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The DEC Podcast - Dance Education in the 21st Century

The DEC Podcast - Dance Education in the 21st Century

By Dance Education Canada
Dance Education Canada strives to uphold high standards for the dance education industry. We are committed to providing professional programs of excellent quality, in an environment within which dance educators realize the fullest extent of their talents.

Listen in as we discuss current and relevant topics related to 21st century Dance Education.
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Embodied Cognition in Dance: In conversation with the Head of the Department of Dance Studies at the University of Malta

The DEC Podcast - Dance Education in the 21st Century

Embodied Cognition in Dance: In conversation with the Head of the Department of Dance Studies at the University of Malta

The DEC Podcast - Dance Education in the 21st Century

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Culturally Relevant and Brain-Based Dance Pedagogy: A conversation with the Chair of the Institute for Dunham Technique
At Dance Education Canada we know how important dance pedagogy is. We consider a thorough and in-depth knowledge of dance pedagogy just as or even more important than a teachers experience in technical skill. It does not matter what you are teaching, whether it be a sport, art form or subject in school, if the teacher is not able to reach the students, then learning cannot happen. Today’s conversation supports our vision and passion for the study of dance pedagogy. It puts the student first. Instead of more traditional approaches to teaching dance that involve a teacher standing at the front of the studio and teaching in a teacher centered learning environment, the learner and the way they learn becomes the focus for lesson planning, goal setting and progressions. Susannah’s research on brain-based dance pedagogy connects the fields of neuroscience and dance education, to support a dancer centered learning environment. GUEST: Susannah “Sukie” Keita has spent equal portions of her career as a public-school educator, college professor, and performing artist.  A student of the Joffrey tradition, she broadened her palette in New York City before traveling westward to dance and choreograph with regional companies including Orts Theatre of Dance and New Articulations. She earned an MFA at the University of Arizona and then became a certified instructor of the Dunham Technique, which guided her work as a dance educator in public schools. She later led the Dance Department at Grand Canyon University from 2010-2020, establishing two successful dance degree programs. She resides in Phoenix where she continues to write, teach, dance, choreograph, and consult through @SukieDance, as well as serve on the Arizona Dance Education Organization and as chair with the Institute for Dunham Technique Certification. INSTA: @sukiedance Disclaimer: Any and all ideas and information presented in the following podcast are those of the presenter. The presenter is not an employee or representative of Dance Education Canada (DEC), and is participating in this podcast on a voluntary basis. The ideas and information they express do not necessarily represent the views of the DEC or its partners, employees or affiliates. The ideas and information expressed herein are for general educational purposes only. They should not necessarily be applied to specific individual situations. DEC recommends consulting an expert or professional regarding specific medical, legal or business concerns. DEC makes no representations about the accuracy or suitability of this content. Please note that Canada's National Academy of Dance Education is now operating as Dance Education Canada.
20:31
October 11, 2021
Reaching Dancers Unconscious Experience through the Skinner Releasing Technique: A conversation with a PhD in Dance Research Candidate
Most of us likely have some understanding of the philosophy’s behind the practice of yoga. The mind, body and spiritual connection and experience it brings through movement, meditation and breath work, but we do not often discuss the unconscious experience that is dance. Such an intimate art form that has us vulnerably expose our body, feelings, ideas and stories, must have deeper processes than the superficial physical form we see. So many of us are so passionate about dance, and cannot imagine it not being in our lives, but why? Is there a deeper connection in the experience of movement, that few dancers understand? Today, we will discuss reaching dancers unconscious experience with the help of Lizzy Le Quesne. GUEST: Lizzy Le Quesne (UK) is a contemporary dance artist, educator and researcher concerned with somatic processes of embodied aliveness: negotiating energy, agency and emotion within spatial, energetic and relational contexts. Originally trained in classical ballet, then contemporary dance and somatics, Lizzy is a certified teacher of Skinner Releasing Technique - which profoundly informs her experience and perception of the forms, the processes and the meaning of dance. Lizzy teaches Skinner Releasing to professional dancers, dance companies and within dance conservatoires and universities internationally and within the wider community and arts-in-health field – supporting dancers to connect with and articulate deep sensory awareness as routes to increased clarity, simplicity and power. She is currently engaged in a PhD at the Centre for Dance Research Coventry University, investigating Skinner Releasing and processes of embodied emancipation. Her research and writing on art, dance and embodiment is published extensively in both academic and wider cultural contexts. LINKEDIN: Lizzy Le Quesne WEBISTE: lizzylequesne.com Disclaimer: Any and all ideas and information presented in the following podcast are those of the presenter. The presenter is not an employee or representative of Dance Education Canada (DEC), and is participating in this podcast on a voluntary basis. The ideas and information they express do not necessarily represent the views of the DEC or its partners, employees or affiliates. The ideas and information expressed herein are for general educational purposes only. They should not necessarily be applied to specific individual situations. DEC recommends consulting an expert or professional regarding specific medical, legal or business concerns. DEC makes no representations about the accuracy or suitability of this content. Please note that Canada's National Academy of Dance Education is now operating as Dance Education Canada.
41:07
October 11, 2021
Helping Children Succeed in Performance: A conversation with Lower School Principal for the Houston Ballet
Dance Education Canada is serious about preparing dance educators to work with children under all conditions and scenarios. We know that dance educators require access and exposure to current training, experience, expertise and insight to be able to apply tools tips and strategies to help their dancers realize the fullest extent of their talents. But what do we do during rehearsals? These stressful moments before a competition, or during a dress rehearsal, can cloud the purpose of these experiences for the dancers. How do we manage our own feelings while allowing students to improve and progress during rehearsals in so that they succeed in performance. Todays’ guest will provide us with tips, tricks and tools you can use when rehearing with children in so that they can succeed in performance. GUEST: As a young dancer, Elisabeth Everitt attended the Houston Ballet Academy on full scholarship, and trained at both the Van Metre School of Dance and the Washington School of Ballet. She has danced professionally with the Houston Ballet, Louisville Ballet, and Dominic Walsh Dance Theatre. More recently, she has performed various character roles with Houston Ballet and Houston Ballet Academy. Beth attends regular teacher training workshops and is a certified GYROTONIC instructor.  Beth currently holds the position of Lower School Principal and Children’s Ballet Master for the Houston Ballet Academy. INSTA: @everittbeth WEBISTE: @houstonballet.org Disclaimer: Any and all ideas and information presented in the following podcast are those of the presenter. The presenter is not an employee or representative of Dance Education Canada (DEC), and is participating in this podcast on a voluntary basis. The ideas and information they express do not necessarily represent the views of the DEC or its partners, employees or affiliates. The ideas and information expressed herein are for general educational purposes only. They should not necessarily be applied to specific individual situations. DEC recommends consulting an expert or professional regarding specific medical, legal or business concerns. DEC makes no representations about the accuracy or suitability of this content. Please note that Canada's National Academy of Dance Education is now operating as Dance Education Canada.
30:29
October 11, 2021
Applied Natya Therapy - Integrating Ancient Wisdom with Modern Science: Insight from an Applied Natya Therapist
Dancers often describe both the mental and physical healing benefits they experience from the art of movement. Experiencing feelings of calmness, and an overall sense of body wellness are among a few of these experiences described.  Movement as therapy is practiced all over the world, and today we have the honour of speaking with an applied Natya therapist from India, Dr Dimple Kaur. Listen in as we learn about a 5000-year old Indian text, that promotes healing through movement. GUEST: Dimple Kaur Malhotra is as scholars, scientist, researcher, teacher and creator with over 20 years of experience working on the confluence of mind, body and emotions to help reach Self Actualization. She is Psychotherapist, performer and dancer.  She has through her research created Applied Natya Therapy which uses the 5000-year-old text in healing though movements. Spending her time between Southern California and India, she creates performances across dance, drama and theatre with a view to awaken and bring forward societal issues which drive conversations leading to impactful changes. She has authored multiple publications dealing with emotions and use of movement in behavioral changes. INSTA: @dimplekaurg LINKEDIN: Dimple Kaur WEBISTE: dimplekaur.com Disclaimer: Any and all ideas and information presented in the following podcast are those of the presenter. The presenter is not an employee or representative of Dance Education Canada (DEC), and is participating in this podcast on a voluntary basis. The ideas and information they express do not necessarily represent the views of the DEC or its partners, employees or affiliates. The ideas and information expressed herein are for general educational purposes only. They should not necessarily be applied to specific individual situations. DEC recommends consulting an expert or professional regarding specific medical, legal or business concerns. DEC makes no representations about the accuracy or suitability of this content. Please note that Canada's National Academy of Dance Education is now operating as Dance Education Canada.
55:33
October 11, 2021
The Ballet Teacher… the responsibility of the vocation in conversation - A discussion with a PhD Candidate from the Vaganova Ballet Company
At Dance Education Canada we are leading change through dance teacher training acknowledging that the role of dance educator that once was no longer suits our 21st century classrooms, studios and students. The responsibility of the vocation can cover a wide spectrum of topics, however today we will focus on the role, specifically pedagogical practices that support overall healthy child development, while discussing the importance of training, certification and continued professional development. Today’s discussion will focus the role of the ballet teacher, how the role has adapted, and why continued adaptation is necessary in today’s world. Today sharing his experience with and insight on the role of the ballet teacher is a ballet teacher, dancer and doctoral candidate Mr. Gabriel Stoyanov. GUEST: Born in the capital of Bulgaria, Gabriel Stoyanov Gabriel is an acclaimed teacher and award winning choreographer. He began his dance training at the age of five with the folklore ensemble “Rosna Kitka” and continued his training at the National School of Dance Art. At thirteen, started training with Krassimira Koldamova in her school while continuing with his education at the state dance school. In 2012 he was accepted to the prestigious National Music Academy “Pancho Vladigerov”  for Ballet Pedagogy, 2017 graduated with a Bachelor’s degree and the title of Ballet Master/Pedagogue and followed his bachloers obtaining a Masters in the same field. In 2020, he was admitted to the doctorate program at the “Vaganova Ballet Academy” specializing in  “Choreographic art”. INSTA: @gabriel.stoyanov LINKEDIN: Gabriel Stoyanov WEBISTE: gabrielstoyanov.com Disclaimer: Any and all ideas and information presented in the following podcast are those of the presenter. The presenter is not an employee or representative of Dance Education Canada (DEC), and is participating in this podcast on a voluntary basis. The ideas and information they express do not necessarily represent the views of the DEC or its partners, employees or affiliates. The ideas and information expressed herein are for general educational purposes only. They should not necessarily be applied to specific individual situations. DEC recommends consulting an expert or professional regarding specific medical, legal or business concerns. DEC makes no representations about the accuracy or suitability of this content. Please note that Canada's National Academy of Dance Education is now operating as Dance Education Canada.
27:02
October 11, 2021
Dance – For All Abilities - A conversation with the Founder and Executive Artistic Director of Abilities Dance
At Dance Education Canada, we embrace a world of dance that is inclusive of all ages, levels and abilities. We welcome dancers from varying backgrounds and encourage all those interested seeking this unique artistic experience to do so. Now, you will notice on our podcast platform that this is not our first podcast on the topic of inclusive dance classes, yet always welcome another perspective, approach and insight into this topic, because we feel that this message and these adaptations need to continue to be recognized, discussed and made. So today we are excited to welcome yet another expert in this field to our program the founder and both executive and artistic director of Abilities Dance Ms. Ellice Patterson. Ellice Patterson is the founder/executive and artistic director of Abilities Dance, a Boston-based dance company that welcomes artists with and without disabilities. Ellice earned her Bachelor of Arts in Biological Sciences from Wellesley College and her Masters of Science in Management Studies from Boston University Questrom School of Business.  She is also the executive director of BalletRox, a Boston-based dance education program that provides youth with access to quality dance education in Boston Public Schools. Ellice has given lectures and workshops at schools, universities, and organizations across the country, some of which include Harvard Graduate School of Education, Fidelity Investments and Boston University. INSTA: @abilitiesdanceboston @ballet_rox WEBSITE: abilitiesdanceboston.org     balletrox.info Disclaimer: Any and all ideas and information presented in the following podcast are those of the presenter. The presenter is not an employee or representative of Dance Education Canada (DEC), and is participating in this podcast on a voluntary basis. The ideas and information they express do not necessarily represent the views of the DEC or its partners, employees or affiliates. The ideas and information expressed herein are for general educational purposes only. They should not necessarily be applied to specific individual situations. DEC recommends consulting an expert or professional regarding specific medical, legal or business concerns. DEC makes no representations about the accuracy or suitability of this content. Please note that Canada's National Academy of Dance Education is now operating as Dance Education Canada.
14:34
October 11, 2021
Dance – The Global Connection: Insight from the Founder of Ballet Rising
Dance Education Canada is proud of our global community of presenters, researchers, scholars, academics, scientists, teachers and students. We know how important a worldly view of dance is and believe it is an essential part of a dance educators knowledge, understanding, practice and training. Today, we are excited to welcome Mr Casey Herd as he joins us for our discussion on a worldly view of dance and how it connects us all. GUEST: Casey Herd began his ballet training at The School for Ballet West & graduated from The Kirov Academy of Ballet in Washington D.C. He began his professional career with American Ballet Theatre in New York City, became a principal dancer with the Pacific Northwest Ballet in Seattle dancer and in 2008 joined the Dutch National Ballet as a principal dancer. After retiring from the stage in 2016, Casey founded Ballet Rising, as part of his life-long passion for art, photography, history, sociology, and travel. INSTA: @balletrising LINKEDIN: Ballet Rising WEBISTE: balletrising.com Disclaimer: Any and all ideas and information presented in the following podcast are those of the presenter. The presenter is not an employee or representative of Dance Education Canada (DEC), and is participating in this podcast on a voluntary basis. The ideas and information they express do not necessarily represent the views of the DEC or its partners, employees or affiliates. The ideas and information expressed herein are for general educational purposes only. They should not necessarily be applied to specific individual situations. DEC recommends consulting an expert or professional regarding specific medical, legal or business concerns. DEC makes no representations about the accuracy or suitability of this content. Please note that Canada's National Academy of Dance Education is now operating as Dance Education Canada.
19:33
October 11, 2021
Dance as an Environmental Practice: Insight from a PhD Researcher
Dance Education Canada is passionate about providing you with access to the most current practices and research in dance education. Today we are excited to bring to you, yet again another unique topic of discussion as we welcome Andrew Sanger who has conducted his PhD research on dance as an environmental practice. Listen in as we discuss his research, methodology and its affect on the dancers. GUEST: Originally from Michigan, U.S.A, Andrew Sanger received a BS in Dance Honours from Wayne State University in Detroit and completed a MA in Dance Anthropology from the University of Roehampton in London, UK. He has performed works by Dwight Rhoden, Doug Varone, Jody Oberfelder, and Biba Bell in collaboration with sculpture artist Nick Cave. Andrew has presented his choreography in the US, UK, and Spain. As a scholar-artist his research interests investigate the entanglements of embodiment, queer theory, ecology, dance, and phenomenology. He is now teaching as a Visiting Lecturer at the University of Roehampton and an anthropology PhD Researcher at University College London researching dance as an environmental practice. INSTA: @seraphaun WEBSITE: Andrew Sanger Disclaimer: Any and all ideas and information presented in the following podcast are those of the presenter. The presenter is not an employee or representative of Dance Education Canada (DEC), and is participating in this podcast on a voluntary basis. The ideas and information they express do not necessarily represent the views of the DEC or its partners, employees or affiliates. The ideas and information expressed herein are for general educational purposes only. They should not necessarily be applied to specific individual situations. DEC recommends consulting an expert or professional regarding specific medical, legal or business concerns. DEC makes no representations about the accuracy or suitability of this content. Please note that Canada's National Academy of Dance Education is now operating as Dance Education Canada.
31:35
October 11, 2021
Hiring Graduates: A company perspective on what directors are looking for. - In conversation with the founder and director of The National Ballet of Ireland
Dance Education Canada knows that Dance Educators work hard to mentor their dancers and prepare them for a career in the field of dance, but preparing young dancers for such a diverse world of dance, with varying expectations across companies can be a challenge, which is why we know that today’s conversation with the Artistic Director of Ballet Ireland Anne Maher, will help provide some guidance and advice into how to better support your dancers transition to their post-secondary dance experiences. GUEST: Dublin-born Anne Maher is one of Ireland’s most respected voices in ballet and dance, with an international career spanning over 35 years. Anne was awarded a scholarship by the late Princess Grace of Monaco, to study at L’Acadamie de Danse Classique in Monte Carlo. Following her training in Monaco, Anne danced for the British Ballet Theatre in London and as Principal Ballerina touring all over Europe with Wiener Ballet Theater, where she performed numerous roles in a range of modern works. Anne returned to Ireland in 1997 to found Ballet Ireland, which she continues to develop as a successful and vibrant national touring company. She has been a former chairperson of Dance Ireland and served 5 years on the Board of Theatre Forum Ireland. INSTA: @balletireland LINKEDIN: Anne Maher WEBSITE: balletireland.ie Disclaimer: Any and all ideas and information presented in the following podcast are those of the presenter. The presenter is not an employee or representative of Dance Education Canada (DEC), and is participating in this podcast on a voluntary basis. The ideas and information they express do not necessarily represent the views of the DEC or its partners, employees or affiliates. The ideas and information expressed herein are for general educational purposes only. They should not necessarily be applied to specific individual situations. DEC recommends consulting an expert or professional regarding specific medical, legal or business concerns. DEC makes no representations about the accuracy or suitability of this content. Please note that Canada's National Academy of Dance Education is now operating as Dance Education Canada.
28:24
October 11, 2021
Dance in the Curriculum – What It Is Not: A discussion with a University Lecturer in Human Movement Studies
Dance Education Canada has led and facilitated discussions with school board and studio dance educators across the country about the importance of teacher training. Our focus and research conducted with elementary classroom teachers revealed that a lack of understanding of dance as subject can result in instruction based on technical skills. This experience in dance, or lack there of, does not enrich the student’s knowledge, understanding and application of dance cross curricularly, as what is being taught, is often not what was intended of the curriculum. How do we influence change? At Dance Education Canada we believe all answers lead to dance teacher training and so does our guest. Today we will discuss how teacher training and professional development can help dance educators (specifically in the school system) give students meaningful and authentic experiences in dance. GUEST: Dr Rachael Jefferson-Buchanan is a lecturer in human movement studies (Health and PE) and Creative Arts within the School of Education at Charles Sturt University in Australia. She holds a Bachelor of Education (Honours) in PE, dance and special educational needs, a Master of Arts in dance studies, and a PhD. Rachael has been a lecturer across UK and Australia and was head of GCSE Performing Arts at the International School of Geneva. Rachael has extensive experience in writing and leading professional development for teachers and has taken on an international role as the lead consultant for PE and dance in Cambridge Assessment International Education/Cambridge University Press central Asian and Nile Egyptian schools projects. She was the UK consultant for Fundamental Movement Skills (STEPS PD), which was a catalyst for the writing of her book: ‘Fundamental Fun: 132 activities to develop fundamental movement skills’. INSTA: @3_dancingfeet LINKEDIN: Rachael Jefferson-Buchanan WEBSITE: csu.edu.au Disclaimer: Any and all ideas and information presented in the following podcast are those of the presenter. The presenter is not an employee or representative of Dance Education Canada (DEC), and is participating in this podcast on a voluntary basis. The ideas and information they express do not necessarily represent the views of the DEC or its partners, employees or affiliates. The ideas and information expressed herein are for general educational purposes only. They should not necessarily be applied to specific individual situations. DEC recommends consulting an expert or professional regarding specific medical, legal or business concerns. DEC makes no representations about the accuracy or suitability of this content. Please note that Canada's National Academy of Dance Education is now operating as Dance Education Canada.
