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Controversies in Church History

Controversies in Church History

By Darrick N Taylor
Controversies in Church History a podcast by Darrick Taylor, adjunct profess of history at Johnson County Community College in Overland Park, Kansas. It focuses on controversial issues in the history of the Catholic Church. Designed for Catholics but accessible for anyone interested in history, it balances storytelling with an academic sensibility.
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The Traditionalist Movement, 1964-Present: Episode 1, The Outsiders
This episode is the first in a new series on the Traditionalist movement in the Catholic Church, from its beginnings in the 1960s to the present day. In light of recent events, we discuss who and what the traditionalist movement is in the present day, discuss how it was born out of the turmoil following the Second Vatican Council, and take a look at the early leadership of the movement.  Please subscribe to our podcast on Anchor and check out Controversies in Church History on our other platforms: LINKS: YouTube Website SOCIAL: Facebook Twitter
45:38
July 24, 2021
Catholic Lives, Episode 13--The Outlaw: "Bloody" Bill Longley
The latest episode of Catholic Lives examines the life and career of the notorious Texas gunman, "Bloody" Bill Longley, whose murderous  life ended with his execution--and a jailhouse conversion to the  Catholic Church. Please subscribe to our podcast on Anchor and check out Controversies in Church History on our other platforms: LINKS: YouTube Website SOCIAL: Facebook Twitter
25:52
July 14, 2021
Great Heresies: Jansenism, 1640-1801
From the early seventeenth century to the beginning of the modern era, a dispute over ideas of salvation and sin, eucharistic discipline and the nature of the Church's authority divided the Latin Church. Labeled Jansenism, a group of writers, priests and religious espoused a rigorous form of Catholic life, inspired by the writings of St. Augustine. Clashing with the Jesuits, whom they accused of promoting laxity in faith and morals, supporters of Jansenism fought a decades long battle to instill their ideas into Church teaching, only to have their ideas condemned by the pope. In this episode, Controversies in Church History takes a deep dive into the history and continuing legacy of this turbulent intellectual challenge in the Church. LINKS: YouTube  Website SOCIAL: Facebook Twitter
01:24:16
July 7, 2021
Catholic Lives Ep. 7: The Catholic Founding Father
*Originally released 7/3/19* This special Fourth of July episode focuses on the life of Charles Carroll of Carrollton (1737-1832), the Catholic landowner, politician and businessman who signed the Declaration of Independence, and helped transform an anti-Catholic British colony into a part of a union one of whose basic rights was religious freedom.   Please subscribe to our podcast on Anchor and check out Controversies in Church History on our other platforms. LINKS: YouTube Website SOCIAL: Facebook Twitter
14:33
July 4, 2021
Catholic Lives, Episode 12--From Victim to Icon: Artemisia Gentileschi
This week's episode of Catholic Lives takes a look at the life and times of Artemisia Gentileschi (1593-1656?). A master of the Baroque era in an age when almost no woman attained such a stature as an artist, she is perhaps more well known for her somewhat scandalous life: raped at the age of 17 by a painter, she was vindicated in court, and went on to become a successful artist in her own right. In this episode we will discuss her life, and why should be considered a Catholic artist, despite her controversial life. Please subscribe to our podcast on Anchor and check out Controversies in Church History on our other platforms: LINKS: YouTube  Website SOCIAL: Facebook Twitter
20:55
July 3, 2021
Councils of the Church: The Council of Trent, 1545-1563
In 1545, the Catholic hierarchy met in the imperial city of Trent to decide how to respond to the Protestant Reformation. Over the course of eighteen years, the council responded to Protestant criticisms by reaffirming key doctrines but also took steps to reform abuses which contributed to the Protestant schism. Trent would reshape and revitalize the Catholic Church in Europe and set the stage as Catholicism became a global faith in the early modern era. In this episode, Controversies in Church History will looks qt the impact of the council and why its achievements are still important (and controversial!) in the life of the Church today. Please subscribe to our podcast on Anchor and check out Controversies in Church History on our other platforms: LINKS: YouTube  Website SOCIAL: Facebook Twitter
