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Court Leader's Advantage

Court Leader's Advantage

By Peter C. Kiefer

Coming innovations, thought-provoking trends, questions that matter to the court community, these and more themes are covered by the Court Leader’s Advantage podcast series, a forum by court professionals for court professionals to share experiences and lessons learned.
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Court Rules and Procedures: Technological Innovation
Court Rules and Procedures: Technological Innovation
A Question of Ethics Conversation August 15, 2022, Episode The COVID Pandemic brought the use of technology to the forefront of our conversation worldwide. Technology is expanding at breakneck speed. Is it out stripping courts' ability to manage new technological innovations? Relevant Ethics Canons Canon 1 Avoiding Impropriety and the Appearance of Impropriety in All Activities 1.1 Performing Court Duties A court professional faithfully carries out all appropriately assigned duties, striving at all times to perform the work diligently, efficiently, equitably, thoroughly, courteously, honestly, openly, and within the scope of the court professional’s authority. Canon 2  Performing the Duties of Position Impartially and Diligently 2.1  Independent Judgment A court professional avoids relationships that would impair one’s impartiality and independent judgment. A court professional is vigilant concerning conflicts of interest and ensures that outside interests are never so extensive or of such a nature as to impair one’s ability to perform court duties. Discussion Questions · How can courts implement new technological innovations without infringing on Constitutional rights? · How can court administrators convince judges who are resistant to change that technology is beneficial? · What strategies can courts use to alleviate the digital divide? Today’s Host Courtney Whiteside, Director St. Louis Municipal Court Today’s Panel · Stay Worby, State Jury Coordinator, Alaska State Court System · Kent Pankey, Senior Planner, Virginia Supreme Court · Karl Thoennes, Court Administrator, 2nd Judicial District, Sioux Falls, South Dakota · Joe Thommasino, Legal Counsel, Justice Court, Las Vegas, Nevada · Peter C. Kiefer, Retired Court Professional
20:13
November 28, 2022
Courts and Confidence: Does the Public Look at Different Courts Differently?
Courts and Confidence: Does the Public Look at Different Courts Differently?
November 15th 2022, Court Leader’s Advantage Podcast Episode The public’s perception of our courts continues to be a topic of concern and curiosity for court professionals. Last month we discussed finding of the National Center for State Courts 2021 State of the State Courts survey that found that public trust in the courts had declined to 64% from a high in 2018 of 76%. This month we will take a deeper dive into several areas of interest: · How much influence does “the ability to be heard in court” affect the public’s perception? · Does the public look at the different levels of the court differently? · What role do lawyers play in promoting differing views between general jurisdiction and limited jurisdiction courts? · How does the development of remote hearings play into caseflow efficiency and the public’s perception? Today’s Cohost Stacy Worby, State Jury Coordinator for the Alaska Court System. In that capacity she is responsible for the coordination and operation of the centralized processes for the court’s jury management systems. Additionally, she provides jury procedure training and guidance for personnel in 40 court locations statewide. Today’s Panel · The Honorable Yvette Alexander, Judge with the City Court in Baton Rouge, Louisiana.  Judge Alexander earned a B.A. in Political Science from Grambling State University and earned a J.D. from the LSU Law Center in 1979. After law school, she worked as counsel for the Louisiana State Legislature, Louisiana State Senate, East Baton Rouge Parish Public Defender’s Office and was an Assistant Attorney General for the Louisiana Attorney General’s Office. · The Honorable Ed Spillane, Judge with the Municipal Court in College Station, Texas.  He has served in this position since May 2002. Prior to this, he served as an Assistant District Attorney for Brazos County for eight years and as an associate for the law firm Fulbright & Jaworski for two years.  Judge Spillane received his undergraduate degree from Harvard University, and his law degree from the University of Chicago. · Rick Pierce, Judicial Programs Administrator for the Administrative Office of Pennsylvania Courts.  Rick has served in the field of court administration for the past twenty-nine years. Prior to his appointment at the Administrative Office of Pennsylvania Courts, Rick was the district court administrator for Cumberland County. Prior to his 4 ½ year tenure as court administrator. · Kent Pankey, Senior Planner for the Supreme Court of Virginia.  Kent received a B.A. in Political Science from Hampden-Sydney College and a J.D. from the College of William and Mary. He is an ICM Fellow (Class of 1999) and a certified ICM instructor for the courses Accountability and Court Performance, Executive Decision Making, Leadership, Modern Court Governance, and Visioning and Strategic Planning. · Sarah Brown-Clark, elected Clerk of Court for the Municipal Court in Youngstown, Ohio.  Sarah is a 1971 cum laude graduate of Ohio University with a B.S. degree in English; she also earned her M.A. degree in English from Ohio University in 1972 and earned hours towards a Ph.D. in English from Kent State University.
29:58
November 14, 2022
Courts and Confidence: What Do We Know About How the Public Perceives the Courts?
Courts and Confidence: What Do We Know About How the Public Perceives the Courts?
October 18, 2022 Court Leader’s Advantage Podcast Episode What do we know about how the public views our courts? We know that the public’s trust and confidence in courts has been slipping over the years. The 2021 National Center for State Courts State of the State Courts survey found that public trust in the courts along other institutions has been declining for some time. In that survey 64% of respondents said they had either a great deal of confidence or some confidence in their state courts. But that is down from a 2018 high of 76%. That same survey asked, "How much do you agree with the phrase that the state courts provide equal justice to all?"  For the first time, state courts were slightly 'under water.'   46% said the phrase described the state courts well or very well, while 47% disagreed. In addition, this year, public confidence in The U.S. Supreme Court (symbolically the paragon of our court system), sank to 25%, down 31 points from its 1988 high. That year 56% had confidence in the Supreme Court. We’ve asked five individuals, both judges and court administrators, how do their friends and neighbors view the courts and why. We asked them about people they know; people who do not work in the courts. What are we looking to find out? · Has trust and confidence in the courts truly been decreasing? · Do people still rely on the fundamental fairness and impartiality of the courts? · If trust and confidence is decreasing what are the reasons? Today’s Cohost Stacy Worby, State Jury Coordinator for the Alaska Court System Today’s Panel The Honorable Yvette Mansfield Alexander is the Judge with the City Court in Baton Rouge, Louisiana.  Judge Alexander earned her B.A. in Political Science from Grambling State University and earned a J.D. from the LSU Law Center in 1979. After law school, she worked as counsel for the Louisiana State Legislature, Louisiana State Senate, East Baton Rouge Parish Public Defender’s Office and was an Assistant Attorney General for the Louisiana Attorney General’s Office. The Honorable Ed Spillane is the Judge with the Municipal Court in College Station, Texas.  Judge Spillane has served in this position since May 2002.  He received his undergraduate degree from Harvard University, and his law degree from the University of Chicago. Rick Pierce is the Judicial Programs Administrator for the Administrative Office of Pennsylvania Courts.  A graduate from Washington and Lee University, Pierce received his Master's Degree in Public Administration from Shippensburg University in 1995. Kent Pankey is the Senior Planner for the Supreme Court of Virginia where he has worked since 2005.  Kent received a B.A. in Political Science from Hampden-Sydney College and a J.D. from the College of William and Mary. He is an ICM Fellow (Class of 1999) and a certified ICM instructor for the courses Accountability and Court Performance, Executive Decision Making, Leadership, Modern Court Governance, and Visioning and Strategic Planning Sarah Brown-Clark is the elected Clerk of Court for the Municipal Court in Youngstown, Ohio.  Sarah was first elected to the position November 1999.  Sarah is a 1971 cum laude graduate of Ohio University with a B.S. degree in English; she also earned her M.A. degree in English from Ohio University in 1972 and earned hours towards a Ph.D. in English from Kent State University.
29:45
October 17, 2022
Courts and Customers: What Do Court Users Have to Tell Us?
Courts and Customers: What Do Court Users Have to Tell Us?
September 20th Court Leader’s Advantage Podcast Episode Obtaining customer feedback, obtaining usable feedback, obtaining enough of it to be able to rationally modify court programs, all of these are major hurdles. And yet getting good customer feedback is so important. It is important to complete the loop: to plan, to act, to check results, and then to refine. And this effort has been made even more complicated by COVID. LaGratta Consulting, with the backing of the State Justice Institute, has developed the Court Voices Project piloting 12 courts from around the country. These courts are collecting real-time, feedback from staff and court users about their pandemic experiences and their ideas. Some of the questions the Court Voices Project is trying to answer include, what percentage of court users prefer virtual hearings and why; have court users found new communication channels like phone banks and online chat features to be more convenient and more accessible; and what ideas do line-staff have for improving court practices? This month we’re looking at court customers and how we collect feedback from them. Some topics we will explore include: · How do we obtain more and better customer feedback? · Why should court leaders focus on better ways to obtain feedback? · What have courts been able to do with more enhanced feedback? and · What advice do these panelists have for the rest of us? Today’s Panel The Honorable Clemens Landau, Judge with the Justice Court in Salt Lake City, Utah.  Judge Landau was appointed to the Salt Lake City Justice Court in 2017. He received his law degree from the University of Utah in 2008. The Honorable Timothy Kuhlman, Judge with the Municipal Court in Toledo, Ohio.  In February 2005 he joined the Toledo Municipal Court and served as Presiding and Administrative Judge from 2007 through 2010, and again in 2019-2021.  Judge Kuhlman graduated from Hillsdale College in Michigan in 1988 and graduated from the University of Toledo Law School and joined the Ohio Bar in 1991. James Cho, Court Administrator for the Municipal Court in Boulder, Colorado. James was first named Court Administrator in June 2015.  Before that he served as Deputy Administrator since 2006.  De'Von Kissick-Kelly, Deputy Court Administrator for the Municipal Court, in Boulder.  De'Von has devoted her career to empowering women through activism, advocacy and education. She holds a B.S in Criminal Justice and Criminology and a M.A. in Adult and Community Education from Ball State University Emily LaGratta is with La Gratta Consulting.  Emily is a national subject matter expert on the topics of procedural justice and user voice. In leading LaGratta Consulting, she works with local and national organizations to design and implement innovative programming, engage end-users and utilize their feedback, and develop practitioner resources and training tools that help enhance public trust and confidence in legal institutions.
36:41
September 19, 2022
Behavioral Health and the Courts: What Should You Be Doing Right Now?
Behavioral Health and the Courts: What Should You Be Doing Right Now?
August 16, 2022, Court Leader’s Advantage Podcast Episode In this episode, we ask the question, “What should our courts be doing now?” This month we bring our discussion on behavioral health and the courts home. In previous episodes we talked about the extent of the problem nationally and how it affects each community; we discussed the need for community collaboration; we explored the challenge of criminal competency to stand trial, and we learned how mental health manifests itself as trauma in our young people. This month is the last of our five-episode discussion with members of the National Judicial Task Force to Examine State Courts’ Response to Mental Illness. Some of the topics we will explore include: · What should judges and court administrators be doing right now to address this crisis? · How do we educate the public about the realities of mental health? · What kind of role will court staff play in this new model for courts? · What advice do these panelists have for the rest of us? Today’s Panel · The Honorable Christopher Goff is a Justice on the Indiana Supreme Court.  Justice Goff was appointed as Indiana’s 110th justice in 2017 by Governor Eric J. Holcomb. Prior to his appointment, Justice Goff was judge of the Wabash Superior Court for twelve years during which time he established the Wabash County Drug Court, Wabash County Family Recovery Court, and the Wabash County Reentry Court. He has served as President of the Huntington County Police Merit Board and was named Huntington County’s Pro Bono Attorney of the Year in 2001 and 2002. He is currently the Chair of the Indiana Justice Reinvestment Advisory Council (JRAC) as well as serving as a member of the National Judicial Task Force to Examine State Courts’ Response to Mental Illness. · Scott Block is the Statewide Behavioral Health Administrator for the Illinois Administrative Office of the Courts.  Scott holds a master’s degree in counseling, is a Licensed Clinical Professional Counselor, a Certified Alcohol and Other Drug Counselor, a Certified Criminal Justice Addictions Professional, and a National Center for State Court’s Certified Court Manager. · Walter Thompson is a Peer Recovery Support Specialist and retired non-commissioned officer in the United States Army after serving more than 20 years. He is an Ordained Deacon at his local church, an advocate for mental health and was recently elected Commissioner and Vice Mayor of Florida City, FL. He attended Central Texas College and Miami Dade College. He is a certified Peer Specialist and Group Instructor. He is also an Intention Peer Specialist (IPS), Wellness Recovery Action Plan Facilitator (WRAP), Interactive Journaling (IJ) Facilitator, and Small Group Instructor (SGI). He is committed to Mentoring underprivileged youth and being a leader in his community. · Patti Tobias is a Principal Court Management Consultant for the National Center for State Courts.  Patti has been with the NCSC’s Court Consulting Services division August 2014. She has experience working in a wide variety of national, statewide, and local projects including those involving leadership and governance, caseflow management, strategic planning, child welfare, criminal justice reform and improving the justice system response to mental illness. She works with national court organizations and often presents at state and national conferences. As part of a NCSC team, she currently supports the work of the National Judicial Task Force to Examine the State Courts’ Response to Mental Illness.