37:10
October 11, 2021
High Expectations through Self-Realization: A conversation with the author of "Being a Ballerina"
Dance Education Canada is proud of our teacher development in that it includes an understanding of how children learn and grow, and how to help them realize the fullest extent of their talents. Often in these excellence driven environments, the traditional approaches to teaching and learning, that still exist today, can include approaches to teaching dance that induce fear through intimidation and can be spirit breaking. Can excellence be achieved in a positive supporting encouraging environment? We at DEC know that yes, it can, and so does our guest. Today we will speak with dance teacher and author Gavin Larsin as she provides us with some tips, tricks, tools and strategies to help dance educators realize that there are alternate paths to excellence that foster healthy child development. GUEST: Born and raised in New York City, Ms. Larsen received her professional dance training at the School of American Ballet, the Pacific Northwest Ballet School and the New York School of Ballet. She has danced professionally with numerous notable companies including the Pacific Northwest Ballet, the Alberta Ballet, the Suzanne Farrell Ballet as a soloist and the Oregon Ballet Theatre as a principal dancer. She retired from performing in 2010 to focus on teaching, coaching and writing about dance. Her writing has appeared in several notable publications and has been a contributing writer for Pointe, Dance Teacher and Dance Spirit magazine.. In 2015 she was honored with a fellowship to the Helene Wurlitzer Foundation to pursue her work as a writer. Her memoir, Being a Ballerina: The Power and Perfection of a Dancing Life, was published by the University Press of Florida in 2021. INSTA: @gavinalarsen LINKEDIN: Gavin Larsen WEBSITE: gavinlarsen.com Disclaimer: Any and all ideas and information presented in the following podcast are those of the presenter. The presenter is not an employee or representative of Dance Education Canada (DEC), and is participating in this podcast on a voluntary basis. The ideas and information they express do not necessarily represent the views of the DEC or its partners, employees or affiliates. The ideas and information expressed herein are for general educational purposes only. They should not necessarily be applied to specific individual situations. DEC recommends consulting an expert or professional regarding specific medical, legal or business concerns. DEC makes no representations about the accuracy or suitability of this content. Please note that Canada's National Academy of Dance Education is now operating as Dance Education Canada.
19:53
October 11, 2021
The Inclusion of Neurodiverse Voices in Dance Training: In conversation with a PhD in Dance Studies Candidate
Dance Education Canada is passionate about promoting dance for all ages, levels and abilities. We encourage all dance spaces to be inclusive and supportive of dancers of all abilities. We appreciate the insight and experience of all our podcast guests who have shared their views and experiences particularly on inclusive dance with us. We welcome all perspectives of inclusion, which is why we are very excited to welcome dance educator and researchers Ms. Leah Antonellis to our program today, who will share her research on the inclusion of neurodiverse voices in dance training. GUEST: Leah Antonellis (MA, BFA) is an educator and advisor for neurodiverse students as well as a PhD candidate in Dance Studies at Middlesex University in London. She has developed several inclusive movement curriculums in both public and private studio settings throughout the US. Her research focuses on the empowerment of autistic and neurodivergent young adults through autonomy support and the incorporation of their voices in dance programming. INSTA: @lantonellis LINKEDIN: Leah Antonellis Disclaimer: Any and all ideas and information presented in the following podcast are those of the presenter. The presenter is not an employee or representative of Dance Education Canada (DEC), and is participating in this podcast on a voluntary basis. The ideas and information they express do not necessarily represent the views of the DEC or its partners, employees or affiliates. The ideas and information expressed herein are for general educational purposes only. They should not necessarily be applied to specific individual situations. DEC recommends consulting an expert or professional regarding specific medical, legal or business concerns. DEC makes no representations about the accuracy or suitability of this content. Please note that Canada's National Academy of Dance Education is now operating as Dance Education Canada.
20:31
October 11, 2021
The Rollettes: The Chelsie Hill Story
With over 130, 000 Instagram followers Chelsie Hill is challenging the norms, shifting biases and changing perspectives on dance one follower at a time. Chelsie is a role-model, advocate, influencer and leader, smashing stereotypes and leading the dance community in this digital world. Not only is she a stunning dancer and natural and talented performer, but she manages to draw you in and connect with you through her performances, despite them being from screen to screen, with her confident, energetic and entertaining expressions, moves and personality. She exudes a contagious energy and passion for life in her videos while creating a positive supportive and encouraging community. We are honoured and privileged to welcome Ms. Chelsie Hill, the Founder of The Rollettes to our program today. Chelsie will share her story and highlight why her mission and vision for dance, aligned with our own views of embracing a new era of dance and dance education. GUEST: Community Leader, Trailblazer, Entrepreneur and Founder of the Rollettes Dance Team, Chelsie Hill has dedicated her life to dance and encouraging others to pursue their passions despite the physical obstacles they face and the tribulations of life. At the age of seventeen, Chelsie, was involved in a drunk driving accident which caused irreversible damage to her spinal cord and left her unable to walk. Chelsie decided she would not submit to her disability and chooses to live her life daily with a no-limits attitude. Cheslie found the Roulette dance team, in California. The Rollettes host an annual weekend long dance camp called the rollettes experience bringing together women wheelchair users of all ages, from all corners of the world, to connect and form bonds with their peers through dance. Since its launch, the Rollettes have gained visibility in the media with appearances on Ellen, Today Show, Hallmark Channel’s “Home and Family," Access Daily and KTLA to name a few. Chelsie has found a larger purpose as a voice for the disability community, shining a light on inclusion in entertainment, fashion and beauty. She is also a speaker and advocate for drunk and distracted driving, pushing through adversity and spinal cord injury awareness. Through social media Chelsie and the Rollettes™ have started an international movement called “Be Boundless” based on encouraging others to live their life independently mentally, physically and emotionally. Each year the Rollettes host an international women’s empowerment weekend for women and children with disabilities. Chelsie also runs a mentorship program with over 100 women in 3 different stages, each month navigating through different topics women with disabilities go through. INSTA/TWIT: @chelsiehill LINKEDIN: Chelsie Hill WEBISTE: www.rollettesdance.com Disclaimer: Any and all ideas and information presented in the following podcast are those of the presenter. The presenter is not an employee or representative of Dance Education Canada (DEC), and is participating in this podcast on a voluntary basis. The ideas and information they express do not necessarily represent the views of the DEC or its partners, employees or affiliates. The ideas and information expressed herein are for general educational purposes only. They should not necessarily be applied to specific individual situations. DEC recommends consulting an expert or professional regarding specific medical, legal or business concerns. DEC makes no representations about the accuracy or suitability of this content. Please note that Canada's National Academy of Dance Education is now operating as Dance Education Canada.
35:55
October 7, 2021
Shifting from Traditional to Blended Learning Environments: In conversation with a Professor of Dance
We have learnt a lot about shifting from one learning environment to the next, over the past year. Dance Educators have moved, modified and adapted their lessons, from in person instruction to online with little to no planning, know-how or preparation. There is no doubt that the dance community has faced challenges this year, while others saw opportunity. Today’s discussion will focus on another shift in dance education, the shift from traditional to blended learning environments. GUEST: Ursula Payne is a professor in Department of Dance and Director of the Frederick Douglass Institute at Slippery Rock University of Pennsylvania. Payne teaches all levels of modern and jazz dance technique, dance kinesiology, and Laban movement analysis. She was the artistic director of Slippery Rock University Dance Theater for twenty years and the Chairperson of the Department of Dance for nine years. Payne received her M.F.A. from The Ohio State University, CMA certification from the Laban/Bartenieff Institute of Movement Studies in New York City, and certification from the management development program for mid-level administrators in higher education at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. Payne served as an elected board member of the American College Dance Association for the East-Central and Mid-Atlantic North regions from 2012-2020. INSTA: @payneu LINKED IN: Ursula Payne WEBSITE: payneperformanceprojects.squarespace.com Disclaimer: Any and all ideas and information presented in the following podcast are those of the presenter. The presenter is not an employee or representative of Dance Education Canada (DEC), and is participating in this podcast on a voluntary basis. The ideas and information they express do not necessarily represent the views of the DEC or its partners, employees or affiliates. The ideas and information expressed herein are for general educational purposes only. They should not necessarily be applied to specific individual situations. DEC recommends consulting an expert or professional regarding specific medical, legal or business concerns. DEC makes no representations about the accuracy or suitability of this content. Please note that Canada's National Academy of Dance Education is now operating as Dance Education Canada.
41:45
October 7, 2021
Mentoring for Early Career Dance Artists: In conversation with a doctoral candidate.
A dance teacher wear’s many hats. Some days we act as a therapist while others we are an advisor. Sometimes a mentor and often a role model. We have all entered into this vocation to change lives, support healthy child development and maybe even inspire the pursuit of a career or education in dance. At the post-secondary and professional level this role does not change much, as professors, artistic directors and ballet masters have indicated that their roles involve aspects of mentorship, guidance and teacher. Today we will take a deeper look into the role of the mentor specifically for early career dance artists. GUEST: After completing her undergraduate training in Dance Theatre at Trinity Laban where she later also completed her master’s degree, Nina Atkinson founded the Loop Dance Company in 1993. In 2004 Nina returned from a two-year sabbatical in New York studying at the Limón Dance Foundation and in 2008 returned to New York to study on the first Limón Teachers Program. Nina’s research interests lie in creating artwork for unusual spaces, from large-scale site-specific work to intimate installation experiences. Nina is, a Lecturer at Canterbury Christchurch University and University of Roehampton and is currently a Visiting Lecturer for Trinity Laban Conservatoire of Music and Dance in their post graduate diploma in Community Dance program. She is currently studying for her PhD at Coventry University. INSTA/TWIT: @ninadatkinson LINKEDIN: Nina Atkinson WEBSITE: loopdancecompany.co.uk Disclaimer: Any and all ideas and information presented in the following podcast are those of the presenter. The presenter is not an employee or representative of Dance Education Canada (DEC), and is participating in this podcast on a voluntary basis. The ideas and information they express do not necessarily represent the views of the DEC or its partners, employees or affiliates. The ideas and information expressed herein are for general educational purposes only. They should not necessarily be applied to specific individual situations. DEC recommends consulting an expert or professional regarding specific medical, legal or business concerns. DEC makes no representations about the accuracy or suitability of this content. Please note that Canada's National Academy of Dance Education is now operating as Dance Education Canada.
28:31
October 7, 2021
Making Deeper Connections to Dance with a Lecturer in Dance Studies
Often one’s experience with dance as a child, especially growing up at a commercial studio, includes a physical and technical understanding of dance. At Dance Education Canada we have made it out mission to expand the understanding of dance beyond the realms of its physicality, to explore its unconscious experience, historical connections and physiology with the hopes of offering considerations to dance educators and studio owners for ways of incorporating a more wholistic dance education experience in their dance classes. These opportunities enrich dancers experience with, and understanding of, dance while opening minds and doors to the world of dance. Today we have the pleasure of speaking with Dr. Deborah Williams who will give us some insight into her research surrounding the themes of social value and representation in dance. GUEST: Dr Deborah Williams is a dancer and dance scholar, with expertise in anthropology and oral history of dance. She has a BA in Dance (Smith College), an MA in Dance Anthropology and a PhD (both from University of Roehampton). She currently teaches in the School of Performing Arts at the University of Malta and is engaged in a multi-year oral history project profiling all forms of dance/dancers, titled Red Dance Shoe Stories. She is also a collaborator and developer of the field of Ludochoreology, using anthropological and embodied dance expertise to inform the development of movement and world- building within online, digital games. Disclaimer: Any and all ideas and information presented in the following podcast are those of the presenter. The presenter is not an employee or representative of Dance Education Canada (DEC), and is participating in this podcast on a voluntary basis. The ideas and information they express do not necessarily represent the views of the DEC or its partners, employees or affiliates. The ideas and information expressed herein are for general educational purposes only. They should not necessarily be applied to specific individual situations. DEC recommends consulting an expert or professional regarding specific medical, legal or business concerns. DEC makes no representations about the accuracy or suitability of this content. Please note that Canada's National Academy of Dance Education is now operating as Dance Education Canada.
27:54
October 7, 2021
Dance Education in South Korea: Insight into secondary and post-secondary arts education. In conversation with a scholar pursuing a PhD in screendance.
What benefits can a worldly understanding of dance education have on our delivery of classes as dance educators? A well-rounded understanding of dance, across countries and cultures provides unique insights and perspectives that, if aligned with your perspectives on teaching and applicable and appropriate for your students, can add a richness and depth to your class. All knowledge we acquire as dance educators can inform our own teaching philosophies and goals for our classes. Today we will gain insight into secondary and post-secondary dance education in Korea with the help of Yerin Lee. GUEST: Yerin Lee is a Korean contemporary dancer and filmmaker based in London and Seoul. Yerin studied Korean traditional dance at Kyunghee University in South Korea. After she moved to London in 2016, she completed an MA in Creative and Cultural Entrepreneurship at Goldsmiths, University of London and founded her dance project team, ‘Y Dance’, with other Korean artists. Since, Yerin has been creating diverse dance performances, films and programmes, while trying to portray social and political issues through her work. Currently, she is working towards her PhD focused on political performance in screendance with traditional Korean concepts at the University of Roehampton. INSTA: @yenn_dance @yenn_dance_official FB: @yenndanceworks LINKEDIN: Ye Rin Lee WEBISTE: www.yenndance.3639.wixsite.com/yenndance Disclaimer: Any and all ideas and information presented in the following podcast are those of the presenter. The presenter is not an employee or representative of Dance Education Canada (DEC), and is participating in this podcast on a voluntary basis. The ideas and information they express do not necessarily represent the views of the DEC or its partners, employees or affiliates. The ideas and information expressed herein are for general educational purposes only. They should not necessarily be applied to specific individual situations. DEC recommends consulting an expert or professional regarding specific medical, legal or business concerns. DEC makes no representations about the accuracy or suitability of this content. Please note that Canada's National Academy of Dance Education is now operating as Dance Education Canada.
32:03
October 7, 2021
The Inclusive Dance Class for all Abilities: In conversation with a scholar pursuing a PhD in Dance Therapy
The topics of inclusion and diversity have found its way into the school system through the implementation of individualized learning plans. These plans are in place in so that we are reaching and meeting the needs of each and every student. However, individualized education and training in the dance class is still a new and in some cases a foreign concept. How does an inclusive environment look in our dance classes, and how to we implement, navigate and foster it? We will discuss some strategies and gain some insight into this important topic today, with the help of Ms. Tsirogianni. GUEST: Tsirogianni received a degree in Physical Education and Sports Science and a Master’s degree in Special Physical Education from Aristotle University in Greece. She is conducting her Ph.D. research on the multiple ways dance therapy can be used for kids with special needs in preschool education. Her academic studies are complemented by numerous certifications from a variety of renowned organizations including a Master certification in dance and disability from the “DanceAbility International Method”. In 2015 she I founded a "wheelchair dance group" for children with mental and physical disabilities in Greece and currently works with many organizations and schools teaching dance to people of all abilities. LINKEDIN: Theodora Tsirogianni FB: @athirmaentrohi Disclaimer: Any and all ideas and information presented in the following podcast are those of the presenter. The presenter is not an employee or representative of Dance Education Canada (DEC), and is participating in this podcast on a voluntary basis. The ideas and information they express do not necessarily represent the views of the DEC or its partners, employees or affiliates. The ideas and information expressed herein are for general educational purposes only. They should not necessarily be applied to specific individual situations. DEC recommends consulting an expert or professional regarding specific medical, legal or business concerns. DEC makes no representations about the accuracy or suitability of this content. Please note that Canada's National Academy of Dance Education is now operating as Dance Education Canada.
27:19
October 7, 2021
Training in Dance: Beyond the Studio – Does your love for dance stop there? In conversation with the Chief Editor of the Hong Kong Dance Magazine
Were you there? Sitting in that post-secondary dance class, or company thinking that you were never going to have a career as a dancer? Maybe your experience was early, as early as high school perhaps where you were pressured and convinced that there were no career opportunities and no job security in the arts. Perhaps you were encouraged to pursue a post secondary degree or schooling in something other than dance assuming that an education in dance would ultimately get you no where. But we love dance… some of us obsessed with it... while others claim it is a part of them and would be lost without it. What options do we have? How can we continue to explore our love for dance beyond the studio? At Dance Education Canada, a part of our mission is not only promoting dance education, but advocating for it. So much so that we did a project, showcased on our Youtube channel on dance careers in Canada. The project highlighted a number of Canadians across the country who have careers in dance or have has careers that stemmed from their education in Dance. There are many fields one could pursue in dance education, including dance science, therapy, writing and more. Today we will talk about our needs as dancers post performing career, our intimate need to have experiences with movements and how an extension of our experiences with dance in the form of a career differs from our experiences while studying dance. GUEST: Rooting from Toronto, Canada, Melinda is a professional dancer, teacher, choreographer, and editor based in Hong Kong. Having graduated summa cum laude from York University’s BFA (Honours) Dance Program, Melinda went on to pursue further studies in the Teacher Training Program at Canada’s National Ballet School where she completed her RAD teachers’ examination. In 2017, Melinda graduated with distinction from The Hong Kong Academy for Performing Arts with an MFA Dance Degree in Choreography. Melinda is now the full-time Chief Editor and Business Development Manager of Hong Kong Dance Magazine.   INSTA/FB/TWIT: @hkdancemagazine LINKEDIN: Hong Kong Dance Magazine WEBSITE: hkdancemagazine.com Disclaimer: Any and all ideas and information presented in the following podcast are those of the presenter. The presenter is not an employee or representative of Dance Education Canada (DEC), and is participating in this podcast on a voluntary basis. The ideas and information they express do not necessarily represent the views of the DEC or its partners, employees or affiliates. The ideas and information expressed herein are for general educational purposes only. They should not necessarily be applied to specific individual situations. DEC recommends consulting an expert or professional regarding specific medical, legal or business concerns. DEC makes no representations about the accuracy or suitability of this content. Please note that Canada's National Academy of Dance Education is now operating as Dance Education Canada.
23:29
October 7, 2021
A Dancer’s Journey: The biography of Mary Anthony. In conversation with the author Mary Price Boday.
What better way to inspire and inform our instruction than by revisiting dance history. Learning about creators, choreographers, influencers and pioneers of dance can help us discover techniques, processes and inspiration that have been explored and used to mark political and social milestones through time. Today I want you to consider what will be your takeaway from learning about the history of Mary Anthony with the help of the author of The biography of Mary Anthony Ms. Mary Price Boday. GUEST: Mary Price Boday, holds a BFA and MFA from the University of Oklahoma and is a citizen of the Cherokee Nation. Following graduation, she danced professionally in New York City and Switzerland with several renowned dance companies including the St Gallen Ballet the Zurich Ballet. Ms. Boday held various positions on faculty at numerous universities, colleges and companies some of which include Visiting Assistant Professor at the University of Illinois, Assistant Professor and Director of Dance at Mercyhurst University, Artistic Director of the Illinois Ballet and Ballet Faculty at the Oklahoma City Ballet. Ms. Boday is the author of the biography of dance pioneer, Mary Anthony, called “A Dancer’s Journey: It All Began With a Lie.” Ms. Boday has been recognized with numerous awards and accomplishments namely the Outstanding Dancer Award through the University of Oklahoma.4, featured in the Who’s Who publications and highlighted on the Albert Nelson Marquis Lifetime Achievement website. LINKEDIN: Mary Price Boday WEBSITE: marypriceboday.com Disclaimer: Any and all ideas and information presented in the following podcast are those of the presenter. The presenter is not an employee or representative of Dance Education Canada (DEC), and is participating in this podcast on a voluntary basis. The ideas and information they express do not necessarily represent the views of the DEC or its partners, employees or affiliates. The ideas and information expressed herein are for general educational purposes only. They should not necessarily be applied to specific individual situations. DEC recommends consulting an expert or professional regarding specific medical, legal or business concerns. DEC makes no representations about the accuracy or suitability of this content. Please note that Canada's National Academy of Dance Education is now operating as Dance Education Canada.
