the Takis Burn
This week, we've stepped away from our normal format because we're on a massive road trip from Maine to Georgia to Florida and back again. So much time in the car is making our brains a bit - a bit - a bit - broken? Have a listen. There's a special guest. She's eleven. She's got opinions just like her dad. Apologies for the car noises. That's because we're in the car. Come join us.  Big News! I just published a super cool adult novel. Gasp! I know! Adult! That’s so …. grown-up? Rosie Jones, small town reporter and single mom, is looking forward to her first quiet Maine winter with her young daughter, Lily. After a disastrous first marriage, she’s made a whole new life and new identities for her and her little girl. Rosie is more than ready for a winter of cookies, sledding, stories about planning board meetings, and trying not to fall in like with the local police sergeant, Seamus Kelley. But after her car is tampered with and crashes into Sgt. Kelley’s cruiser during a blizzard, her quiet new world spirals out of control and back into the danger she thought she’d left behind. One of her new friends is murdered. She herself has been poisoned and she finds a list of anagrams on her dead friend’s floor. As the killer strikes again, it’s obvious that the women of Bar Harbor aren’t safe. Despite the blizzard and her struggle to keep her new identity a secret, Rosie sets out to make sure no more women die. With the help of the handsome but injured Sgt. Kelley and the town’s firefighters, it’s up to Rosie to stop the murderer before he strikes again. You can order it here. Buy limited-edition prints and learn more about my art here on my site. And... my new book, IN THE WOODS, is out! Gasp! It’s with Steve Wedel. It’s scary and one of Publisher’s Weekly’s Buzz Books for Summer 2019. There’s an excerpt of it there and everything! But even cooler (for me) they’ve deemed it buzz worthy! Buzz worthy seems like an awesome thing to be deemed!
12:24
February 18, 2020
What's Evil is Killing Your Relationship and Your Character?
There was a post on Medium on PS I LOVE YOU called, “The Silent Relationship Killer You Never See Coming” about how the silent relationship killer is basically routine and sameness. The author, Barry Davret, compared relationships to a song that you love so intensely you listen to over and over again obsessively, but then suddenly, you are done with that song. Couples, he says, set weekly and daily routines after that initial burst of frantic attraction and then? They get bored of having intercourse every Saturday, date night every Friday, laundry every Monday. If they’re polite, they’ll still ask each other how their days went, but they won’t actually care about the answer because the answer is always the same. He writes “Look back on the last six months. Does it feel like it was one day lived 180 times?” How do you defeat being bored in your relationship? He suggests two tips to not be bored Occasionally be spontaneous Pursue separate passions This has never happened to us. As you can tell from our random thoughts, we’re weird. We’re so weird especially when we’re alone. I will fall down laughing because of the things Shaun says. We think that Barry has it right, but he also has it wrong. Yes, people get dulled by routines and because of the comfort in routines, and that might be partially be because they've stopped doing things on their own. But it's also more about empathy and building walls around yourself so you don't get hurt. The person you're in a relationship with sees you warts and all? And that, my friends, can be a bit scary. To have a relationship that lasts and evolves you have to do the following things: You have to find humor in yourself and each other even during the bad times. You have to blow off the assumption that you know absolutely everything about your significant other as if they are a blank piece of paper rather than a living, breathing, changing organism. There is still mystery in them even if you aren’t seeing it. You have to be willing to be vulnerable so that your partner can see that mystery inside of you. There is nothing dull in courage and it takes courage to be vulnerable. How does this relate to writing? Hold on! We’re getting there. WRITING TIP OF THE POD Our novels and characters also need to have tiny doses of the unexpected to keep people from being bored. We want to have each character have differences and not be the same. That sameness, that lack of diversity? It makes Johnny a dull boy. Insert quirks into your characters. DOG TIP FOR LIFE Even when you’re on the same walk that your person always takes you on, there’s going to be a nuance in the smells you sniff up on the side of the road. Rejoice in that nuance. Seek it out. Live in the moment. It’s a good way not to be bored. SHOUT OUT The music we’ve clipped and shortened in this podcast is awesome and is made available through the Creative Commons License. Here’s a link to that and the artist’s website. Who is this artist and what is this song?  It’s “Night Owl” by Broke For Free. Big News! I just published a super cool adult novel. Gasp! I know! Adult! That’s so …. grown-up? You can order it here. Please, please, preorder it. So, um, please go buy it. I am being brave, but that means that despite all my reasons for doing this, I’m still terrified that nobody will buy it and I really, really love this book. A lot. carriejonesbooks.blog
20:58
February 11, 2020
Are you Beige? Do you Think in Words? Or Images? Not everyone thinks the same!