32:10
August 09, 2022
Where is Bail Reform Now? Drive for Reform and Push Back
Where is Bail Reform Now? Drive for Reform and Push Back
July 19th 2022 Court Leader’s Advantage Podcast Episode Bail Reform has been praised as an effective way to correct a societal wrong. The movement's byword has been “bail does not keep the most dangerous in jail: it keeps the poorest.” Despite this argument, Bail Reform is receiving increasing pushback. Bail Reform aims to curb or eliminate cash bail for people who are in jail awaiting trial and charged with either misdemeanors or nonviolent offenses. Bail Reform releases many of these vulnerable low-income defendants from pretrial incarceration. It allows them to return to their homes, to go back to their to families, and to keep their jobs. It also saves taxes by managing jail populations. Jail is by far the most expensive way to deal with defendants. A national average puts keeping a defendant in jail at $391 a day; in contrast probation on average costs $121 a day. Here are just a few recent examples of the pushback: · Progressive San Francisco prosecutor Chesa Boudin, who supported Bail Reform has been recalled · Progressive Los Angeles prosecutor George Gascon is facing a recall. · Judges in Chicago have been blamed for releasing defendants on electronic ankle monitors who then go out and commit violent crimes, · New York City Mayor Eric Adams blames rising crime in his city partially on judges who are not keeping dangerous criminals in jail. Some pundits believe that voters are tired of being afraid: afraid of rising crime, afraid of the homeless, and afraid that courts, under Bail Reform, let dangerous criminals out to threaten their communities. Some of the topics we will explore today include: · What is the current situation on Bail Reform? · What should be the courts’ position regarding Bail Reform? · What should courts be doing right now? Today’s Panel · The Honorable Edward Spillane is the Presiding Judge of the Municipal Court in College Station, Texas.  He has served in this position since May 2002. Prior to this, he served as an Assistant District Attorney for Brazos County for eight years and as an associate for the law firm Fulbright & Jaworski for two years.  Judge Spillane received his undergraduate degree from Harvard University, and his law degree from the University of Chicago. · The Honorable Paul C. Farr is the Judge with the Herriman and Alta Municipal Courts in Salt Lake County, Utah.  Judge Farr graduated from the J. Reuben Clark Law School at BYU in 1999 and has been a member of the Utah State Bar for 21 years. He has been a municipal court judge for the past 11 years. He is also a member of the Utah Judicial Council and has been serving in that capacity for the past 5 years.
23:45
July 18, 2022
Online Dispute Resolution and Virtual Mediation: What Is Your Court Choosing?
Online Dispute Resolution and Virtual Mediation: What Is Your Court Choosing?
June 21st Court Leader’s Advantage Podcast Episode Online Dispute Resolution has been us in various forms since the 1990s, although it really became widely accepted a little over five years ago. By contrast, widespread acceptance of virtual mediation seems to have been an outgrowth of the COVID pandemic. Today many courts around the country use one form or the other (or possibly both) to quickly and efficiently settle disputes. What has been the courts’ experience using these two different platforms? This month we’re looking at online dispute resolution and virtual mediation. Some of the Topics We Will Explore: · What has been the courts’ experience with these two formats? · Why did a court choose to go with one format over the other? · What has been the response from the folks using that format? · What has been the biggest benefit and the one thing that needs to be changed? Today’s Panelists: · Kathy Scott: the Small Claims and Civil Pro Se Mediation Program Coordinator for the Multnomah Circuit Court in Portland, Oregon · Joe Haas: a Domestic Relations Mediator for the St. Joseph Circuit Court, in Centreville, Michigan · Kelly Steele, Court Programs Manager for the 9th Judicial Circuit Court in Orlando, Florida
30:33
June 20, 2022
Diversity, Equity, Inclusion: Political Agendas and Affirmative Action
Diversity, Equity, Inclusion: Political Agendas and Affirmative Action
A Question of Ethics Conversation May 2022 This episode of A Question of Ethics will continue to explore diversity, equity, and inclusion (DEI), and NACM’s commitment to helping provide equal justice. This session was recorded after the Ethics Subcommittee Conference Call on April 28th, 2022. The questions the group explored include: · Does focusing on Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion policies, and programs conflict with the court’s purpose to be a separate, independent, and impartial forum for resolving disputes? · How do courts keep political agendas out of its efforts to make court personnel and court process equitable for all? · How does implementing DEI policies and programs compare to Affirmation Action requirements? · How can courts today be more inclusive and accessible to those having business before it? Relevant Canons from the NACM Code of Conduct for Court Professionals: Canon 1.1: Performing Court Duties A court professional faithfully carries out all appropriately assigned duties, striving at all times to perform the work diligently, efficiently, equitably, thoroughly, courteously, honestly, openly, and within the scope of the court professional’s authority. Canon 1.3: Fairness The court professional makes the court accessible and conducts his or her work without bias or prejudice. Canon 1.4 Respect for Others A court professional treats litigants, co-workers, and all others interacting with the court with dignity, respect, and courtesy. Canon 4.1 Inappropriate Political Activity (Paraphrased) A court professional: · retains his or her right to vote · engages in political activity strictly as a private citizen, in accordance with Federal and state law, with local court rule, and with the policy of the appropriate local governing authority. · participates in political activity only during non–court hours, · uses only non–court resources. · Never uses his or her position to politically influence others.
24:38
May 30, 2022
Behavioral Health and the Young: Adolescents and The Mental Health Crisis
Behavioral Health and the Young: Adolescents and The Mental Health Crisis
May 17th Court Leader’s Advantage Podcast Episode This country’s mental health crisis is by no means limited to adults. We know that young people frequently suffer from traumatic events. This fact has only been made worse by the scourge of COVID. A recent survey by the Pew Research Center revealed that well over a third (37%) of U.S. high school students struggle with stress, anxiety, or depression due to COVID-19. We must address this crisis. We do not want to endure the effects of trauma that has been ignored for too long. This month is the 4th of our five-episode discussion with members of the National Judicial Task Force to Examine State Courts’ Response to Mental Illness. Some of the questions we explore include: · What do judges and court administrators see every day in their courts that are clear indicators of this crisis? · What should we be doing in the courtroom now about children, youth, and families with behavioral health needs? · How can judges and court administrators support the health and safety of young people even before they enter the courtroom? · What advice do these panelists have for the rest of us? Today’s Panelists: The Honorable Kathleen A. Quigley is a Judge with the Pima County Superior Court in Tucson, Arizona.  Judge Quigley graduated from University of Arizona Law School in 1986. Ms. Quigley joined the Pima County Attorney’s Office in 1987, where she worked as a prosecutor and trial attorney. In September of 2003, she was appointed to the Pima County Juvenile Court Bench as a Hearing Officer/Judge Pro Tem. In April of 2009, she was appointed as a Pima County Juvenile Court Commissioner.  In October of 2012, she was appointed by Governor Brewer to the Pima County Superior Court Bench. She served as the Presiding Judge of Pima County Juvenile Court from 2014-2020. She has been the Associate Presiding Judge of the Juvenile Court since July 2020 to the present. The Honorable Theresa Dellick is a Judge with the Mahoning County Juvenile Court in Youngstown, Ohio.  Judge Dellick entered private practice in 1984. She became a partner in a Youngstown law firm and was a civil trial lawyer. In 1999, she became a county court judge, where she implemented the first misdemeanant county drug court. Since 2001, she served as judge of the Mahoning County Juvenile Court overseeing the administration of the Court as well as the Detention Center. Her administration of the Court has been directed to balanced and restorative justice with focused attention to youth accountability and responsibility, public safety and restoration of victims’ rights Teri Deal M. Ed is a Principal Court Management Consultant with the National Center for State Courts.  Teri joined the National Center for State Courts in 2019 after several years of experience working in juvenile and family court research settings and in direct service to system-impacted youth and families. Her work at NCSC focuses on child, youth, and family justice with a specific emphasis on implementing and evaluating court practices, continuous quality improvement, and systems change efforts.  She is currently pursuing her Ph.D. and is researching school-justice partnerships.
46:11
May 16, 2022
The Great Resignation: How Has It Affected the Courts?
The Great Resignation: How Has It Affected the Courts?
April 19th Court Leader’s Advantage Podcast Episode One unintended consequence of the COVID pandemic has been a phenomenon called “The Great Resignation.” Large numbers of American workers have either quit their jobs or (after being laid off) have chosen not to return to their previous employer. CBS News has reported an estimated 20 million people left their jobs in only the second half of 2021. Why is this occurring? A survey conducted by the Pew Research Center found that of those who left their jobs, almost a two-thirds (63%) cited low pay. Almost two-thirds also cited no opportunity for advancement. Well over half (57%) felt they were disrespected at work. Slightly less than half (48%) cited child-care issues. An interesting side note: only 18% cited their employer’s vaccine mandate as a reason for leaving. Since we appear to be coming out of the COVID pandemic, is this Great Resignation on the wane? Well, a survey conducted by ResumeBuilder.com estimates that almost a third of workers (32%) plan to leave their current job this year. That number is particularly high in the Information Technology Profession. This month we are going to explore The Great Resignation and its effect on courts and court employees. In this discussion we are including not only courts that may have lost employees, but courts that are having trouble recruiting and courts that are suffering because their justice system partners have having trouble keeping fully staffed. Some of the questions we will explore include: · What has been the courts’ workforce experience during this “Great Resignation”? · Do you see this situation getting better or worse in 2022? · Are there things courts can do to entice more people to consider court administration as a career? · What advice do these panelists have for the rest of us? Today’s Cohost and Panelists Cohost Alyce Roberts is the semi-Retired Special Projects Manager for the Alaska State Court System.  As a member of the court’s senior staff, Alyce was the AOC’s primary liaison with the clerks of court. In this capacity, she was responsible for developing the annual statewide clerks of court conference program, facilitating the sessions and serving as a presenter.  She has worked for the Alaska Court System since 1989, holding a number of positions including clerk of court in Anchorage (the state’s largest general jurisdiction court). She has served on the National Association for Court Management’s (NACM) Board of Directors, chairs NACM’s Communication Committee, and she is a Fellow of the Institute for Court Management (2010). Panelists Dawn Palermo is the Judicial Administrator for the Jefferson Parish Juvenile Court in Harvey, Louisiana. She has held this position since 2004. In this capacity, she oversees all court programs, employees and finances, negotiates and monitors all contracts and drafts all funding proposals. Ms. Palermo is also currently serving as a board member for the Louisiana Court Administrators Association (LCAA). Eric Silverberg is the Court Administrator for the Municipal Court in Tucson, Arizona.  He has worked in the Arizona Courts since 2005.  Eric has been an involved member of NACM since 1995. His academic credentials include graduate degrees in Business Administration and Computer Resources and Information Technology. He became an ICM Fellow in 1997.        Be Sure to Take Our Survey Access the link: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/3GVFMSX The results will be posted and periodically updated on the NACM Ethics Webpage Leave a question or comment about the episode at clapodcast@nacmnet.org
23:08
April 18, 2022
Diversity, Equity, Inclusion: What is the Court’s Duty?
Diversity, Equity, Inclusion: What is the Court’s Duty?
A Question of Ethics Conversation: Summer 2022 Edition of the Court Manager NACM has made a commitment to the values of providing equal justice regardless of race, gender, age, ethnicity, sexual orientation or identity, disability, or social economic status. What is the court’s ethical obligation, particularly when it comes to implementing court operations? This episode was a recorded conversation held immediately after the Ethics Subcommittees’ Conference Call held on March 24, 2022. The questions the group explored include: · Do courts have an ethical obligation to implement policies and procedures that ensure the values of diversity, equity, and inclusion (DEI) are applied to court processes? · Can a court apply diversity, equity, and inclusion to assessing fines, costs, and fees? if so, how does one go about doing that? The ethical Canons from the NACM Model Code for Court Professionals referenced during the conversation include: Canon 1.1: Performing Court Duties A court professional faithfully carries out all appropriately assigned duties, striving at all times to perform the work diligently, efficiently, equitably, thoroughly, courteously, honestly, openly, and within the scope of the court professional’s authority. Canon 1.3: Fairness The court professional makes the court accessible and conducts his or her work without bias or prejudice. Canon 1.4 Respect for Others A court professional treats litigants, co-workers, and all others interacting with the court with dignity, respect, and courtesy. Today’s Moderator: Courtney Whiteside, Director of the St. Louis Municipal Court, St. Louis, Missouri
29:04
April 09, 2022
Mental Health and the Courts: The Collaborative Court and Community Effective Criminal Case Management
Mental Health and the Courts: The Collaborative Court and Community Effective Criminal Case Management
March 15th Court Leader’s Advantage Podcast Episode In our last two episodes on mental health and the courts we talked about the fact that traditional criminal case management is not meeting the needs of the people we serve. We must develop a new comprehensive and collaborative model. We need to create a fair and effective caseflow management system that meets the challenges of those with behavioral health needs. There are estimates that up to 70% of the individuals seen in our criminal courts today have behavioral health issues. Currently, state courts do not generally have systems in place to help those with these challenges. This need is made even more urgent with the pandemic and the resulting case backlogs. We must find a new model to strengthen the collaborative court and community response to individuals with behavioral health needs. This month is the third of our five-episode discussion with members of the National Judicial Task Force to Examine State Courts’ Response to Mental Illness. Some of the topics we will explore include: · What is this new collaborative model for addressing caseflow management? · What are the four pillars that make up the new caseflow management model? · How can court administrators integrate this new model into a court’s existing practices and · What resources are available for us to use now? Our panel today includes: The Honorable Paula Carey is recently retired Chief Justice of the Massachusetts Trial Courts She was appointed Chief Justice of the Trial Court in July 2013 by the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court. Prior to that time, she had served as the Chief Justice of the Probate and Family Court beginning in October 2007. She was appointed an Associate Justice of the Norfolk Probate and Family Court in 2001. Chief Justice Carey partnered with the Court Administrator in the oversight of the Massachusetts Trial Court, which is comprised of seven court departments with 385 judges, 6,400 court staff, including Probation and Security, and 99 court facilities. They jointly direct the implementation of Strategic Plan 3.0, which targets priorities such as user experience, judicial excellence, operational excellence and diversity, equity and inclusion.  She served on the Council of State Governments Working Group and on Governor Baker’s Opioid Task Force and has worked on National Initiatives in the areas of Substance Use disorders and Behavioral Health. Prior to her appointment to the bench in January 2001, Chief Justice Carey was a partner in the firm of Carey & Mooney, PC, where she specialized in domestic relations matters.  She has lectured and authored material for numerous publications and educational programs in the area of domestic relations, diversity equity and inclusion as well as substance use disorder and behavioral health both as a practitioner and as a judge.  She is a graduate of New England Law/Boston. Donald E. Jacobson is a Senior Special Projects Consultant with the Arizona Supreme Court.  He began his court career working as a bailiff, law librarian and assistant administrator in the Superior Court in Coconino County. Having served as a court administrator, consultant and trainer in both general jurisdiction and limited jurisdiction courts throughout Arizona over the past 28 years he is sought out as a Subject Matter Expert in court financial management, change management, performance measures, improving court performance and system structure. Don received a B.S. in Engineering, with an emphasis in Electrical Engineering, from Northern Arizona University (NAU) in 1979, and received his M.A., with Honors, from Denver Seminary in 1984. He is a 1999 Fellow of the Institute for Court Management. 
