Skip to main content
Conversations about Arts, Humanities and Health

Conversations about Arts, Humanities and Health

By Conversations about Arts, Humanities and Health

This podcast is part of the project 'Conversations about Arts, Humanities and Health', a series of free online events where scholars, health professionals, and the public discuss how arts and humanities can inform healthcare. Hosted by the University of Kent and with the support of the Winston Churchill Memorial Trust, these conversations seek to develop meaningful dialogue and connection between humanities and medicine. Each one of these events will form the basis of an episode of the podcast.

The project is a joint initiative by Prof Ian Sabroe (Sheffield) and Dr Dieter Declercq (Kent).
Where to listen
Apple Podcasts Logo

Apple Podcasts

Google Podcasts Logo

Google Podcasts

Pocket Casts Logo

Pocket Casts

RadioPublic Logo

RadioPublic

Spotify Logo

Spotify

Episode 16 - In Conversation with Prof Miranda Fricker and Prof Havi Carel
Episode 16 - In Conversation with Prof Miranda Fricker and Prof Havi Carel
Ian and Dieter talk with Prof Miranda Fricker and Prof Havi Carel about epistemic injustice, harms in health contexts, and the connections that philosophical thinking has with literature and art. Miranda Fricker is Distinguished Professor of Philosophy at The Graduate Center, CUNY. Her research is primarily in Ethics and Social Epistemology with a special interest in virtue and feminist perspectives. She is the author of Epistemic Injustice: Power and the Ethics of Knowing (2007); co-author and editor of Reading Ethics: Selected texts with interactive commentary (2009); and co-editor of a number of collections, the most recent of which is The Routledge Handbook of Social Epistemology (2019). She was Director of the Mind Association from 2010-2015; Assistant Editor of the Journal of the APA from 2014-2020; and since 2015 has served as Moral Philosopher on the Spoliation Advisory Panel, a UK government-appointed body of expert advisers that considers claims concerning loss of cultural property during the Nazi era. She is an Honorary Professor in the Department of Philosophy, University of Sheffield, a Fellow of the British Academy, and a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. This year she was elected President of the American Philosophical Association (Eastern Division) 2022-23. Havi Carel is Professor of Philosophy at the University of Bristol, where she also teaches medical students. In 2020 she completed a Wellcome Trust Senior Investigator Award, leading a five-year project, the Life of Breath. She was awarded the Health Humanities’ Inspiration Award 2018 for her work on the project. Havi won the IJPS 2021 PERITIA Prize for her paper ‘When Institutional Opacity Meets Individual Vulnerability: Institutional Testimonial Injustice’ (co-authored with Ian Kidd), published in International Journal of Philosophical Studies. Her third monograph was published by Oxford University Press in 2016, entitled Phenomenology of Illness. Havi was voted by students as a ‘Best of Bristol’ lecturer in 2016. Havi is the author of Illness (2008, 2013, 2018), shortlisted for the Wellcome Trust Book Prize, and of Life and Death in Freud and Heidegger (2006). She is the co-editor of Health, Illness and Disease (2012) and of What Philosophy Is (2004). She uses film in teaching and has co-edited a volume entitled New Takes in Film-Philosophy (2010). She also co-edited a special issue of Philosophy on ‘Human Experience and Nature’ (2013). She previously published on the embodied experience of illness, epistemic injustice in healthcare, vulnerability, wellbeing within illness, transformative experience, death, and on the experience of respiratory illness in the Lancet, BMJ, Journal of Medicine and Philosophy, Journal of Medical Ethics, Journal of Applied Philosophy, and in edited collections.
51:01
October 26, 2022
Episode 15 - In Conversation with Dr Ian Williams and Dr Muna Al-Jawad
Episode 15 - In Conversation with Dr Ian Williams and Dr Muna Al-Jawad
Ian and Dieter talk with Dr Ian Williams and Dr Muna Al-Jawad about graphic medicine and explore the intersection between the medium of comics and the discourse of healthcare.  Dr Ian Williams is a comics artist, writer and doctor who lives in Brighton. His graphic novel, The Bad Doctor, was published in 2014 and followed up in 2019 by The Lady Doctor. Both were critically acclaimed and he is working on his third, for the same publishers, provisionally entitled The Sick Doctor, which will be published in 2022. Dr Muna Al-Jawad is a consultant geriatrician and senior lecturer in medical education in Brighton. In 2010 she started drawing comics as part of a masters in clinical education, and her superhero alter-ego “Old Person Whisperer” was born. She uses comics in her practice as a medical teacher and in her research. She does and supervises comics-based research into various areas of practitioner and student experience. Click here to find out more about Graphic Medicine. Click here to see some of Muna’s work.