This week, I’ve been editing two male authors’ stories and there is a lot of internal monologue embedded within the paragraphs of dialogue and exposition. At the same time that I’ve been doing this a man’s reaction to some people not having an inner dialogue has gone viral. It began with a tweet as so many things do. Kyleplantemoji wrote: Fun fact: some people have an internal narrative and some don’t. As in, some people’s thoughts are like sentences they “hear,” and some people just have abstract nonverbal thoughts, and have to consciously verbalize them. And most people aren’t aware of the other type of person. Later, on his blog, Ryan who is also Kyleplantemoji wrote: My day was completely ruined yesterday when I stumbled upon a fun fact that absolutely obliterated my mind. I saw this tweet yesterday that said that not everyone has an internal monologue in their head. This became a very big deal. Some people, it seems, don’t hear thoughts in word or sentence form in their heads. Ever. Some people, it seems, have a constant inner monologue that never stops. Ever. And people are stunned, flummoxed, and sometimes horrified that not everyone processes information or thinks the way that they do. Writing Tip of the Pod When writing, try to think of how your characters aren’t like you. How are their speech patterns, values, and thoughts different from yours. Do they all sound alike? They shouldn’t. Dog Tip for Life When living, don’t expect all people to be the same and instead of superimposing your thoughts and values and experiences, realize that they have their own experiences. It’s like in the dog world, a Rottweiler has a different life and interactions than a poodle wearing a tutu. They are both dogs and have similarities, but they aren’t the same. Even two poodles aren’t the same. We’re all unique and amazing. That should be respected not diminished as we all try to raise each other up. SHOUT OUT! The music we’ve clipped and shortened in this podcast is awesome and is made available through the Creative Commons License. Here’s a link to that and the artist’s website. Who is this artist and what is this song?  It’s “Night Owl” by Broke For Free. BALLSY SPONSORED THIS EPISODE! We’re super psyched because this episode is sponsored by Ballsy.  Best sponsorship ever. And why is that? Because Ballsy is for fun couples like us who are not into lame gifts for Valentine’s Day and they have a cool gift set just for Valentine’s Day and people like us. You want this, don’t you? There’s an I’m Nuts About You gift set and the You’re Incrediballs heart box set. They are running a promo right now for LOVE DAY and all days, really. The retail price is $less than $50, and the coupon code is for 20% off. Here is your code for you, our cool listener: DOGS20
20:20
February 4, 2020
Banff, Beer, Balls, and Going to the Dark Side, Baby
We have a bonus podcast this week and it has swears in it and some adult content, so we're going to give it an explicit rating even though it's not super explicit. We're just chill like that. The bonus podcast features: Shaun lying Banff Film Festival! Carrie talking about third grader writers. Note: They have their characters rip their own hearts out in stories. The fact that the word 'fart' is a terribly ugly word and Carrie never quote-unquote 'rips one.' Bud-Lite We're super psyched because this episode is sponsored by Ballsy.  Best sponsorship ever. And why is that? Because Ballsy is for fun couples like us who are not into lame gifts for Valentine’s Day and they have a cool gift set just for Valentine’s Day and people like us. You want this, don’t you? There's an I'm Nuts About You gift set and the You're Incrediballs heart box set. They are running a promo right now for LOVE DAY and all days, really. The retail price is $less than $50, and the coupon code is for 20% off. Here is your code for you, our cool listener: DOGS20 It has the word DOG in the code. That’s so cool. Just like you’ll be cool if you give this to your special man for Valentine’s. So go check Ballsy out at ballwash.com
19:36
February 2, 2020
Dude, Don't Whatever Me
We like to think that our lives have a point and that they matter. I think they do, but we’re not here to get all esoteric on you. We’re here to help you be better writers and humans and one of the biggest things we need to tell you is this. You need to ban the ‘whatever.’ If you want your life to have a point then you need to give it a point. If you want your story to have a point? Same thing. Your life and your story should never be about ‘whatever.’ In life, you fix things when they break. You create goals. You move forward to solve things. In your story? Well it needs to happen that way too. We have to lean into the guiding force that creates every moment and scene in our stories. We focus so much on our feelings and our emotions, but here’s the thing – emotions change, feelings are flighty. What matters is our point or our purpose and that matters both overall and in the moment. Remembering your point or purpose works really well when you’re arguing with your partner because they failed to hear you when you said, “Can you put the onions in the pot, right now?” Instead of being super cranky and resentful that they didn’t put the onions in the pot for two minutes, you can think, “Wait. What is my purpose of being with this person?” Chances are your purpose isn’t about getting onions quickly into a pot or having someone to boss around. Usually your purpose about being someone is something like, “To build a happy, safe, collaborative life together.” So, how do you find your life’s purpose? That’s a bit question that Carrie’s always struggling with. A good first step is to ask yourself these five questions: What happens because I am here? What wouldn’t happen if I wasn’t here? What am I good at and think is pretty easy? What do I love doing when I do it? What do I actually look forward to? Ask yourself these questions over and over again and if you’re blocked on them, if you think you don’t make a difference in anyone’s life? Ask again. Keep asking. Wonder for a second if it’s easier to believe that you don’t matter than accept that you do. Because you do. You have a point. Writing Tip of the Pod Just like our lives, our characters in stories need to have a point and a purpose and so do our stories. Ask yourself what each characters’ points are. Ask yourself what the story’s point is? Is it a treatise about government corrupt? A call to love? Dog Tip for Life Dog’s don’t ask what they should be doing. They ask, what their purpose is? A protector dog protects. A hunter hunts. A lap dog laps. A lab eats. Their purpose propels their choices and gives them a point to existence. So, think about it. What is your purpose right now in this second? SHOUT OUT The music we’ve clipped and shortened in this podcast is awesome and is made available through the Creative Commons License. Here’s a link to that and the artist’s website. Who is this artist and what is this song?  It’s “Night Owl” by Broke For Free. WHERE TO FIND US The podcast link if you don’t see it above. Plus, it’s everywhere like Apple Music, iTunes, Stitcher, Spotify, and more. Just google, “DOGS ARE SMARTER THAN PEOPLE” then like and subscribe.
14:13
January 28, 2020
Don't Vomit in the Taxi and How to Tell a Good Story in Three Quick Steps
This week Carrie was in Georgia hanging out with her daughter who had just had an operation. Her daughter is fine! Anyways, on the way to the airport at 4 a.m., the taxi driver told her story after story, mostly about the drunk people from Fort Benning who had ridden in his cab. He was an amazing story teller and I realized that sometimes writing is just like telling a big anecdote. And you don’t want to be boring. We all know the people who have super boring anecdotes that just go on and on, right? You don’t want to be that person! The Three Quick and Simple Steps For Telling a Good Anecdote or writing a Good Story Hook them in This is the attention grabber. Tell an actual story Tell a real story, not just a bunch of random details. Let it have a beginning, a middle and an end. Give a Moment to Let the Message Sink In Your story has a point, right? Let us understand what that point is. Don’t rush the ending. Show how your anecdote or your novel or your story reflects a bigger piece of life. Let it resonate. Writing Tip of the Pod Give your story a point. Dog Tip for Life Do whatever you can to get their attention. Hook them in. SHOUT OUT The music we’ve clipped and shortened in this podcast is awesome and is made available through the Creative Commons License. Here’s a link to that and the artist’s website. Who is this artist and what is this song?  It’s “Night Owl” by Broke For Free. WHERE TO FIND US The podcast link if you don’t see it above. Plus, it’s everywhere like Apple Music, iTunes, Stitcher, Spotify, and more. Just google, “DOGS ARE SMARTER THAN PEOPLE” then like and subscribe. Big News! I’m about to publish a super cool adult novel. Gasp! I know! Adult! That’s so …. grown-up? It's a mystery. It has romance, Maine, death, and high stakes.  You can preorder it here. Please, please, preorder it. So, um, please go buy it. I am being brave, but that means that despite all my reasons for doing this, I’m still terrified that nobody will buy it and I really, really love this book. A lot. LEARN WITH ME AT THE WRITING BARN! The Write. Submit. Support. format is designed to embrace all aspects of the literary life. This six-month course will offer structure and support not only to our writing lives but also to the roller coaster ride of submissions: whether that be submitting to agents or, if agented, weathering the submissions to editors. We will discuss passes that come in, submissions requests, feedback we aren’t sure about, where we are feeling directed to go in our writing lives, and more. Learn more here!  “Carrie just happens to be one of those rare cases of extreme talent and excellent coaching.”