57:48
July 1, 2021
In the News: Catholic Indian Schools in Canada
In the past week, some disturbing stories have come out of Canada regarding the Residential School System, the educational apparatus set in the 19th century by the Canadian government to assimilate indigenous peoples into European civilization. The Canadian government contracted the Catholic Church and other churches in Canada to run these schools, and since the early 2000s they have been in the news as tales of abuse, neglect, and above all the forced relocation of Indian children to these schools has become more widely known. In this episode, we examine the news coming out of Canada and gives some factual background on this tragic and disturbing history. Please subscribe to our podcast on Anchor and check out Controversies in Church History on our other platforms: LINKS: YouTube Website SOCIAL: Facebook Twitter
23:24
July 1, 2021
Councils of the Church: The Council of Constance, 1414-1418
In 1415, cardinals, bishops and religious met in the imperial city of Constance to resolve the Great Western Schism. The Council Fathers would condemn the teachings of John Wycliffe, burn Hus at the stake, elect a new pope and end the schism. Most controversially, the Fathers of Constance would make claims for the power of councils that challenged the primacy of the papacy and inspire the Conciliarist movement of the 15th century, which claimed that ecumenical councils were superior to popes. The episode of Controversies in Church History will examine the history and legacy of Constance and the lessons it holds for us today. Please subscribe to our podcast on Anchor and check out Controversies in Church History on our other platforms: LINKS: YouTube  Website SOCIAL: Facebook Twitter
01:09:22
June 30, 2021
Vatican II: Continuity or Rupture?
In  1962, Pope John XXIII opened the Second Vatican Council in Rome.  Before the Council, the Church's liturgy was in Latin, its hierarchy  largely unquestioned by it members, and Catholics were everywhere  recognizable by their habit of abstaining from meat on Fridays, as much  as by their devotion to the Virgin Mary.  Everyone knew that Catholics  thought theirs was the one true Church, and that it was opposed to much in the modern world, most obviously contraception, abortion and sex outside marriage. Within five years of the Council's closing in 1965, all of these things had  changed--the liturgy was translated into vernacular, Catholics no longer  abstained from meat on Fridays, and vast numbers of its members--including its clergy--openly rejected its teaching on sexual  morality.  To this day, debates rage among Catholic clergy and scholars about what sort of changes Vatican II introduced. Please subscribe to our podcast on Anchor and check out Controversies in Church History on our other platforms: LINKS: YouTube Website SOCIAL: Facebook Twitter
01:26:37
June 29, 2021
Catholic Lives, Episode 11: American Moses
In this episode of Catholic Lives, we detail the life of Venerable Augustus Tolton, the first black American priest to be considered for canonization. In it we will discuss his journey from slavery to freedom, and from seminary in Rome to the priesthood, ministering to black Catholics in 19th century Chicago.   Please subscribe to our podcast on Anchor and check out Controversies in Church History on our other platforms: LINKS: YouTube Website SOCIAL: Facebook Twitter
36:03
June 25, 2021
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00:12
June 25, 2021
Catholic Lives Episode 10: the Knight Prisoner
In this episode, we look at the life and times of Sir Thomas Malory, author of Le Morte d'Arthur, the most famous of medieval renditions of the story of King Arthur, during the Wars of the Roses in fifteenth century England. Please subscribe to our podcast on Anchor and check out Controversies in Church History on our other platforms: LINKS: YouTube Website SOCIAL: Facebook Twitter
35:33
June 23, 2021
The Catholic Charismatic Movement, 1967-Present