52:57
September 12, 2022
Episode 14 - In Conversation with Prof Angela Woods
Episode 14 - In Conversation with Prof Angela Woods
Ian and Dieter talk with Prof Angela Woods (Durham University) about moving from Australia to the UK to develop her research in medical humanities, and about how the field has grown and changed over the last 10 years. They also discuss some of the challenges of interdisciplinary collaboration and about what we can do to identify and address barriers to the further evolution of the medical and health humanities, especially for early career researchers. Angela Woods is Director of the Institute for Medical Humanities at Durham University, and since 2012 has been Co-Director of Hearing the Voice, an ambitious interdisciplinary research project on the experience of hearing voices. Her research focuses on experiences and frameworks for understanding psychosis and voice-hearing, and on 'critical concepts’ within the medical humanities. Angela is the founding editor of The Polyphony and a series editor of Bloomsbury’s Critical Interventions in the Medical and Humanities series, as well as a former Associate Editor of the BMJ’s Medical Humanities Journal.
54:18
July 18, 2022
Episode 13 - In Conversation with Sue Foster and Dr Matt Jennings
Episode 13 - In Conversation with Sue Foster and Dr Matt Jennings
Dieter and Ian talk with Sue Foster and Dr Matt Jennings about their work with Health Action Training, a project combining techniques drawn from actor training and applied drama to help improve person-centred communication and resilience for nurses and other health and social care professionals. Sue Foster is a Lecturer in Nursing. As a nurse of more than 30 years standing, she has worked in a variety of settings.  The early part of her career was firmly rooted in the clinical setting before moving into nurse education. She is passionate about person-centred Palliative and End of Life Care and has specialised in this field for 23 years, a practice that’s holds central the personhood of everyone involved in health and social care - staff, service users and care partners. Dr Matt Jennings has been Lecturer and Senior Lecturer in Drama at Edge Hill University, Northumbria University and Ulster University. Since the 1980s, Matt has worked as an actor, musician and arts facilitator in many countries and contexts. Originally from Sydney, he moved to Northern Ireland in 2001. In 2010, Matt completed a PhD on applied drama and conflict transformation in Northern Ireland. He is co-founder of Health Action Training.
58:51
July 04, 2022
Episode 12 - In Conversation with Dr Sayantani DasGupta
Episode 12 - In Conversation with Dr Sayantani DasGupta
Dieter and Ian talk with Dr Sayantani DasGupta about her work in health humanities/narrative medicine, particularly her work at the intersection of narrative, health and social justice. Sayantani will discuss the importance of pedagogy in her scholarly work, and the impact of her identity as a children's and YA author to her scholarship, and vice versa. Click here for the article by Maria Sachiko Cecire that Sayantani discusses at 22:30. Dr. Sayantani DasGupta is Senior Lecturer in the Master’s Program in Narrative Medicine, the Center for the Study of Ethnicity and Race, and the Institute for Comparative Literature and Society, all at Columbia University. Originally trained in pediatrics and public health, she is the author or co-author of several academic books including The Principles and Practices of Narrative Medicine. Her work has appeared in The Lancet, JAMA, Pediatrics, The Hastings Center Report, Teaching and Learning in Medicine, and the Journal of Medical Humanities, and other venues. Her current interests are in issues of abolition medicine, racial justice and health, diaspora studies, and science fiction/health futurities. She is also a New York Times bestselling children’s author, and you can learn more about her work at www.sayantanidasgupta.com.
54:08
May 16, 2022
Episode 11 - In Conversation with Prof Margarita Saona
Episode 11 - In Conversation with Prof Margarita Saona