19:52
January 21, 2020
How to Be A HAPPY writer, Big Foot, Statues that Pee
This week’s podcast is about something really important. It’s about remembering to have fun. For a lot of us, life has a ton of stressors and responsibilities. We have to make enough money to survive. We have to take care of our family and ourselves. We have to deal with a world and not succumb to constant catastrophic thinking about the state of the world. It’s easy to forget to have fun. Or to feel guilty about having fun. Or to feel guilty about having hobbies. And here’s the thing. It’s great to be a professional writer and make money at something you love to do, but you don’t have to make money at it. A lack of financial rewards for your efforts doesn’t mean you’re a failure. It just means you aren’t getting money. And money, my friends, is not everything. What is everything? Having fun. Growing. Enjoying your damn self in this short amount of time you have on this world, making yourself wiser and stronger and embracing your moments of joy. Everyone who sings in the shower isn’t expected to make money at singing in the shower. That should go for those of us who write too. Here’s the truth: You can write solely for the joy of writing. Don’t let other people’s opinions or standards give you or your writing validation. Don’t let the pressure for external measures of success (publication, an agent, an award, 100,000 social media followers) ruin your joy in creating stories. Here are Five Quick Steps to Reclaiming That Joy Rest when you need to. Take care of your body. Eat food. Drink water. The simple things that all us living organisms should be doing. Don’t have buttheads for friends. Be with people who make you happy and support you and inspire you. Ditch the others. Go outside. Seriously. Go out of the building. Feel the air. You are part of this earth. Remember this and take care of it, too. Study a flower, a rock, a tree. It’ll make you a better writer, too. Notice the whole. Be grateful for the good stuff that happens. What do you have? You’re reading this, or listening. That means you have enough that allows you to do that. Pretty cool, right? Open your mind and your heart. Try not to be so super judgmental. Be generous and chill when you can. Writing Tip of the Pod If writing isn’t your profession and isn’t feeding you and your family. It’s okay to stop if it’s not giving you joy. Wait until it gives you joy and go back to it. Also, remember that y-o-u-r  (your) means belonging to you and y-o-u-r-apostrophe-e(you’re) means you are. Dog Tip for Life It’s good to have a pack of humans to clean up after you. That way you can enjoy life and be messy when you slobber on the windows barking enthusiastically at the Fed Ex guy. Try to find a good pack of humans to be your clean-up crew. Sponsor This podcast was sponsored by BookNotes and this link sets you up for a free seven-day trail. SHOUT OUT The music we’ve clipped and shortened in this podcast is awesome and is made available through the Creative Commons License. Here’s a link to that and the artist’s website. Who is this artist and what is this song?  It’s “Night Owl” by Broke For Free. NEW BOOK COMING OUT!  The Places We Hide arrives Feb 1. Preorder now! Romantic. Thriller. Mystery. Maine. Sounds good, right? 