*The talk is a bit rambling, as it was recorded while I was traveling. Apologies for any confusion or difficulty in listening.* In  1967, students and faculty at a weekend retreat at Duquesne University  in Pennsylvania experienced what they believed was a movement of the Holy Spirit, which led them to embrace what they called "baptism in the  Holy Spirit," a form of spirituality and devotion previously found in Pentecostal Christianity. Since the late 60s, the Catholic Charismatics  have made up a growing but controversial part of the global Catholic Church. This installment of Controversies in Church History discusses the historical origins and theology of the Catholic Charismatic movement within the Catholic Church, and discuss why it has sometimes become an object of controversy. Please subscribe to our podcast on Anchor and check out Controversies in Church History on our other platforms: LINKS: YouTube Website SOCIAL: Facebook Twitter
01:41:45
June 2, 2021
Dignitatis Humanae: Religious Liberty & the Church
Dignitatis Humanae, the document on religious liberty issued by the second Vatican Council, states that "that all men are to be immune from coercion on the part of individuals or of social groups and of any human power." And yet, nearly a century before, pope Pius IX condemned the proposition that "every man is free to embrace and profess that religion which...he shall consider true." Because it seemed to contradict previous magisterial teachings, Dignitatis Humanae has caused controversy ever since its promulgation. Controversies in Church History looks at the history of the Church's teaching on religious freedom since the 19th century and its bearing on the status of Dignitatis Humanae. Please subscribe to our podcast on Anchor and check out Controversies in Church History on our other platforms: LINKS: YouTube Website SOCIAL: Facebook Twitter
01:19:49
May 2, 2021
The Modernist Crisis, c.1890-1920
In the early twentieth century, a group of Catholic scholars tried to  argue that the Catholic Church needed to adapt fundamental doctrines of  its faith to match with the findings of modern historical and biblical  scholarship. In doing so, they challenged both some of the most  fundamental doctrines of the Catholic faith, as well as the authority of  its hierarchy. In this lecture, we give a broad overview of the causes  that led these scholars to deny traditional Church teaching, and why  Pope Pius X condemned their beliefs as "the synthesis of all heresies."  More  than a century later, it is still a lightning rod for criticism of the  Catholic Church and its relationship to the modern world. In this episode of Controversies in Church History, we will explore what  modernism was and who subscribed to it, as well as examine its legacy  for the Church today. Please subscribe to our podcast on Anchor and check out Controversies in Church History on our other platforms: LINKS: YouTube Website SOCIAL: Facebook Twitter
01:27:40
April 7, 2021
Evolution and the Catholic Church, 1859-Present
In this episode, we take a look at the history of how the Catholic Church has navigated the issues surrounding the scientific theory of evolution, what its teaching is regarding evolution, and how it came to that position.  From the initial reception of Darwin's ideas, Catholics have debated the implications of his idea for the Catholic faith, and over time it has come to be accepted by most Catholics, if only in modified form. How and why that has happened, and what the relationship of evolutionary theory is to Catholic theology today, are also touched upon.  Please subscribe to our podcast on Anchor and check out Controversies in Church History on our other platforms: LINKS: YouTube Website SOCIAL: Facebook Twitter
01:21:30
March 2, 2021
Development of Doctrine, 1845-Present
The episode of Controversies in Church History examines the theory of doctrinal development in the history of the  Catholic Church in the 19th and 20th centuries. Associated with St. John Henry Newman, we will discuss how this idea became has become central to debates on controversial issues in the life of the Church today. LINKS: YouTube  Website SOCIAL: Facebook Twitter
01:29:07
February 2, 2021
Catholic Lives Ep. 9: Captive, Convert and Mother Superior in Colonial America
This episode of Catholic Lives focuses on the extraordinary Esther Wheelwright (1696-1780).  Born in a Puritan family in colonial Massachusetts, she was abducted from her family  at age seven by a Native American tribe, eventually converted to Catholicism and became mother superior in a convent of colonial Canada.  Please subscribe to our podcast on Anchor and check out Controversies in Church History on our other platforms: LINKS: YouTube Website SOCIAL: Facebook Twitter