Ian and Dieter talk with Prof Margarita Saona (University of Illinois Chicago) about her experience as a literary scholar trying to find her way through the labyrinth of the health humanities. You'll also hear about Margarita’s experience of being a heart transplant patient, and how this impacted her writing and her thinking. Prof Margarita Saona teaches literature at the University of Illinois Chicago. She studied linguistics and literature at Pontificia Universidad Católica del Peru. She received a Ph.D. in Latin American literature from Columbia University in New York. She is interested in issues of memory, cognition, empathy, and representation in literature and the arts. She has published numerous articles, two books on literary and cultural criticism, Novelas familiares: Figuraciones de la nación en la novela latinoamericana contemporánea (Rosario, 2004) and Memory Matters in Transitional Perú (London, 2014), three books of short fiction, Comehoras (Lima, 2008) Objeto perdido (Lima, 2012), and La ciudad en que no estás (Lima, 2021) and a book of poems, Corazón de hojalata/Tin Heart (Chicago, 2017). Her new book of cultural and literary studies, Despadre: La masculinidad y la crisis de la identidad en la cultura peruana which examines the way representations of men in Peruvian literature and film reveal deep fractures in the country’s imaginary, will appear later this year. She is currently working on a non-fiction book entitled Corazón en trance.
48:22
January 26, 2022
Episode 10 - In Conversation with Dr Keisha Ray
Episode 10 - In Conversation with Dr Keisha Ray
Prof Ian Sabroe and Dr Dieter Declercq talk to Dr Keisha Ray about her ground-breaking work in Black bioethics, her journey to studying Black people's health, and what she wants the world to know about Black health. Keisha Ray, PhD received her PhD in philosophy from the University of Utah and is currently an assistant professor with the McGovern Center for Humanities & Ethics at the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston. Most of Dr. Ray’s work focuses on the social and cultural determinants of Black people’s health, integrating race education into medical school curricula, and the ethics of biomedical enhancement. She has contributed to peer-reviewed journals like Journal of Medical Humanities and Pediatrics, as well as edited volumes, and textbooks. She currently has a monograph in progress on Black people’s health contracted with Oxford University Press. Dr. Ray also serves as an associate editor of the American Journal of Bioethics blog site to which she is a regular contributor.
56:27
December 13, 2021
Episode 9 - In Conversation with Prof Paul Crawford
Episode 9 - In Conversation with Prof Paul Crawford
Prof Ian Sabroe and Dr Dieter Declercq talk to Prof Paul Crawford about his ground-breaking work as the world's first professor of health humanities and his research into how creative practices advance health and mental well-being. Check out 'What's Up With Everyone?' Paul's recent campaign with the animation studio Aardman. Paul Crawford is Professor of Health Humanities at the School of Health Sciences and Director of the Centre for Social Futures at the Institute of Mental Health, University of Nottingham, UK. He is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Arts (FRSA), Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences (FAcSS) and Fellow of the Royal Society for Public Health (FRSPH). As founding father of the global and rapidly developing field of health humanities, Professor Crawford leads a large program of research in applying the arts and humanities to inform and transform healthcare, health and wellbeing. He is the author of over 140 peer-reviewed articles or chapters and 13 books, most recently The Routledge Companion to Health Humanities (Palgrave), Florence Nightingale at Home (Palgrave) and Cabin Fever: Surviving Lockdown in the Coronavirus Pandemic (Emerald). He is the commissioning editor for two series, Arts for Health (Emerald) and Routledge Studies in Literature and Health Humanities (Routledge) and is lead Editor-in-Chief for The Encyclopedia of Health Humanities (Springer). In 2021, he led the campaign for young people’s mental health called What’s Up With Everyone with Academy Award-winning Aardman (Shaun the Sheep, Wallace & Gromit). This initiative brought five original short animations to more than 18 million people and won Best Social Media and Content at the Design Week Awards 2021.
50:06
November 02, 2021
Episode 8 - Bonus Episode - Looking Back on Season One
Episode 8 - Bonus Episode - Looking Back on Season One
To mark the end of our first season, we are putting out this bonus episode of the podcast. Prof Ian Sabroe and Dr Dieter Declercq talk with previous guest and friend of the podcast Dr Lauren Barron and look back on the first season of Conversations About Arts Humanities and Health and the series as a whole. This conversation was originally recorded as part of the Mayo Clinic's 'Humanities in Medicine Symposium 2021 Engaging Across Disciplines: Toward a Practice of Transdisciplinarity'. We are very grateful to the conference team at the Mayo Clinic for kindly allowing us to share this conversation as an episode of our podcast.