40:46
October 7, 2021
Intimate partnerings among Dance, the Social Sciences, and the Humanities: Feeling our way among cultures and communication through movement. In conversation with a Doctoral Candidate
Connecting our dance educators with dance scholars, scientists and dance researchers is a part of our mission for bringing the best and most current practices in dance education into our studio environments. Making connections between dance scholarship and related fields is essential to informing our dance instruction and teaching philosophy in so that we can provide the best education in dance to our students. Today’s conversation will revolve around interdisciplinary scholarship, and investigate how the fields of Dance, Social Sciences and Humanities can inform one another. Today we welcome an Instructor Associate from Arizona State University Ms. Lauren Mark. GUEST: Lauren Mark is a Doctoral Candidate and Instructor Associate at the Hugh Downs School of Human Communication at Arizona State University. Her dissertation work focuses on Asian-based approaches to relationality that lead to survival and generativity. Lauren also holds an M.Ed in Educational Organization, Leadership and Policy from the University of Illinois and an M.A. in Dance from The Ohio State University. Lauren looks for ways to explore interdisciplinary scholarship, stemming from performative pedagogies and embodied learning in her courses. Lauren incorporates improvisation and embodied learning in the field of Communication and cultural improvisations in the field of Dance. Specifically, she has experimented with the use of improvisation to cultivate active listening and to simulate cultural uncertainty. She has also brought cultural concepts of proximity and affect to dance technique classes. This work builds on her previous explorations of multigenerational movement improvisations of shared memories and collective devising approaches to choreograph poetry. TWIT: @laurenmark6 LINKEDIN: Lauren Renee Mark WEBSITE: humancommunication.asu.edu/content/lauren-mark Disclaimer: Any and all ideas and information presented in the following podcast are those of the presenter. The presenter is not an employee or representative of Dance Education Canada (DEC), and is participating in this podcast on a voluntary basis. The ideas and information they express do not necessarily represent the views of the DEC or its partners, employees or affiliates. The ideas and information expressed herein are for general educational purposes only. They should not necessarily be applied to specific individual situations. DEC recommends consulting an expert or professional regarding specific medical, legal or business concerns. DEC makes no representations about the accuracy or suitability of this content. Please note that Canada's National Academy of Dance Education is now operating as Dance Education Canada.
34:32
October 7, 2021
Ageism in Dance
Pursuing a career or post secondary education in dance are topics of discussion we’ve navigated in other podcasts. We’ve questioned and challenged the stereotypes associated with pursuing a career and/or post secondary training in dance, while trying to dissect and determine factors that influence and contribute them. Today’s discussion will focus on the career of the professional dancer. It is well known that the career of a professional dancer is often short lived, but why? Is the longevity of a career as a professional dancer based on societies expectations surrounding what they want to see on stage or are the factors related to limitations of the body after a demanding 30-40+ years of elite training?  Today we will address ageism in dance. Does it exist and if yes, is it only professional dancers that experience ageism or do dance teachers also experience it, in this physically demanding career? Does a professional career in dance need to end early, or can we increase its longevity? How can we promote careers in dance that are free from age biases, stable and can support a family financially? Can we change the publics perception to see beauty of an ageing dancer? We will discuss these questions and more today with the help of an adjunct professor of dance at Marymount Manhattan College Ms. Kristine Bendul. GUEST: Kristine Bendul is a performer, choreographer and master instructor based in New York City. As a performer Kristine has appeared in seven Broadway shows including Roger’s and Hammerstein’s Cinderella and Twyla Tharp’s shows Movin’ Out. She has appeared in several television productions including performances on the David Letterman Show and the Academy Awards. Kristine studied at numerous prestigious ballet schools including the School of American Ballet, Boston Ballet and New Jersey Ballet where she became a demi-soloist with the company by age 16. She holds numerous awards and titles as a professional performer including Disco America’s 1st place championships and America’s First professional male-female couple to compete in the gender-neutral category of professional Dancesport ballroom. Kristine has guest taught at the Julliard School, the University Of Michigan and Santa Clara University and is currently working as an Adjunct Professor for Marymount Manhattan College’s Theatre Arts Daily Dance Program. INSTA: @kbendulny TWIT: @kbendul LINKEDIN: Kristine Bendul WEBSITE: kristinebendul.com Disclaimer: Any and all ideas and information presented in the following podcast are those of the presenter. The presenter is not an employee or representative of Dance Education Canada (DEC), and is participating in this podcast on a voluntary basis. The ideas and information they express do not necessarily represent the views of the DEC or its partners, employees or affiliates. The ideas and information expressed herein are for general educational purposes only. They should not necessarily be applied to specific individual situations. DEC recommends consulting an expert or professional regarding specific medical, legal or business concerns. DEC makes no representations about the accuracy or suitability of this content. Please note that Canada's National Academy of Dance Education is now operating as Dance Education Canada.
15:29
October 7, 2021
Fostering Confident Dancers: In conversation with a Professor of Dance
As dance educators we should be constantly questioning what we are doing in the dance class and how it effects our dancers. Using false identifiers such as laughing and agreeance to justify the students well being during a particular experience is wrong. However it is not only the immediate well-being of the dancer that we should be concerned about, but their longevity as dancers and confident contributing members of society as well. Dance educators must be trained in child development, which is why at Dance Education Canada, we include it as a part of our Dance Teacher Training Programs. Historically we might find timid, even scared and voiceless dancers in the studio, but in this 21stcentury, this can no longer be the norm. How we foster an environment in which our dancers can execute performance and communicate confidently about their art form will be the topic of our discussion today, with the help of Ms. Kiesha Lalama. Kiesha Lalama graduated with an MFA in Interdisciplinary Arts from Goddard College and a BA in Dance from Point Park University. Lalama has choreographed over 50 works for a variety of events and companies some of which include Ballet Arkansas, Jazz Dance World Congress, and TEDx Pittsburgh. She has received numerous awards and notable reviews for her choreography some of which include Best Choreography by Dayton’sMostMetro.com and the Pittsburgh Post Gazette’s “Best of Dance” Top Ten list. She was named twice to the Youth American Grand Prix’s coveted “Top 12” and was named one of Dance Magazine’s “25 to Watch”. As an educator, Kiesha serves as a Professor in the Point Park University Dance Department and as the Director of Community Engagement for the Pittsburgh CLO. INSTA/TWIT: @kieshalalama LINKEDIN: Kiesha Lalama WEBSITE: kieshalalama.com Disclaimer: Any and all ideas and information presented in the following podcast are those of the presenter. The presenter is not an employee or representative of Dance Education Canada (DEC), and is participating in this podcast on a voluntary basis. The ideas and information they express do not necessarily represent the views of the DEC or its partners, employees or affiliates. The ideas and information expressed herein are for general educational purposes only. They should not necessarily be applied to specific individual situations. DEC recommends consulting an expert or professional regarding specific medical, legal or business concerns. DEC makes no representations about the accuracy or suitability of this content. Please note that Canada's National Academy of Dance Education is now operating as Dance Education Canada.
38:04
October 7, 2021
Technology VS Dance: Friend or Foe? - In conversation with a Doctor of Dance and Media
Technology VS the arts is certainly not a new topic of discussion. If Dance on film has been around for years, then what is difference between then and now? Well the relationship is different. The relationship between the arts and technology resembled a cutting and pasting technique, where the film crew did their thing, while the choreographers and dancers did theirs. So what did this collaboration (if we can even call it that) look like? What ensued? Basically dance on film usually involved plopping a video camera at the front of the stage and recording dance from one viewpoint in 2 dimensions. So what has changed? What does the relationship look like now? Should we be fearful of technology? Should students be leaving their cell phones at the door? We will answer these questions today, while discussing how we can embrace technology and use it as a tool in our dance classes… because well as we all know its not going anywhere. Enlightening us with her perspectives on and experience with technology is Dr Kate Sicchio. GUEST: Dr. Kate Sicchio is a choreographer, media artist and performer whose work explores the interface between choreography and technology with wearable technology, live coding, and real-time video systems. Her work has been shown internationally in many countries including the US, Germany, Australia, Belgium, Sweden, and the UK at venues including the Banff New Media Institute in Canada, V&A London, and the Artisan Gallery Hong Kong. She co-edited the book "Intersecting Art and Technology in Practice: Techne/Technique/Technology" (Routledge) with Dr. Camille Baker. She has given invited talks and presented at countless conferences, universities and events across the globe some of which include: EU Parliament, Expo ‘74 and the Dance Studies Association. She is currently Assistant Professor of Dance and Media Technology at Virginia Commonwealth University. INSTA/TWIT: @sicchio Disclaimer: Any and all ideas and information presented in the following podcast are those of the presenter. The presenter is not an employee or representative of Dance Education Canada (DEC), and is participating in this podcast on a voluntary basis. The ideas and information they express do not necessarily represent the views of the DEC or its partners, employees or affiliates. The ideas and information expressed herein are for general educational purposes only. They should not necessarily be applied to specific individual situations. DEC recommends consulting an expert or professional regarding specific medical, legal or business concerns. DEC makes no representations about the accuracy or suitability of this content. Please note that Canada's National Academy of Dance Education is now operating as Dance Education Canada.
23:59
October 7, 2021
Inclusivity and Adaptation: The Jessica Ping-Wild Story
Today we welcome the charismatic, confident, intelligent, passionate, stunning and talented Mrs. Jessica Ping-Wild to our program. With over 10, 000 Instagram followers Jessica is challenging the norms, smashing the stereotypes while shifting biases and perspectives on dance and self-expression through movement one follower at a time. The energy she exudes in her videos is contagious and her mission clear, to inspire, advocate and support her community as a role model, influencer and leader, through dance and song. Through Jessica we are inspired to embrace each day, and live life to the fullest, despite challenges and struggles along the way. Jessica is a perfect addition to the CNADE Podcast Family, as her mission to challenge the norms and stereotypes often associated with dance, aligned with our own views of embracing a new era of dance and dance education. GUEST: Jessica Ping-Wild, a graduate of the University of Notre Dame, was born with a very rare disease known as CHILD Syndrome. Only affecting 60 people worldwide, this disease impacts both the skin and limbs on one side of the body. Jessica’s particular case leaves her with only one full leg and arm on her right side. Despite this, she grew up loving dance. Jessica began taking ballet lessons at age 3.  As she grew older, she joined a dance performance company and a competitive dance team. Now, Jessica is passionate about educating people about disability through her lifestyle blog, The Rolling Explorer, where she posts videos of herself dancing for all to see. INSTA/FB: @therollingexplorer TWIT: @rollingexplorer LINKEDIN: Jessica Ping-Wild WEBSITE: therollingexplorer.com Disclaimer: Any and all ideas and information presented in the following podcast are those of the presenter. The presenter is not an employee or representative of Dance Education Canada (DEC), and is participating in this podcast on a voluntary basis. The ideas and information they express do not necessarily represent the views of the DEC or its partners, employees or affiliates. The ideas and information expressed herein are for general educational purposes only. They should not necessarily be applied to specific individual situations. DEC recommends consulting an expert or professional regarding specific medical, legal or business concerns. DEC makes no representations about the accuracy or suitability of this content. Please note that Canada's National Academy of Dance Education is now operating as Dance Education Canada.
19:02
October 7, 2021
Dance is Scary – Addressing the hesitations and fears of performing artists associated with the study of dance.
What perceptions do people have about dance? What does a dance class, dance performance, dance lesson look like in the minds of others? Is dance training interpreted as an elite unattainable art reserved only for the gifted and talented? If yes, then it is easy to see how fears and insecurities about embarking on ones own dance journey can be met with hesitation. How can we change peoples understanding of dance, in so that ones own interest in pursuing it as a hobby, form of exercise or area of study can be realized. We will address some of the contributing factors that may lead to the feeling that “Dance is Scary” with the help of Ms Jenny Patrone. GUEST: Jenny has worked in all aspects of the industry, both locally and internationally splitting her time between the U.K and Australia. Current Disney Audition Choreographer in the UK and Australia for Tokyo, Disney cruises. Jenny's is a teacher, choreographer and performer, having danced with rock legend Neil Young and on the popular television program Downton Abbey. She is the co-creator of 1920s entertainment group The Gatsby Girls, performing throughout the UK and Europe. Jenny currently works with professional actors and singers under the company she founded CBS Dance, offering dance classes to this exclusive group of performers in the UK. INSTA: @cbs_dance TWIT: @dancecbs FB: @cbsdancelondon LINKEDIN: Jenny Patrone WEBSITE: cbsdance.com Disclaimer: Any and all ideas and information presented in the following podcast are those of the presenter. The presenter is not an employee or representative of Dance Education Canada (DEC), and is participating in this podcast on a voluntary basis. The ideas and information they express do not necessarily represent the views of the DEC or its partners, employees or affiliates. The ideas and information expressed herein are for general educational purposes only. They should not necessarily be applied to specific individual situations. DEC recommends consulting an expert or professional regarding specific medical, legal or business concerns. DEC makes no representations about the accuracy or suitability of this content. Please note that Canada's National Academy of Dance Education is now operating as Dance Education Canada.
28:18
October 7, 2021
Embracing the Challenges and Benefits of the Virtual Dance Classroom: In conversation with an Associate Professor of Dance
Welcome to 2020. A new world in the middle of a global pandemic. We are all holding our breath watching arts organizations, dance companies and dance studios struggle to stay open, terminating service, while other are shutting down permanently. Amidst the struggles comes a rapid shift to serving, performing and teaching through an online learning platform. The learning curve so steep, that some say that we are now 10 years ahead of where we would have been without the pandemic. The demands on and changes to dance education have been drastic and the effects on the arts detrimental. But what do we do? Well dancers are known for being adaptable, resilient and flexible. So we pick ourselves up and learn. We embrace this new world, look at the benefits of these changes, and address the challenges. Providing us with some tips to help us better deliver our virtual classes is Ms Elisabeth Higgins GUEST: Elizabeth Higgins is Associate Professor and Coordinator of Dance at Howard Community College.  Elizabeth received her MFA in Dance from Florida State University and a BFA in Dance from Rutgers University. She served on the faculty at Marymount Manhattan College as an Assistant Professor of Dance Composition and has taught at several studios and institutions including Manhattanville College, Columbia University and Florida State University. She served as a teaching artist for the New York City Ballet Education Program for six years, working in public school system outreach. Her company, Elizabeth Higgins Dance Theater, premiered its first season at Joyce SoHo and subsequently was chosen as one of the critics' "Best Picks" by Back Stage Magazine. INSTA: @howardccdance FB: @howardcommunitycollegedanceprogram LINKEDIN: Elizabeth Higgins WEBSITE: howardcc.edu/dance Disclaimer: Any and all ideas and information presented in the following podcast are those of the presenter. The presenter is not an employee or representative of Dance Education Canada (DEC), and is participating in this podcast on a voluntary basis. The ideas and information they express do not necessarily represent the views of the DEC or its partners, employees or affiliates. The ideas and information expressed herein are for general educational purposes only. They should not necessarily be applied to specific individual situations. DEC recommends consulting an expert or professional regarding specific medical, legal or business concerns. DEC makes no representations about the accuracy or suitability of this content. Please note that Canada's National Academy of Dance Education is now operating as Dance Education Canada.
26:21
October 7, 2021
Structuring Dance Classes – A dance pedagogy refresher with a Professor of Dance
Lifelong learning and professional development are at the foundation of ALL programs at Dance Education Canada. We are passionate about dance teacher training being so much more than just teaching steps, thus is why dance pedagogy guides our curriculum design. It is essential for those dedicated to the vocation of teaching, that workshops and other professional development opportunities are a part of your yearly learning plan. What does your lesson planning look like? Do you lesson plan? How do you structure your classes? What are the theories and research that support the structure of your classes? Perhaps it is fear of the unknown, or fear of being judged that fosters some insecurities in seeking out new information as dance educators. The only way we can continue to promote the value of an education in dance is if we model self-improvement and motivation. Maybe this podcast is a first step for you… in which case I enthusiastically applaud you. What a great step you are taking towards updating your skillset and questioning your current practice. So to help guide us on our journey of continued learning today, providing us with a mini pedagogical refresher is Ms. Diana Harris. GUEST: Holding a B.A. in Dance Education and an M.S. in Exercise Science, Diana has taught dance in private schools, public schools and dance studios for almost 30 years. In 2012 she received a grant from the Guilford Fund for Education to develop and implement a curriculum that used dance to teach geometry to second graders, while directing a dance outreach program for fourth graders. She has served on the boards of the Connecticut Dance Alliance and New England Ballet Company and is a member of the International Association of Dance Medicine and Science. She currently teaches in the dance department at Naugatuck Valley Community College and in the theater department at University of New Haven. Her textbook, Beginning Musical Theatre Dance is used in both high school and college musical theater classes. FB: @thehealthydancer TWIT: @healthydancer1 LINKEDIN: Diana (Dart) Harris WEBSITE: thehealthydancer.blogspot.com Disclaimer: Any and all ideas and information presented in the following podcast are those of the presenter. The presenter is not an employee or representative of Dance Education Canada (DEC), and is participating in this podcast on a voluntary basis. The ideas and information they express do not necessarily represent the views of the DEC or its partners, employees or affiliates. The ideas and information expressed herein are for general educational purposes only. They should not necessarily be applied to specific individual situations. DEC recommends consulting an expert or professional regarding specific medical, legal or business concerns. DEC makes no representations about the accuracy or suitability of this content. Please note that Canada's National Academy of Dance Education is now operating as Dance Education Canada.
21:16
October 7, 2021
Knowing Your own Body: Dancer specific conditioning and training - A conversation with a Principal Dancer from the Scottish Ballet
Many of our podcast perspectives come from our valued community of scholars, researchers and dance educators… but it is also important that dancers have a voice as well. In today’s world, it is important that dancers' confidence is nurtured in so that they are able to step up and acknowledge their need for modifications and adaptations themselves. This is especially important if a dance educator is not encouraging individualized learning plans and implementing unique individualized approaches for their dancers. Which is why today we will hear from a talented and highly reviewed Principal Ballerina from the Scottish Ballet Ms. Constance Devernay, who will provide us with insight into the importance of dancer-specific training and conditioning programs. We will discuss when and how dancers should advocate for their individual needs as it relates to their overall mind and body wellness, and hear firsthand as she shares her advice for dancers and dance educators. Guest: Constance Devernay was born in Amiens, France. She trained pre-professionally at the Rosella Hightower school in Cannes, then at the English National Ballet School, in London. Constance joined The Scottish Ballet permanently in 2009, and became a Principal dancer in 2016. She has worked with renowned choreographers some of which include David Dawson, Peter Darrell and Christopher Hampson. Some of her performance highlights include the Sugar Plum fairy in The Nutcracker and Cinderella and The Snow Queen. In addition to teaching dance, Constance is currently studying for a Bachelor of Science in Sport, Fitness and Coaching. She practices Yoga alongside her professional career and holds a level 3 instructor diploma in Yoga and a diploma in meditation. INSTA: @instacoco16 TWIT: @balletcoco LINKEDIN: Constance Devernay WEBSITE: scottishballet.co.uk Disclaimer: Any and all ideas and information presented in the following podcast are those of the presenter. The presenter is not an employee or representative of Dance Education Canada (DEC), and is participating in this podcast on a voluntary basis. The ideas and information they express do not necessarily represent the views of the DEC or its partners, employees or affiliates. The ideas and information expressed herein are for general educational purposes only. They should not necessarily be applied to specific individual situations. DEC recommends consulting an expert or professional regarding specific medical, legal or business concerns. DEC makes no representations about the accuracy or suitability of this content. Please note that Canada's National Academy of Dance Education is now operating as Dance Education Canada.
28:33
October 7, 2021
Debunking the Myth: But I am a dancer… I don’t have any transferable skills. In conversation with a Professor of Dance.
Pursuing post-secondary education, training or employment in the Arts is often a difficult decision for most. Why is it such a difficult decision? I think we are reminded during a time like now, where arts Organization and Arts Businesses are not just struggling to stay open, but shutting down. It is during times like these where we realize the instability, the lack of financial security and employment opportunities there is in Dance. But we, the dance community have to despite constantly facing challenges must unite and inform. We must continue to educate the public about the benefits of an education in dance. Today we discuss the benefits of pursuing an education in dance whether you decide to pursue a career in dance or not with the help of Professor Emeritus Ms. Tauna Hunter. GUEST: Tauna Hunter is a retired Professor and Chair of Dance at Mercyhurst University. She earned B.F.A. and M.F.A. degree in ballet performance and choreography. In 1985, she co-founded DANSOURCE, and as its managing director, she was highlighted in “Megatrends 2000” and featured in “Success” Magazine as a trendsetter in the future of the arts. She has been honoured with the Chautauqua Artist Teacher Award, the University of Utah Legacy Award and was highlighted in the July 2017 issue of Dance Teacher Magazine. She has served many boards including the University of Utah Artistic Advisory Council, the Advisory Boards of Ballet Concerto and Dance Now Miami. LINKEDIN: Tauna Hunter Disclaimer: Any and all ideas and information presented in the following podcast are those of the presenter. The presenter is not an employee or representative of Dance Education Canada (DEC), and is participating in this podcast on a voluntary basis. The ideas and information they express do not necessarily represent the views of the DEC or its partners, employees or affiliates. The ideas and information expressed herein are for general educational purposes only. They should not necessarily be applied to specific individual situations. DEC recommends consulting an expert or professional regarding specific medical, legal or business concerns. DEC makes no representations about the accuracy or suitability of this content. Please note that Canada's National Academy of Dance Education is now operating as Dance Education Canada.