23:24
August 24, 2020
Catholic Lives Ep. 8: The Poet-Priest of the South and the Confederate General
Our eighth installment of Catholic Lives is a two for one deal! We look at the lives of two men loyal to the Confederacy during the American Civil War, one of whom entered the Catholic Church after the war was over. Father Abram Ryan (1838-1886) was a priest and poet, know both for his poetry eulogizing the fallen South but also for his great preaching and love for the Catholic faith.  James Longstreet (1821-1904) was the second in command to Robert E. Lee during the war, and afterwards became a pariah in the South for criticizing Lee's decision making at Gettysburg.  Please subscribe to our podcast on Anchor and check out Controversies in Church History on our other platforms: LINKS: YouTube Website SOCIAL: Facebook Twitter
32:35
July 31, 2020
Humanae Vitae
*Recorded on May 27, 2020* In 1968, Pope Paul VI issued his encyclical on the regulation of birth,  which reaffirmed Catholic teaching on the nature of human sexuality. The  ensuing controversy led to open defiance of the encyclical by both  clergy and laity alike, and so great was the outcry against it that Paul  VI never issued another encyclical during his reign as pope. This episode discusses the origins of the encyclical as well as the widespread conflict that followed its promulgation, and grapples with enduring impact of that conflict. Please subscribe to our podcast on Anchor and check out Controversies in Church History on our other platforms: LINKS: YouTube Website SOCIAL: Facebook Twitter
01:16:38
May 31, 2020
The Case of Edgaro Mortara
In 1858, a scandal rocked Europe. The Vatican removed an eight year old  Jewish boy from his family and pope Pius IX raised him as a Catholic. The boy's name was Edgaro Mortara, and he would eventually become a  Catholic priest. The Vatican based its decision on the claims that the  boy's nurse had baptized him during a serious illness when he was one  year old, and that therefore he had a right to a Christian upbringing.  In an era of revolutionary change throughout Europe and the world,  non-Catholics were incensed, Jewish organizations mounted a campaign in  the press to have the boy returned to his family, and even Catholic  governments in France, Italy and Austria issued protests for Pius IX to  relent, but he refused. In this episode, we delve into why Pius IX  refused to return the child Edgaro Mortara to his parents, and its  lasting impact on the Church today.   Please subscribe to our podcast on Anchor and check out Controversies in Church History on our other platforms: LINKS: YouTube Website SOCIAL: Facebook Twitter
01:06:21
April 29, 2020
The Great Western Schism, 1378-1417
In recent years, the existence of a "pontiff emeritus" has caused some confusion for faithful Catholics, with two living popes at the same time. But imagine if there were THREE living popes, none of them "retired," all with their own rival supporters among the cardinals of the Church--what would this be like? How would we know whom to follow as Catholics? In  this episode, Controversies in Church History details the Great Western  Schism (1378-1417), when just such a scenario took place in the Church,  and examines how the Church became divided between rival popes, how  this was resolved, how people at the time experienced it, and what we  can learn from this messy episode in the Church's long history. Please subscribe to our podcast on Anchor and check out Controversies in Church History on our other platforms: LINKS: YouTube  Website SOCIAL: Facebook Twitter
01:08:13
March 31, 2020
Great Heresies: John Wyclif and the Lollards
He has been called "The Morning Star of the Reformation" by Protestants,  and is sometimes regarded as the last great scholastic theologian of the Middle Ages. He denied the doctrine of transubstantiation, translated  parts of the bible from Latin to English, and sent lay preachers out  into the English countryside to teach poor people.  His followers were  condemned by the Church and persecuted by English authorities, but a scattered few remained in existence at the time of the Reformation in  England. In this episode, Controversies in Church History retails the exploits of the medieval theologian John Wyclif, why the Church condemned his teachings, and what we can learn from his challenge to the Church's faith. Please subscribe to our podcast on Anchor and check out Controversies in Church History on our other platforms. LINKS: YouTube Website SOCIAL: Facebook Twitter