18:40
January 14, 2020
How to Deal with Distractions like Trolls and Panting
Dealing With Distractions How do you write (or live) when you’re surrounded by distractions? Recently, a great teacher was talking to me about me being his writing coach, but he was hesitant to start right now because of his new class load. I’m a seize the moment kind of human because I always expect to die tomorrow. That ticking-clock point of view keeps me moving and going despite distractions, but I know not everyone is that way. When I was a newspaper editor and Em was little, I was always dealing with distractions and I would write anywhere – at a planning board meeting, at a swim meet, at the Y on the bike, waiting in the car to pick Em up after school, in bed, standing at the counter, anywhere and everywhere. Noise was everywhere. Ten-year-olds would be having sleep-overs. Dinner would need to be made. Dogs would be barking. And I would write. I knew that if I wanted to write, then I had to write. And to do that? I had to force my brain to filter though the distractions and be in the flow. So how do you do that? According to an article on the Entrepeneur by Deep Patel, which we’ve linked to in the notes for this podcast, there are several decent methods for dealing with distractions. Make It Chill He says to, “Begin building habits that help you eliminate distractions and stay focused. Start by creating an environment in which you’re less tempted to get preoccupied with something other than what you’re working on.” That means make things quiet. Close your door. Turn off the cell. Make Pretend Deadlines Deadlines make us focus. Make small time limits for you to get your work done instead of giving yourself all day to get your priorities done. I (Carrie) do this all the time, actually and even stress about my completely self-imposed deadlines. That anxiety sucks, but that focus? It makes me get a lot of things done. Get into The Pondoro Method What is this? It sounds sort of x-rated, right? It’s not. Patel explains it as a method “in which you set a timer and are completely focused on a task for a period of time, such as 45 minutes straight. Then allow yourself a 15-minute break.” It’s actually another thing Carrie does all the time, only she’s a 50-10 split. She also makes herself stand for that 10 minutes because she’s afraid of Dead Butt Syndrome, which we talked about in an earlier podcast. You should look it up. It’s wild in a dead-butt kind of way. There you go. Three hot tips to help keep yourself from being distracted in 2020. Writing Tip of the Pod Don’t let distractions become your attention. Dog Tip for Life Pant throughout the podcast, look cute, and rest your muzzle on someone’s knee. SHOUT OUT The music we’ve clipped and shortened in this podcast is awesome and is made available through the Creative Commons License. Here’s a link to that and the artist’s website. Who is this artist and what is this song?  It’s “Night Owl” by Broke For Free. Please like, subscribe, and help us be goofs. We're everywhere like Apple Music, iTunes, Stitcher, Spotify, and more. Just google, “DOGS ARE SMARTER THAN PEOPLE” then like and subscribe.
22:41
January 7, 2020
Attacking Seagulls, Mr. Taco and New Year? New Writer You?
This week on the podcast we talk about:Mr. Taco, Attacking Seagulls, Doing the Raccoons, and Goals. Also, Shaun sings. So it’s the New Year and as we all know it’s all about goals and looking back and creating our lives in a new way. People are spending money on exercise equipment and diet food and all that, but you know what? The you that you are? It’s totally fine. Writers especially feel pushed towards outside affirmations and validations. We think, “If I traditionally publish a book, I’ve made it. I’m a writer.” Or we might think, “If my self-published book sells 100 copies, I’ve made it.” Or even, “If I get 10,000 Twitter followers, then I’ve made it.” Here’s the thing though. You are a person in a moment. Every moment that you write? You are a writer. You don’t have to aim for any goals other than the goal of self realization. You are a writer by writing, not because you hit a list or make an editor you’ve never met buy your story or a critic that you’ll never know give you five stars. Writing is communication and exploration. It is craft and art. It’s all these things bundled together and just like you – the writer – the human – it is shiny and real and just fine the way it is. You are a writer by writing. You are a human because you do human things. This year maybe we can give others and especially ourselves the empathy to not