21:01
October 7, 2021
Crossroads: Where Dance and Music Meet – For musicians who work with moving image. In conversation with a music teacher and scholar from the Scottish Ballet
The mission of Dance Education Canada is to not only promote lifelong learning and professional development for dance educators, but to provide them with the best and most current practices and training in 21st-century dance education. But what about musicians that play for dance, is there a training and certification program for them? If yes, what does that training encompass and why is it important? If no, how have musicians that play for dance typically acquired their skill set? We will explore these questions and more today with the help of a musician and educator currently working with the Scottish Ballet Ms. Karen MacIver. GUEST: Karen MacIver has been associated with Scottish Ballet since 1990. She was a guest repetiteur with Birmingham Royal Ballet and worked as a contract musician at the Edinburgh Festival. In 1999, Karen turned her skills towards film and gained her postgraduate Masters in Music in Music for Film and TV. It was at this point in her career that she re-marketed her job title as ‘Musician working in Moving Image’, which embraced the duality of her work. IN 2006 Scottish Ballet invited Karen back, to become the first full-time teacher of a pioneering postgraduate Master's course for young musicians wishing to work in the world of Professional Dance. Karen creates content for her audience through various channels some of which include her Youtube channel and her E-book, The Art of Class, where she has documented her work as an improviser for Moving Image. Karen has lectured around the world and is most passionate about encouraging excellence in music for dance. FB: @musicforballetanddanceclass TWIT: @musicdesignuk LINKEDIN: Karen MacIver WEBSITE: artofclass.online Disclaimer: Any and all ideas and information presented in the following podcast are those of the presenter. The presenter is not an employee or representative of Dance Education Canada (DEC), and is participating in this podcast on a voluntary basis. The ideas and information they express do not necessarily represent the views of the DEC or its partners, employees or affiliates. The ideas and information expressed herein are for general educational purposes only. They should not necessarily be applied to specific individual situations. DEC recommends consulting an expert or professional regarding specific medical, legal or business concerns. DEC makes no representations about the accuracy or suitability of this content. Please note that Canada's National Academy of Dance Education is now operating as Dance Education Canada.
22:34
October 7, 2021
Dance Majors: How to prepare your dancers. In conversation with a Professor of Dance
The decision to pursue post-secondary training or education in Dance can often be met with challenges and biases surrounding this decision to pursue the Arts as a post-secondary degree. Some of those biases may include the lack of career opportunities, the lack of stability and the overall value of an education dance in supporting a competitive candidate in the job market. Despite these challenges, many dancers decide to pursue a post-secondary dance degree/diploma program, but often when they begin they soon realize it is not what they expected. I can certainly speak from my own experience with regards to the challenges I faced transitioning from a commercial studio to a post-secondary dance education institute. Why is the transition into post-secondary dance education so challenging for dancers, what roadblocks or misconceptions are there and how can dance educators better prepare their dancers for post-secondary dance studies? We will answer all of those questions and more, today, with the help of Ms. Jenfer Davies. GUEST: Jenefer Davies is a Professor of Dance at Washington and Lee University and is the Artistic Director of the W&L Repertory Dance Company. She received an MFA in Choreography and Performance from The George Washington University and a MALS in Dance from Hollins University. Davies founded the contemporary modern dance company, Davies & Dancers and created one of the first academic programs in aerial dance in the country. Davies has been published in the International Planetarian Magazine, World Congress on Dance, the Nu Delta Alpha Journal and the Athens Institute for Research in the Arts Consortium, among others. She serves on the Editorial and Reviewer’s Board of the Athens Journal of Humanities and Arts and has reviewed dance proposals for Oxford University Press. Her book Aerial Dance: A Guide to Dance with Rope and Harness was published by Routledge Press in 2018 and she is currently writing a book on dance composition. INSTA/TWIT: @jdayvvv LINKEDIN: Jenefer Davies Disclaimer: Any and all ideas and information presented in the following podcast are those of the presenter. The presenter is not an employee or representative of Dance Education Canada (DEC), and is participating in this podcast on a voluntary basis. The ideas and information they express do not necessarily represent the views of the DEC or its partners, employees or affiliates. The ideas and information expressed herein are for general educational purposes only. They should not necessarily be applied to specific individual situations. DEC recommends consulting an expert or professional regarding specific medical, legal or business concerns. DEC makes no representations about the accuracy or suitability of this content. Please note that Canada's National Academy of Dance Education is now operating as Dance Education Canada.
22:34
October 7, 2021
Methodological Approaches for Interpreting the History of Dance: In conversation with a Doctor of Dance Studies
Dance Education Canada believes strongly that all areas of dance research, science, medicine and studies can and should inform our practice as dance educators. Included in that list of valuable subject areas for dance educators is dance history. Dance history is so important to us that we’ve included it as a subject in Part 2 of our dance teacher training program. Today we have the honour and privilege of speaking with a Doctor of Dance Studies from Norway, Dr. Elizabeth Svarstad. GUEST: Dr. Elizabeth Svarstad is a dancer, choreographer, teacher and researcher specializing in historical dance and dance history. She holds a BA in dance from the Norwegian Ballet Academy and a Nordic Master of Arts in Dance Studies from The Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), University of Copenhagen and Stockholm University. She defended her PhD in dance studies at the Department of music at NTNU with the project Dance as social education in Norway 1750–1820. She has studied baroque dance in France, England and the US and is well established as the only specialist baroque dancer in Norway. She has taught historical dance and dance history at Norway's performing arts institutions and universities and is currently a lecturer at Oslo National Academy of the Arts and the Norwegian Academy of Music. In 2019 she was awarded the Parelius Prize for deserved artists. INSTA: @elizabethsvarstad LINKEDIN: @esvarstad WEBSITE: elizabethsvarstad.no Disclaimer: Any and all ideas and information presented in the following podcast are those of the presenter. The presenter is not an employee or representative of Dance Education Canada (DEC), and is participating in this podcast on a voluntary basis. The ideas and information they express do not necessarily represent the views of the DEC or its partners, employees or affiliates. The ideas and information expressed herein are for general educational purposes only. They should not necessarily be applied to specific individual situations. DEC recommends consulting an expert or professional regarding specific medical, legal or business concerns. DEC makes no representations about the accuracy or suitability of this content. Please note that Canada's National Academy of Dance Education is now operating as Dance Education Canada.
27:54
October 6, 2021
What Listening and Reflecting Looks Like on our Dancers and how Dance Educators can Encourage this Active Experience. In conversation with an Adjunct Professor of Dance.
At Dance Education Canada we understand the importance of giving our dance educators the most current tools and knowledge as it relates to their practice, in so that their approach as dance educators is progressive, current and student-centred. In previous podcasts, we’ve provided dance educators with important topics about the whole dance education experience including expression, imagery and even musicality. Today will add another notch to our belt by discussing “listening what it looks like and feels like on our dancers” with the help of Ms. Danielle Bazinet. GUEST: Danielle Bazinet has been teaching dance and theatre for over twenty years in K-12 private, public, and dance studio settings. She completed her MA in Dance and Dance Education at New York University and holds a dual BA in Theater Education and Communications from Regis College. Currently, Danielle is pursuing her Doctor of Education (EdD) in Leadership in Higher Education at Regis College. Her research is focused on arts education, best practices of arts curriculum, and the benefits of studying the arts and their ability to foster 21st-century skills. Danielle has presented her work across many organizations including the Massachusetts State Dance Education Organization Conference and The New England Gifted and Talented Conference. She is a founding member of the Massachusetts Dance Education Organization and currently working as an adjunct professor at Bridgewater State University in the Dance Education Program. Disclaimer: Any and all ideas and information presented in the following podcast are those of the presenter. The presenter is not an employee or representative of Dance Education Canada (DEC), and is participating in this podcast on a voluntary basis. The ideas and information they express do not necessarily represent the views of the DEC or its partners, employees or affiliates. The ideas and information expressed herein are for general educational purposes only. They should not necessarily be applied to specific individual situations. DEC recommends consulting an expert or professional regarding specific medical, legal or business concerns. DEC makes no representations about the accuracy or suitability of this content. Please note that Canada's National Academy of Dance Education is now operating as Dance Education Canada.
20:54
October 6, 2021
Expressivity and Technique: Finding the Balance with a Doctor of French Literature
Dance Education Canada's approach to dance teacher training is unique in that we address all aspects of teaching, beyond the teaching of just steps. This unique approach allows dance educators to be the best they can be in so that their students can thrive, excel and progress in an environment that is nurturing and supportive while maintaining excellence and mastery in their performance. Part of a “whole dance education experience” includes teaching performers, artists and dancers how to express themselves through movement. I have heard it many many times from adjudicators, teachers and even artistic directors of company’s that there is too much focus on technique these days and not enough emphasis on the storytelling. Today we will discuss the importance of finding the balance between both technique and expression with the help of Dr. Cynthia Dariane. GUEST: For Cynthia, dance is more than just an art: it is a life discipline and an identity. In addition to her stage experience, she obtained the French State diploma in jazz dance teaching while integrating Terpsichore’s art in her studies. She holds a PhD in French Literature focused on the relationship between literature and dance, and a Masters in dance research focused on gender studies in Baladi. She believes in the richness of heteroclites. Involved in choreography, theatre, concerts, teaching, and conferences, Cynthia is an well-rounded scholar who juggles between the worlds of writing, literature and dance. INSTA: @cynth_da LINKEDIN: Cynthia Dariane Disclaimer: Any and all ideas and information presented in the following podcast are those of the presenter. The presenter is not an employee or representative of Dance Education Canada (DEC), and is participating in this podcast on a voluntary basis. The ideas and information they express do not necessarily represent the views of the DEC or its partners, employees or affiliates. The ideas and information expressed herein are for general educational purposes only. They should not necessarily be applied to specific individual situations. DEC recommends consulting an expert or professional regarding specific medical, legal or business concerns. DEC makes no representations about the accuracy or suitability of this content. Please note that Canada's National Academy of Dance Education is now operating as Dance Education Canada.
25:44
October 6, 2021
Practitioner Self-Care: Using creative embodied approaches – In conversation with a Dance Movement Psychotherapist
These days there is plenty of discussion surrounding the mental well-being of our students both in the studio and in the classroom. But, what about the teachers? It is often said that we are no good to anyone if we don’t take care of ourselves first. How can we shift the conversation and switch the context in so that we are looking inwards, to our own personal wellness? Today's very important discussion will address the mental wellness of the dance educator, and give us some insight into tips, tools and strategies to help us become aware of, manage and maintain our own mental health. Helping us understand the role that self-care plays in the lives of the dance educator in Ms. Celine Butte. GUEST: In 1999, whilst going through a personal crisis, Ms. Celine Butte found out about dance movement psychotherapy (DMP), and enrolled in the MA in DMP with Roehampton University. She qualified in 2002 with a PGDip in DMP and completed her add-on MA in 2008. She has since worked as a dance movement psychotherapist with marginalized and vulnerable individuals. She currently works within Merton Arts Therapies team for People with Learning Disabilities and in Private Practice in South London. A core member of the teaching team on the Creative Approaches to Supervision Diploma with the London Centre for Psychodrama, she embeds attention to the body and movement within this action-oriented supervision training for practitioners across modalities. She has taught DMP/T internationally and has been a visiting lecturer at the Roehampton University. She Is the co-founder of the ARTSjAM,  was on council at the Association for Dance Movement Psychotherapy UK and was the Treasurer of the European Association for Dance Movement Therapy. As a Dance Movement Psychotherapist and dancer, she considers the moving-dancing-living body as a source of inspiration, play and healing. LINKEDIN: Celine Butte WEBSITE: heartofmovement.com Disclaimer: Any and all ideas and information presented in the following podcast are those of the presenter. The presenter is not an employee or representative of Dance Education Canada (DEC), and is participating in this podcast on a voluntary basis. The ideas and information they express do not necessarily represent the views of the DEC or its partners, employees or affiliates. The ideas and information expressed herein are for general educational purposes only. They should not necessarily be applied to specific individual situations. DEC recommends consulting an expert or professional regarding specific medical, legal or business concerns. DEC makes no representations about the accuracy or suitability of this content. Please note that Canada's National Academy of Dance Education is now operating as Dance Education Canada.
19:41
October 6, 2021
Motivating the Dancer with Goal Setting – In conversation with the Artistic Director of the West Australian Ballet
At Dance Education Canada, we believe lesson planning is an important part of every dance teacher’s training, which is why, not only do we publish a DANCE EDUCATORS’ PLANNER designed to help dance educator’s plan out their year, but we also include the topic in Part 1 of our Dance Teacher Training Program. Why is planning, progression and goal setting important? We will discuss its value today in and how it allows our dancers to achieve the fullest extent of their talents. Enlightening us with his experience and knowledge on the topic of motivating our dancers through goal setting is the Artistic Director of the West Australian Ballet Mr. Aurélien Scannella. GUEST: Aurelien is a Belgian born dancer, ballet master, choreographer and director. He completed his training at the prestigious Royal Ballet School of Flanders and was subsequently accepted into the Royal Ballet of Flanders. After three years in Flanders he was appointed as a Soloist at Deutsche Oper am Rhein, and then promoted to the role of Principal Dancer the State Theatre Wiesbaden, Deutsche Oper Berlin and Ballett Basel. In 2008, he retired from dancing to focus on teaching. Quickly, Aurélien became one of the most sought after Ballet Masters on the market working with some of the best companies around the world such as Dutch National Ballet, Finnish National Ballet, Royal Swedish Ballet and Hong Kong Ballet. Aurélien took the helm as West Australian Ballet’s Artistic Director in 2013 and has since developed the West Australian Ballet into a versatile and diverse 21st-century company with a total of nine nationalities represented within the company. INSTA: @waballet FB: @westaustralianballet LINKEDIN: West Australian Ballet WEBSITE: waballet.com.au Disclaimer: Any and all ideas and information presented in the following podcast are those of the presenter. The presenter is not an employee or representative of Dance Education Canada (DEC), and is participating in this podcast on a voluntary basis. The ideas and information they express do not necessarily represent the views of the DEC or its partners, employees or affiliates. The ideas and information expressed herein are for general educational purposes only. They should not necessarily be applied to specific individual situations. DEC recommends consulting an expert or professional regarding specific medical, legal or business concerns. DEC makes no representations about the accuracy or suitability of this content. Please note that Canada's National Academy of Dance Education is now operating as Dance Education Canada.
24:41
October 6, 2021
An Education in Dance: Changing the Language: A discussion with the Founder/Artistic Director of the Puerto Rico Classical Dance Competition
Movement is the way through which we express ourselves and our body the medium. But does the verbal language we use in class, whether it be used for a correction, for instruction or to describe a particular quality/energy affect the way we move? How can language be used as a teaching tool in the dance class and what are some of the effects of language that is detrimental to the physical and cognitive well being of our dancers? Today we will explore those questions and more with the help of Ms. Blanca Huertas-Agnew GUEST: Blanca Huertas-Agnew began her training in her native Puerto Rico. She was a member of the corps of ballet at Ballet Concierto de Puerto Rico, later, joining Ballets de San Juan, as a Principal Soloist. Her professional career allowed her to perform across the globe including the United States, Central America, South America, and Europe. Blanca has a bachelor’s degree in Business Administration from Temple University, an MFA in Choreography and is certified to teach dance through various certification programs. Blanca is currently the Founder and Artistic Director of the Puerto Rico Classical Dance Competition, and on faculty and The School of Pennsylvania Ballet. INSTA/FB: @prcdc2020 Disclaimer: Any and all ideas and information presented in the following podcast are those of the presenter. The presenter is not an employee or representative of Dance Education Canada (DEC), and is participating in this podcast on a voluntary basis. The ideas and information they express do not necessarily represent the views of the DEC or its partners, employees or affiliates. The ideas and information expressed herein are for general educational purposes only. They should not necessarily be applied to specific individual situations. DEC recommends consulting an expert or professional regarding specific medical, legal or business concerns. DEC makes no representations about the accuracy or suitability of this content. Please note that Canada's National Academy of Dance Education is now operating as Dance Education Canada.
24:42
October 6, 2021
Can Yoga Inform our Practice as Dancers, Performers and Choreographers? – A conversation with a Principal Dancer from the National Ballet of Canada
As the dance community begins to lean on cross-training techniques and develop individualized training programs for dancers, the search for unique methods and tools becomes activated. Dancers continue to strive for excellence by trying and employing the latest techniques to enhance their performance. But what if instead of looking for the most current trend and most contemporary technique, we took a look at an ancient art form and used its methodologies and philosophies to inform our practice, what would then transpire? Well, we will find out today with the help of a principal dancer from the National Ballet of Canada, Mr Skylar Campbell. GUEST: Recognized by Dance Magazine as one of the “top 25 Dancers To Watch” in 2015, Skylar Campbell is a revered dancer, artist, curator and founder of the Skylar Campbell Dance Collective. Skylar was born in Laguna Beach, California and trained with Victor and Tatiana Kasatsky in Orange County. Mr. Campbell joined The National Ballet of Canada as an RBC Apprentice in 2009 and was promoted to Principal Dancer in 2018. Skylar has danced principal roles in, Etudes, Paquita and, George Balanchine’s Tarantella and among many others and has most recently performed in Crystal Pite’s world premiere of Angels’ Atlas with the National Ballet of Canada. In addition to his dance credits Skylar has worked closely with influential dance makers around the world some of which include James Kudelka, William Forsythe, Crystal Pite, and Wayne McGregor . Mr. Campbell is the recipient of many prestigious awards notably a Bronze Medal at the Youth American Grand Prix, a finalist in the Prix de Lausanne in addition to winning the William Marrie Award for artistic achievement for his role in La Fille Mal Garde. INSTA: @skylar.campbell WEBSITE: skylarcampbelldancecollective.org Disclaimer: Any and all ideas and information presented in the following podcast are those of the presenter. The presenter is not an employee or representative of Dance Education Canada (DEC), and is participating in this podcast on a voluntary basis. The ideas and information they express do not necessarily represent the views of the DEC or its partners, employees or affiliates. The ideas and information expressed herein are for general educational purposes only. They should not necessarily be applied to specific individual situations. DEC recommends consulting an expert or professional regarding specific medical, legal or business concerns. DEC makes no representations about the accuracy or suitability of this content. Please note that Canada's National Academy of Dance Education is now operating as Dance Education Canada.
26:21
October 6, 2021
Empowering Girls and Women through Indian Classical Dance: A conversation with a Doctor of Kalakruti
As our world addresses gender equality under various conditions some of which include unequal pay, education as well as economic and political rights, today’s guest focuses on women empowerment through dance, specifically Indian Classical Dance. Today we will touch on why preserving the culture, values, traditions and heritage of Indian Classical Dance is important and how an education in dance is valuable for girls and women.  GUEST: Guru Dr. Rehka Desai, is the Founder of Kalakruti Dance Academy. She has worked tirelessly for over 3 decades to empower girls and women through the culture and tradition of Indian Classical dance. Desai holds a Masters in Commerce, a Master of Arts and was honored with a PhD from Chennai University in 2017. She is currently writing her biography, as well as a book on the Indian Classical Dance Kalakruti Margam. She also holds a diploma, post-diploma and teacher training certification in the Bharatanatyam ba-rata-nat-ti-em training method. Currently Desai is working as a pranic psychotherapist and life coach, while facilitating workshops on girl, child and women empowerment. INSTA/FB: @kalakrutidanceacademy LINKEDIN: Dr. Rehka Desai WEBSITE: kalakrutidanceacademy.in Disclaimer: Any and all ideas and information presented in the following podcast are those of the presenter. The presenter is not an employee or representative of Dance Education Canada (DEC), and is participating in this podcast on a voluntary basis. The ideas and information they express do not necessarily represent the views of the DEC or its partners, employees or affiliates. The ideas and information expressed herein are for general educational purposes only. They should not necessarily be applied to specific individual situations. DEC recommends consulting an expert or professional regarding specific medical, legal or business concerns. DEC makes no representations about the accuracy or suitability of this content. Please note that Canada's National Academy of Dance Education is now operating as Dance Education Canada.
24:18
October 6, 2021
Folk Dancing: History, philosophy, influence and engagement. Insight from a PhD student studying Scottish Folk Dance.