55:54
February 25, 2020
The Reformation of the World: the Gregorian Reform, c. 1050-1150
In 1077, the Emperor Henry IV did homage to pope Gregory VII at Canossa in  northern Italy, who in return absolved him of the excommunication he had pronounced upon the Emperor.  The most powerful man in Europe submitted himself to the bishop of Rome, who not only excommunicated him  but even declared him deposed as emperor and absolved his subjects from their allegiance to him. The Gregorian reform movement saw popes clash with kings, church reformers impose celibacy upon the clergy and enjoin their vision of a purified Church on medieval society, lay and clerical alike. In the next lecture, we will explain why and how reforming clergy like Gregory VII reshaped the life of the Catholic Church in the Middle Ages, in ways that affect us as Catholics directly to this day. Please subscribe to our podcast on Anchor and check out Controversies in Church History on our other platforms: LINKS: YouTube Website SOCIAL: Facebook Twitter
50:05
January 29, 2020
1054 and All That: the Latin-Byzantine Schism
In the year 1054 AD, representatives of Pope Leo IX and the patriarch of  Constantinople, pronounced a mutual excommunication upon each other. This event usually is remembered as the beginning of the schism that has  lasted since then between the Catholicism and the Eastern Orthodox. But  how did this excommunication come about?  And was this event really the  beginning of the division between two rival versions of apostolic Christianity? Can this division be healed? "1054 and All That: the Latin-Byzantine Schism" grapples with these questions and more. Please subscribe to our podcast on Anchor and check out Controversies in Church History on our other platforms: LINKS: YouTube Website SOCIAL: Facebook Twitter
01:03:51
January 29, 2020
The Arian Crisis, c.330-381 AD
The  First Council of Nicaea (325) proclaimed the doctrine that Jesus was  one with the Father, and condemned the idea that he was a mere creature.  Yet with a few years, that belief--that Christ could not be truly God  and man--gained the acceptance of nearly every bishop in the Christian  world, and the support of numerous Roman emperors.  How did a belief condemned by an ecumenical council dominate the Church's hierarchy for so long, and how did it fail to successfully perpetuate itself in the end? The second episode of Controversies in Church History for the 2019-2020 season investigates the history of how Nicene orthodoxy eventually overcame the opposition of the various Arian theologies. Please subscribe to our podcast on Anchor and check out Controversies in Church History on our other platforms. LINKS: YouTube  Website SOCIAL: Facebook Twitter
01:00:54
October 29, 2019
The First Council of Nicaea
"I believe in one God, the Father Almighty..."  Each week, Catholics  recite the Nicene Creed in the liturgy.  Why do we do this? The first lecture of Controversies in Church History for the 2019-2020  academic year will be on the First Council of Nicaea, the first  ecumenical (or general) council in the history of the Christian Church. In 325, the bishops assembled promulgated a creed which is the basis of  the one we recite today.  Critics in the past have asserted that the  Council corrupted Christianity's original message, and that the council  invented the canon of Scripture, among other accusations.  Come learn the history of this momentous event, which for the first time bound all  Christians to believe doctrines as a test of orthodoxy, on pain of excommunication from the Church. Please subscribe to our podcast on Anchor and check out Controversies in Church History on our other platforms. LINKS: YouTube Website SOCIAL: Facebook Twitter
01:00:55
October 3, 2019
The Wars of Religion, 1524-1649
"Why were there no wars of religion in the pagan world?" the philosopher Jean Jacques Rousseau once asked. His answer was that their religions made no universal claims, unlike Christianity, which he called "the most  violent despotism in the world." "The Wars of Religion, 1524-1549," discusses the wars fought between Catholics and Protestants in the 16th and 17th centuries, and how much Christian faith contributed to the wars of that age. Was Christianity responsible for the violent wars of the  period?  Or were there other factors which complicate this received  picture of the era?  Listen to find out! Please subscribe to our podcast on Anchor and check out Controversies in Church History on our other platforms. LINKS: YouTube Website SOCIAL: Facebook Twitter