48:13
October 15, 2021
Episode 7 - In Conversation with Prof Rita Charon
Episode 7 - In Conversation with Prof Rita Charon
Prof Ian Sabroe and Dr Dieter Declercq talk to Prof Rita Charon about her pioneering work in narrative medicine, as well as the pivotal role of aesthetics and aesthetic experiences in the practices of narrative medicine. Rita Charon is a general internist and literary scholar who originated the field of narrative medicine. She is Professor and Founding Chair of the Department of Medical Humanities and Ethics and Professor of Medicine at Columbia University. She completed the MD at Harvard in 1978 and the PhD in English at Columbia in 1999, concentrating on narratology and the works of Henry James. Her research focuses on the consequences of narrative medicine practice, narrative medicine pedagogy, and health care team effectiveness. At Columbia, she directs the Foundations of Clinical Practice faculty seminar, the Virginia Apgar Academy for Medical Educators, the Narrative and Social Medicine Scholarly Projects Concentration Track, the required and elective Narrative Medicine curriculum for the medical school, and Columbia Commons: Collaborating Across Professions, a medical-center-wide partnership devoted to health care team effectiveness. She inaugurated and teaches in the Master of Science in Narrative Medicine graduate program at Columbia. She has lectured and served as Visiting Professor at many medical schools and universities in the US and abroad, teaching narrative medicine theory and practice. She has received a Guggenheim Fellowship, a Rockefeller Foundation Bellagio residency, and research funding from the NIH, the NEH, the American Board of Internal Medicine, the Josiah Macy Jr. Foundation, and several additional private foundations. She was chosen by the National Endowment for the Humanities to deliver the 2018 Jefferson Lecture, “the highest honor the federal government bestows for distinguished intellectual achievement in the humanities.” Dr. Charon has published in The New England Journal of Medicine, Lancet, JAMA, Annals of Internal Medicine, Narrative, Henry James Review, Poetics Today, The Drama Review, Partial Answers, and Literature and Medicine. She is the author of Narrative Medicine: Honoring the Stories of Illness (Oxford University Press, 2006) and co-author of Principles and Practice of Narrative Medicine (Oxford University Press, 2017). She is co-editor of Stories Matter: The Role of Narrative in Medical Ethics (Routledge, 2002) and Psychoanalysis and Narrative Medicine (SUNY Press, 2008).
45:12
September 17, 2021
Episode 6 - In Conversation with Prof David Magnus and Dr Alyssa Burgart
Episode 6 - In Conversation with Prof David Magnus and Dr Alyssa Burgart
Prof Ian Sabroe is joined by guest host Dr Lauren Barron (Baylor University) to talk with Prof David Magnus and Dr Alyssa Burgart about the role of philosophy and bioethics in medicine, with a particular focus on the theoretical and practical delivery of ethics into clinical services. Prof David Magnus is Thomas A. Raffin Professor of Medicine and Biomedical Ethics, and Professor of Pediatrics, Medicine and by Courtesy of Bioengineering at Stanford University, where he directs the Stanford Center for Biomedical Ethics and is an Associate Dean of Research. At Stanford, David has spearheaded ethics training programs offered to medical students and clinicians. He serves as the Editor-In-Chief of The American Journal of Bioethics and is widely published on a range of topics including brain death, health care reform, research ethics, end-of-life care, and genetic technology. Dr Alyssa Burgart is a board-certified paediatric anaesthesiologist and bioethicist. Dr Burgart is committed to finding the most successful way for each child to interact with the anaesthesia team to create an overall positive experience. She champions a program specifically supporting children with unique needs, such as those with sensory integration differences. Dr Burgart has a joint appointment in the Stanford Center for Biomedical Ethics, serves as the Co-Chair of the LPCH Ethics Committee and as a member of the SHC Ethics Committee. Her ethics interests include paediatric ethics, organ transplantation, communication skills, disability rights, women’s healthcare access, adolescent decision-making, ethics education, and excellence in ethics consultation.
53:57
August 12, 2021
Episode 5 - In Conversation with Dr Lauren Barron
Episode 5 - In Conversation with Dr Lauren Barron