judge each other by our end goals, but by our journey and actions that we perform every day or every week, by how we create our stories and our families and our communities. It’s okay to just write. It’s okay to just be. Let the goals that you create be about process as much as they are about achievement. And have a happy new year as you, not a new you, but the you that you are, right now, in this moment, a beautiful, shiny soul. Writing Tip of the Pod Three obstacles are important in your story especially if it's a picture book about a seagull trying to nab a French fry. Dog Tip For Life Life is about community. Make your community good. SHOUT OUT The music we’ve clipped and shortened in this podcast is awesome and is made available through the Creative Commons License. Here’s a link to that and the artist’s website. Who is this artist and what is this song?  It’s “Night Owl” by Broke For Free. WRITING NEWS The Write. Submit. Support. format is designed to embrace all aspects of the literary life. This six-month course will offer structure and support not only to our writing lives but also to the roller coaster ride of submissions: whether that be submitting to agents or, if agented, weathering the submissions to editors. We will discuss passes that come in, submissions requests, feedback we aren’t sure about, where we are feeling directed to go in our writing lives, and more. Learn more here!  “Carrie’s feedback is specific, insightful and extremely helpful. She is truly invested in helping each of us move forward to make our manuscripts the best they can be.” “Carrie just happens to be one of those rare cases of extreme talent and excellent coaching.” IN THE WOODS – READ AN EXCERPT, ORDER NOW! My new book, IN THE WOODS, is out! 
21:36
December 31, 2019
Subordinate Me, Santa Claus
Subordinate clauses are baby clauses that can’t stand all by themselves as complete thoughts and they demand a certain kind of punctuation – or lack of punctuation. Here are examples: If I can find Santa, then we can go party. We can go party if Santa ever freaking shows up. So, in both of those sentences there is a clause can’t stand alone as a complete thought: If I can find Santa If Santa ever freaking shows up. A subordinate clause or supporting clause is basically a clause that’s supporting the show-stopping regular clause, right? These clauses do not get a comma before them if they are at the end of the sentence. HOW TO DEAL There are words that always lead off these clauses. What I do is go back and do a find/replace in my work (or client’s work) when I’m copyediting. Helpful hint for writers: If you include the comma in the find/replace search, it makes it so much easier. Those words are… These conjunctions: After, although, as, because, before, even if, even though, if, in order that, once, provided that, rather than, since, so that, than, that, though, unless, until, when, whenever, where, whereas, whether, while, why, for, therefore, hence, consequently, and due to. And these relative pronouns that make the world of the clause even trickier. They are part of relative clauses but then these overachievers? Well, they are part of a subculture called restrictive or nonrestrictive clauses. These are the relative pronouns that, which, who, whom, whichever, whoever, whomever, and whose. Are you Restrictive or Nonrestrictive Mr. Clause? These pronouns start either restrictive clauses or nonrestrictive clauses. Restrictive clauses also like to be called essential clauses because they are alpha like that, but also because they are – you guessed it – essential to the sentence meaning and shouldn’t be separated by a comma Do you enjoy watching Santa Claus employ lots of elves that wear sexy sweaters? No comma before that because the sentence needs to know the qualifier for its meaning. But in a nonrestrictive clause? Well, you don’t have that happen. Here’s an example: Watching Santa, who employs a lot of elves wearing sexy sweaters, is pretty freaking awesome. WRITING TIP OF THE POD Subordinate the proper things. DOG TIP FOR LIFE It’s not about domination. It’s about understanding restrictions. And there you go. Grammar Moment with Dogs are Smarter Than People. Happy Holidays! SHOUT OUT The music we’ve clipped and shortened in this podcast is awesome and is made available through the Creative Commons License. Here’s a link to that and the artist’s website. Who is this artist and what is this song?  It’s “Night Owl” by Broke For Free.
27:17
December 24, 2019
Santa, what are your eyebrows doing? Telling Details, Christmas Parties and Taco Bell Smells.