01:03:27
August 20, 2019
Black Legends: Myths of the Spanish Conquest
In the sixteenth century, the Spanish brutally conquered a more civilized  and advanced Aztec civilization, and imposed Catholicism on the native peoples of the Americas.    Or did they?   In this special episode, Dr. Ezekiel Stear of the University of Auburn, dispels the myths surrounding the Spanish colonization of the Americas,  and the conversion of their native peoples. In this lecture, Dr. Stear  provides us with some background on the "Black Legend," the propaganda  of Spanish rivals in the early modern period, which became the received  wisdom about alleged Catholic cruelty to Native Americans, in contrast  to the Protestant empires of Britain and the Netherlands.  (Note the volume may be low on this episode, and you may need to turn it up to listen.) Please subscribe to our podcast on Anchor and check out Controversies in Church History on our other platforms. LINKS: YouTube Website SOCIAL: Facebook Twitter
01:02:24
August 6, 2019
The Church and the Holocaust
*Originally recorded April 30 2018* This episode of Controversies in Church History assesses the charges against the Catholic Church and pope Pius XII as being culpable in some way for the Holocaust during WWII. In this talk, we explore the Church's relationship with Nazi Germany, and its actions with regards to the Jewish people during the war. The talks concludes that the charges are  mostly false, while acknowledging the sensitivity of the issues  involved. Please subscribe to our podcast on Anchor and check out Controversies in Church History on our other platforms. LINKS: YouTube Website SOCIAL: Facebook Twitter
01:11:45
July 26, 2019
The First Vatican Council & Papal Infallibility
*Recorded March 26 2018* Popes have always exercised "immediate jurisdiction" over the entire  Church, and have always been proclaimed to speak infallibly when pronouncing upon matter of faith and morals--haven't they? Though popes long claimed some sort of infallibility with regards to their teaching,  it was only in the late 19th century that papal infallibility was  solemnly defined as a dogma of the Church. In this episode, we discuss the debate over the definition of papal infallibility which took place  at the First Vatican Council in 1870. It details the immediate  background for the definition, what the major criticisms of it were, and  what papal infallibility means for Catholics today. Please subscribe to our podcast on Anchor and check out Controversies in Church History on our other platforms. LINKS: YouTube Website SOCIAL: Facebook Twitter
59:09
July 9, 2019
Catholic Lives Ep. 6: The Pope That Excommunicated Napoleon
This week's episode of Catholic Lives recalls the life of Barnaba Chiaramonti (1742-1823), known to history as Pope Pius VII (1800-1823), the pope who dealt with the aftermath of the French Revolution in Europe, including the general and statesman Napoleon Bonaparte, whom he excommunicated in 1809.   Please subscribe to our podcast on Anchor and check out Controversies in Church History on our other platforms. LINKS: YouTube Website SOCIAL: Facebook Twitter
20:32
June 30, 2019
The Trial and Condemnation of Galileo
*Recorded on February 26 2018* Ever since the Inquisition condemned him in 1633, critics have used the story of Galileo Galilei to illustrate the conflict between faith and science, and the obscurantism of the Catholic Church. In this episode, we will explain why the Church condemned Galileo's heliocentric theory, and what the ramifications are of this historical event for the  relationship between the Church and science, reason and faith in our  world today. on the condemnation of Galileo Galilei (1564-1642) will discuss why the Inquisition condemned his word. This episode talk discusses aspects of the Galileo affair, which do not fit the conventional narrative, and actually exonerates the Church from much (though not all) of the calumnies it has received over the centuries. Please subscribe to our podcast on Anchor and check out Controversies in Church History on our other platforms. LINKS: YouTube Website SOCIAL: Facebook Twitter
01:04:08