36:02
March 13, 2022
Work - Life Balance: What Does It Look Like in 2022?
Work - Life Balance: What Does It Look Like in 2022?
February 15th, 2022 Court Leader’s Advantage Podcast Episode We’ve been talking about work-life balance for decades. It is a perennial challenge. What has changed in these last two years is, of course, COVID. For the first time in the history of America’s court system, large numbers of employees are teleworking, many are frightened of catching the Coronavirus in the office, others are concerned over losing their personal freedom, and we all seem to be working and living with incomplete and often rapidly changing information. Anecdotal comments are both positive and negative. Office productivity has improved; but the lines between work-life and homelife have blurred, particularly for caregivers; management has adapted to the new flexible office; but burnout and mental health concerns have skyrocketed, and this is a contributing factor to what has come to be known as “the great resignation.” This month we are going to explore work-life balance and how COVID has affected courts and court employees. Some of the questions we will explore include: · What has been folk’s experience with work-life balance over the years? · Has the advent of COVID changed that experience? Is that change for the better or worse? · Is there anything NACM can do to address this issue? · What advice do these court professionals have for the rest of us? Today’s Co-Host: Alyce Roberts, Semi-Retired Special Projects Manager for the Alaska State Court System. As a member of the court’s senior staff, she was the AOC’s primary liaison with the clerks of court. In this capacity, she was responsible for developing the annual statewide clerks of court conference program, facilitating the sessions and serving as a presenter. Alyce regularly worked with court colleagues and justice partners to propose revisions to court rules and develop statewide clerical procedures. Today’s Panelists: Angie VanSchoick, Court Clerk and Town Clerk for the Town of Silverthorne, Colorado.  Previously she was Court Administrator with the Town of Breckenridge Municipal Court, a position she held since 2013. In this role, she was responsible for all court operations, including the implementation of policies and procedures, general administration, and jury management.  Angie is a licensed macro level social worker in the State of Colorado and Michigan, receiving her MSW from the University of Michigan in 2007. Kelly Hutton, Assistant Court Administrator for the North Dakota Court System. She has served on local committees and assisted in the implementation of many projects in North Dakota. In 2015, Kelly completed the Court Management Program and in 2017 completed her ICM Fellowship through the National Center for State Courts (NCSC).  Kelly holds a B.A. in Legal Studies from Hamline University, where she also had minors in Economics and Political Science. She is currently working on her Master’s in Public Administration at the University of North Dakota. Alexis Allen, Court Administrator for the Municipal Court in Tempe, Arizona.  Ms. Allen is a 2014 graduate of the Institute for Court Management (ICM) Fellows Program. She received her Master’s degree in Administration, emphasis on Leadership, from Northern Arizona University and her Bachelor’s degree in Interdisciplinary Studies, emphasis on Organizational Studies, from Arizona State University.
24:28
February 14, 2022
Mental Health and the Courts: The Crisis with Competency to Stand Trial
Mental Health and the Courts: The Crisis with Competency to Stand Trial
Tuesday, January 18, 2022, Court Leader’s Advantage Podcast Episode In November we started our discussion on how mental illness is impacting our nation and particularly our courts. In this episode, we are taking a deeper dive into the criminal justice realm, specifically the challenge of competency to stand trial. The task of determining if a defendant is competent to stand trial, to assist in one’s own defense can be daunting. The road to restoring a defendant to competency can be arduous and leave some people in an incarcerated limbo for weeks or even months. This month is the second of our five-episode discussion with members of the National Judicial Task Force to Examine State Courts’ Response to Mental Illness. Some of the questions we will explore include: · What are some of the specific challenges surrounding competency to stand trial? · What is being done to overcome those challenges on both the national and the community level? and · What recommendations does the Task Force have for us? Our panel today includes: · The Honorable Nan Waller, Judge of the 4thJudicial District in Portland, Oregon and · Richard Schwermer, with the National Center for State Courts and Retired State Court Administrator for the state of Utah.
33:25
January 17, 2022
After Two Years of COVID: What Do We Know Now About Courts, Safety, and Privacy? Question of Ethics: A Video Conversation on Courts and Ethics Winter 2021 Edition
After Two Years of COVID: What Do We Know Now About Courts, Safety, and Privacy? Question of Ethics: A Video Conversation on Courts and Ethics Winter 2021 Edition
These last two turbulent years have brought into sharp relief the dynamic tension between a court’s duty to keep both employees and the public safe, and the duty to respect the privacy and the personal choices of those very same employees and the public. This conversation is taking place at a time when many of us thought (or at least hoped), that these kinds of discussions were behind us. We could move on. Yet, as of December of 2021 the recent appearance of yet another COVID variant has raised a new round of concerns. Three examples suggest points where work life has become increasingly intrusive, yet employees and the public are still at risk. 1) As court offices reopen, some returning employees have refused to disclose their vaccine status. This can put those very same employees as well as others at a higher risk of contracting COVID. 2) As more courthouses open again for staff and the public, some members of the public refuse to disclose their vaccine status and refuse to wear a mask. Security at the front door has occasionally refused them entry; they are therefore being denied access to justice. 3) Courthouses, as public buildings, need to be accessible to the public. However, there have been instances of employees being attacked by individuals. Three canons of NACM’s Model Code of Conduct for Court Professionals come into play when discussing this dynamic tension: · NACM Canon 1.1 states that a court professional faithfully carries out all appropriately assigned duties. Is not the safety of court employees and the public a fundamental duty? What could be more basic than ensuring the health and well-being of the staff and public that comes to the courthouse every day? · NACM Canon 1.3 states that a court professional must make the court accessible. Presumably, the courthouse must be accessible to the public and its employees. Can court security limit public access by demanding to know if an individual has legitimate business in the courthouse? · NACM Canon 2.7 states that a court professional respects the personal lives of litigants, the public, and employees. How intrusive can security personnel get in demanding to know about the medical background and business of the public and employees? Today’s Panel includes: Courtney Whiteside, Court Administrator for the Municipal Court, in St. Louis, Missouri. Barbara Marcelle, Trial Court Administrator for the 4th Judicial District in Portland, Oregon. Karl Thoennes, Trial Court Administrator for the 2nd Judicial Circuit Court in Sioux Falls, South Dakota.
38:07
December 24, 2021
The Voice of the Profession: Public Confidence in the Courts
The Voice of the Profession: Public Confidence in the Courts
December 21st Court Leader’s Advantage Podcast Episode The preliminary results from NACM’s Voice of the Profession survey have revealed folks' number one issue this year: Public Confidence in the Courts. Over 95% of those responding reported that they either agreed or strongly agreed that NACM needs to advocate on behalf of the courts regarding the public’s confidence in our court system. This result is no surprise. The 2021 National Center for State Courts “State of the Courts” survey conducted this past October reported that public trust and confidence in the courts has sunk to a new low: 64%. A common response to this issue is “we need more public outreach.” If we could just explain what we do and why we did it, the community would immediately embrace the court’s central role in society. This has been disparagingly referred to as the “to know us is to love us” approach. The community may actually know more about the courts than we think and yet remain less than satisfied. Here are three examples of why the public might have a negative impression of courts: 1. Many folks, including our fellow court professionals, think that courts are too complicated, particularly for self-represented litigants 2. Excessive fines, surcharges, and user fees that courts pile on can hobble defendants guilty of relatively minor crimes 3. Courts can exhibit subtle yet systemic bias against people of color, the mentally ill, and the poor. Some of the questions we will explore this month include: · Why do we think the public’s confidence in the courts is declining? · What can and should courts do about this lack of confidence? · What is NACM’s role in addressing this challenge? · What advice do these court professionals have for the rest of us? Today’s Panel includes: · Samantha Wallis, Assistant Court Administrator for the District Court, in Coeur d’Alene Idaho · Greg Lambard, Trial Court Administrator for the Superior Court in Middlesex Vicinage, New Jersey · Danielle Trujillo, Court Administrator for the Municipal Court in Littleton, Colorado
23:35
December 20, 2021
What We Know Now About Mental Health and the Courts: Grasping the Challenge
What We Know Now About Mental Health and the Courts: Grasping the Challenge
November 16th Court Leader’s Advantage Podcast Episode The challenge of mental illness is impacting America nationwide. It impacts our states, our communities, our courts, and our entire justice system. The courts are at the center of the clash between competing funding choices, community concerns, and those struggling with behavioral health issues. Local jails and detention centers are the largest providers of mental health services in the country. That’s for both adults and children.  In 44 states a jail or prison holds more mentally ill individuals than the state’s largest psychiatric hospital. On the other hand, nearly 30 percent of all family homicides involve a mentally ill individual. This month is the first of five episodes. They will be spread out over the coming winter and spring discussing the National Judicial Task Force to Examine State Courts’ Response to Mental Illness. Some of the questions we will explore include: · What do we know now about mental health, incarceration, and the courts? · What sort of change can courts make to deal with the mental health challenge? · What options do judges have in helping the mentally ill, what sort of options should judges have? And finally · What advice do our guests have for the rest of us regarding mental health and the courts? Today's Panelists · The Honorable Steve Leifman, Judge of the Eleventh Judicial Circuit Court in Miami, Florida and · Patti Tobias, Principal Court Management Consultant with the National Center for State Courts in Denver, Colorado
43:38
November 15, 2021
The Battle Over Bail Reform: How 5 Courts are Coping with the Challenge
The Battle Over Bail Reform: How 5 Courts are Coping with the Challenge
Tuesday, October 19, 2021, Court Leader’s Advantage Podcast Episode The national movement to reduce or eliminate cash bail continues to spark heated discussion. Several states, including New Jersey and Alaska, have instituted bail reform. Other states such as California have repeatedly seen attempts at reform fail, either in the legislature or at the ballot box. Proponents argue that bail criminalize poverty. Bail doesn’t keep the most dangerous in jail, it keeps the poorest. Opponents point to reported instances where bail reform was followed by an uptick in crime. This month we are looking at the ongoing debate over bail reform and the pivotal role that courts play in this discussion. Some of the questions we will explore include: · What are courts doing now about bail reform? · What role does generating revenue have in the debate over bail? · How do risk assessment algorithms play into this discussion? · What advice do our panelists have for the rest of us regarding courts and bail reform? Our panel today includes: · The Honorable Paul Farr, Judge with the Herriman, Sandy, and Alta Municipal Courts in Salt Lake County, Utah; · Elizabeth Rambo, Trial Court Administrator for the Lane Country Trial Courts in Eugene, Oregon; · The Honorable Ed Spillane, Presiding Judge of the Municipal Court in College Station, Texas; and · Courtney Whiteside, Court Administrator of the Municipal Court in St. Louis, Missouri; · Alexzandria Poole, Interim Senior Trial Attorney with Neighborhood Defender Service of Detroit.
36:06
October 18, 2021
Defending Against Cyberattacks! What to Ask to Make Sure You are Safe
Defending Against Cyberattacks! What to Ask to Make Sure You are Safe
Tuesday, October 5, 2021, Court Leader’s Advantage Podcast Episode A cyberattack is truly a different kind of threat, but that threat is real and growing. It takes a different kind of approach to defend against such an attack. Different questions need to be asked well before an attack occurs. Cybersecurity experts advise that having responses to these questions is essential to effectively preparing for and responding to an attack. In this episode we are talking to several court professionals who have endured a cyberattack on their court. We will be exploring questions on how to prepare your court to defend against an attack: · What questions do you need to ask your IT professionals? · How do you convince a funding body to spend the needed resources on cybersecurity? · Do you have a realistic plan to conduct court business without your case management system or even computers for weeks possibly even months? · How can you effectively train staff to respond to a cyberattack? · Does your Continuity of Operations Plan (your COOP) even address the implications of a cyberattack? Today's Panelists Kevin Bowling is the Court Administrator for the 20th Circuit Court in Ottawa County, Michigan.  Kevin is also co-chair of the National Center for State Courts’ Joint Technology Committee and has helped develop three resource bulletins to assist court managers with handling cyberattacks.    Kevin received his B.A. in Political Science/Public Administration from Providence College, Providence, Rhode Island; a M.S. in Judicial Administration from the University of Denver College of Law; a J.D. from Thomas M.Cooley Law School in Lansing, Michigan, and is a Fellow of the Institute for Court Management. Julia Hidy is the Court Administrator for the Probate Court in Fayette County, Ohio.  Julia is a graduate of the Supreme Court of Ohio’s Certified Court Management Program in 2014, she has been seasoned by events such as an extensive conversion of the case management system in 2014, Fayette County’s extensive ransomware/malware attack of June, 2019, subsequent case management update in September, 2019, and the COVID-19 global pandemic. Casey Kennedy is the Director for the Office of Court Information Services at the Office of State Court Administration in Austin, Texas.  . Casey is currently the chair of the Court Information Technology Officer Consortium, a national organization of Court IT professionals. He holds a BA in Computer Science from The University of Texas at Austin. Jorge Basto is the Director of IT Programs for the Cherokee County Clerk of Courts in Canton, Georgia.  A graduate of Georgia State University, Jorge has remained active in both local and national industry organizations and has been highlighted in the Gov Tech and ComputerWorld publications. Montrella Jackson is the Court Administrator for the Akron Municipal Court, in Akron, Ohio.  Montrella received a B.A. in Political Science from the University  of Michigan College of Literature, Science and the Arts and  subsequently earned a law degree from the University of Akron School  of Law. She is a Board member of the Ohio State Bar Association  Board of Directors and past president of the Board of Good Samaritan Hunger Center since.