Prof Ian Sabroe and Dr Dieter Declercq talk to Dr Lauren Barron about the role of humanities in medical education, focussing especially on the innovative Medical Humanities Program at Baylor University, which provides undergraduate students who aspire towards careers in healthcare with a foundation in both sciences and humanities. Dr Lauren Barron is Clinical Professor, Director of the Medical Humanities Program, and Inaugural Michael E DeBakey, M.D., Selma DeBakey and Lois DeBakey Chair for Medical Humanities at Baylor University. The Medical Humanities Program at Baylor is one of the first of its kind in the United States. The program partners the humanities with science education to holistically prepare those going into the medical field. Lauren dedicates most of her time to the professional formation of university students before they enter into medical school and other health professional programs with the belief that they need more than basic science courses to prepare them to be the kind of caregivers we want and need them to be.
55:12
July 15, 2021
Episode 4 - In Conversation with Dr Chris Millard
Episode 4 - In Conversation with Dr Chris Millard
Prof Ian Sabroe and Dr Dieter Declercq talk with Dr Chris Millard about the challenges and benefits of interdisciplinary research, the history of medical labels, and the question of value in the humanities. Chris Millard is a Lecturer in the Department of History at the University of Sheffield. He has worked on the history of psychiatric and clinical categories such as ‘self-harm’, ‘attempted suicide’, ‘illness deception’ and ‘child abuse’. Chris is currently writing a history of Munchausen Syndrome and Munchausen Syndrome by Proxy (now called ‘fabricated or induced illness’), and attempting to write history that takes adequate account of personal experiences. Chris teaches on the history of psychiatry, the history of emotions, and the history of ideas of ‘parity of esteem for mental health’. He has collaborated with Prof Ian Sabroe supervising projects across the medicine / humanities divide on postnatal depression, physician accounts of illness, clinical uncertainty and physician error.
52:15
June 04, 2021
Episode 3 - In Conversation with Dr Esther L Jones
Episode 3 - In Conversation with Dr Esther L Jones
In this episode, Prof Ian Sabroe and Dr Dieter Declercq talk with Dr Esther L Jones about her important work at the intersection of medical humanities, black speculative fiction, and gender. Dr Esther L Jones is Associate Provost and Dean of the Faculty at Clark University, where she is a professor in the department of English and the E Franklin Frazier Chair of African American Literature, Theory and Culture. Her research and teaching specializations include black women’s health and medical ethics as represented in literature. She is the author of Medicine and Ethics in Black Women’s Speculative Fiction (2015), and the editor-in-chief for “Global Critical Health Humanities: Race and Ethnicity” a reference text with Palgrave MacMillan.
50:10
May 20, 2021
Episode 2 - In Conversation with Prof Nicola Shaughnessy
Episode 2 - In Conversation with Prof Nicola Shaughnessy
In this episode, Prof Ian Sabroe and Dr Dieter Declercq talk with Prof Nicola Shaughnessy about her inspiring work and many interdisciplinary collaborations with artists, health professionals, and scholars in humanities and social science. Nicola Shaughnessy is Professor of Performance at the University of Kent. Throughout her career, she has worked across subject boundaries, with publications in literature, film and social science as well as performance studies and theatre history. She founded Kent’s Research Centre for Cognition, Kinesthetics and Performance (2010-2018), and is co-editor of Methuen’s Performance and Science series. Nicola is currently collaborating with psychologists and neuroscientists through projects using creative and participatory research practices to explore neurodiversity and mental health. She was Principal Investigator for the AHRC project, Imagining Autism, and follow-on project Autism Reimagined. She’s currently leading another AHRC project, Playing A/Part, a project investigating the experience of autistic women, girls and marginalised genders through participatory arts practices.  Click here to watch 'I Feel Different', part of the BBC's Animated Thinking project. See here for more details about the ATTUNE research collaboration.
01:01:37
April 30, 2021
Episode 1 - Taster Episode
Episode 1 - Taster Episode
Welcome to the first instalment of 'Conversations About Arts, Humanities and Health'. This taster episode features a short conversation between the co-organisers of this project, Prof Ian Sabroe and Dr Dieter Declercq. Ian and Dieter will discuss the genesis of this project, tell you what you can expect from the series, and offer some thoughts about how arts and humanities can inform healthcare.
33:33
April 14, 2021