June 24, 2019
Catholic Lives Ep. 5: The Man Who Volunteered for Auschwitz
In this episode of Catholic Lives, we discuss the heroism of Witold Pilecki (pronounced Vitold Piletski, 1901-1948), a member of the Polish resistance against the Nazi occupation of Poland who volunteered to enter the concentration camp of Auschwitz to gain information. Captain Pilecki wrote a hundred page report on the camp, and both it and his life testify to the enduring power of the Catholic faith and the human spirit. Please subscribe to our podcast on Anchor and check out Controversies in Church History on our other platforms. LINKS: YouTube Website SOCIAL: Facebook Twitter
13:17
June 11, 2019
The Protestant Reformation
*Recorded January 29 2018* This episode covers one of the most divisive events in all of Church  history: the Protestant Reformation. Why did the Reformation happen? Is  it still important for Catholics today? This talk will address some of  these basic questions, and provide some basic historical background for  those still unfamiliar with the great divide within the Western  Christian world. Please subscribe to our podcast on Anchor and check out Controversies in Church History on our other platforms. LINKS: YouTube Website SOCIAL: Facebook Twitter
01:33:16
June 7, 2019
Catholic Lives Ep. 4: The Last Roman Emperor
Today we take a brief look at the life of Constantine XI Dragases Palaiologos (1404-1453), the last Emperor of the Romans, who came to the throne of Constantinople at the very end of the Roman (i.e. "Byzantine") empire's life, and fought a heroic 52 day siege against Ottoman forces before succumbing in May of 1453.   Please subscribe to our podcast on Anchor and check out Controversies in Church History on our other platforms. LINKS: YouTube Website SOCIAL: Facebook Twitter
13:06
May 29, 2019
The Inquisition
*Recorded November 27 2017* This episode addresses the origins and function of the various  institutions that that have gone under the name of "inquisition" in the  Catholic Church since the Middle Ages, and separates the history of  those institutions from the many myths surrounding them in our popular  culture. It give a broad overview of how the Church has treated heretics, how an "inquisition" as a legal process was established in the Middle Ages, debunks some myths about its destructiveness, and explains how it came to used in propaganda against the Church from the Reformation onward.   Please subscribe to our podcast on Anchor and check out Controversies in Church History on our other platforms. LINKS: YouTube Website SOCIAL: Facebook Twitter
01:08:07
May 21, 2019
Catholic Lives Ep. 3: A Woman Author in Charlemagne's Empire
The latest episode focuses on Dhuoda, the 9th noble woman known to us only through her Handbook, the work she wrote for her eldest son William.  Dhuoda's handbook instructs her son on how to live a Christian life, and prepare him for public life as an aristocrat.  Written during a time of war an turmoil during the Carolingian period, Dhuoda's handbook is a testament to a life filled with grief but also a strong and enduring Catholic faith. Please subscribe to our podcast on Anchor and check out Controversies in Church History on our other platforms. LINKS: YouTube Website SOCIAL: Facebook Twitter
18:40
May 16, 2019
The Crusades
*Recorded October 30 2017* What  were the Crusades?  Were they merely wars of conquest?  Did they  represent a perversion of Christian teachings?  Were the Crusades "holy wars," the way they are often presented in popular culture?  This episode provides an overview of the origins, outcome and meaning of the Crusading movement of the Middle Ages. Please subscribe to our podcast on Anchor and check out Controversies in Church History on our other platforms. LINKS: YouTube Website SOCIAL: Facebook Twitter
01:13:56
May 9, 2019
Deaconesses in the Early Church
In this podcast, we discuss the evidence for the ordination of Deaconesses in the early Church, and the arguments for whether or not they were ordained in the same way men were in the early Church.  Please subscribe to our podcast on Anchor and check out Controversies in Church History on our other platforms. LINKS: YouTube Website SOCIAL: Facebook Twitter
41:50
May 4, 2019
Catholic Lives Ep. 2: Konrad Adenauer (1876-1967)
Konrad Adenauer, Chancellor of the Federal Republic of West Germany, from 1949-1963, is the subject of this episode of Catholic Lives. Please subscribe to our podcast on Anchor and check out Controversies in Church History on our other platforms. LINKS: YouTube Website SOCIAL: Facebook Twitter