As dance studios adopt, and as tv shows spotlight more contemporary western styles of dance, the interest in the study of more traditional forms of folk dance dissipates. Today we will ask questions that challenge our minimal engagement with classical folk styles of dance and question their relevance, importance and enrichment in today’s society. Helping us better understand our role in the preservation of these traditional dance forms, is Yang Zhao. GUEST: Yang Zhao is currently engaged in a PhD in Education in Scottish country dancing at the University of Edinburgh. She graduated with Cohort 2016 Choreomundus with an International Master in Dance, Knowledge, Practice, and Heritage in 2018. The Erasmus Mundus joint master was awarded by four partnership universities: Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Université Clermont Auvergne, University of Szegedi (segette) and Roehampton University London. While enrolled in a Master of Science in Dance Science and Education at the University of Edinburgh in 2016, she was actively engaged in learning Scottish dancing. INSTA: @sunshineraising FB: @themorningraisingsunshine LINKEDIN: Yang Zhao Sunshineraising Disclaimer: Any and all ideas and information presented in the following podcast are those of the presenter. The presenter is not an employee or representative of Dance Education Canada (DEC), and is participating in this podcast on a voluntary basis. The ideas and information they express do not necessarily represent the views of the DEC or its partners, employees or affiliates. The ideas and information expressed herein are for general educational purposes only. They should not necessarily be applied to specific individual situations. DEC recommends consulting an expert or professional regarding specific medical, legal or business concerns. DEC makes no representations about the accuracy or suitability of this content. Please note that Canada's National Academy of Dance Education is now operating as Dance Education Canada.
32:22
October 6, 2021
The Boston Ballet’s ChoreograpHER Initiative: A conversation with the Artistic Director of the Boston Ballet
As global discussions surrounding the imbalances of gender representation in leadership roles in professional companies arise, we begin to understand our role in not only developing a deeper understanding of these issues, but what steps we can take to promote action. A good starting point is using the work of companies that are already taking action, to inform our initiatives. The Boston Ballet Company is one of those companies. Listen in as we speak to the brilliant and accomplished artistic director of the Boston ballet Mr Mikko Nissinen as he speaks to us about the Boston Ballet’s ChoreograpHER initiative. GUEST: A Helsinki native, Mikko Nissinen began studying ballet at the age of 10. His professional career took off soon after with the Finnish National Ballet at age 15. During his 19 year professional career, Nissinen toured across the Netherlands and Switzerland, also performing as a principal dancer with the San Francisco Ballet. As the artistic director of Boston Ballet since 2001, Mikko’s vision and passion for the art form, has allowed him to transform this world-class ballet company. Mikko has pushed the repertoire beyond classical story ballets, by including more contemporary works by notable choreographers as John Neumeier, Wayne McGregor and William Forsythe. Disclaimer: Any and all ideas and information presented in the following podcast are those of the presenter. The presenter is not an employee or representative of Dance Education Canada (DEC), and is participating in this podcast on a voluntary basis. The ideas and information they express do not necessarily represent the views of the DEC or its partners, employees or affiliates. The ideas and information expressed herein are for general educational purposes only. They should not necessarily be applied to specific individual situations. DEC recommends consulting an expert or professional regarding specific medical, legal or business concerns. DEC makes no representations about the accuracy or suitability of this content. Please note that Canada's National Academy of Dance Education is now operating as Dance Education Canada.
14:53
October 6, 2021
Expressing the Expressions: A conversation with a Doctor of Kathak.
How do we learn about our feelings and emotions? How do we learn about the expressions that convey our emotions? How do we express our emotions through our body language and where do we go to explore our own expressions? A good starting place, that some might not immediately consider, is the dance class. The reasons people study dance can vary from a unique fitness experience, to a social outing, while others love to express themselves through movement. Expressing oneself is empowering, and using our expressions and body language to do so, can become even more empowering. Dr Vrushali is using the art of Indian Classical Dance to help others gain a deeper understanding of their emotions, expressions, body language and feelings. Today we have the honour of speaking with Dr. Vrushali, who will give us some insight into her research, work and practice. GUEST: Dr Vrushali started training in Kathak at age 6 under the guidance of Guru Dr Manjiri Deo and Guru Mookoondrajdeo and has spent the last 23 years promoting Kathak dance. She recently completed PhD in Kathak. She acquired her BA and MA degrees from Gandharva University and an MA in Kathak. She is the recipient of numerous notable awards including the rotary excellence award and hosts many workshops for her community in her spare time. INSTA: @dr.vrushali.dabke FB: @kathakbyvarushali LINKEDIN: Dr Vrushali Dabke Disclaimer: Any and all ideas and information presented in the following podcast are those of the presenter. The presenter is not an employee or representative of Dance Education Canada (DEC), and is participating in this podcast on a voluntary basis. The ideas and information they express do not necessarily represent the views of the DEC or its partners, employees or affiliates. The ideas and information expressed herein are for general educational purposes only. They should not necessarily be applied to specific individual situations. DEC recommends consulting an expert or professional regarding specific medical, legal or business concerns. DEC makes no representations about the accuracy or suitability of this content. Please note that Canada's National Academy of Dance Education is now operating as Dance Education Canada.
32:01
October 6, 2021
Insight into the Hiring Process – What Dance Educators Need to Know: A conversation with the Associate Artistic Director of Canada’s Royal Winnipeg Ballet
At Dance Education Canada, we love providing insight into the various realms of not only a dancer's training, care and education, but that of their post-secondary aspirations as well. These post-secondary aspirations are not only relevant after dancers have left their school, as dancers' decisions are highly influenced by their dance educators, directors, studio owners and classmates. The role dance educators play in preparing dancers for the future in dance is very important. These aspirations could include everything from career goals, to professional training and education. Today we will gain insight into the hiring process of one of Canada’s Professional Ballet Companies the Royal Winnipeg Ballet. Today’s tips will hopefully help guide dance educators as they prepare their dancers for their careers, dance-related or not. We are pleased to welcome the associate artistic director of Canada’s Royal Winnipeg Ballet to our program today Ms. Tara Birtwhistle. GUEST: After graduating from the Royal Winnipeg Ballet School in 1991, Ms. Birthwhistle was hired into the Royal Winnipeg Ballet company eventually accepting the role as principal dancer. Birthwhistle holds many accolades including: MacLean’s “One of 100 Young Canadians to Watch”, her Majesty’s Diamond Jubilee Medal and a Gemini award. Since retiring from the stage, Birtwhistle has been an integral part of the Royal Winnipeg Ballet artistic team. At the end of the Royal Winnipeg Ballet’s 2017-18 season, Birtwhistle was appointed Associate Artistic Director of the Royal Winnipeg Ballet. As Associate Artistic Director, Birtwhistle is a member of the senior leadership team, participating in strategic planning with responsibilities including casting, scheduling, development, marketing and overall management of the artistic team. INSTA: @rwballet @tarabirt LINKEDIN: Tara Birtwhistle WEBSITE: rwb.org Disclaimer: Any and all ideas and information presented in the following podcast are those of the presenter. The presenter is not an employee or representative of Dance Education Canada (DEC), and is participating in this podcast on a voluntary basis. The ideas and information they express do not necessarily represent the views of the DEC or its partners, employees or affiliates. The ideas and information expressed herein are for general educational purposes only. They should not necessarily be applied to specific individual situations. DEC recommends consulting an expert or professional regarding specific medical, legal or business concerns. DEC makes no representations about the accuracy or suitability of this content. Please note that Canada's National Academy of Dance Education is now operating as Dance Education Canada.
17:50
October 6, 2021
Ankle & Foot Health in Dancers – A conversation with the Principal Physiotherapist of The Australian Ballet
The discussions surrounding dance injury care, prevention and rehabilitation for today's dance educators needs to be specific, relevant and proven/practiced by the health care teams of today’s dancers. So it is no surprise that today's topic, focusing on the ankle and foot health of dancers, is one we’ve visited in the past, due to the nature of, and demands on this particular muscle group in dance training. Today we have the pleasure and privilege of speaking with the Principal Physio Therapist at the Australian Ballet Dr. Sue Mayes. GUEST: Dr Sue Mayes, is the Director of Artistic Health and has been the Principal Physiotherapist of The Australian Ballet since 1997. She has consulted for the AFL, Cricket Australia, and the Victorian Institute of Sport. She was appointed Adjunct Research Fellow at La Trobe University following the completion of her PhD in 2017. She has published papers titled: ‘Hip joint health in professional ballet dancers’, and co-authored many ballet injury-related publications. As a part of the partnership between the Australian ballet and La Trobe University, Dr Mayes is researching ankle, foot and hip joint health in professional ballet dancers and athletes. She has been invited to speak internationally at the IOC World Conference, the International Association of Dance Medicine and Science, among other lectures throughout Australia and Europe. TWIT: @s_maysey Disclaimer: Any and all ideas and information presented in the following podcast are those of the presenter. The presenter is not an employee or representative of Dance Education Canada (DEC), and is participating in this podcast on a voluntary basis. The ideas and information they express do not necessarily represent the views of the DEC or its partners, employees or affiliates. The ideas and information expressed herein are for general educational purposes only. They should not necessarily be applied to specific individual situations. DEC recommends consulting an expert or professional regarding specific medical, legal or business concerns. DEC makes no representations about the accuracy or suitability of this content. Please note that Canada's National Academy of Dance Education is now operating as Dance Education Canada.
36:16
October 6, 2021
The Creative Process: In conversation with the Artistic Director of LA Dance Moves
At Dance Education Canada, we know that learning is a 2-way process. If dance is a form of creative expression, then why aren’t we letting the dancers create? Composing steps for, and imposing steps on a dancer does not engage the dancer in their own creative process and means of self-expression through movement. A part of a whole dance education experience includes modelling the creative process. Should dance educators challenge, explore and modify their own creative process in so that they are inspiring students through this experience? The creative process should be fluid, in that dance educators and choreographers are constantly revisiting and revising their own practices.  New inspirations, new techniques and new processes is what helps us grow. Listen in today to the creative process of the artistic director of LA Dance Move Ms. Nancy Paradis as she dissects her own process. GUEST: Nancy Paradis performed as a principal and soloist dancer for many renowned companies including the Washington Ballet, Richmond Ballet and Louisville Ballet Company. She is no stranger to the commercial TV space having performed and choreographed for numerous shows in both the dance and fitness space including NBC Must See TV, A&E Promo, MTV Movie Awards while appearing in several fitness and yoga videos for crunch fitness and power core yoga. Fall 2020 Nancy is excited will return to the Richmond Ballet to choreograph a new work/world premiere. INSTA/FB: @ladance_moves TWIT: @LADMparadis LINKEDIN: Nancy Paradis WEBSITE: ladancemoves.com Disclaimer: Any and all ideas and information presented in the following podcast are those of the presenter. The presenter is not an employee or representative of Dance Education Canada (DEC), and is participating in this podcast on a voluntary basis. The ideas and information they express do not necessarily represent the views of the DEC or its partners, employees or affiliates. The ideas and information expressed herein are for general educational purposes only. They should not necessarily be applied to specific individual situations. DEC recommends consulting an expert or professional regarding specific medical, legal or business concerns. DEC makes no representations about the accuracy or suitability of this content. Please note that Canada's National Academy of Dance Education is now operating as Dance Education Canada.
24:26
October 6, 2021
How to create self-efficacy and foster individuality with pre-professional dancers: In conversation with the Associate Professor of Dance at North Kentucky University
Today's dancers and dance classrooms are not the same as they were 20 years ago. The hierarchical and teacher-centred approach to instruction is dated and ineffective in today's classrooms. Long gone are the days of dancers nodding their heads in agreement or obedience without saying a word. Today's classrooms are student-centred learning environments that incorporate inquiry-based approaches to learning.  Why should the dance studio learning environment be any different? In order for the learning environment to feel safe both physically and mentally for each dancer, the dancer needs to have a voice. Helping us better understand how to foster a learning environment that promotes self-efficacy and individuality in our dancers is the Dance Coordinator and Associate Professor at North Kentucky University Ms. Tracey Boner. GUEST: Tracey Bonner received her Bachelor of Fine Arts from Shen -en-dough-a Shenandoah University, her Master of Fine Arts from the University of California, Irvine, and is currently pursuing a Master's of Arts in Integrative Studies. Her extensive background in academic and artistic research which focuses on using dance in creative ways across academic disciplines has led her to receive multiple awards for her work. Since becoming Associate Professor of Dance & BFA Dance Coordinator at Northern Kentucky University Ms. Bonner has quadrupled enrollment in the Bachelor of Fine Arts dance program and established a new student performance entitled The Emerging Choreographers Showcase among other notable accomplishments. Tracey Bonner has a long-standing career as an artist, an arts advocate, an artistic leader, and entrepreneur. She has developed specific course work in higher education to redefine artistic and academic leadership for women, while simultaneously refining and developing her own artistic aesthetic in dance. INSTA: @traceydancesnsings TWIT: @bonner_tracey LINKEDIN: Tracey Bonner Disclaimer: Any and all ideas and information presented in the following podcast are those of the presenter. The presenter is not an employee or representative of Dance Education Canada (DEC), and is participating in this podcast on a voluntary basis. The ideas and information they express do not necessarily represent the views of the DEC or its partners, employees or affiliates. The ideas and information expressed herein are for general educational purposes only. They should not necessarily be applied to specific individual situations. DEC recommends consulting an expert or professional regarding specific medical, legal or business concerns. DEC makes no representations about the accuracy or suitability of this content. Please note that Canada's National Academy of Dance Education is now operating as Dance Education Canada.
19:28
October 6, 2021
Teaching Musicians to Work within the Dance Studio Setting: In conversation with a Professor of Dance and Music
At Dance Education Canada, we believe that dance teachers can best support their dancers' training and progression by having a well-rounded understanding of all of the components that make up the dance class from technique and performance, to progressions and musicality. Today we will focus on the musicality aspect of the dance class, including how musicians read the dancing body. We will answer questions such as How do piano accompanists know what play? And What cues do they take from the dancers and dance educators? Today's discussion about “musicians working within the dance studio setting” is with the Professor of Dance and Music at the University of Michigan, Mr. Christian Matijas-Mecca. GUEST: A native of Los Angeles, Christian earned his undergraduate and graduate degrees in Harpsichord and Early Music Performance at the University of Southern California. Over the past four decades, Christian has served as musical repetiteur in the staging of dances for artists some of which whom have worked with Balanchine, Graham and Lubovitch. He has accompanied for a plethora of directors and artists from renowned dance companies including the New York City Ballet, Bolshoi Ballet, Martha Graham Dance Company, Trisha Brown Dance Company, Miami City Ballet, and many more. As a leading researcher and pianist in Dance & Music Studies, Christian has presented conference papers at professional societies across the globe. As the author of several books including The Words and Music of Brian Wilson, Christian is on faculty at the University of Michigan with current research interests in popular music. INSTA/FB/TWIT: @magicxtian LINKEDIN: Christian Matijas-Mecca WEBSITE: smtd.umich.edu/departments/dance Disclaimer: Any and all ideas and information presented in the following podcast are those of the presenter. The presenter is not an employee or representative of Dance Education Canada (DEC), and is participating in this podcast on a voluntary basis. The ideas and information they express do not necessarily represent the views of the DEC or its partners, employees or affiliates. The ideas and information expressed herein are for general educational purposes only. They should not necessarily be applied to specific individual situations. DEC recommends consulting an expert or professional regarding specific medical, legal or business concerns. DEC makes no representations about the accuracy or suitability of this content. Please note that Canada's National Academy of Dance Education is now operating as Dance Education Canada.
21:01
October 6, 2021
Dance in America – Fostering its Integrity: In conversation with the Assistant Professor of Dance at Southern Utah University
At Dance Education Canada, we are passionate about promoting lifelong learning and professional development for dance educators. Our mission is embedded in challenging the dated teaching methods that no longer suit today's dancers and today's dance classes. We know teaching practices and methods need to progress along with dance research, curriculums, and dance programming. The good news is, is that we are not the only ones who are passionate about changing the norms. How we speak about dance, how we teach dance and how we represent ourselves contributes to the way our profession is perceived. With us today is the Assistant Professor of Dance at Southern Utah University Ms. Danielle Sheather. GUEST: Danielle Sheather completed a BFA in Dance and BA in Psychology from Honors College and received her MFA from the University of Arizona. She has received numerous awards some of which include the Outstanding Graduate Teaching Assistant for the College of Fine Arts, the Creative Achievement Award and the SUNY Chancellor’s Award. Danielle has previously served as Clinical Assistant Professor at the University at Buffalo and as Guest Artist and Instructor at East Carolina University Currently serving as Assistant Professor at Southern Utah University she is interested in exploring the neuromuscular/psychosomatic connections that exist between the mind and body in order to develop sound anatomical alignment, longevity, and injury prevention techniques. She is also passionate about continuing the legacy of choreographers both past and present and has an active research agenda in Dance Documentation and Preservation. INSTA: @dlsheather LINKEDIN: Danielle Lydia Sheather WEBISTE: daniellelydiasheather.com Disclaimer: Any and all ideas and information presented in the following podcast are those of the presenter. The presenter is not an employee or representative of Dance Education Canada (DEC), and is participating in this podcast on a voluntary basis. The ideas and information they express do not necessarily represent the views of the DEC or its partners, employees or affiliates. The ideas and information expressed herein are for general educational purposes only. They should not necessarily be applied to specific individual situations. DEC recommends consulting an expert or professional regarding specific medical, legal or business concerns. DEC makes no representations about the accuracy or suitability of this content. Please note that Canada's National Academy of Dance Education is now operating as Dance Education Canada.
30:11
October 6, 2021
Developing the Adolescent Male into a Strong and Resilient Dancer and Pas de Deux Partner: A discussion with the Strength Coach for the Queensland Ballet Academy and Company
Discussions surrounding dance injuries are plentiful these days, which is why at Dance Education Canada we are passionate about providing our dance educators with specific, current and relevant content regarding dance injury prevention, care and rehabilitation. We take time to ensure our topics are unique, thought-provoking and informative for today's dance educators.  We also ensure we connect you with professionals who have not only researched these particular methods but have extensive experience in putting these techniques into practice. Which is why today for our topic on strength training for the adolescent male dancer, we welcome the Strength Coach of the Queensland Ballet Academy and Company Mr. Tony Lewis. GUEST: After studying full-time at the Australian Ballet School, Tony began his 15 years as a dance professional with The Australian Ballet Company followed by his retirement as Principal Dancer from the Queensland Ballet in 2003. After experiencing a career where refined physical maintenance and injury rehabilitation was perpetual, a career move to health and fitness was a natural transition for Tony, thus health and fitness business, TONY LEWIS STRENGTH & CONDITIONING was born. In 2014 he was invited to be the Strength and Conditioning Coach for the Queensland Ballet Academy. His work with the male students at the Academy led to accepting a position with Queensland Ballet’s Health Team. By drawing on his past, and using both traditional and modern Strength and Conditioning techniques, Tony has developed a unique style of training. His focus is on creating lean, strong and agile bodies. INSTA/FB/TWIT: @tonylewispt LINKEDIN: Tony Lewis Disclaimer: Any and all ideas and information presented in the following podcast are those of the presenter. The presenter is not an employee or representative of Dance Education Canada (DEC), and is participating in this podcast on a voluntary basis. The ideas and information they express do not necessarily represent the views of the DEC or its partners, employees or affiliates. The ideas and information expressed herein are for general educational purposes only. They should not necessarily be applied to specific individual situations. DEC recommends consulting an expert or professional regarding specific medical, legal or business concerns. DEC makes no representations about the accuracy or suitability of this content. Please note that Canada's National Academy of Dance Education is now operating as Dance Education Canada.