The Magic of The Eyebrow and Telling Details What is this thing? This telling detail? It’s a phrase or an image or a word that illustrates something about a character. It’s pretty exact. It’s a magical moment of showing rather than telling. It’s usually pretty short. And it’s the opposite of a telling description. Here’s a bad description: He was nervous and scared and sad all at once. Here’s a telling-detail description: He soothed himself, rubbing the tips of his own ears over and over. Telling details make the characters and settings feel real. If we say, “Shaun lifted his eyebrows?” Well, that’s a cliché, but also it’s not quite enough to be a telling detail no matter how much people communicate with their eyebrows. Here’s a bad description: They walked into an almost empty bar. We don’t really see the bar, do we? Here’s something a bit better: The bar smelled of beer and lilac bushes somehow. The Sonos speaker tottering on the edge of the reclaimed wood bar blared “Something’s Coming” from West Side Story. A man leaning between ferns used a pencil to smash a hole into the bottom of a Bud Lite can and chugged it all down. He crushed the empty can between his hands and belched out the alphabet to cheers. “Wow. This place is weird,” I said and grabbed the door handle, ready to bolt. Writing Tip of the Pod When you’re revising think, “Can I make this shorter? Tighter? Quirkier? More authentic?” Dog Tip for Life Notice the eyebrows. The difference. The details. And use them in your stories. This week's podcast Last week's podcast SHOUT OUT The music we’ve clipped and shortened in this podcast is awesome and is made available through the Creative Commons License. Here’s a link to that and the artist’s website. Who is this artist and what is this song?  It’s “Night Owl” by Broke For Free. WRITING NEWS LEARN WITH ME AT THE WRITING BARN! The Write. Submit. Support. format is designed to embrace all aspects of the literary life. This six-month course will offer structure and support not only to our writing lives but also to the roller coaster ride of submissions: whether that be submitting to agents or, if agented, weathering the submissions to editors. We will discuss passes that come in, submissions requests, feedback we aren’t sure about, where we are feeling directed to go in our writing lives, and more. Learn more here!  “Carrie’s feedback is specific, insightful and extremely helpful. She is truly invested in helping each of us move forward to make our manuscripts the best they can be.” “Carrie just happens to be one of those rare cases of extreme talent and excellent coaching.”
23:36
December 17, 2019
Are You A Drama Queen or a Melodrama Queen
At its most basic a story’s components are these – a beginning, a middle, an end. The beginning is the situation or set up. The middle are the complications. The end is the resolution. Our lives are like this too. We begin in certain circumstances. We live and encounter complications and then we end. But even within that simplified construction there are divisions. There are vertical stories and linear stories, which is a fancier way of saying stories that are character driven or plot driven. Linear – plot driven Vertical – character driven. But the key word is up there twice and that’s – driven. We drive the stories we write and we also have to drive the stories that we live, controlling our own destiny so that we can handle the murky middles and complications and so that by the time we get to the resolution, we can feel satisfied by who we are and what we’ve done. We tend to think of stories as either or. They are plot driven or they are character driven, but the truth is that most stories are intertwined. And then there’s drama and melodrama. I think people can be roughly categorized as these types, too, but we can oscillate between the two. A drama is usually more realistic. People will ponder things. The set might be a bit depressing or quirky or dull because – well, because real life involves these things, too. A melodrama usually involves a chase sequence.  The scenery rushes by quickly. There are things – all the things – happening. What kind of story you’re writing is an important first step to think about even if you’re a writer who doesn’t outline ahead of time. What kind of life you’re living? That’s an even more important thing to think about honestly. So what are you? Are you drama? Or are you melodrama? Are you linear or vertical? Do you oscillate between them all? Writing Tip of the Pod: Think about stuff. Dog Tip for Life: Be the drama or melodrama or middle-drama that you want to be? Also, it’s okay to be a drug cocktail. The New York Post article we reference in the podcast is by Lindsay Putnam. SHOUT OUT The music we’ve clipped and shortened in this podcast is awesome and is made available through the Creative Commons License. Here’s a link to that and the artist’s website. Who is this artist and what is this song?  It’s “Night Owl” by Broke For Free. WRITTING NEWS The Write. Submit. Support. format is designed to embrace all aspects of the literary life. This six-month course will offer structure and support not only to our writing lives but also to the roller coaster ride of submissions: whether that be submitting to agents or, if agented, weathering the submissions to editors. We will discuss passes that come in, submissions requests, feedback we aren’t sure about, where we are feeling directed to go in our writing lives, and more. Learn more here!  “Carrie’s feedback is specific, insightful and extremely helpful. She is truly invested in helping each of us move forward to make our manuscripts the best they can be.” “Carrie just happens to be one of those rare cases of extreme talent and excellent coaching.” IN THE WOODS – READ AN EXCERPT, ORDER NOW! My new book, IN THE WOODS, is out! Gasp!