35:45
October 04, 2021
Courts and Cyberattacks! It’s Not “If” – It’s “When”
Courts and Cyberattacks! It’s Not “If” – It’s “When”
Tuesday, September 21, 2021, Court Leader’s Advantage Podcast Episode Threats from cyberattacks can be easily ignored by courts. There are many rationalizations: “Our court is too small to worry about cyberattacks” “We have a great firewall that keeps everything out” “Our employees change their passwords every three months just like clockwork” “Everyone has been told not to open suspicious email attachments” Often the perspective can be “We’re good” You are good until the morning you fire up your desktop only to find a black screen with the words “pay $50,000 in bitcoin and we will send you the codes to unlock your case management system.” Cyber-experts continue to advise that it isn’t a matter of “if,” it is a matter of “when.” In this episode we are talking to court professionals, several of whom have suffered through a cyberattack in their court. We’ll be exploring questions including: · How did the court respond to the cyberattack? · What could management have done differently? · What could they have done to have prevented a cyberattack in the first place? · What advice does our panel of experts have for the rest of us? Our panel today includes: Kevin Bowling is the Court Administrator for the 20th Circuit Court in Ottawa County, Michigan Kevin is also co-chair of the National Center for State Courts’ Joint Technology Committee and has helped develop three resource bulletins to assist court managers with handling cyberattacks.  He is a Past President of the National Association for Court Management, Co-Chair of the DOJ Global Advisory Committee.  Kevin received his B.A. in Political Science/Public Administration from Providence College, Providence, Rhode Island; a M.S. in Judicial Administration from the University of Denver College of Law; a J.D. from Thomas M.Cooley Law School in Lansing, Michigan, and is a Fellow of the Institute for Court Management. Julie Hidy is the Court Administrator for the Probate Court in Fayette County, Ohio  A graduate of the Supreme Court of Ohio’s Certified Court Management Program in 2014, Julia has been seasoned by events such as an extensive conversion of the case management system in 2014, Fayette County’s extensive ransomware/malware attack of June, 2019, subsequent case management update in September, 2019, and the COVID-19 global pandemic. As the Fayette County Courthouse never closed during COVID-19, Julia managed a court staff that never worked from home and navigated court-in-session with restrictions and distanced hearings in person. Casey Kennedy is the Director for the Office of Court Information Services at the Office of State Court Administration in Austin, Texas.  . Casey is currently the chair of the Court Information Technology Officer Consortium, a national organization of Court IT professionals. He holds a BA in Computer Science from The University of Texas at Austin. Jorge Basto is the Director of IT Programs for the Cherokee County Clerk of Courts in Canton, Georgia.  Prior to joining the Clerk’s Office, Mr. Basto served as Georgia’s Chief Information Officer for 15 years with the Judicial Council’s Administrative Office of the Courts (AOC).  Jorge is a graduate of Georgia State University. Montrella Jackson is the Court Administrator for the Akron Municipal Court, in Akron, Ohio.  She received a B.A. in Political Science from the University  of Michigan College of Literature, Science and the Arts and subsequently earned a law degree from the University of Akron School  of Law.
36:10
September 20, 2021
Judicial Performance Management: What is the World Thinking Now?
Judicial Performance Management: What is the World Thinking Now?
IACA’s Global Conversation Podcast Summer 2021 Measuring judicial performance is a burning topic in many countries around the globe. How to balance the need for timely case resolution with the necessity for just results is a question many court experts have often pondered. Today, our panel of international court professionals will discuss the implications of measuring judicial performance. This episode delves into a number of questions surrounding measuring judicial performance: · How do you use the performance measures? · Who gets to see the data? · What effects does automating judicial performance measurement have? · Do you tie judicial performance to an overall strategic plan? · What advice do these court professionals have for the rest of us? Our panel today Includes: Angéline Rutazana: Inspector General for the Judiciary of Rwanda Niceson Karungi: E-Justice Expert with Synergy International Systems Dr. Aseel Zimmo: Advisor to the Chief Justice and Minister of Justice, Bahrain Thomas G. Bruton: Clerk of Court, U.S. District Court, Northern District of Illinois
38:07
September 17, 2021
Courts of Record, Judicial Selection, Should Everyone Get a Lawyer? What Can We Learn from Challenges Local Courts Face Every Day?
Courts of Record, Judicial Selection, Should Everyone Get a Lawyer? What Can We Learn from Challenges Local Courts Face Every Day?
Tuesday, August 17, 2021, Court Leader’s Advantage Podcast Episode Local Courts can offer incredible opportunity for both defendants and for the community. They are positioned precisely at a point to curtail dangerous behavior before it grows worse. The array of problem-solving courts nationally, often managed on a shoestring budget, is astounding. This does not make up for the fact that local courts are often neglected. They are frequently disparaged. In some cases, they manifest structural flaws that clearly need to be corrected. All the while, we remember that local courts are the place where most of the public obtain their first-hand experience of courts and justice. This month we look at some of the challenges local courts face including: · How should local court judges be selected? · Should all local court judges be attorneys? · Should all defendants in matters before local courts be represented by counsel? · Should local courts be courts of record? We will also continue our discussion of three recent Harvard Law Review articles about local courts. "Criminal Municipal Courts" by Alexandra Natapoff, "Kangaroo Courts" by Shaun Ossei-Owusu, and "Abolish Municipal Courts" by Brendan Roediger. The Honorable Edward Spillane is the Presiding Municipal Judge for the City of College Station, Texas and has served in this position since May 2002. Prior to this, he served as an Assistant District Attorney for Brazos County for 8 years and as an associate for the law firm Fulbright & Jaworski for 2 years.  He received his undergraduate degree from Harvard University, and his law degree from the University of Chicago. The Honorable Mary Logan has been practicing law for over 27 years as a licensed attorney in California and in Washington. As a Judge, she was elected Presiding Judge of the Spokane Municipal Court from 2009 through 2014. Among her many accomplishments, she is one of the “core engineers” of the City of Spokane’s Community Court and presides over the City’s Veteran’s Therapeutic Court. Courtney Whiteside is the Director of the St. Louis County Municipal Division where she provides educational opportunities to municipal divisions and clerks through various committees and educational groups in the state while promoting cultural and procedural reforms.  Courtney started in 2012 as a court clerk then went to Jefferson City to work with the Office of State Courts Administrator and on to the Missouri Supreme Court to serve as the state’s municipal division courts monitor. Bettye King is a Court Administrator for the Municipal Court for the City of Birmingham, Alabama.  She has served in this capacity since 2003. Bettye earned her Master’s Degree in Public Administration and Bachelor’s Degree in Pre-Law Criminal Justice from Auburn University. She was the Patricia Harris Fellowship recipient and awarded Outstanding Achievement in Public Administration.  She earned her Juris Doctorate from the Jones School of Law. Rashida Davis serves as the Court Administrator and Chief Clerk for the Municipal Court of Atlanta, Georgia. She earned her bachelor’s degree in Political Science from Georgia State University. Rashida graduated from the University of Tennessee College of Law Cum Laude.  She is a licensed attorney with the State of Georgia. Her legal background primarily focused on litigation and criminal defense.
33:58
August 16, 2021
Examining Local Courts: Uncovering the Real Story
Examining Local Courts: Uncovering the Real Story
Tuesday, July 20, 2021, Court Leader’s Advantage Podcast Episode Local Courts are the least analyzed components of the American court system. This is particularly ironic since there are thousands of local courts, far more than there are courts of general jurisdiction. It has been estimated that they process over three and a half million criminal cases and collect at least two billion dollars in fines and fees annually. When we talk about preserving the public’s trust and confidence in America’s courts, we often miss that most citizens gain their first-hand experience from dealing with a local court. This month we are looking at three recent Harvard Law Review articles on local courts: Criminal Municipal Courts by Alexandra Natapoff, Kangaroo Courts by Shaun Ossei-Owusu, and Abolish Municipal Courts by Brendan Roediger. Here to discuss their perspectives on these articles are folks who can honestly reveal the whole story on local courts. They are judges and court administrators all of whom work in municipal courts. We are looking at questions including: · Can and should we be collecting more data on local courts nationally? · Can the problem-solving model, fostered by many local courts, scale-up across the country? · Can local courts resist the pressure many cities impose to increase revenue? · What takeaways do these Judges and Court Administrators have for the rest of us? Today's Panelists The Honorable Edward Spillane is the Presiding Municipal Judge for the City of College Station, Texas and has served in this position since May 2002. Prior to this, he served as an Assistant District Attorney for Brazos County for 8 years and as an associate for the law firm Fulbright & Jaworski for 2 years.  He received his undergraduate degree from Harvard University, and his law degree from the University of Chicago. The Honorable Mary Logan has been practicing law for over 27 years as a licensed attorney in California and in Washington. As a Judge, she was elected Presiding Judge of the Spokane Municipal Court from 2009 through 2014. Among her many accomplishments, she is one of the “core engineers” of the City of Spokane’s Community Court and presides over the City’s Veteran’s Therapeutic Court. Courtney Whiteside is the Director of the St. Louis County Municipal Division where she provides educational opportunities to municipal divisions and clerks through various committees and educational groups in the state while promoting cultural and procedural reforms.  Courtney started in 2012 as a court clerk then went to Jefferson City to work with the Office of State Courts Administrator and on to the Missouri Supreme Court to serve as the state’s municipal division courts monitor. Bettye King is a Court Administrator for the Municipal Court for the City of Birmingham, Alabama.  She has served in this capacity since 2003. Bettye earned her Master’s Degree in Public Administration and Bachelor’s Degree in Pre-Law Criminal Justice from Auburn University. She was the Patricia Harris Fellowship recipient and awarded Outstanding Achievement in Public Administration.  She earned her Juris Doctorate from the Jones School of Law. Rashida Davis serves as the Court Administrator and Chief Clerk for the Municipal Court of Atlanta, Georgia. She earned her bachelor’s degree in Political Science from Georgia State University. Rashida graduated from the University of Tennessee College of Law Cum Laude.  She is a licensed attorney with the State of Georgia. Her legal background primarily focused on litigation and criminal defense.
34:17
July 19, 2021
International Rule of Law Assignments: Asking Questions that Change Lives
International Rule of Law Assignments: Asking Questions that Change Lives
Tuesday, June 15, 2021, Court Leader’s Advantage Podcast Episode Long days of travel, strange hotels, and strange food. Yes, international assignments can include all of these. But it can also afford the opportunity to make real change and create real change in yourself. This month we are talking to folks who have engaged in international rule of law assignments in countries around the world. We’re asking questions about international assignments. Did the folks on assignment make a difference? What were the political and cultural hurdles these people had to overcome? Do you need to know the language to go on assignment? What takeaways do these folks have for the rest of us? Today’s contributors: · Michele Oken, is a past president of NACM and has chaired the International Committee for the past seven years. In March of 2020, she retired from the Los Angeles Superior Court where she worked as a manager and court administrator for approximately 19 years. · Jeffrey Apperson is Vice President of the National Center for State Courts’ International Division.  Jeff works all over the world to help courts establish and improve judicial administration. He directs dozens of programs in 25 or so nations at any given time. He has had leadership roles in projects in Mongolia, Iraq, Brazil, Nigeria and Trinidad and Tobago, to name just a handful. He co-founded the International Association for Court Administration. Our panel today includes: · Norman Meyer is a CourtLeader contributor with 38 years of experience as a trial court administrator in the U.S. federal and state courts.  Norman has experience working with many foreign judiciaries, especially in the Russian Federation, Serbia, Ukraine, Moldova, and Albania.  He received his M.S. in Judicial Administration from the University of Denver Sturm College of Law in 1979, and a B.A. in political science and Russian studies from the University of New Mexico, graduating in 1977. Pam Harris is the first woman State Court Administrator for the Maryland Court System. In 1989, she was appointed as the first woman to hold the Court Administrator position for the Circuit Court for Montgomery County, Maryland. Pamela has been active in various rule-of-law initiatives in Argentina, Brazil, Russia, Sri Lanka, India, China, and the Ukraine. Pamela Ryder-Lahey is a Court Management Consultant with 41 years’ experience and most recently Chief Executive Officer for the Supreme Court of Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada.   Since 2000, she has been involved in Rule of Law and Court Reform projects in several countries including Russia, Ukraine, Vietnam, Albania, Jamaica, and Philippines. John Cipperly is a Senior Program Manager with the International Division of the National Center for State Courts.  John has more than 15 years of experience in the design and management of justice sector assistance programs for the U.S. Department of State, USAID, and other donors. He has developed or managed programs in Latin America, Africa, Europe, and Asia.  John is a native English speaker and fluent in Spanish. Janet Cornell court consultant with over 35 years of experiences with both general and limited jurisdiction courts.  Janet is a founding and contributing member to www.courtleader.net. She has a Masters in Public Administration from Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ, and is a Fellow of the Institute for Court Management along with certificates from the Leader Coach Institute, Scottsdale, AZ, and the Leadership Institute for Judicial Education.
31:17
June 14, 2021
NACM’s International Committee: Are You Ready for the Adventure?
NACM’s International Committee: Are You Ready for the Adventure?
Tuesday, May 18, 2021 Court Leader’s Advantage Podcast Episode International work can be challenging. It can also be very rewarding. No matter what, it is an adventure you will remember for the rest of your life. Have you thought about it? Wondered if it was for you? Where would you even go to get answers to your questions? This month we are talking to folks who have served as consultants on rule of law assignments in countries across the globe. From Russia, to Vietnam, to the Pacific Islands, these panelists have seen it all. Now you will hear their stories first-hand. This episode will give you a taste of international work. We will also tell you about NACM’s own forum for people involved in international work and for those wanting to get involved: The NACM International Committee. In addition, you will learn about the National Center for State Court’s International Division and the outstanding work it is doing around the globe. Today's Contributors Michele Oken is a past president of NACM and has chaired the International Committee for the past seven years. In March of 2020, she retired from the Los Angeles Superior Court where she worked as a manager and court administrator for approximately 19 years. Jeffrey Apperson is Vice President of the National Center for State Courts’ International Division.  Jeff works all over the world to help courts establish and improve judicial administration. He directs dozens of programs in 25 or so nations at any given time. He has had leadership roles in projects in Mongolia, Iraq, Brazil, Nigeria and Trinidad and Tobago, to name just a handful. He co-founded the International Association for Court Administration, Norman Meyer is a CourtLeader contributor with 38 years of experience as a trial court administrator in the U.S. federal and state courts.  Norman has experience working with many foreign judiciaries, especially in the Russian Federation, Serbia, Ukraine, Moldova, and Albania.  He received his M.S. in Judicial Administration from the University of Denver Sturm College of Law in 1979, and a B.A. in political science and Russian studies from the University of New Mexico, graduating in 1977. Pam Harris is the first woman State Court Administrator for the Maryland Court System. In 1989, she was appointed as the first woman to hold the Court Administrator position for the Circuit Court for Montgomery County, Maryland. Pamela has been active in various rule-of-law initiatives in Argentina, Brazil, Russia, Sri Lanka, India, China, and the Ukraine. Pamela Ryder-Lahey is a Court Management Consultant with 41 years’ experience and most recently Chief Executive Officer for the Supreme Court of Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada.   Since 2000, she has been involved in Rule of Law and Court Reform projects in several countries including Russia, Ukraine, Vietnam, Albania, Jamaica, and Philippines. John Cipperly is a Senior Program Manager with the International Division of the National Center for State Courts.  John has more than 15 years of experience in the design and management of justice sector assistance programs for the U.S. Department of State, USAID, and other donors. He has developed or managed programs in Latin America, Africa, Europe, and Asia.  John is a native English speaker and fluent in Spanish. Janet Cornell court consultant with over 35 years of experiences with both general and limited jurisdiction courts.  Janet is a founding and contributing member to www.courtleader.net. She has a Masters in Public Administration from Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ, and is a Fellow of the Institute for Court Management along with certificates from the Leader Coach Institute, Scottsdale, AZ, and the Leadership Institute for Judicial Education.