26:06
October 6, 2021
The Use of Imagery in Technique Classes
As our world changes, as students change and as we become more knowledgeable towards informing our practice through collaborations with other fields related to dance education, our teaching method must change. How do we evoke a particular energy, quality, effort and get our dancers to execute steps with a particular momentum or fluidity? One of the most current and practical methods, particularly relevant in today's virtual world, is to teach dance using imagery. Helping us better understand how to incorporate the use of imagery for maximum results is the adjunct dance professor at Western Michigan University Ms. Marie Chamberlain. GUEST: Marie Stanek Chamberlain earned a Bachelor of Arts in Modern Dance from Brigham Young University and a Master of Arts in Dance Education from New York University. She is the founder and artistic director of Chamberlain Dance, a modern dance company committed to developing work that examines the human experience. Marie Chamberlain has taught at many renowned institutions some of which include the Regional Center for the Arts, the Hartford Conservatory and Western Michigan University. Marie Chamberlain is certified in the Laban/Bartenieff movement system and is pursuing her MFA at Wilson College. She currently works with Education for the Arts, teaching dance residencies and aesthetic education in Kalamazoo County schools. FB: @chamberlaindance LINKEDIN: Marie Chamberlain Disclaimer: Any and all ideas and information presented in the following podcast are those of the presenter. The presenter is not an employee or representative of Dance Education Canada (DEC), and is participating in this podcast on a voluntary basis. The ideas and information they express do not necessarily represent the views of the DEC or its partners, employees or affiliates. The ideas and information expressed herein are for general educational purposes only. They should not necessarily be applied to specific individual situations. DEC recommends consulting an expert or professional regarding specific medical, legal or business concerns. DEC makes no representations about the accuracy or suitability of this content. Please note that Canada's National Academy of Dance Education is now operating as Dance Education Canada.
23:51
October 6, 2021
Embodied Cognition in Dance: In conversation with the Head of the Department of Dance Studies at the University of Malta
At Dance Education Canada, we encourage dance educators to offer their dancers so much more than a physical experience in their dance classes. In order to bridge the gap between dance education and dance training, we need to foster an all-encompassing understanding of dance for our dancers. Part of this “whole dance education experience” includes embodied cognition. What is embodied cognition? Why do we need to talk about it and what will it look like in our dance classes? Providing us with answers to these questions and more is the Head of the Department of Dance Studies at the University of Malta, Dr. Lucia Piquero Alvarez. GUEST: Dr. Lucía Piquero-Alvarez trained in Classical Ballet and read for a Bachelor of Science in Psychology in Spain. She then studied contemporary dance training at The Place, London, received her MA in Choreography from Middlesex University, and completed her PhD at Roehampton University. She is currently head of the Dance Studies Department at the University of Malta. She researches embodied cognition and the experience of emotion in dance. She has presented her research and choreographic works internationally for numerous conferences, commissions, and residencies.  She has also directed several choreographic practice-as-research projects. INSTA/FB/TWIT: @lupiquero LINKEDIN: Lucia Piquero WEBISTE: luciapiquero.com Disclaimer: Any and all ideas and information presented in the following podcast are those of the presenter. The presenter is not an employee or representative of Dance Education Canada (DEC), and is participating in this podcast on a voluntary basis. The ideas and information they express do not necessarily represent the views of the DEC or its partners, employees or affiliates. The ideas and information expressed herein are for general educational purposes only. They should not necessarily be applied to specific individual situations. DEC recommends consulting an expert or professional regarding specific medical, legal or business concerns. DEC makes no representations about the accuracy or suitability of this content. Please note that Canada's National Academy of Dance Education is now operating as Dance Education Canada.
22:10
October 6, 2021
Just because your dance teacher taught you that way… doesn’t mean it’s right! – In conversation with a guest Dance Teacher from the Scottish Ballet
At Dance Education Canada our discussions surrounding the role of the 21st-century dance educator in 21st-century dance education, reoccur regularly, as we feel that we cannot present this topic enough, due to its importance in the overall development of our young dancers. At the heart of our mission and vision is always the wellness of the dancer and how dance educators can be the best they can be to teach, train and promote excellence in young dancers whether they choose to pursue a career in dance or not. Excellence is not only reserved for professional ballet schools and post-secondary institutions. These same expectations can be also fostered in a supportive, encouraging and nurturing studio environment. As dance educators, we need to seek out current practices that foster healthy child development whether it be through conferences, events, dance teacher training and certifications. The excuse “well my dance teacher did it” is not a good enough reason to model or present a specific teaching method in today's dance classes. Discussing this important topic with us today is a teacher, rehearsal director and stager who has worked with many reputable companies and schools including the Royal Ballet and English National Ballet, Ms. Kristen McGarrity. GUEST: Born in Glasgow, Scotland, Kristen McGarrity trained at The Royal Ballet School before graduating into the Birmingham Royal Ballet Company. After leaving the Birmingham Royal Ballet she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology from Open University and received her teaching diploma from the Royal Ballet School. Kristen has guest taught at some of the UK’s top vocational schools, namely the Royal Ballet School, Elmhurst School for Dance and Urdang Academy. She most recently embarked on a mentorship opportunity with the English National Ballet School. Kristen is currently guest teaching at Scottish Ballet and continues her career as a freelance performer, stager and coach. INSTA: @kristenjmcgarrity TWIT: @KJMcGarrity LINKEDIN: Kristen McGarrity Disclaimer: Any and all ideas and information presented in the following podcast are those of the presenter. The presenter is not an employee or representative of Dance Education Canada (DEC), and is participating in this podcast on a voluntary basis. The ideas and information they express do not necessarily represent the views of the DEC or its partners, employees or affiliates. The ideas and information expressed herein are for general educational purposes only. They should not necessarily be applied to specific individual situations. DEC recommends consulting an expert or professional regarding specific medical, legal or business concerns. DEC makes no representations about the accuracy or suitability of this content. Please note that Canada's National Academy of Dance Education is now operating as Dance Education Canada.
31:42
October 5, 2021
Pointe Shoe Fittings – A discussion with the New York City Ballet’s Pointe Shoe Supervisor
At Dance Education Canada, we care about providing dance educators and studio owners with the tools they need to lead their dancers confidently and safely throughout their years of training. Current discussions surrounding dance injury and dance injury prevention are plentiful, but when do we start looking at the training tools, the equipment and the footwear that could be contributing to injuries when used improperly. So today, we will discuss footwear, pointe shoes to be exact. During today's education about appropriate footwear and fittings, we will talk all things pointe shoes including the factors that go into choosing a pointe shoe and how to identify signs of an ill-fitting pointe shoe. Speaking with us today about pointe shoes is the Coordinator of Pointe Shoes at the New York City Ballet Ms. Linette Roe. GUEST: Linnette (Hitchin) Roe was a Principal Dancer for the pacific northwest ballet. In her over twelve years with the company, she toured all over the world from New York to London, Scotland and Melbourne, working with many renowned choreographers. Currently, she holds the position of Shoe Supervisor for the New York City Ballet. She enjoys sharing her experience and knowledge by teaching and training the next generation of dancers. INSTA: @linnetteintransit LINKEDIN: Linnette Roe WEBSITE: nycballet.com Disclaimer: Any and all ideas and information presented in the following podcast are those of the presenter. The presenter is not an employee or representative of Dance Education Canada (DEC), and is participating in this podcast on a voluntary basis. The ideas and information they express do not necessarily represent the views of the DEC or its partners, employees or affiliates. The ideas and information expressed herein are for general educational purposes only. They should not necessarily be applied to specific individual situations. DEC recommends consulting an expert or professional regarding specific medical, legal or business concerns. DEC makes no representations about the accuracy or suitability of this content. Please note that Canada's National Academy of Dance Education is now operating as Dance Education Canada.
14:05
October 5, 2021
Preventing Overuse Injuries in Dancers: Insight from a Doctor of Physical Therapy
At Dance Education Canada, we know that dance educators wear many hats. Their role goes well beyond the teaching of steps, and choreography of dances. In order for dance educators to support their dancers' overall health and well-being they require an education in, and understanding of, dance injury prevention. Above and beyond the more general dance injury prevention, today we are going to focus specifically on overuse injuries. Helping us learn about some of the most common overuse injuries and, physical compensations is Dr. Julieann Berg. GUEST: As a young dancer with over 20 years of dance training in everything from ballet to modern and even Latin dance, Dr. Berg is no stranger to the dance world. Dr. Berg received her Doctorate of Physical Therapy from Columbia University in 2017. Her clinical experience includes treating pediatric patients, adults and dancer athletes through telehealth and in-person sessions. Julieann enjoys educating dancers and dance educators through content creation and workshops. INSTA: @phillydancephysio WEBSITE: julieannbergdpt.com Disclaimer: Any and all ideas and information presented in the following podcast are those of the presenter. The presenter is not an employee or representative of Dance Education Canada (DEC), and is participating in this podcast on a voluntary basis. The ideas and information they express do not necessarily represent the views of the DEC or its partners, employees or affiliates. The ideas and information expressed herein are for general educational purposes only. They should not necessarily be applied to specific individual situations. DEC recommends consulting an expert or professional regarding specific medical, legal or business concerns. DEC makes no representations about the accuracy or suitability of this content. Please note that Canada's National Academy of Dance Education is now operating as Dance Education Canada.
15:07
October 5, 2021
This is 21st Century Dance Education – In conversation with Artistic Coordinator of the Australian Ballet
Why does changing the way we teach dance matter? Have we changed enough? Are we changing fast enough? What are the effects on today's dancers if we do not change the way we teach dance? These are all questions we will discuss today as we explore 21st-century dance education from the viewpoint of Ms. Amelia Drummond The Artistic Coordinator of the Australian Ballet. GUEST: Amelia Drummond is a writer, choreographer and former dancer. After finishing her Bachelor of Arts in Dance at the Performing Arts University of Mannheim in Germany, Amelia was offered a contract and worked with the Baden State Ballet of Karlsruhe. She danced in a range of ballets including classical works like Christopher Wheeldon’s Swan Lake, MacMillan’s Romeo and Juliet, as well as other neo-classical and modern styles. In 2019 Amelia was the recipient of the Emerging Female Classical Choreographer Initiative. She was later awarded a week’s residency at the Sydney Opera House and went on to choreograph her work ‘Einsamkeit’ for the Australian Ballet’s Bodytorque: Atelier season. Currently, Amelia holds the position of Artistic Co-ordinator of The Australian Ballet. INSTA: @ameliadrummond LINKEDIN: Amelia Drummond Disclaimer: Any and all ideas and information presented in the following podcast are those of the presenter. The presenter is not an employee or representative of Dance Education Canada (DEC), and is participating in this podcast on a voluntary basis. The ideas and information they express do not necessarily represent the views of the DEC or its partners, employees or affiliates. The ideas and information expressed herein are for general educational purposes only. They should not necessarily be applied to specific individual situations. DEC recommends consulting an expert or professional regarding specific medical, legal or business concerns. DEC makes no representations about the accuracy or suitability of this content. Please note that Canada's National Academy of Dance Education is now operating as Dance Education Canada.
30:18
October 5, 2021
The Dance Teacher: Using psychological skills and strategies to be the best you can be for your dancers: A conversation with a Doctor of Sport and Exercise Psychology
At Dance Education Canada, we are passionate about helping dance educators be the best they can be, in so that their dancers can learn, grow and progress in an environment that supports their social, cognitive, physical and emotional well-being both throughout childhood into adolescence and adulthood. It is essential that dance educators are aware of and able to assess their own emotional and cognitive state. The dancers' wellness, execution and performance both inside and outside of class is in our hands, and at the forefront of what we do in the studio, and thus this skillset is an essential part of your practice as a dance educator. Helping guide us in today's discussion, and providing us with some strategies, tips and tools is the Associate Dean of Queensland University of Technology Dr. Gene Moyle. GUEST: Professor Gene Moyle is a graduate of the Australian Ballet School. After having danced with the Australian Ballet and Queensland Ballet Companies, Gene pursued further studies in psychology completing a Masters and Doctorate Degree in Sport and Exercise Psychology. Dr. Moyle focuses on the application of performance psychology and performance enhancement, particularly within the performing arts, elite sport and corporate domains. Her involvement in performing arts is extensive and includes her role as a contributor to DANCE Australia magazine and the Head of Student Health & Welfare at the Australian Ballet School. She currently holds the position of Associate Dean of International and Advancement at Queensland University of Technology Creative Industries. TWIT: @genemoyle LINKEDIN: Gene Moyle WEBSITE: staff.qut.edu.au/staff/g.moyle Disclaimer: Any and all ideas and information presented in the following podcast are those of the presenter. The presenter is not an employee or representative of Dance Education Canada (DEC), and is participating in this podcast on a voluntary basis. The ideas and information they express do not necessarily represent the views of the DEC or its partners, employees or affiliates. The ideas and information expressed herein are for general educational purposes only. They should not necessarily be applied to specific individual situations. DEC recommends consulting an expert or professional regarding specific medical, legal or business concerns. DEC makes no representations about the accuracy or suitability of this content. Please note that Canada's National Academy of Dance Education is now operating as Dance Education Canada.
32:57
October 5, 2021
Jose Limon: In Conversation with the Artistic Director of the Jose Limon Foundation
A phrase that you will hear me say often is “Where we come from matters.” How can we possibly progress in dance education, research and study without a sound understanding of techniques, styles, aesthetics and the people who influenced these movements? At Dance Education Canada, we have had the privilege of interviewing dance historians, scholars, researchers, choreographers and educators who have committed their lives to the study of dance. We’ve interviewed people who’ve danced with Graham and rubbed shoulders with Cunningham, so today's guest should be no surprise.  GUEST: A widely respected former member of the Limón Dance Company for more than a decade, Puleio was appointed only the sixth Artistic Director in the Company’s 74-year history, a position that originated with Doris Humphrey. After a diverse performing career with the Limón Dance Company, touring national and international musical theatre productions, television and film, he received his Master of Fine Arts from the University of California, Irvine. His research focuses on contextualizing mid-20th-century dance for the contemporary artist and audience. He is committed to implementing that research by celebrating José Limón's historical legacy and reimagining his intention and vision to reflect the rapidly shifting 21st-century landscape. INSTA: @limondance @dantepuleio FB/TWIT: @limondance LINKEDIN: Limon Dance WEBSITE: limon.nyc Disclaimer: Any and all ideas and information presented in the following podcast are those of the presenter. The presenter is not an employee or representative of Dance Education Canada (DEC), and is participating in this podcast on a voluntary basis. The ideas and information they express do not necessarily represent the views of the DEC or its partners, employees or affiliates. The ideas and information expressed herein are for general educational purposes only. They should not necessarily be applied to specific individual situations. DEC recommends consulting an expert or professional regarding specific medical, legal or business concerns. DEC makes no representations about the accuracy or suitability of this content. Please note that Canada's National Academy of Dance Education is now operating as Dance Education Canada.
20:08
October 5, 2021
The U.S. Government’s Use of Modern Dance in its Cultural Propaganda Campaign during the Cold War – In conversation with a Doctor of Dance
At Dance Education Canada we believe that in order to be able to provide a dance education that is comprehensive, dance educators must have an understanding of where we came from. This includes insight into how styles transformed into others, what inspired the founders and how society influenced various styles. Today we will explore the later, and get to know Jose Limon and his work with the help of Professor and Coordinator of the Dance Department at Montgomery County Community College Dr Melinda Copel. GUEST: Melinda Copel holds a Doctorate in Dance from Temple University and certification in Elementary Labanotation from the Dance Notation Bureau. Copel has taught dance to adults and children for over twenty-seven years teaching at many universities including Temple University and Rutgers University—Camden. Copel has studied a broad range of dance styles including modern dance at the Martha Graham School, where she was fortunate to take classes with Graham, and ballet at the Finis Jhung School of Ballet in New York. Copel has studied choreography and performance at Smith College,  and has served as research consultant for the video documentary Limón: A Life Beyond Words. Copel’s articles and reviews can be found in renowned publications including Choreography and Dance and the Dance Research Journal amongst many others. Her dissertation examines the State Department's use of modern dance as part of its cultural propaganda campaign during the Cold War. FB: @MCCCDance LINKEDIN: Melinda Copel WEBSITE: mc3.edu Disclaimer: Any and all ideas and information presented in the following podcast are those of the presenter. The presenter is not an employee or representative of Dance Education Canada (DEC), and is participating in this podcast on a voluntary basis. The ideas and information they express do not necessarily represent the views of the DEC or its partners, employees or affiliates. The ideas and information expressed herein are for general educational purposes only. They should not necessarily be applied to specific individual situations. DEC recommends consulting an expert or professional regarding specific medical, legal or business concerns. DEC makes no representations about the accuracy or suitability of this content. Please note that Canada's National Academy of Dance Education is now operating as Dance Education Canada.
24:52
October 5, 2021
The Place and Role of the Dance Educator in our Prevailing Culturally-Diverse World – In conversation with a Doctor of Dance Studies
At Dance Education Canada we know that dance is a language through which we can communicate globally. The power of dance as a language allows us to share our history, traditions, culture, stories and celebrations. Canada’s National Academy of Dance Education has been blessed to have met many dance educators from around the world and gained insight into their dance training and experiences from their point of view. The more we know about dance history and cultural influences on styles, the better equipped we are as dance educators to truly present an education in dance to our students. Helping us better understand the dance educator's role in supporting diversity in our dance community is Co-Founder of Africa Speaks and Assistant Lecturer of Dance at Makerere University Dr. Alfdaniels Mabingo. GUEST: Alfdaniels Mabingo is a Ugandan dance researcher, scholar, performer, Afro-optimist and co-founder of AFRIKA SPEAKS. Born and raised in his ancestral village, Mbuukiro, in Uganda, he holds a Ph.D. in Dance Studies from the University of Auckland. He holds an MA in Dance Education from New York University, an MA in Performing Arts and a BA in Dance, both from Makerere University. He has taught dance courses at many renowned Universities throughout the US, New Zealand and Jamaica.  Mabingo has published more than 20 peer-reviewed scholarly articles and book chapters. In 2020, his book titled ‘Ubuntu as Dance Pedagogy: Individuality, Community, and Inclusion in Teaching and Learning of Indigenous Dances in Uganda’ was published. Mabingo has received numerous prestigious scholarships and awards including the University of Auckland Doctoral Scholarship and the George Payne award for outstanding academic leadership and excellence at NYU. INSTA: @amabingo LINKEDIN: Alfdaniels Mabingo WEBSITE: afrikaspeaks.org Disclaimer: Any and all ideas and information presented in the following podcast are those of the presenter. The presenter is not an employee or representative of Dance Education Canada (DEC), and is participating in this podcast on a voluntary basis. The ideas and information they express do not necessarily represent the views of the DEC or its partners, employees or affiliates. The ideas and information expressed herein are for general educational purposes only. They should not necessarily be applied to specific individual situations. DEC recommends consulting an expert or professional regarding specific medical, legal or business concerns. DEC makes no representations about the accuracy or suitability of this content. Please note that Canada's National Academy of Dance Education is now operating as Dance Education Canada.
26:44
October 5, 2021
The Ballet Pianist: Communication Tips between the Pianist and the Ballet Teacher: In conversation with a Ballet Music Composer
At Dance Education Canada we care about connecting our dance educator with industry experts in order to provide them with tips, tricks, tools in so that they can see and understand dance education from various perspectives, including that of the pianist. For those of your lucky enough to have a live music for your ballet classes, understand how it can inspire and influence creation, through subtle changes in tempo, dynamics and pitch. The nuances in tempo and dynamics can create effects that inspire the dancer to jump higher or land softer. This relationship between teacher and pianist, requires effective and clear communication in order for desired effects to be understood and then translated into a musical or movement equivalent of a particular gesture or adjective. Providing us with some tips, tricks and tools to help us better communicate with our ballet pianist is ballet music composer and pianist Mr. Robert Long. GUEST: Robert Long has worked as a ballet pianist-accompanist for over 30 years, playing for both exam classes and “open” classes. There have been many requests for Robert's music in notable TV programs and films including "The Curious Case of Benjamin Button" and a BBC4 episode of "Danceworks". In 2004, Robert appeared as pianist in an episode about ballet on a children’s TV show called “This is Daniel Cook.” You can find his original compositions of piano music for ballet class on his three albums entitled Ballet Etudes. INSTA: @rlongballetmusic FB: @balletclassmusic TWIT: @glisses LINKEDIN: Robert Long WEBISTE: rlongballetmusic.com Disclaimer: Any and all ideas and information presented in the following podcast are those of the presenter. The presenter is not an employee or representative of Dance Education Canada (DEC), and is participating in this podcast on a voluntary basis. The ideas and information they express do not necessarily represent the views of the DEC or its partners, employees or affiliates. The ideas and information expressed herein are for general educational purposes only. They should not necessarily be applied to specific individual situations. DEC recommends consulting an expert or professional regarding specific medical, legal or business concerns. DEC makes no representations about the accuracy or suitability of this content. Please note that Canada's National Academy of Dance Education is now operating as Dance Education Canada.