11:55
April 30, 2019
Liturgy Wars: Catholic Liturgy Since Vatican II
Within  living memory, the liturgy of the Latin rite provided a visible focus  of unity for Catholics.  It possessed a universal liturgical language  that distinguished Catholicism wherever it was present, supplemented by  devotional practices such as processions, Eucharistic adoration and  other aids to faith.  To many Catholics, it appeared the embodiment of  the Church's unchanging nature. By contrast, today the liturgy of the  Latin Church is a source of controversy, over virtually every aspect of  the liturgy, whether it be which direction the priest faces, the music  played, or the vestments worn by the clergy, and has been the source of  fierce debates and division among clergy and laity alike. "Liturgy Wars: Catholic Liturgy After Vatican II" will describe the efforts to reform the Catholic liturgy in the 20th century and how those efforts led to the divisions which persist within the Roman Catholic Church today. Please subscribe to our podcast on Anchor and check out Controversies in Church History on our other platforms. LINKS: YouTube Website SOCIAL: Facebook Twitter
01:13:52
April 30, 2019
Necessary Additions? The Marian Dogmas, 1854 & 1950
Only twice in history have popes explicitly invoked their infallible teaching authority, and both times they did so to defend teachings concerning the Virgin Mary. "Necessary  Additions? The Marian Dogmas, 1854 & 1950," discusses how and why popes Piux IX and Pius XII felt it necessary to invoke their authority to defend these doctrines, and why they caused such consternation for Protestant and Orthodox Christians, who object both to the content but also the authority of the pope to define such  matters of faith. Please subscribe to our podcast on Anchor and check out Controversies in Church History on our other platforms. LINKS: YouTube Website SOCIAL: Facebook Twitter
50:51
March 26, 2019
Catholic Lives Ep. 1: The Battalion of St. Patrick
The first episode of a new series I am calling "Catholic Lives."  Each episode will be a brief look at the lives of Catholics in history who have been overlooked or not as well known to our listeners.  For our first episode, recorded shortly after St. Patrick's Day, we will look at the brief but fascinating career of the Battalion of St. Patrick, a unit in the Mexican army during the U.S.-Mexican War of 1846-1848, comprised entirely of former American soldiers who had deserted the U. S. Army to fight for Mexico.  Please subscribe to our podcast on Anchor and check out Controversies in Church History on our other platforms. LINKS: YouTube Website SOCIAL: Facebook Twitter
19:28
March 21, 2019
Clerical Celibacy in the Early Church
Why does the Catholic Church require celibacy of its priests?  Was this  discipline an imposition of the medieval Church, or is there a basis for  this discipline in the Early Church?  This episode of Controversies in Church considers these questions, and examines what the Church's practice of celibacy in its earliest days and how it came to be made mandatory for priests in the Western Church--though not for the East.  Please subscribe to our podcast on Anchor and check out Controversies in Church History on our other platforms. LINKS: YouTube Website SOCIAL: Facebook Twitter
47:43
March 7, 2019
By This Sign Conquer: the Conversion of Constantine
Christianity was a persecuted, minority religion within the Roman Empire until, in  the year 312, the Western Emperor Constantine decreed toleration for the Christian Church, and became its patron, endowing it with land,  buildings, wealth, and a status it had never before attained. Throughout history, many have claimed that Constantine's embrace damaged  the Church by allying it to wealth and power, corrupting its message, and has been the source of criticism for many centuries. "By This Sign Conquer: the Conversion of Constantine," discusses the historical background to this momentous event, and also outlines the long standing controversy over the effect Constantine's embrace of Christianity had on the Church, from Enlightenment philosophes to Dan Brown. Please subscribe to our podcast on Anchor and check out Controversies in Church History on our other platforms. LINKS: YouTube Website SOCIAL: Facebook Twitter
55:24
February 2, 2019