43:27
May 17, 2021
What Is the Key to Effective Communication? Let’s Hear from You!
What Is the Key to Effective Communication? Let’s Hear from You!
Tuesday, April 27, 2021 Court Leader’s Advantage Podcast Episode This week we are continuing our April 20th conversation with our panel on what is the key to effective communication, particularly during the pandemic. This week our panel covers topics including rumors and misinformation, the importance of “virtual water cooler” time, and the challenge of delivering unwelcome news. You will remember that we asked you viewers to send in your thoughts on what was the key to effective communication. We received some great ideas, so we asked several folks to give us their advice on what makes for effective communication during the pandemic. Today’s Contributors: These are folks who sent in advice on what is the key to effective communication: · LaShawn Thompson, Court Administrator for Oklahoma City Municipal Court · Joshua Larsen, Trial Court Supervisor, Dubuque, Iowa · Stacy Worby, Jury Coordinator for the Alaska Court System Today's Co-Host: Alyce Roberts with the Alaska Court System. Today's Panel: · Zenell Brown, Executive Court Administrator for the Third Circuit Court in Detroit, Michigan · Rick Pierce, Judicial Programs Administrator for the Pennsylvania Administrative Office of the Courts · T.J. BeMent, District Court Administrator for the 10th Judicial District in Athens, Georgia · Elizabeth “Liz” Rambo, Trial Court Administrator for the Lane County Circuit Court in Eugene, Oregon.
28:28
April 25, 2021
What is The Key to Effective Communication? Particularly During the Pandemic
What is The Key to Effective Communication? Particularly During the Pandemic
Tuesday, April 20, 2021 Court Leader’s Advantage Podcast Episode It seems that at some point in every class the facilitator utters those words, “communication is key.” We all know however, that communication must be effective to make a difference. So, what is the key to making communication effective? In this episode, we are going to explore communication. How to make it count. How to avoid wasting time for you and your employees. Specifically, we will look at: · How effective has court communication been during the pandemic? · Are there different approaches to effectively communicating with employees, with other justice stakeholders, and with the general public? · How can you obtain employee feedback in the age of Zoom meetings? · What can we learn from our panel of court administrators? About Our Presenters Our Co-Host Alyce Roberts is recently retired as the Special Projects Coordinator for the Alaska Court System. As a member of the court’s senior staff, she was the AOC’s primary liaison with the clerks of court. In this capacity, she was responsible for developing the annual statewide clerks of court conference program, facilitating the sessions and serving as a presenter.  Alyce served on the National Association for Court Management’s (NACM) Board of Directors, chaired NACM’s Communication Committee, and she is a Fellow of the Institute for Court Management (2010). Our Panelists Liz Rambo is the Trial Court Administrator (TCA) for Lane County Circuit Court. As the TCA for one of Oregon’s largest courts, Liz is responsible for all non-judicial court functions including budget, human resources, technology, facilities, and business efficiency.  Liz Liz graduated with high scholarship from Oregon State University with a BA in history and has an MBA from Portland State University. Rick Pierce is the Judicial Programs Administrator of the Judicial District Operations and Programs Department, has served in the field of court administration for the past twenty-nine years.  Prior to his appointment at the Administrative Office of Pennsylvania Courts, Rick was the district court administrator for Cumberland County.  He graduated from Washington and Lee University and received his Masters in Public Administration from Shippensburg University in 1995. Tracy "T.J." BeMent is the District Court Administrator for the 10th Judicial Administrative District of Georgia. The 10th JAD covers the general jurisdiction superior courts in six circuits in 21 counties.  He was previously the Court Administrator for the Athens-Clarke County Courts in Athens, Georgia, where he worked with all six levels of trial courts in the county.  J.T. received his undergraduate and graduate degrees from the George Washington University in Washington, DC, and completed his ICM Fellowship in spring 2015. As a Court Administrator, Zenell Brown has garnered respect for her ethical leadership and innovation. She has built her approach on three pillars: communication, leadership responsibility and accountability, and diversity and inclusion.  Zenell received her Juris Doctor from Wayne State University Law School; she received her Public Service Administration Graduate Certificate from Central Michigan University, her Court Administration Certificate from Michigan State University, and her Certified Diversity Professional from the National Diversity Council-DiversityFirst.
28:50
April 19, 2021
What You Need to Know About Juvenile Detention and Placement Decision-Making and COVID
What You Need to Know About Juvenile Detention and Placement Decision-Making and COVID
Tuesday, March 16, 2021, Court Leader’s Advantage Podcast Episode The Coronavirus has created a crisis in America’s jails and prisons. Many of these facilities have become COVID hotspots. Although sometimes overlooked, the pandemic also poses an enormous risk for juveniles who are detained. It is surprising to learn that, according to the Annie E. Casey Foundation, there were actually more young people in detention in December of last year than in April when the pandemic was new. And a greater proportion of those young people were Black and Latino. To investigate this alarming situation, Drexel University and the National Council of Juvenile and Family Court Judges have come together in a new project to 1) research juvenile risk assessment, risk reduction, and judicial decision-making during the pandemic; 2) develop a research-based plan to safely lower the numbers of young people confined in juvenile facilities; and 3) use that plan to motivate decision-makers to safely reduce the number of confinements, and therefore help manage the virus. · How can we benefit from the research these experts are conducting on judicial detention and placement decisions in the time of COVID? · How will this project change juvenile justice both during and after COVID? · What lessons have we learned and what advice do we have to share? About Our Panelists: The Honorable Gayl Branum Carr is a Judge on the Fairfax Juvenile and Domestic Relations District Court in Fairfax County, Virginia. She was appointed to the bench in 1994.  She received her Juris Doctor from the University of Richmond School of Law in 1987 and her Bachelor of Social Work from Virginia Commonwealth University in 1984.  She is a Board Member of the National Council of Juvenile and Family Court Judges.  Prior to her appointment to the bench, Judge Carr served as Fairfax County Assistant County Attorney where she was responsible for prosecuting civil cases involving child dependency matters.  She previously served as President of the Virginia Council of Juvenile and Domestic Relations District Court Judges and Secretary, National Association of Women Judges District 4 among other leadership positions she holds in the community. Dr. Naomi Goldstein is a Professor of Psychology and Co-Director of the Law and Psychology Program at Drexel University in Philadelphia.  Dr. Goldstein collaborates with community stakeholders to use social science research to improve juvenile justice policy and practice. Her work centers on the role of adolescent development in legal settings, and the development, implementation, and evaluation of best practices in juvenile justice contexts.  She currently focuses on cross-systems work to dismantle the school-to-prison pipeline, reform juvenile probation systems, and reduce racial and ethnic disparities within the justice system. Bob Bermingham is Director of the Court Services Unit at the Fairfax County Juvenile and Domestic Relations District Court.  He began his career in juvenile justice in 1986 as child care specialist in the Fairfax County Juvenile Detention Center. During the past 30 plus years Bob has served in many different capacities within the juvenile justice system in Fairfax County.  During his tenure Bob has held management positions with probation services, served as the County’s first Gang Prevention Coordinator, and since 2009 has served as the Court Service Unit Director of the Commonwealth of Virginia’s largest Court Service Unit.
42:27
March 15, 2021
Telework: Is There A Secret to Effective Management?
Telework: Is There A Secret to Effective Management?
Thursday, February 18, 2021, Court Leader’s Advantage Podcast Episode Back in October of 2019, for most courts, working remotely from home was a privilege granted to a small number of court employees. It seemed to be granted mostly to Court Technology workers and Executive Office staff who were working on some major project. Who would have thought that just six months later, courts across the country would be engaged in promoting telework to many if not most of their employees? This has been a profound cultural shift that is almost unheard of in court administration. We now have close to a year’s experience with allowing telework on a widespread basis. · What has been the experience of court administrators and clerks of court with telework? · What productivity improvements have we seen? · What are the obstacles that we have encountered and how have we steered around them? · What lessons have we learned and what advice do we have to share? We are talking with court administrators from around the country about the effect teleworking has had on the courts including the technological, cultural, and operational aspects of this dramatic shift in how court work gets done. About Our Co-Host Panelists  Co-Host Alyce Roberts is the Special Projects Coordinator for the Alaska Court System.  Alyce is a 2010 Fellow of the Institute for Court Management. Sam Hamrick is the Court Executive Officer for the Superior Court in Riverside, California.  Sam received his Bachelor's degree from the University of North Carolina, his Master's in Public Administration from the Western Carolina University, his Juris Doctor from Campbell University School of Law.  Terri March is the Court Administrator for the Justice Court in North Las Vegas, Nevada.  Terri received a Bachelor's Degree and a Master's Degree in Business Administration from the University of Nevada, Las Vegas.  She is a Fellow of the Institute for Court Management (ICM) and is a certified ICM faculty; she received a Master of Arts in Security Studies from the Naval Postgraduate School in Monterey, California.   Courtney Whiteside is the Director of the Municipal Court in St. Louis, Missouri.  Previously, Courtney was a court clerk in St. Charles, Missouri, and then as the state’s municipal division courts monitor with the Office of State Courts Administrator and Missouri Supreme Court.  Debbie Spradley is the Trial Court Administrator with the Clackamas County Circuit Court in Oregon City, Oregon.  Debbie received her Bachelor of Science degree in Business Administration from the California State University, San Marcos.
40:45
February 17, 2021
Local Courts: Their Complex Issues and How Are They Solving Them?
Local Courts: Their Complex Issues and How Are They Solving Them?
Thursday, January 28, 2021, Court Leader’s Advantage Podcast Bonus Episode Welcome to a bonus episode on how local courts are facing and solving their many complex issues. As mentioned in last week’s episode, these local suburban and rural jurisdictions are very often the representative of the judicial branch in much of America. We are continuing our conversation with clerks of court and court administrators from one and two judge courts around the country. We are chatting about the current issues facing local courts including automated case management systems, teleconferencing, telework, and training in smaller jurisdictions. How are these courts managing those issues, and what advice they have for the rest of us? About Our Speaker Panelists Angie Van Schoick is the Court Administrator for the Municipal Court in the Town of Breckenridge, Colorado.  It is a position she has held since 2013.  Angie is a licensed macro level social worker in the State of Colorado and Michigan, receiving her MSW from the University of Michigan in 2007. Saundra Berry is the Clerk of Court for the Municipal Court in Cleveland Heights, Ohio.  Saundra earned a master’s degree in business administration from Atlanta University and a bachelor of science degree in mathematics from Central State University. Kelly S. Elliott is the Court Administrator for the Municipal Court in Lee’s Summit, Missouri.  Kelly has more than 39 years of experience in the court and legal field.  Kelly completed her Certified Court Administrator certificate in 2015 and received her Advanced Certified Court Administrator in 2019 through the Missouri Association for Court Administration. Lindsey Forshee is the Superior Court Administrator for the Tifton Judicial Circuit in Georgia.  Lindsey graduated from the University of Mississippi with a Bachelor of Science degree in Hospitality Management in May 2018. Danielle Trujillo is the Court Administrator for the Municipal Court in Littleton, Colorado.  Danielle is an innovative public safety professional with an exceptional ability to research and analyze complex issues and provide actionable conclusions.  Through problem solving and critical thinking she utilizes a multidisciplinary approach to bridge gaps in information and processes.   DanielIe started her career in restorative justice and love the ability to directly serve my community through local government.
15:52
January 27, 2021
Local Courts: Their Complex Issues And How Are They Solving Them?
Local Courts: Their Complex Issues And How Are They Solving Them?
Court Leader’s Advantage Podcast: January 2021 Episode When we talk about the challenges confronting America’s judicial branch, we often focus on the concerns and accomplishments of large metropolitan courts. After all, they are often the ones that have more money and more resources to throw at a problem.  However, a survey conducted several years ago, revealed that almost 65% of all courts in the United States had benches of fewer than four judges. In a large portion of our country, these local suburban and often rural jurisdictions, these local courts are the representative of the judicial branch.  How are these local courts solving their problems? How are they coping with the issues of the day with less staff, less money, often shared facilities, and frequently government entities that are somewhat less respectful of the court as being a separate branch of government? This month we have invited clerks of court and court administrators of one and two judge courts around the country to chat about their current issues, about how they are managing those issues, and what advice they have for the rest of us. About Our Speaker Panelists Angie Van Schoick is the Court Administrator for the Municipal Court in the Town of Breckenridge, Colorado.  It is a position she has held since 2013.  Angie is a licensed macro level social worker in the State of Colorado and Michigan, receiving her MSW from the University of Michigan in 2007. Saundra Berry is the Clerk of Court for the Municipal Court in Cleveland Heights, Ohio.  Saundra earned a master’s degree in business administration from Atlanta University and a bachelor of science degree in mathematics from Central State University. Kelly S. Elliott is the Court Administrator for the Municipal Court in Lee’s Summit, Missouri.  Kelly has more than 39 years of experience in the court and legal field.  Kelly completed her Certified Court Administrator certificate in 2015 and received her Advanced Certified Court Administrator in 2019 through the Missouri Association for Court Administration. Lindsey Forshee is the Superior Court Administrator for the Tifton Judicial Circuit in Georgia.  Lindsey graduated from the University of Mississippi with a Bachelor of Science degree in Hospitality Management in May 2018. Danielle Trujillo is the Court Administrator for the Municipal Court in Littleton, Colorado.  Danielle is an innovative public safety professional with an exceptional ability to research and analyze complex issues and provide actionable conclusions.  Through problem solving and critical thinking she utilizes a multidisciplinary approach to bridge gaps in information and processes.   DanielIe started her career in restorative justice and love the ability to directly serve my community through local government.