18:55
October 5, 2021
“LIVE” Music in the Dance Class - A conversation with a Solo Pianist for the New York City Ballet
At Dance Education Canada we know the important role our community of experts plays in providing our dance educators with a 21st-century dance education. Which is why today, you will have the privilege of hearing from one of the solo pianist from the New York city Ballet. Although we are most familiar with live music in a ballet class, today we will explore the benefits of live music in a variety of dance classes including modern and tap. Hopefully today’s insight will give you some considerations of providing the added element of live music in your dance classes. GUEST: Elaine Chelton studied piano at Manhattan School of Music and at Queens College where received her Bachelors of Music and Master of Arts degree. Her career began playing for the New York City Ballet in 1990. She has a global performance roster having performed in the US, Russia, Japan, Hong Kong & Europe. She was featured in a PBS Broadcast of NYC Ballet Live at the Chatalet Theatre in Paris and has played for the Balanchine Foundation. Her work can be found on 2 recorded CD’s for ballet class. INSTA: @elainechelton LINKEDIN: Elaine Chelton WEBSITE: newyorkcityballet.com Disclaimer: Any and all ideas and information presented in the following podcast are those of the presenter. The presenter is not an employee or representative of Dance Education Canada (DEC), and is participating in this podcast on a voluntary basis. The ideas and information they express do not necessarily represent the views of the DEC or its partners, employees or affiliates. The ideas and information expressed herein are for general educational purposes only. They should not necessarily be applied to specific individual situations. DEC recommends consulting an expert or professional regarding specific medical, legal or business concerns. DEC makes no representations about the accuracy or suitability of this content. Please note that Canada's National Academy of Dance Education is now operating as Dance Education Canada.
24:06
October 5, 2021
Dance Training and Dance Education – In conversation with an Emeritus & Senior Scholar of Dance
At Dance Education Canada we know that dance teacher training is so much more than just learning steps. It includes integration of various components of an education in dance, to bridge the gap between dance training and dance education. Focusing on one or the other was and sometimes is common practice, but in today’s world, like we always say at DEC we need to provide our dancers and dance educators with a “whole dance education” experience. Helping us better understand how both approaches can inform and enhance one another is Emeritus and Senior Scholars from the Deptartment of Dance at York University Ms. Claire F. Wootten. GUEST: Following completion of her studies with the Professional Division at the Royal Winnipeg Ballet School, Claire danced professionally with the Alberta Ballet Company. She is a graduate of the Teacher Training Program at Canada’s National Ballet School and has taught extensively throughout Canada. Claire has been on faculty in the Department of Dance at York University since 1990, joining the full-time roster in 2004 and holding the role of Department Chair from 2010-14. Her area of teaching specialization is contemporary ballet, dance education and community dance. She is a certified instructor of 3-D Workout, an integrated fitness program based on the work of Bartenieff and Laban. Recently retired from full-time teaching at York, Claire has returned to freelance work. Disclaimer: Any and all ideas and information presented in the following podcast are those of the presenter. The presenter is not an employee or representative of Dance Education Canada (DEC), and is participating in this podcast on a voluntary basis. The ideas and information they express do not necessarily represent the views of the DEC or its partners, employees or affiliates. The ideas and information expressed herein are for general educational purposes only. They should not necessarily be applied to specific individual situations. DEC recommends consulting an expert or professional regarding specific medical, legal or business concerns. DEC makes no representations about the accuracy or suitability of this content. Please note that Canada's National Academy of Dance Education is now operating as Dance Education Canada.
41:17
October 5, 2021
The Creative Process of a Canadian Conductor and Doctor of Musical Arts with her International Ballet Portfolio
At Dance Education Canada we know that it is likely your own dance training lacked the inclusion and incorporation of the creative process, which would have allowed you you to create, explore and express movement that was your own. If this sounds familiar, you are not alone. Elements of creative movement were not often a part of commercial studio dance training. However things are changing, the more dance teacher education is becoming prevalent, the better understanding dance educators have of the creative process and the importance of incorporating it into their own dance classes.  But who do we learn best from? Fellow dance educators, professors, researchers and dance scholars? What if instead we look to our artistic community? What if to gain an enriched understanding of the creative process we looked beyond the dance community and explore the creative process of other artists? Today we will do just that… today we have the honour of speaking with Assistant Professor at Berklee College of Music and world-renown conductor Ms. Genvieve Leclair. GUEST: Geneviève holds a Doctor of Musical Arts degree in Orchestral Conducting from Boston University, with a Bachelor's and Master's degrees in flute performance from the Université de Montréal. She was appointed Assistant Professor at Berklee College of Music in 2016. Equally at home in the symphony, ballet and opera worlds, she was a recurring guest conductor with The National Ballet of Canada and Northern Ballet in the UK, as well as Assistant Conductor and Guest Conductor for Boston Ballet. Geneviève was awarded the 2017 American Prize in Conducting, college/university division and in 2010, received the Sir Ernest MacMillan Memorial Foundation Award in Orchestral Conducting. In addition to her expertise and experience as a conductor, Geneviève has published several music literature and theory exercise books. LINKEDIN: Genvieve Leclair WEBISTE: genvieveleclair.com Disclaimer: Any and all ideas and information presented in the following podcast are those of the presenter. The presenter is not an employee or representative of Dance Education Canada (DEC), and is participating in this podcast on a voluntary basis. The ideas and information they express do not necessarily represent the views of the DEC or its partners, employees or affiliates. The ideas and information expressed herein are for general educational purposes only. They should not necessarily be applied to specific individual situations. DEC recommends consulting an expert or professional regarding specific medical, legal or business concerns. DEC makes no representations about the accuracy or suitability of this content. Please note that Canada's National Academy of Dance Education is now operating as Dance Education Canada.
31:34
October 5, 2021
The Luigi Technique: Development, Teaching and Relevance – In conversation with a faculty member of the Joffrey Ballet and Luigi Student
At Dance Education Canada we know that an understanding of how specific dance styles developed and what specific styles influence one another is essential in being able to truly understand movement. Knowing these details will help you teach movement based on its fundamentals and stylistic qualities. Even some of the most contemporary syllabi were not created of out thin air, they were influenced by pioneering founders of dance and movement techniques. Why is this important? Being a dance educator calls to question how you incorporate your own style influences in class.  Teaching dance is not simply sticking to a syllabus and exam work, it is your constantly evolving stylistic qualities and incorporation of all your experiences that influence your own creation of movement. Today we have the pleasure of speaking with Ballet and Luigi Technique teacher on faculty at the Joffrey ballet Mr. William Waldinger GUEST: William Waldinger is a regular faculty member at The Joffrey Ballet School. In addition to his position at Joffrey, he also teaches at Broadway Dance Center and the New York Film Academy among other notable schools and colleges.  He has taught and directed several dance programs, including his role as Director of Jazz at The Manhattan Ballet School. Certified by Luigi to teach the Luigi Jazz Technique, Bill has recently been filmed and interviewed for the recently released feature film Uprooted which chronicles the history of Jazz Dance. As a performer, Bill has appeared in various industries including musical theatre, concert dance, commercials, music videos, television and industrials. INSTA: @williamwaldinger411 TWIT: @bwaldingerjazz LINKEDIN: Bill Waldinger WEBSITE: classicalballetandallthatjazz.com Disclaimer: Any and all ideas and information presented in the following podcast are those of the presenter. The presenter is not an employee or representative of Dance Education Canada (DEC), and is participating in this podcast on a voluntary basis. The ideas and information they express do not necessarily represent the views of the DEC or its partners, employees or affiliates. The ideas and information expressed herein are for general educational purposes only. They should not necessarily be applied to specific individual situations. DEC recommends consulting an expert or professional regarding specific medical, legal or business concerns. DEC makes no representations about the accuracy or suitability of this content. Please note that Canada's National Academy of Dance Education is now operating as Dance Education Canada.
29:30
October 5, 2021
Creating a Safe Space for Performance – Setting Up Students for Success: A discussion with a Recipient of the Queen’s Diamond Jubiliee Medal
At Dance Education Canada, we know that dancers can realize the fullest extent of their talents in a nurturing, positive and safe physical and cognitive environment. Part of a “whole dance education experience” includes allowing dancers to explore their own creative process. Allowing dancers to express their own thoughts and ideas through movement, while giving them opportunities to communicate through creation, will help dancers form a deeper understanding of movement and its connection to storytelling. Is there a specific recipe that includes ideal conditions required for dancers/performers to truly immerse themselves in a focused, engaged explorative experience?  We will take a look at answering this question today. Helping us understand how important creative expression is for our performers, and how to create ideal conditions for successful performances is the recipient of the 2013 Queen’s Diamond Jubliee Medal and Founder and Director of Burlington Student Theatre is Mr. Rainer Noack.  GUEST: Rainer Noack is a graduate of Sheridan College, McMaster University, and the University of Toronto. His experiences have influenced his decisions to develop, coordinate, implement, and encourage countless theatre programs in the Burlington area including founding the 40 year running Burlington student theatre program. He has taught Drama in both the Public and Catholic School Boards all while inspiring hundreds of students to pursue careers in the Arts. Rainer is the recipient of many notable awards, including the Burlington Arts Person of the Year and Burlington Performing Arts Centre Hall of Fame inductee. Rainer believes that a future of peace for humankind will come from artists, because that is what they do. Strength, confidence, and great work ethic are core values that Rainer applies to his career as an Arts Educator, and instills in his students as a sure path to success. The work Disclaimer: Any and all ideas and information presented in the following podcast are those of the presenter. The presenter is not an employee or representative of Dance Education Canada (DEC), and is participating in this podcast on a voluntary basis. The ideas and information they express do not necessarily represent the views of the DEC or its partners, employees or affiliates. The ideas and information expressed herein are for general educational purposes only. They should not necessarily be applied to specific individual situations. DEC recommends consulting an expert or professional regarding specific medical, legal or business concerns. DEC makes no representations about the accuracy or suitability of this content. Please note that Canada's National Academy of Dance Education is now operating as Dance Education Canada.
18:06
October 5, 2021
The Hidden Signs of Core Weakness in Dancers - In conversation with a Doctor of Physical Therapy
At Dance Education Canada we know that in order for dancers to achieve prime performance, their training requires a balance of exercises for both strength and flexibility. However, in today’s world, this message can become distorted with the amount of extreme stretching videos and tools that dancers have access to. At Dance Education Canada, we know that dance educators play an essential role in not only teaching dancers how to safely execute stretch and strength exercises but in helping dancers reach the fullest extent of their talents. This can be achieved through individual physical assessments for the purpose of determining each dancer's personalized training regimen. Often overlooked or sometimes misdiagnosed is “core weakness” in dancers.  GUEST: Dr. Alexis Sams, is the owner of AZ Dance Medicine Specialists based in Phoenix, Arizona a mobile service for local dancers. She holds a Doctorate in Physical Therapy from Long Island University, Brooklyn and is well known for her holistic approach to maximizing performance and injury management. Over the last six years, her business has grown, adding coaching, education, professional development and consulting dance professionals and related fields. Alexis combines over 20 years of dance training, teaching, and choreography with over 10 years of practice as a physical therapist to treat and educate dancers, instructors, and clinicians all over the world. INSTA: @azdancemed FB: AZ Dance Medicine Special WEBSITE: azdancemed.com Disclaimer: Any and all ideas and information presented in the following podcast are those of the presenter. The presenter is not an employee or representative of Dance Education Canada (DEC), and is participating in this podcast on a voluntary basis. The ideas and information they express do not necessarily represent the views of the DEC or its partners, employees or affiliates. The ideas and information expressed herein are for general educational purposes only. They should not necessarily be applied to specific individual situations. DEC recommends consulting an expert or professional regarding specific medical, legal or business concerns. DEC makes no representations about the accuracy or suitability of this content. Please note that Canada's National Academy of Dance Education is now operating as Dance Education Canada.
16:38
October 5, 2021
Creating Content & Branding for Dance Educators & Studio Owners: Insight from a 5x TEDX Speaker
At Dance Education Canada we know that Dance Educators and Studio Owners are busy navigating this new world of online branding and marketing. With the amount of platforms and access to information, it is easy for Dance Educators to become overwhelmed, be misinformed and feel frustrated. We know that providing our dance educators’ with access to experts in the space of business, branding and marketing, they will be better able to spend time and effort on projects and promotions that will make a positive impact on their business. Today we are pleased to welcome one of Inc. Magazine’s Top 100 Leadership Speakers Bobby Umar.   GUEST: Bobby Umar is a 5x TEDx speaker and one of the top influencers in the world, with over half a million followers. He has been named the 2nd best business coach to follow on Twitter and the 4th best leadership influencer according to Kred. Bobby is an international author of two books, including a #1 best-seller, and is also is a Huffington Post contributor. He hosted a weekly tweetchat called “The Power of Connection” that reached over 65 million impressions weekly. To date, his social media influence has garnered over a billion impressions. Bobby was also named a “2015 Speaker to Watch” and one of the Top 7 Networking gurus to follow. He founded the social enterprise DYPB – Discover Your Personal Brand, which organized the largest conference in North America dedicated solely to personal branding, featuring 60 experts and over 300 delegates. 300,000+ people from across the world have experienced Bobby’s high-energy keynotes, interactive teambuilding activities, and engaging workshops. Bobby helps professionals ramp up their careers or businesses with focus, clarity and mindset and help ‘lost leaders’ transition to find their authentic path of passion and purpose. INSTA/TWIT/FB: @raehanbobby LINKEDIN: Bobby Umar WEBISTE: dypb.ca Disclaimer: Any and all ideas and information presented in the following podcast are those of the presenter. The presenter is not an employee or representative of Dance Education Canada (DEC), and is participating in this podcast on a voluntary basis. The ideas and information they express do not necessarily represent the views of the DEC or its partners, employees or affiliates. The ideas and information expressed herein are for general educational purposes only. They should not necessarily be applied to specific individual situations. DEC recommends consulting an expert or professional regarding specific medical, legal or business concerns. DEC makes no representations about the accuracy or suitability of this content. Please note that Canada's National Academy of Dance Education is now operating as Dance Education Canada.
17:24
October 5, 2021
How Musical Time Signatures affect Adagio in Ballet: In conversation with an experienced Canadian ballet pianist.
At Dance Education Canada we know that dance teacher training, is so much more than learning steps. It is an understanding of various components of a dancer's training and technique, some of which include anatomy, dance injuries, dance history and music. To better support dancers’ “whole dance education” dance educators should be able to use music as a tool, as inspiration and method through which students can learn about their execution, performance and art form as a whole. Today we will focus on one exercise in ballet, “the adagio” to learn how time signatures can affect its execution.  GUEST: Ms. Leal holds a BFA in Performing Arts from Providence College in Manitoba.  She has worked as a piano accompanist for over 19 years with some of Canada’s most prestigious schools and companies including the Royal Winnipeg Ballet, the Alberta Ballet Company and Albert Ballet School. In addition to her work as a piano accompanist for ballet exams and Ms. Leal has also taught music to ballet teachers throughout various programs. INSTA/FB: @thebarrepianist LINKEDIN: Lorel (Plett) Leal WEBSITE: thebarrepianist.com Disclaimer: Any and all ideas and information presented in the following podcast are those of the presenter. The presenter is not an employee or representative of Dance Education Canada (DEC), and is participating in this podcast on a voluntary basis. The ideas and information they express do not necessarily represent the views of the DEC or its partners, employees or affiliates. The ideas and information expressed herein are for general educational purposes only. They should not necessarily be applied to specific individual situations. DEC recommends consulting an expert or professional regarding specific medical, legal or business concerns. DEC makes no representations about the accuracy or suitability of this content. Please note that Canada's National Academy of Dance Education is now operating as Dance Education Canada.
14:51
October 5, 2021
Preparing for Re-opening: Considerations for Dance Studio Owners and Educators
As we all navigate this new world, amidst studio closures, stages of reopening and a worldwide pandemic, we need to come together to share ideas, suggestions and considerations more than ever.  At Dance Education Canada, we believe in the power of “team”. Our team includes researchers, scholars, doctors, professionals and experts in the related fields of dance education, science, medicine and business. We also know that you, our dance community are a part of our team. You play an essential role in helping us navigate the needs of 21-st century dancers, dance educators and studio owners. As a collective, we can combine our efforts, share our ideas and inspire and encourage one another in our practice as studio owners and dance educators to help dance in Canada flourish. Dance Education Canada recently held a 3-week free webinar series in June 2020 for dance educators and dance studio owners. Over the course of these 3 weeks, we met many many dance educators, who shared ideas, suggestions and strategies for reopening in September 2020. During these past 3 weeks, I’ve had the pleasure of getting to know many great studio owners, 2 of whom I’ve invited to be guests on our podcast today, to share their experience, knowledge, and expertise both in their 40th year of dance studio leadership/ownership. Disclaimer: Any and all ideas and information presented in the following podcast are those of the presenter. The presenter is not an employee or representative of Dance Education Canada (DEC), and is participating in this podcast on a voluntary basis. The ideas and information they express do not necessarily represent the views of the DEC or its partners, employees or affiliates. The ideas and information expressed herein are for general educational purposes only. They should not necessarily be applied to specific individual situations. DEC recommends consulting an expert or professional regarding specific medical, legal or business concerns. DEC makes no representations about the accuracy or suitability of this content. Please note that Canada's National Academy of Dance Education is now operating as Dance Education Canada.
17:03
October 5, 2021
Women in Leadership: A perspective from the fitness industry with Senior Director of Corporate a Business Development at Goodlife
At Dance Education Canada, we know that it can sometimes feel lonely at the top. Leadership, especially that of a dance studio owner, can be challenging yet rewarding, frustrating yet fulfilling. Today we approach leadership from the perspective of one of the Senior Administrators and leaders at Canada’s largest fitness company, Ms Tammy Brazier. GUEST: Tammy Brazier is the Senior Director of Corporate & Business Development at GoodLife Fitness. She has over 20 years of experience focusing on the business of optimizing health and well-being, Tammy’s true passion has been centered on inspiring and coaching others to realize and experience the best versions of themselves. As a leader, influencer and champion at GoodLife Fitness, her personal journey and leadership track has inspired her to share her story and insights with professionals in a range of sectors including corporate, non-profit and government. Drawing on her experience in developing a team from the ground up that now works with over 3000 Canadian organizations from coast to coast, Tammy has demonstrated a true appreciation of the challenges, demands and responsibilities that leaders face, and the skills required to succeed.   Disclaimer: Any and all ideas and information presented in the following podcast are those of the presenter. The presenter is not an employee or representative of Dance Education Canada (DEC), and is participating in this podcast on a voluntary basis. The ideas and information they express do not necessarily represent the views of the DEC or its partners, employees or affiliates. The ideas and information expressed herein are for general educational purposes only. They should not necessarily be applied to specific individual situations. DEC recommends consulting an expert or professional regarding specific medical, legal or business concerns. DEC makes no representations about the accuracy or suitability of this content. Please note that Canada's National Academy of Dance Education is now operating as Dance Education Canada.
27:06
October 5, 2021
Let’s Talk Hip Impingement in Dancers: Insight from a Doctor of Physical Therapy
At Dance Education Canada, we care about providing our dance educators with access to the most current and relevant topics in dance education. This includes providing them with insight into specific dance injuries, their symptoms, contributors and prevention techniques, which is why we are excited to welcome Dr. Jenna Loewer to our program today. GUEST: Dr. Loewer graduated from Nazareth college in Rochester, NY with a Doctorate in Physical Therapy. After graduation, she spent time specializing her practice by focusing on the field of dance medicine. Dr Loewer has worked with The Rochester City Ballet, Garth Fagan Dance Company and Eastman School of Music. In 2016 Dr. Loewer opened On Pointe Wellness and Rehab with the goal to help others through personalized Physical Therapy in Virginia State fulfilling a lifelong passion for providing quality dance medicine practice in the state. She has served as adjunct faculty member at Nazareth College and George Mason University and is an active member of the American Physical Therapy Association (APTA), Orthopedic Section of the APTA, Performing Arts Special Interest Group, and the International Association for Dance Medicine and Science. Disclaimer: Any and all ideas and information presented in the following podcast are those of the presenter. The presenter is not an employee or representative of Dance Education Canada (DEC), and is participating in this podcast on a voluntary basis. The ideas and information they express do not necessarily represent the views of the DEC or its partners, employees or affiliates. The ideas and information expressed herein are for general educational purposes only. They should not necessarily be applied to specific individual situations. DEC recommends consulting an expert or professional regarding specific medical, legal or business concerns. DEC makes no representations about the accuracy or suitability of this content. Please note that Canada's National Academy of Dance Education is now operating as Dance Education Canada.