21:10
December 10, 2019
Florida Man and the Queen of Kittens - Writing With Yearning
Stories are about people having emotions. Writers who write from their heads (outlining like crazy, etc,) are often missing out on the emotion because they are analyzing how to show emotion. But it’s desire and yearning that makes stories stand out and makes writers into artists and truth tellers. Robert Olen Butler says that yearning creates a dynamic of desire and that dynamic of desire creates plot and story. The need, the yearning, the want, is something that needs to bleed out into the page and it does. It does. Good stories have two epiphanies in them that use this yearning. The first epiphany shows up early in the story where all the details culminate to show the reader what it is that the main character wants. The reader gets it, responds, relates, understands and yearns for it too – yearns for it enough to turn the page and keep reading. The second epiphany is basically the climax or the story’s crisis. The main character is fully committed to her desire and she is at that make-or-break point and we’re there with her. The difference between regular books and books that rock your soul is that they are about wants, not about yearnings. Yearnings are bigger than wants. They are the desire of the inside. The foe blocks that desire, that attempt to fulfill yearnings. The character responds. And that is plot. Writers Tip of the Pod Make your characters yearn. Dog Tip For Life Go after what you yearn for. Random Thoughts In our random thoughts this week you get to hear: Shaun fail to see his beer advent calendar The Queen of Kittens talk about BTX Florida Men and the things you do Christmas Tree success. SHOUT OUT The music we’ve clipped and shortened in this podcast is awesome and is made available through the Creative Commons License. Here’s a link to that and the artist’s website. Who is this artist and what is this song?  It’s “Night Owl” by Broke For Free. WRITING NEWS LEARN WITH ME AT THE WRITING BARN! The Write. Submit. Support. format is designed to embrace all aspects of the literary life. This six-month course will offer structure and support not only to our writing lives but also to the roller coaster ride of submissions: whether that be submitting to agents or, if agented, weathering the submissions to editors. We will discuss passes that come in, submissions requests, feedback we aren’t sure about, where we are feeling directed to go in our writing lives, and more. Learn more here!  “Carrie’s feedback is specific, insightful and extremely helpful. She is truly invested in helping each of us move forward to make our manuscripts the best they can be.” “Carrie just happens to be one of those rare cases of extreme talent and excellent coaching.” IN THE WOODS – READ AN EXCERPT, ORDER NOW! My new book, IN THE WOODS, is out! Gasp! It’s with Steve Wedel. It’s scary and one of Publisher’s Weekly’s Buzz Books for Summer 2019. There’s an excerpt of it there and everything! But even cooler (for me) they’ve deemed it buzz worthy! Buzz worthy seems like an awesome thing to be deemed!
18:03
December 3, 2019
Road Rage When North Meets South
This week? Well, our podcast is not our normal format because we’ve been in the car for… um… Okay? Forty-eight hours? Apologies! So, this week we drove from Maine to Vermont to Maine to North Carolina to Maine. In North Carolina, we went to Shaun’s dad’s funeral and it was the first time that Carrie’s been in a Southern church. And we learn that there is an adult-themed section of Shaun's brain.  WRITING NEWS LEARN WITH ME AT THE WRITING BARN! The Write. Submit. Support. format is designed to embrace all aspects of the literary life. This six-month course will offer structure and support not only to our writing lives but also to the roller coaster ride of submissions: whether that be submitting to agents or, if agented, weathering the submissions to editors. We will discuss passes that come in, submissions requests, feedback we aren’t sure about, where we are feeling directed to go in our writing lives, and more. Learn more here!  “Carrie’s feedback is specifi