33:09
January 20, 2021
The Courts and COVID: What's Been the Global Response?
The Courts and COVID: What's Been the Global Response?
IACA’s Global Conversation Podcast, Thursday, December 31, 2020 Brought to You By the: International Association for Court Administration The Coronavirus pandemic has been a scourge across the globe. It has also been one of the longest lasting and most widespread crises in recent times. It has affected every component of government in every nation that has had to deal with COVID-19. How have court systems in different countries coped with the pandemic?  This podcast asks court leaders from around the world about issues important to the administration of justice. This episode will explore how courts around the globe have responded to the Coronavirus. About the Co-Hosts: Janet Cornell has over 35 years in court leadership including service in general and limited jurisdiction courts. She is a founding and contributing member to www.courtleader.net. She has a Masters in Public Administration from Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ, and is a Fellow of the National Center for State Courts, Institute for Court Management in Williamsburg, VA, along with certificates from the Leader Coach Institute, Scottsdale, AZ, and the Leadership Institute for Judicial Education, Memphis, TN. Peter C. Kiefer has served for over 40 years working with trial courts in Oregon, Arizona, and California.  He has consulted with the judicial systems in Liberia, Moldova, and Beirut, Lebanon, as well as being a member of a NACM delegation to visit the People’s Republic of China.  Peter graduated from Santa Clara University with his bachelor’s degree in Political Science, received his Master’s of Public Administration with a specialty in Court Administration from the University of Southern California, and is a Fellow of the Institute for Court Management.  About the Panelists: Judge Belen G. Salespara-Carasig is the Presiding Judge of the Regional Trial Court Branch 296, Paranaque City. She is an alumna of the University of Santo Tomas Facultad de Derecho Civil. Upon her graduation in 2004, she took the Bar Examinations where she garnered a general weighted average of 80.55%.  Upon her assumption into office, her Court was designated as a Special Election Court for Barangay and Sangguniang Kabataan Election Cases in addition to her regular case load as a MeTC Court. On top of that, her Court was also among the pilot courts for the Speedy and Continuous Trial under AM 15-06-10 SC.  Judge Sidney H. Stein has been a United States District Judge for the Southern District of New York by appointment of the President of the United States since 1995. He received an A.B. degree from Princeton University and a J.D. degree from Yale Law School. Following his graduation, he was a clerk to the Chief Judge of the State of New York and Chief Judge of the New York Court of Appeals. Judge Stein was a partner in a litigation firm he founded from 1981 until his induction as a United States District Judge in 1995. Noora Aarnio is the Senior Specialist, International Affairs, Department of Development for the National Courts Administration, in Vantaa, Finland. Ali Shamis Al Madhani is Judge of the Dubai International Financial Center Courts (DIFC), and in April 2008 he was sworn in as a Judge of the DIFC Courts Court of Appeal. He was later appointed as a member of the Joint Committee of the Dubai Courts. H.E. Judge Ali is currently a Senior Judge of Court of Appeal and Head of International Relations of Judicial Affairs.  Judge Al Madhani began his judicial career in 1994 until 1998 as a Public Prosecutor for Dubai Public Prosecution. In 1998, he was appointed by the Ruler of Dubai to serve as a Judge in the Dubai Courts.  
41:40
December 29, 2020
Wildfires, Protests, and COVID: How Have Courts Coped with Compounding Crises? Part Two
Wildfires, Protests, and COVID: How Have Courts Coped with Compounding Crises? Part Two
Thursday, December 17, 2020, Court Leader's Advantage Podcast Episode Part two of a conversation with our panel of court administrators whose courts have endured multiple concurrent crises. They had to deal with questions of allowing protestors into the courthouse because it is a public building while worrying about vandalism. They struggled to maintain a semblance of an operation with courthouses that were closed for months at a time. They had to keep air circulation open to eliminate the Coronavirus yet close the vents to prevent breathing in wildfire smoke. We have so much to learn from their solutions they crafted. What did they and their courts have to go through? How are they modifying their future contingency plans? What can we learn from what they have had to endure? About My Co-Host: Alyce Roberts is recently retired as Special Projects Coordinator for the Alaska Court System.  Alyce is a 2010 Fellow of the Institute for Court Management. About Our Speaker Panelists: Our panel includes administrators whose courts have been at the heart of ongoing and devastating crises: months-long protests, wildfires, and the Coronavirus: Barbara Marcille is the Trial Court Administrator in the Circuit Court for the 4th Judicial District in Portland, Oregon.  She has served in a variety of roles for the courts in Oregon, New Mexico, and North Carolina, and holds a degree in Business from Florida State University. Michael Roddy is the Court Executive Officer for the Superior Court in San Diego County, California.  Mike served as the California Administrative Office of the Courts’ Regional Administrative, Director for the Northern/Central Region, Executive Officer of the Sacramento Superior Court, and Assistant Executive Officer of the Superior Court of San Diego County, Elizabeth Baldwin is the Court Administrator for the Municipal Court in Seattle, Washington.  Before moving to Seattle, Beth worked as the Court Administrator of the Fifth Judicial District of Iowa. Beth holds her law degree from the University of Minnesota, her MPA from the Ohio State University and her undergraduate degree from Northwestern University. Bob Fleshman is the Court Executive Officer for the Superior Court in Napa County, California.  Bob has thirty years of public administration experience, which includes two decades in judicial administration in the California trial court system and Judicial Council of California. In addition to nearly two decades with the California judiciary, Bob spent a decade in public service at the national level in disaster recovery as well as uniformed military service. Elizabeth Rambo is the Trial Court Administrator for the Lane County Circuit Court in Eugene, Oregon.  Liz graduated with high scholarship from Oregon State University with a BA in history and has an MBA from Portland State University.  She is a long-time member of the National Association of Court Management and holds a Court Manager certification from the National Center for State Courts· Barbara Marcille is the Trial Court Administrator in the Circuit Court for the 4th Judicial District in Portland, Oregon
35:22
December 16, 2020
Wildfires, Protests, and COVID: How Have Courts Coped with Compounding Crises? Part One
Wildfires, Protests, and COVID: How Have Courts Coped with Compounding Crises? Part One
Thursday, November 19, 2020, Podcast Episode Unbelievably, the expression “we are living in unprecedented times” has become a cliché. Since early 2020, so much has happened to us, so quickly, and with so little warning that the only response anyone seems to have is “Well, now what?” Still, because so many extraordinary events have occurred this year, 2020 has much to teach us. We are talking with court administrators whose courts have endured nightly violent demonstrations that have lasted for months, wildfires that have turned day to night and made the air unbreathable and, of course, the Coronavirus. This is part one of two episodes where our panel shares the lessons they have  experienced first-hand. What can we learn from the experiences of these courageous court administrators, their staffs, and their courts? How will they update their Continuity of Operations Plans? What advice do they have for the rest of us? About My Co-Host: Alyce Roberts is recently retired as Special Projects Coordinator for the Alaska Court System.  Alyce is a 2010 Fellow of the Institute for Court Management. About the Speaker Panel: Barbara Marcille is the Trial Court Administrator in the Circuit Court for the 4th Judicial District in Portland, Oregon.  She has served in a variety of roles for the courts in Oregon, New Mexico, and North Carolina, and holds a degree in Business from Florida State University. Michael Roddy is the Court Executive Officer for the Superior Court in San Diego County, California.  Mike served as the California Administrative Office of the Courts’ Regional Administrative, Director for the Northern/Central Region, Executive Officer of the Sacramento Superior Court, and Assistant Executive Officer of the Superior Court of San Diego County, Elizabeth Baldwin is the Court Administrator for the Municipal Court in Seattle, Washington.  Before moving to Seattle, Beth worked as the Court Administrator of the Fifth Judicial District of Iowa. Beth holds her law degree from the University of Minnesota, her MPA from the Ohio State University and her undergraduate degree from Northwestern University. Bob Fleshman is the Court Executive Officer for the Superior Court in Napa County, California.  Bob has thirty years of public administration experience, which includes two decades in judicial administration in the California trial court system and Judicial Council of California. In addition to nearly two decades with the California judiciary, Bob spent a decade in public service at the national level in disaster recovery as well as uniformed military service. Elizabeth Rambo is the Trial Court Administrator for the Lane County Circuit Court in Eugene, Oregon.  Liz graduated with high scholarship from Oregon State University with a BA in history and has an MBA from Portland State University.  She is a long-time member of the National Association of Court Management and holds a Court Manager certification from the National Center for State Courts
33:44
November 23, 2020
Court Professionals and Protests: What Should You Be Thinking About Now? Bonus Episode from the July 2020 Podcast
Court Professionals and Protests: What Should You Be Thinking About Now? Bonus Episode from the July 2020 Podcast
Our July Court Leader’s Advantage video podcast episode on courts and protest marches has garnered considerable interest. Over 300 viewers have accessed the episode. Among those who watched the episode was Norman Meyer, Retired Clerk of the U.S. Bankruptcy Court for the District of New Mexico, who wrote in two questions to ask about court employees, protest marches, our first amendment rights, and the NACM Model Code of Conduct. Norman joins the episode to ask his two questions. About the Guest Speaker: Norman Meyer retired after serving for 38 years as a court administrator in both the state and Federal systems. Most recently, he was Clerk of the United States Bankruptcy Court for the District of New Mexico.  He is a court administration expert after a 38 year career as a trial court administrator in the state and federal U.S. courts.  He has written and spoken widely on judicial administration in the United States and abroad,  and is currently writing a court management blog (https://courtleader.net/vantage-point) as a member of the nonprofit Court Leader coalition. Elisa Chinn-Gary, is Clerk of Superior Court and Judge of Probate for Mecklenburg County, North Carolina.  She obtained her B.A. from Winston Salem State University (magna cum laude) 1996; J.D. UNC School of Law 1999; M.A. in Social Work UNC 2000.  Elisa was an Attorney Advocate for North Carolina's Guardian Ad Litem program from 1999 to 2002; Juvenile Defender for the  Council for Children’s Rights (formerly Children’s Law Center) from 2000 to 2001; Administrator of the Mecklenburg Family Court from 2001 to 2015; and Adjunct Professor for the Charlotte School of Law from 2010 to 2015. Sarah Brown-Clark is a 1971 cum laude graduate of Ohio University with a B.S. degree in English; she also earned her M.A. degree in English from Ohio University in 1972 and earned hours towards a Ph.D. in English from Kent State University. Currently Ms. Brown-Clark is the Clerk of the Youngstown Municipal Court, a position to which she was elected in November 1999. She is retired from Youngstown State University where she was an Associate Professor of English since 1972 and currently has Faculty Emeritus status. Beth Baldwin has served as the Court Administrator for the Seattle Municipal Court since November, 2015. Before moving to Seattle, Beth worked for 15 years as the Court Administrator of the Fifth Judicial District of Iowa, a 16 county area including Polk County/Des Moines. Beth holds her law degree from the University of Minnesota, her MPA from the Ohio State University and her undergraduate degree from Northwestern University. 
16:28
November 17, 2020
Diversity and Inclusion: Why Is It Even More Important Now? Part Two
Diversity and Inclusion: Why Is It Even More Important Now? Part Two
For decades we court professionals have committed ourselves to the practice diversity and inclusion. We make this commitment to earn the public’s trust and confidence in our nation’s courts. This dedication is ongoing; the work still continues. The goals of diversity and inclusion affirm our pledge to fairness, equity, impartiality, trust, and accountability. They also enhance decision-making, innovation, resiliency, responsiveness, employee engagement, and the delivery of services. Courts are constantly confronted by the demand for more access, the desire for equality, and the erosion of that very public trust and confidence we have pledged to earn. What can we do to strengthen our core values? What can we do to use diversity and inclusion as a way to solve today’s problems? What do we see on the horizon for courts as they struggle to address these issues every day? About the Co-Host: Zenell Brown Zenell Brown, Executive Court Administrator for the Third Circuit Court in Detroit, Michigan.  She received her Juris Doctor from Wayne State University Law School; received a Public Service Administration Graduate Certificate from Central Michigan University; a Court Administration Certificate from Michigan State University; and is a Certified Diversity Professional from the National Diversity Council-DiversityFirst. About the Panelists: Marcia M. Anderson recently retired as Clerk of the United States Bankruptcy Court for the Western District of Wisconsin.  She was employed for over 28 years with the United States Courts, serving an Operations Manager and later as the Supervisory Staff Attorney for the Second Circuit Court of Appeals in New York City. Hector Gonzalez is the Court Executive Officer for the Superior Court in Tuolumne County, California.  He was born and raised in Los Angeles. He is bilingual, speaking both Spanish and English. Hector received a certificate in Judicial Administration from Cal State, Sacramento. He has a law degree from University of California-Hasting College of the Law and a BA from Loyola Marymount University. Norman Meyer retired after serving for 38 years as a court administrator in both the state and Federal systems. Most recently, he was Clerk of the United States Bankruptcy Court for the District of New Mexico.  He is a court administration expert after a 38 year career as a trial court administrator in the state and federal U.S. courts.  He has written and spoken widely on judicial administration in the United States and abroad,  and is currently writing a court management blog (https://courtleader.net/vantage-point) as a member of the nonprofit Court Leader coalition. Jose Octavio Guillen retired in 2017 after working for 42 years in the California Justice System. He served as court executive officer and Jury Commissioner for the Superior Courts in Sonoma, Napa, Riverside, and Imperial Counties, as well as, served as court administrator for Beverly Hills Municipal Court, district chief for Los Angeles Superior Court, trial court services director for the California Administrative Office of the Courts, and deputy sheriff for Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department.