27:34
October 5, 2021
The ART of Stretching: Stretching to Prevent Injury - In conversation with a MScPT
At Dance Education Canada, we believe in providing dancers with a whole dance education. This involves giving dancers access to a team of professionals who can help prevent, diagnose and treat dance injuries to increase the longevity of a dancer's career. This partnership includes a relationship with a registered physiotherapist. GUEST: Krista Ross holds an Honours Bachelor of Arts in Human Kinetics from St.Francis Xavier University and a Master of Science in Physiotherapy from Dalhousie University. Krista has obtained post-graduate certifications in advanced manual therapy skills, pelvic floor rehabilitation for both men and women, and core/pelvic floor considerations for female athletes.  Disclaimer: Any and all ideas and information presented in the following podcast are those of the presenter. The presenter is not an employee or representative of Dance Education Canada (DEC), and is participating in this podcast on a voluntary basis. The ideas and information they express do not necessarily represent the views of the DEC or its partners, employees or affiliates. The ideas and information expressed herein are for general educational purposes only. They should not necessarily be applied to specific individual situations. DEC recommends consulting an expert or professional regarding specific medical, legal or business concerns. DEC makes no representations about the accuracy or suitability of this content. Please note that Canada's National Academy of Dance Education is now operating as Dance Education Canada.
17:54
October 5, 2021
Let’s Talk Bunions and Foot Pain in Dancers: Insight from a Canadian Orthopaedic Clinical Specialist
At Dance Education Canada we believe strongly in providing our dance educators with access to experts in the field of dance science and medicine. Dance injury diagnosis, assessment and rehab is best left to the experts who have devoted their life, education and research to the study of dance science and medicine, which is why today we are beyond excited to welcome one of Canada’s top physiotherapists specializing in dance injuries. GUEST: Alan has been awarded some of the most prestigious and most highly regarded honours in his field including becoming a Fellow of the Canadian Academy of Manipulative Physiotherapy and earning the title of certified Orthopaedic Clinical Specialist in Canada, becoming one of only a handful of physiotherapist to earn. He has earned a certification from the North American Institute of Orthopaedic Manual Therapy and is currently in the process of completing the prestigious Doctorate of Science in Physical Therapy (DScPT) program at Andrews University. LINKEDIN: Alan Lam Disclaimer: Any and all ideas and information presented in the following podcast are those of the presenter. The presenter is not an employee or representative of Dance Education Canada (DEC), and is participating in this podcast on a voluntary basis. The ideas and information they express do not necessarily represent the views of the DEC or its partners, employees or affiliates. The ideas and information expressed herein are for general educational purposes only. They should not necessarily be applied to specific individual situations. DEC recommends consulting an expert or professional regarding specific medical, legal or business concerns. DEC makes no representations about the accuracy or suitability of this content. Please note that Canada's National Academy of Dance Education is now operating as Dance Education Canada.
23:15
October 5, 2021
The Dance Teacher – A Dancers’ Point of View: A conversation with a Former 1st Soloist of Canada’s Royal Winnipeg Ballet
At Dance Education Canada we know that by allowing our dance educators to hear a variety of perspectives with regards to teaching dance, that they will become more well-rounded dance educators that will allow them to access a variety of sources and strategies in these diverse studio environments. Which is why the perspective of the dancer matters. Today we are gaining some insight into the life of a professional ballerina. We will hear about some teaching styles that inspired her, and those that left her feeling weak and humiliated. We are very excited to have the brave, transparent, articulate, motivated and hardworking Sarah Murphy Dyson speaking with us today. GUEST: Sarah Murphy-Dyson was a 1st soloist with the Royal Winnipeg Ballet. After retirement, she was cast in the North American premiere of Dirty Dancing (Mirvish) which brought her to Toronto. Sarah has appeared on such shows as Suits, Diggstown, Rookie Blue, The Next Step, and as Isabelle’s ballet teacher in the recent American Girl movie. She has won a Gemini Award and has worked as a stunt double for Milla Jovovich, Kate Beckinsale and Jaime King. Ms. Murphy-Dyson holds a BFA in theatre from the University of Winnipeg. INSTA: @sarahmd26 Disclaimer: Any and all ideas and information presented in the following podcast are those of the presenter. The presenter is not an employee or representative of Dance Education Canada (DEC), and is participating in this podcast on a voluntary basis. The ideas and information they express do not necessarily represent the views of the DEC or its partners, employees or affiliates. The ideas and information expressed herein are for general educational purposes only. They should not necessarily be applied to specific individual situations. DEC recommends consulting an expert or professional regarding specific medical, legal or business concerns. DEC makes no representations about the accuracy or suitability of this content. Please note that Canada's National Academy of Dance Education is now operating as Dance Education Canada.
27:01
October 5, 2021
Healthy Child Development: Achieving Excellence in Training and Performance in a Positive Environment - A conversation with the Senior Coordinator of High Five Canada
At Dance Education Canada, we know that dance teachers play a lifechanging role in their dancers’ lives.  This role, if positive, induces a safe physical and cognitive space through which their dancers can achieve excellence in a supportive and caring environment. Challenging dated and possibly questionable practices of dance teachers is needed to ensure that each and every dance educator is reflecting positively on the dance educator community as a whole. To help us learn how to create a positive excellence-driven environment is Ms. JaimeLynn Nobari. GUEST: JaimeLynn holds Bachelor of Physical Education and a Diploma in Fitness and Health Promotion. She has coached varsity level sports, worked as a registered kinesiologist and children’s programs supervisor, while attaining both her coaching and fitness trainer certifications. Jaime currently works with Parks and Recreation Ontario, focusing on healthy child development in her role as Senior Coordinator, HIGH FIVE® Training and Stakeholder Engagement.  HIGH FIVE® is Canada’s quality standard for children’s programs while providing support for Adults and Seniors as well. Disclaimer: Any and all ideas and information presented in the following podcast are those of the presenter. The presenter is not an employee or representative of Dance Education Canada (DEC), and is participating in this podcast on a voluntary basis. The ideas and information they express do not necessarily represent the views of the DEC or its partners, employees or affiliates. The ideas and information expressed herein are for general educational purposes only. They should not necessarily be applied to specific individual situations. DEC recommends consulting an expert or professional regarding specific medical, legal or business concerns. DEC makes no representations about the accuracy or suitability of this content. Please note that Canada's National Academy of Dance Education is now operating as Dance Education Canada.
31:34
October 5, 2021
Studio Ownership, A Seasoned Perspective
At Dance Education Canada we believe strongly in supporting our Dance Educators in all stages of their career, including Studio Ownership. So for today’s podcast we have invited 3 seasoned and experienced Dance Studio Owners who have been in business for over 10 years. We will discuss what they have learned, what they have sacrificed and how things have changed over the years. They will give us some tools, tips, tricks and strategies to help you save time, save money and not only stick to your vision and mission but flourish in it. Disclaimer: Any and all ideas and information presented in the following podcast are those of the presenter. The presenter is not an employee or representative of Dance Education Canada (DEC), and is participating in this podcast on a voluntary basis. The ideas and information they express do not necessarily represent the views of the DEC or its partners, employees or affiliates. The ideas and information expressed herein are for general educational purposes only. They should not necessarily be applied to specific individual situations. DEC recommends consulting an expert or professional regarding specific medical, legal or business concerns. DEC makes no representations about the accuracy or suitability of this content. Please note that Canada's National Academy of Dance Education is now operating as Dance Education Canada.
39:51
October 5, 2021
Women in Dance: Navigating dance education in this new climate. Insight from an Assistant Teaching Professor of Dance
At Dance Education Canada we are proud to not only support women in dance leadership, but give our dance educators access to amazing women in dance leadership., because as The Dance Data Project states there are “gender imbalance in artistic and administrative leadership in dance companies, venues, and organizations.” Today we will discuss the current climate from the perspective of women in dance. We welcome the Founder/CEO of Women in Dance Ms Sandra Parks to our program today. GUEST: Sandra Parks is a choreographer, dance educator, and an advocate for female leadership. She is the founder and CEO of Women in Dance, a non-profit organization that promotes female leadership in dance and related fields. Sandra holds her BFA from New York University and MFA from Smith College, MA. Originally from Taipei, Taiwan, Sandra danced as a soloist with Four Seasons Ballet and Wu-I (ee) Dance Company. Sandra has been a faculty member of many renowned universities and colleges including Boston University and Louisiana State University. She is currently a full-time assistant teaching professor and the Dance Program Director at Drexel University. INSTA: @womenindance WEBSITE: womenindance.com Disclaimer: Any and all ideas and information presented in the following podcast are those of the presenter. The presenter is not an employee or representative of Dance Education Canada (DEC), and is participating in this podcast on a voluntary basis. The ideas and information they express do not necessarily represent the views of the DEC or its partners, employees or affiliates. The ideas and information expressed herein are for general educational purposes only. They should not necessarily be applied to specific individual situations. DEC recommends consulting an expert or professional regarding specific medical, legal or business concerns. DEC makes no representations about the accuracy or suitability of this content. Please note that Canada's National Academy of Dance Education is now operating as Dance Education Canada.
23:05
October 5, 2021
Establishing Pointe Readiness in the Adolescent Dancer - Current Guidelines from a Doctor of Physical Therapy
At Dance Education Canada we believe in providing our dance educators with the most current and relevant practices in dance education which is why we are passionate about connecting you with experts like Dr. Jessica Davis who are academics, researchers, scientists and doctors in the field of dance medicine and science. GUEST: Dr Davis received her Doctorate in Physical Therapy from Chatham University and is a Board-Certified Specialist in Orthopaedics. She has been on faculty with numerous programs and universities including the Institute of Clinical Excellence and with Slippery Rock University Dance Department. Today we will debunk some myths and squash dated pointe shoe readiness assessments. Dr Davis will provide us with current research surrounding the assessment process, and provide some tips, tools and techniques to use when screening your dancers readiness for pointe.  INSTA: @performphysiopt WEBISTE: performphysiopt.com Disclaimer: Any and all ideas and information presented in the following podcast are those of the presenter. The presenter is not an employee or representative of Dance Education Canada (DEC), and is participating in this podcast on a voluntary basis. The ideas and information they express do not necessarily represent the views of the DEC or its partners, employees or affiliates. The ideas and information expressed herein are for general educational purposes only. They should not necessarily be applied to specific individual situations. DEC recommends consulting an expert or professional regarding specific medical, legal or business concerns. DEC makes no representations about the accuracy or suitability of this content. Please note that Canada's National Academy of Dance Education is now operating as Dance Education Canada.
18:36
October 5, 2021
Studio Ownership, the first few years. What I know now, and what I wish I had known.
At Dance Education Canada, we believe strongly in supporting our Dance Educators in all stages of their career, including Studio Ownership. So for today’s podcast we have invited 2 new Dance Studio Owners who have been in business for less than 3 years. We will discuss some of the challenges they faced opening their studio within the first few years with hopes of helping other new studio owners navigate these challenging years. Disclaimer: Any and all ideas and information presented in the following podcast are those of the presenter. The presenter is not an employee or representative of Dance Education Canada (DEC), and is participating in this podcast on a voluntary basis. The ideas and information they express do not necessarily represent the views of the DEC or its partners, employees or affiliates. The ideas and information expressed herein are for general educational purposes only. They should not necessarily be applied to specific individual situations. DEC recommends consulting an expert or professional regarding specific medical, legal or business concerns. DEC makes no representations about the accuracy or suitability of this content. Please note that Canada's National Academy of Dance Education is now operating as Dance Education Canada.
23:06
October 5, 2021
Why Cross-Training for your Dancers is Important, and how Dance Educators can Set Up their Season to Include Cross-Training in their Programming.
At Dance Education Canada, we believe strongly in empowering the dance educator. We accomplish this by providing our Dance Educators with access to the most relevant and current practices in 21st-century dance education. We also accomplish this by teaming up with people like Jennifer, who are specialists in their field of study. Dancers' injury prevention, care, and rehab are topics that we regularly discuss throughout our programming and events at DEC. Today’s podcast, however, is going to focus specifically on the cross-training component of dance injury prevention and care especially for dancers with hypermobility issues.  GUEST: Jennifer Milner is a ballet coach and certified Pilates trainer. She worked for Westside Dance Physical Therapy (the official physical therapists for New York City Ballet and the School of American Ballet), and has trained a variety of clients, from Olympic medalists to dancers from professional companies such as the New York City Ballet and San Francisco Ballet.  INSTA: @jennifer.milner WEBSITE: jennifer-milner.com/what-s-new Disclaimer: Any and all ideas and information presented in the following podcast are those of the presenter. The presenter is not an employee or representative of Dance Education Canada (DEC), and is participating in this podcast on a voluntary basis. The ideas and information they express do not necessarily represent the views of the DEC or its partners, employees or affiliates. The ideas and information expressed herein are for general educational purposes only. They should not necessarily be applied to specific individual situations. DEC recommends consulting an expert or professional regarding specific medical, legal or business concerns. DEC makes no representations about the accuracy or suitability of this content. Please note that Canada's National Academy of Dance Education is now operating as Dance Education Canada.
17:16
October 5, 2021
How to Navigate the Social and Cognitive Well-Being of your Dancers, While Creating a Trauma Informed Environment in the Dance Class – In conversation with a Licensed Clinical Counselor.
At Dance Education Canada, we believe strongly in providing dance educators with the tools and knowledge they need to make informed decisions about their dancers' well-being both cognitively and physically. Having met and spoken with many dance educators across the country and beyond, one of the most important conversations that ensues surrounds the assessment of our current practices, and how they consider the cognitive and physical well-being of the dancer.  GUEST: Erica is a licensed clinical professional counselor and board-certified dance/movement therapist. She is also the founder and CEO of Chicago Dance Therapy, a group practice founded in 2011.  As an expert on the intersection of movement and mental health, Erica’s work has appeared across various platforms some of which include, Dance Informa Magazine, Buzzfeed, and Reader’s Digest. Erica has a multitude of experience in everything from cognitive and movement disorders to neurologic conditions, from PTSD to anxiety and depression, making her an expert of her practice. INSTA: @chicago_dance_therapy WEBISTE: @chicagodancetherapy.com Disclaimer: Any and all ideas and information presented in the following podcast are those of the presenter. The presenter is not an employee or representative of Dance Education Canada (DEC), and is participating in this podcast on a voluntary basis. The ideas and information they express do not necessarily represent the views of the DEC or its partners, employees or affiliates. The ideas and information expressed herein are for general educational purposes only. They should not necessarily be applied to specific individual situations. DEC recommends consulting an expert or professional regarding specific medical, legal or business concerns. DEC makes no representations about the accuracy or suitability of this content. Please note that Canada's National Academy of Dance Education is now operating as Dance Education Canada.
16:56
October 5, 2021
Dance Injury Prevention, Care, Rehab and Recovery: Insight from a Doctor of Chiropractic
Join us as the Part 1 & Part 2 students of Dance Education Canada's Dance Teacher Training Program, engage in meaningful discussions with Dr. Setrakov about best practices surrounding their dancers injury prevention and care. Listen in as we address the role of the 21st-Century Dance Educator in dance injury prevention and rehab. GUEST: Dr Setrakov began dancing at the age of 3 and continued dancing as a competitive and exam dancer most of her life. Dr Setrakov graduated from the University of Saskatchewan with a Bachelor of Science. She is also graduate or the Palmer College of Chiropractic. As a practicing Chiropractor at ONE Wellness Group in Hamilton, ON Kirsten is currently completing her Contemporary Medical Acupuncture course at McMaster University. We welcome Dr. Setrokov to our program. Dr Setrakov is a Doctor of Chiropractic currently studying contemporary acupuncture at McMaster University.  INSTA: @dr.kirsten_chiro LINKEDIN: Kirsten Setrakov WEBSITE: flowhealthcentre.ca FACEBOOK: facebook.com/FLOWHealthCentre Disclaimer: Any and all ideas and information presented in the following podcast are those of the presenter. The presenter is not an employee or representative of Dance Education Canada (DEC), and is participating in this podcast on a voluntary basis. The ideas and information they express do not necessarily represent the views of the DEC or its partners, employees or affiliates. The ideas and information expressed herein are for general educational purposes only. They should not necessarily be applied to specific individual situations. DEC recommends consulting an expert or professional regarding specific medical, legal or business concerns. DEC makes no representations about the accuracy or suitability of this content. Please note that Canada's National Academy of Dance Education is now operating as Dance Education Canada.
39:09
October 4, 2021
Dance Education in Public Schools - A discussion surrounding its current state and a call to action for school board administrators
DEC's Founder/Director Jolanta Oko and 2 x CNADE-DTTPV Grads who are all Dance Educators' both in the classroom and studio settings.  This group of 3 experienced and educated scholars, researchers and students discuss Dance Education in Public Schools - A discussion surrounding its current state and a call to action for school board administrators. Disclaimer: Any and all ideas and information presented in the following podcast are those of the presenter. The presenter is not an employee or representative of Dance Education Canada (DEC), and is participating in this podcast on a voluntary basis. The ideas and information they express do not necessarily represent the views of the DEC or its partners, employees or affiliates. The ideas and information expressed herein are for general educational purposes only. They should not necessarily be applied to specific individual situations. DEC recommends consulting an expert or professional regarding specific medical, legal or business concerns. DEC makes no representations about the accuracy or suitability of this content. Please note that Canada's National Academy of Dance Education is now operating as Dance Education Canada.
34:35
October 4, 2021
Societal Influences in/on Dance Education: Selma Odom Lecture Recap with a Doctor of Dance Studies
An afterthought and recap from Dr. Tanya Berg's presentation at the Selma Odom Lectures at York University in Toronto, Canada. GUEST: Dr Tanya Berg PhD in Dance Studies Disclaimer: Any and all ideas and information presented in the following podcast are those of the presenter. The presenter is not an employee or representative of Dance Education Canada (DEC), and is participating in this podcast on a voluntary basis. The ideas and information they express do not necessarily represent the views of the DEC or its partners, employees or affiliates. The ideas and information expressed herein are for general educational purposes only. They should not necessarily be applied to specific individual situations. DEC recommends consulting an expert or professional regarding specific medical, legal or business concerns. DEC makes no representations about the accuracy or suitability of this content. Please note that Canada's National Academy of Dance Education is now operating as Dance Education Canada.
06:23
October 4, 2021
Merce Cunningham – After the Arbitrary: A conversation with Author Carrie Noland
At Dance Education Canada we are passionate about promoting lifelong learning and professional development for dance educators. This involves picking up a good dance book and diving into the history, technique and processes of that particular virtuoso in dance. Dance Education Canada has taken the reigns and started the only dance related book club in Canada. In our inaugural year, we dive into our first book on Merce Cunningham: After the Arbitrary. We are beyond honoured to have the author here with us today. Noland’s research will allow us to plunge deep into to Cunningham’s work and see sides of his processes that might not have been so well known. It is an honour and a pleasure to have the author of Merce Cunningham: After the Arbitrary with us today, Professor Carrie Noland. GUEST: Carrie Noland is currently Professor of French and Comparative Literature at the University of California, Irvine, and Director of the International Center for Writing and Translation. Noland is no stranger to the dance world having been a Martha Graham student for 10 years. Noland studies the interplay between technology and artistic creation from a variety of angles, moving from performance poetry to dance, from subjectivation to racialization. She is the recipient of many fellowships from foundations and societies some of which include the National Endowment of the Humanities, the American Philosophical Society and the American Council of Learned Societies. WEBSITE: https://www.faculty.uci.edu/profile.cfm?faculty_id=2770 Disclaimer: Any and all ideas and information presented in the following podcast are those of the presenter. The presenter is not an employee or representative of Dance Education Canada (DEC), and is participating in this podcast on a voluntary basis. The ideas and information they express do not necessarily represent the views of the DEC or its partners, employees or affiliates. The ideas and information expressed herein are for general educational purposes only. They should not necessarily be applied to specific individual situations. DEC recommends consulting an expert or professional regarding specific medical, legal or business concerns. DEC makes no representations about the accuracy or suitability of this content. Please note that Canada's National Academy of Dance Education is now operating as Dance Education Canada.
28:55
September 6, 2020