46:12
October 15, 2020
Diversity and Inclusion: Why Is It Even More Important Now? Part One
Diversity and Inclusion: Why Is It Even More Important Now? Part One
Over the last forty years, our nation’s courts have been committed to diversity and inclusion, in order to live up to the ideals of fairness and equality, and to build public trust and confidence. While we can point to many improvements, there is still much work to be done. The lessons learned from diversity and inclusion practices point to benefits beyond just furthering the institutional values of fairness, equity, impartiality, trust, and accountability. They also improve decision-making, innovation, resiliency, responsiveness, employee engagement, and delivery of services. Institutions like courts today are challenged by the spread of global pandemics, the demand for more access, the desire for more equitable outcomes, and the erosion of public trust and confidence in government. Diversity and inclusion should be at the forefront to harness new solutions and to turn challenges into opportunities. What can we do to strengthen our institutional values and apply concrete diversity and inclusion practices to the problems we face today? What advice do we have for court administrators and clerks of court around the country dealing with these issues on a daily basis? About the Co-Host: Zenell Brown Zenell Brown, Executive Court Administrator for the Third Circuit Court in Detroit, Michigan.  She received her Juris Doctor from Wayne State University Law School; received a Public Service Administration Graduate Certificate from Central Michigan University; a Court Administration Certificate from Michigan State University; and is a Certified Diversity Professional from the National Diversity Council-DiversityFirst. About the Panelists: Marcia M. Anderson recently retired as Clerk of the United States Bankruptcy Court for the Western District of Wisconsin.  She was employed for over 28 years with the United States Courts, serving an Operations Manager and later as the Supervisory Staff Attorney for the Second Circuit Court of Appeals in New York City. Hector Gonzalez is the Court Executive Officer for the Superior Court in Tuolumne County, California.  He was born and raised in Los Angeles. He is bilingual, speaking both Spanish and English. Hector received a certificate in Judicial Administration from Cal State, Sacramento. He has a law degree from University of California-Hasting College of the Law and a BA from Loyola Marymount University.  Norman Meyer retired after serving for 38 years as a court administrator in both the state and Federal systems. Most recently, he was Clerk of the United States Bankruptcy Court for the District of New Mexico.  He is a court administration expert after a 38 year career as a trial court administrator in the state and federal U.S. courts.  He has written and spoken widely on judicial administration in the United States and abroad,  and is currently writing a court management blog (https://courtleader.net/vantage-point) as a member of the nonprofit Court Leader coalition. Jose Octavio Guillen retired in 2017 after working for 42 years in the California Justice System. He served as court executive officer and Jury Commissioner for the Superior Courts in Sonoma, Napa, Riverside, and Imperial Counties, as well as, served as court administrator for Beverly Hills Municipal Court, district chief for Los Angeles Superior Court, trial court services director for the California Administrative Office of the Courts, and deputy sheriff for Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department.
40:27
September 17, 2020
The Coronavirus: How are Courts Coping with the Crisis? Thursday, June 25, 2020 Episode:
The Coronavirus: How are Courts Coping with the Crisis? Thursday, June 25, 2020 Episode:
COOPs and the Coronavirus: The Lessons May Surprise You Courts are now in the midst of reopening, yet the Coronavirus is still very much with us. Right now, the United States has had over 2.3 million confirmed cases with over 26,000 new cases reported just yesterday. We have experienced 121,000 deaths from the virus and new projections predict that we will top 200,000 by the fall. In over a third of the country, the infection rate is actually increasing. This alone makes this crisis different from any courts have ever faced before. If it were a hurricane, a tornado, or an earthquake, within a few hours to a few days, it would be over; efforts would turn to clean up and repair. We still cannot do that yet, even though the country is working hard to return to normal. Nevertheless, this seems like a good time to look back and take stock of what we have learned so far from the crisis, and what we would change in our Continuity of Operations Plans (COOP). This week the panel discusses the need for long-term COOP recovery plans; necessary pandemic based legal changes in family court law, protection orders, child custody, domestic violence, and speedy trial requirements; the reality of having no physical location in which to hold court for months; improving emergency communications systems; improving teleworking protocols; identifying court functions that can be permanently performed at home; the radically different design of future courthouses; and changing sick leave requirements from “if sick – stay home,” to “if might be sick – stay home to protect others.” This Week's Panelists Zenell Brown has garnered respect both as Executive Court Administrator for the Third Circuit Court in Detroit, Michigan, and for her ethical leadership and innovation.  Zenell has a Juris Doctor from Wayne State University Law School, a Public Service Administration Graduate Certificate from Central Michigan University, and  a Court Administration Certificate from Michigan State University. Dorothy Howell is the Division Manager with Probation for the Superior Court in East Orange, New Jersey, which is part of Newark. Dorothy has a bachelor's degree from Rutgers University and is a Certified Court Executive from the National Center for State Courts. Richard J. "Rick" Pierce is the Judicial Programs Administrator of the Judicial District Operations and Programs Department, at the Pennsylvania Administrative Office of the Courts.  He graduated from Washington and Lee University, and received his Masters in Public Administration from Shippensburg University. Angela S. "Angie" VanSchoick is the Court Administrator with the Town of Breckenridge Municipal Court.   She received her MSW from the University of Michigan in 2007.   She also assist the Court and with the Colorado Association for Municipal Court Administration. Elizabeth "Liz" Rambo is the Trial Court Administrator for Lane County Circuit Court in Eugene, Oregon.  She graduated with high scholarship from Oregon State University with a BA in history and has an MBA from Portland State University. Michael Roddy is the Executive Officer of the Superior Court of San Diego County.  Prior to his current position he served as the California Administrative Office of the Courts’Regional Administrative Director for the Northern/Central Region, and was Executive Officer of the Sacramento Superior Court. Mark A. Weinberg is the Court Administrator for the Seventh Judicial Circuit in Daytona Beach, Florida.  He holds a bachelor's degree in public administration from James Madison University and a master's degree in judicial administration from the University of Denver.
41:05
June 24, 2020
The Coronavirus: How are Courts Coping with the Crisis? Thursday, June 18, 2020 Episode:
The Coronavirus: How are Courts Coping with the Crisis? Thursday, June 18, 2020 Episode:
Your Court Restarting Trials? Here’s What Works As courts are reopening, many have already held their first trials. Others are planning to start trials in the next month or two. Whether they are conducted in-courtroom, or via video conference-calls, trials are going to look different for some time into the future. What will change for those coming to the courthouse? What will a trial on a video conference-call look like? To help manage this process, The Federal Judiciary just released a report on June 4 titled, “Conducting Jury Trials and Convening Grand Juries During the Pandemic.” The panel discusses the experience of courts that have already held some trials; others courts that are starting up pilot programs in their states; the dramatic increase in the space needs for jury trials (it is currently taking three courtrooms to hold a single trial); supplemental jury questionnaires specifically addressing jurors and the Coronavirus; masks, goggles, and gloves, disinfecting routines; videos describing what courts are doing to keep jurors safe, and even the possibility of video conferencing the voir dire. This Week's Panelists Zenell Brown has garnered respect both as Executive Court Administrator for the Third Circuit Court in Detroit, Michigan, and for her ethical leadership and innovation.  Zenell has a Juris Doctor from Wayne State University Law School, a Public Service Administration Graduate Certificate from Central Michigan University, and  a Court Administration Certificate from Michigan State University. Richard J. "Rick" Pierce is the Judicial Programs Administrator of the Judicial District Operations and Programs Department, at the Pennsylvania Administrative Office of the Courts.  Prior to his current position, he was the district court administrator for Cumberland County.  He graduated from Washington and Lee University, and received his Masters in Public Administration from Shippensburg University. Angela S. "Angie" VanSchoick is the Court Administrator with the Town of Breckenridge Municipal Court.   She received her MSW from the University of Michigan in 2007.   She also assist the Court and with the Colorado Association for Municipal Court Administration. Elizabeth "Liz" Rambo is the Trial Court Administrator for Lane County Circuit Court in Eugene, Oregon.  She graduated with high scholarship from Oregon State University with a BA in history and has an MBA from Portland State University. Mark A. Weinberg is the Court Administrator for the Seventh Judicial Circuit in Daytona Beach, Florida.  Prior to his current position, he was an administrator with the court in Maricopa County, Arizona.  He holds a bachelor's degree in public administration from James Madison University and a master's degree in judicial administration from the University of Denver. Leave a comment at CLAPodcast@nacmnet.org
28:51
June 17, 2020
The Coronavirus: How are Courts Coping with the Crisis? Thursday, June 11, 2020 Episode
The Coronavirus: How are Courts Coping with the Crisis? Thursday, June 11, 2020 Episode
Budget Strategies: What Have We Learned from the Lockdown? About three weeks ago, May 14, 2020, the financial crisis was looming, but the details were still vague. Since then several courts have been forced to begin budget cuts that have included layoffs and furloughs. Yet even now all we can say about the national situation is, it remains fluid. Dread over the upcoming economic statistics turned to excitement on Friday, June 5th as the unemployment numbers were better than expected. Still, unemployment remains well above the highest numbers seen during the 2008 recession. What do we know now after several weeks have gone by? Have courts adapted their plans to the changing economic situation? This week panelists are asked a question by listener Jeff Barlow on the difference between the “thin the soup” and the “ration the soup” strategies for court budget reductions. The panel also talks about how to manage through layoffs and employee furloughs; charging for establishing time payment schedules; extending those schedules out to help defendants through the recession; coping with an expected increase in default judgments, landlord-tenant disputes, and home foreclosures; finally panelists predict what the next 12 months will hold for the courts. This Week's Panelists: Zenell Brown has garnered respect both as Executive Court Administrator for the Third Circuit Court in Detroit, Michigan, and for her ethical leadership and innovation.  Zenell has a Juris Doctor from Wayne State University Law School, a Public Service Administration Graduate Certificate from Central Michigan University, and  a Court Administration Certificate from Michigan State University. Richard J. "Rick" Pierce is the Judicial Programs Administrator of the Judicial District Operations and Programs Department, at the Pennsylvania Administrative Office of the Courts.  Prior to his current position, he was the district court administrator for Cumberland County.  He graduated from Washington and Lee University, and received his Masters in Public Administration from Shippensburg University. Angela S. "Angie" VanSchoick is the Court Administrator with the Town of Breckenridge Municipal Court.   She received her MSW from the University of Michigan in 2007.   She also assist the Court and with the Colorado Association for Municipal Court Administration. Elizabeth "Liz" Rambo is the Trial Court Administrator for Lane County Circuit Court in Eugene, Oregon.  She graduated with high scholarship from Oregon State University with a BA in history and has an MBA from Portland State University. Chris Gaddis has been the Court Administrator for the Superior Court of Washington for Pierce County for 4 years. Prior to working for the court, he served in law enforcement. He is a member of the Washington State Jury Diversity Task Force and the Washington State Supreme Court Minority and Justice Commission Public Trust and Confidence Committee. Michael Roddy is the Executive Officer of the Superior Court of San Diego County.  Prior to his current position he served as the California Administrative Office of the Courts’Regional Administrative Director for the Northern/Central Region, and was Executive Officer of the Sacramento Superior Court. Mark A. Weinberg is the Court Administrator for the Seventh Judicial Circuit in Daytona Beach, Florida.  Prior to his current position, he was an administrator with the court in Maricopa County, Arizona.  He holds a bachelor's degree in public administration from James Madison University and a master's degree in judicial administration from the University of Denver. Leave a comment at CLAPodcast@nacmnet.org
36:35
June 10, 2020
The Coronavirus: How are Courts Coping with the Crisis? Thursday, June 4, 2020 Episode:
The Coronavirus: How are Courts Coping with the Crisis? Thursday, June 4, 2020 Episode:
Courts and Protest! also Virtual Hearings: What Have We Learned After Three Months? The events that have transpired since late February of this year defy classification. · A pandemic the likes of which this country has not seen since the 1918 Spanish flu · Unemployment numbers that rival the 1929 Great Depression · Now protests and riots in dozens of American cities sparked by the killing of an unarmed African-American man in Minneapolis. Protests and the Courts This episode was to focus on virtual hearings, and we will still discuss this topic, yet it is vital that we acknowledge the events of the last week during this episode. Virtual Hearings Most courts now have experienced about three months using virtual hearings on an extensive scale. This is a good time to explore some of the everyday topics that concern expanding the use of this innovation. The panel discusses public access to virtual hearings, security, ease of use, handling private attorney-client sidebars, making the record, and situations where one party physically shows up for a hearing while the other party is virtual. Guest Speakers: Richard J. "Rick" Pierce is the Judicial Programs Administrator of the Judicial District Operations and Programs Department, at the Pennsylvania Administrative Office of the Courts.  Prior to his current position, he was the district court administrator for Cumberland County.  He graduated from Washington and Lee University, and received his Masters in Public Administration from Shippensburg University. Elizabeth "Liz" Rambo is the Trial Court Administrator for Lane County Circuit Court in Eugene, Oregon.  She graduated with high scholarship from Oregon State University with a BA in history and has an MBA from Portland State University. Chris Gaddis has been the Court Administrator for the Superior Court of Washington for Pierce County for 4 years. Prior to working for the court, he served 20 years in law enforcement with the last four years as Chief of Police. Mr. Gaddis is the current President of the Association of Washington Superior Court Administrators. He is also a member of the Washington State Jury Diversity Task Force and the Washington State Supreme Court Minority and Justice Commission Public Trust and Confidence Committee. Michael Roddy is the Executive Officer of the Superior Court of San Diego County.  Prior to his current position he served as the California Administrative Office of the Courts’Regional Administrative Director for the Northern/Central Region, and was Executive Officer of the Sacramento Superior Court. Mark A. Weinberg is the Court Administrator for the Seventh Judicial Circuit in Daytona Beach, Florida.  Prior to his current position, he was an administrator with the court in Maricopa County, Arizona.  He holds a bachelor's degree in public administration from James Madison University and a master's degree in judicial administration from the University of Denver. Leave a question or comment about the episode at clapodcast@nacmnet.org.
29:37
June 03, 2020
The Coronavirus: How are Courts Coping with the Crisis? Thursday, May 28, 2020 Episode:
The Coronavirus: How are Courts Coping with the Crisis? Thursday, May 28, 2020 Episode:
What Will the Courthouse of the Future Look Like? As more courts reopen many practical problems are emerging. How to social distance in courthouses and courtrooms that are ill-equipped for this kind of crisis? What kinds of traffic and crowd management tools are available? What will courthouses look like ten or fifteen years from now? The panel discusses how courts will manage crowds of court users congregating at the courthouse entrance; thermal testing; litigant scheduling for high volume calendars; and physical changes to courtrooms themselves. Panel members also give their predictions as to what the courthouse of the future will look like with the age of Coronavirus. Guest Speakers: Angela S. "Angie" VanSchoick is the Court Administrator with the Town of Breckenridge Municipal Court.   She is a licensed macro level social worker in the State of Colorado and Michigan, receiving her MSW from the University of Michigan in 2007. Her focus was on Policy, Evaluation, Community Organization, and Community Social Systems, which has provided her with a solid background to assist her Court and with the Colorado Association for Municipal Court Administration. Dorothy Howell is the Division Manager with Probation for the Superior Court in East Orange, New Jersey, which is part of Newark. Dorothy has a bachelor's degree from Rutgers University and is a Certified Court Executive from the National Center for State Courts. Richard J. "Rick" Pierce is the Judicial Programs Administrator of the Judicial District Operations and Programs Department, at the Pennsylvania Administrative Office of the Courts.  Prior to his current position, he was the district court administrator for Cumberland County.  He graduated from Washington and Lee University, and received his Masters in Public Administration from Shippensburg University. Elizabeth "Liz" Rambo is the Trial Court Administrator for Lane County Circuit Court in Eugene, Oregon.  She graduated with high scholarship from Oregon State University with a BA in history and has an MBA from Portland State University. Chris Gaddis has been the Court Administrator for the Superior Court of Washington for Pierce County for 4 years. Prior to working for the court, he served 20 years in law enforcement with the last four years as Chief of Police. Mr. Gaddis is the current President of the Association of Washington Superior Court Administrators. He is also a member of the Washington State Jury Diversity Task Force and the Washington State Supreme Court Minority and Justice Commission Public Trust and Confidence Committee. Zenell Brown has garnered respect both as Executive Court Administrator for the Third Circuit Court in Detroit, Michigan, and for her ethical leadership and innovation.  Zenell has a Juris Doctor from Wayne State University Law School, a Public Service Administration Graduate Certificate from Central Michigan University, a Court Administration Certificate from Michigan State University, and is a Certified Diversity Professional from National Diversity Council-DiversityFirst. Leave a question or comment about the episode at clapodcast@nacmnet.org.
32:31
May 28, 2020
The Coronavirus: How are Courts Coping with the Crisis? Thursday, May 21, 2020 Episode
The Coronavirus: How are Courts Coping with the Crisis? Thursday, May 21, 2020 Episode
Ready to Reopen: What You Should Be Thinking About Now Almost all states have reopened, yet the future is still uncertain as COVID cases continue to climb and a vaccine appears unlikely before 2021. Courts are faced with an ever-growing array of challenges. Keeping employees, judicial staffs, litigants, and attorneys safe while reopening courthouses. Dealing with an ever-growing backlog of cases. Restarting court operations that ground to a halt months ago. Facing the possibility of enormous budget shortfalls. Solutions are scarce and the need for innovation has never been greater. The panel discusses how courts will be dealing with employees who test positive for the virus after the office reopens; coordinating with justice partners such as the Clerk of Court; as well as handling jurors and defendants who refuse to enter the courthouse for fear of infection.  This Week's Guest Speakers Angela S. "Angie" VanSchoick is the Court Administrator with the Town of Breckenridge Municipal Court.   She is a licensed macro level social worker in the State of Colorado and Michigan, receiving her MSW from the University of Michigan in 2007. Her focus was on Policy, Evaluation, Community Organization, and Community Social Systems, which has provided her with a solid background to assist her Court and with the Colorado Association for Municipal Court Administration. Mark A. Weinberg is the Court Administrator for the Seventh Judicial Circuit in Daytona Beach, Florida.  Prior to his current position, he was an administrator with the court in Maricopa County, Arizona.  He holds a bachelor's degree in public administration from James Madison University and a master's degree in judicial administration from the University of Denver. Richard J. "Rick" Pierce is the Judicial Programs Administrator of the Judicial District Operations and Programs Department, at the Pennsylvania Administrative Office of the Courts.  Prior to his current position, he was the district court administrator for Cumberland County.  He graduated from Washington and Lee University, and received his Masters in Public Administration from Shippensburg University. Elizabeth "Liz" Rambo is the Trial Court Administrator for Lane County Circuit Court in Eugene, Oregon.  She graduated with high scholarship from Oregon State University with a BA in history and has an MBA from Portland State University. Chris Gaddis has been the Court Administrator for the Superior Court of Washington for Pierce County for 4 years. Prior to working for the court, he served 20 years in law enforcement with the last four years as Chief of Police. Mr. Gaddis is the current President of the Association of Washington Superior Court Administrators. He is also a member of the Washington State Jury Diversity Task Force and the Washington State Supreme Court Minority and Justice Commission Public Trust and Confidence Committee. Leave a question or comment about the episode at clapodcast@nacmnet.org.
31:01
May 20, 2020
The Coronavirus: How are Courts Coping with the Crisis? Thursday, May 14, 2020 Episode
The Coronavirus: How are Courts Coping with the Crisis? Thursday, May 14, 2020 Episode
Budget Cuts: The Crisis in a Crisis  As if the Coronavirus crisis was not enough, our country now faces the worst unemployment figures since the 1929 Great Depression. People not working means people unable to pay taxes. State and local governments are experiencing staggering declines in tax revenue. Sales taxes are decreasing since, despite states reopening, many people are still not going to stores or restaurants. Withholding taxes have been reduced as millions have been laid off. Income tax revenue will start to shrink into next year as those who are out of work file their tax returns. Finally, property taxes will begin to fall as unemployed people are no longer able to hold on to their homes. How will courts now deal with the double dilemma of an ongoing pandemic along with budget cuts? The panel discusses how courts are communicating to employees about the evolving budget crisis, hiring freezes, work furloughs, and reduction-in-force layoffs. Other topics include the search for alternative funding to lessen the blows to the budget, cooperating with city and county agencies as courts prepare to reopen, and morale-sapping fatigue as the Coronavirus with its deadly effects claims its toll on line staff and management alike. About the Guest Speakers Angela S. VanSchoick is the Court Administrator with the Town of Breckenridge Municipal Court.   She is a licensed macro level social worker in the State of Colorado and Michigan, receiving her MSW from the University of Michigan in 2007. Her focus was on Policy, Evaluation, Community Organization, and Community Social Systems, which has provided her with a solid background to assist her Court and with the Colorado Association for Municipal Court Administration. Mark A. Weinberg is the Court Administrator for the Seventh Judicial Circuit in Daytona Beach, Florida.  Prior to his current position, he was an administrator with the court in Maricopa County, Arizona. He holds a bachelor's degree in public administration from James Madison University and a master's degree in judicial administration from the University of Denver. Richard J. Pierce is the Judicial Programs Administrator of the Judicial District Operations and Programs Department, at the Pennsylvania Administrative Office of the Courts.  Prior to his current position, he was the district court administrator for Cumberland County.  He graduated from Washington and Lee University, and received his Masters in Public Administration from Shippensburg University. Elizabeth Rambo is the Trial Court Administrator for Lane County Circuit Court in Eugene, Oregon.  She graduated with high scholarship from Oregon State University with a BA in history and has an MBA from Portland State University. Zenell Brown has garnered respect both as Executive Court Administrator for the Third Circuit Court in Detroit, Michigan, and for her ethical leadership and innovation.  Zenell has a Juris Doctor from Wayne State University Law School, a Public Service Administration Graduate Certificate from Central Michigan University, a Court Administration Certificate from Michigan State University, and is a Certified Diversity Professional from National Diversity Council-DiversityFirst. Dorothy Howell is the Division Manager with Probation for the Superior Court in East Orange, New Jersey, which is part of Newark. Dorothy has a bachelor's degree from Rutgers University and is a Certified Court Executive from the National Center for State Courts. Leave a question or comment about the episode at clapodcast@nacmnet.org.
30:38
May 13, 2020
The Coronavirus: How are Courts Coping with the Crisis? Thursday, May 7, 2020 Episode
The Coronavirus: How are Courts Coping with the Crisis? Thursday, May 7, 2020 Episode
 Is It Time to Reopen? It has been nearly two months since the President declared a national health emergency. Twenty-two states have reopened or partially reopened; another six have plans to reopen in the near future. This while the other twenty-two states have extended their orders to remain closed or have no reopening date set. Even though nationwide, deaths from the Coronavirus have not significantly lessened, the trend toward reopening is clear. How are courts responding? Have they set a date to resume jury trials? And now, the specter of government budget shorts falls loom due to massive unemployment. How are courts bracing for possible funding cuts? This Week's Guest Panelists: Angela S. VanSchoick is the Court Administrator with the Town of Breckenridge Municipal Court.   She is a licensed macro level social worker in the State of Colorado and Michigan, receiving her MSW from the University of Michigan in 2007. Her focus was on Policy, Evaluation, Community Organization, and Community Social Systems, which has provided her with a solid background to assist her Court and with the Colorado Association for Municipal Court Administration. Mark A. Weinberg is the Court Administrator for the Seventh Judicial Circuit in Daytona Beach, Florida.  Prior to his current position, he was an administrator with the court in Maricopa County, Arizona. He holds a bachelor's degree in public administration from James Madison University and a master's degree in judicial administration from the University of Denver. Richard J. Pierce is the Judicial Programs Administrator of the Judicial District Operations and Programs Department, at the Pennsylvania Administrative Office of the Courts.  Prior to his current position, he was the district court administrator for Cumberland County.  He graduated from Washington and Lee University, and received his Masters in Public Administration from Shippensburg University. Elizabeth Rambo is the Trial Court Administrator for Lane County Circuit Court in Eugene, Oregon.  She graduated with high scholarship from Oregon State University with a BA in history and has an MBA from Portland State University. Michael Roddy is the Executive Officer of the Superior Court of San Diego County.  Prior to his current position he served as the California Administrative Office of the Courts’Regional Administrative Director for the Northern/Central Region, and was Executive Officer of the Sacramento Superior Court. Zenell Brown has garnered respect both as Executive Court Administrator for the Third Circuit Court in Detroit, Michigan, and for her ethical leadership and innovation.  Zenell has a Juris Doctor from Wayne State University Law School, a Public Service Administration Graduate Certificate from Central Michigan University, a Court Administration Certificate from Michigan State University, and is a Certified Diversity Professional from National Diversity Council-DiversityFirst. Chris Gaddis has been the Court Administrator for the Superior Court of Washington for Pierce County for 4 years. Prior to working for the court, he had 20 years in law enforcement with the last four years as Chief of Police. Mr. Gaddis is the current President of the Association of Washington Superior Court Administrators. He is also a member of the Washington State Jury Diversity Task Force and the Washington State Supreme Court Minority and Justice Commission Public Trust and Confidence Committee. Leave a question or comment about the episode at clapodcast@nacmnet.org.  
43:34
May 06, 2020
The Coronavirus: How are Courts Coping with the Crisis? Thursday, April 30, 2020 Episode
The Coronavirus: How are Courts Coping with the Crisis? Thursday, April 30, 2020 Episode
Many jails and prisons across the country have now become coronavirus hotspots. For example, news reports about the infamous Rikers Island jail in New York estimate that 12 hundred inmates are infected and 10 have died. An estimated 800 correctional officers have been infected and of those 8 have passed. There are estimates that over 560 prisoners in federal custody have tested positive and 24 have died. Social distancing in jail is impossible. So, across the country, large numbers of inmates are being released to reduce the risk of spreading the virus. Of course, there are also risks from releasing inmates. Some released prisoners have been rearrested for committed new crimes. What effect has releasing so many inmates had on jails and on courts? What effect has it had on our communities? This week, we continue our weekly podcast series, “Coronavirus: How are Courts Coping with the Crisis,” in a conversation with our panelists. This episode explores jurisdictions that have reduced their jail populations and have adjusted their time payment plans to accommodate those at risk of contracting the coronavirus.  We look at how the release decisions have been made, how judges and staff still working the courthouse are protecting themselves, and how our communities view these inmate releases. This Week's Guest Panelists: Angela S. VanSchoick is the Court Administrator with the Town of Breckenridge Municipal Court.   She is a licensed macro level social worker in the State of Colorado and Michigan, receiving her MSW from the University of Michigan in 2007. Her focus was on Policy, Evaluation, Community Organization, and Community Social Systems, which has provided her with a solid background to assist her Court and with the Colorado Association for Municipal Court Administration. Mark A. Weinberg is the Court Administrator for the Seventh Judicial Circuit in Daytona Beach, Florida.  Prior to his current position, he was an administrator with the court in Maricopa County, Arizona. He holds a bachelor's degree in public administration from James Madison University and a master's degree in judicial administration from the University of Denver. Richard J. Pierce is the Judicial Programs Administrator of the Judicial District Operations and Programs Department, at the Pennsylvania Administrative Office of the Courts.  Prior to his current position, he was the district court administrator for Cumberland County.  He graduated from Washington and Lee University, and received his Masters in Public Administration from Shippensburg University. Elizabeth Rambo is the Trial Court Administrator for Lane County Circuit Court in Eugene, Oregon.  She graduated with high scholarship from Oregon State University with a BA in history and has an MBA from Portland State University. Michael Roddy is the Executive Officer of the Superior Court of San Diego County.  Prior to his current position he served as the California Administrative Office of the Courts’Regional Administrative Director for the Northern/Central Region, and was Executive Officer of the Sacramento Superior Court. Zenell Brown has garnered respect both as Executive Court Administrator for the Third Circuit Court in Detroit, Michigan, and for her ethical leadership and innovation.  Zenell has a Juris Doctor from Wayne State University Law School, a Public Service Administration Graduate Certificate from Central Michigan University, a Court Administration Certificate from Michigan State University, and is a Certified Diversity Professional from National Diversity Council-DiversityFirst. Leave a question or comment about the episode at clapodcast@nacmnet.org.
28:33
April 29, 2020
The Coronavirus: How are Courts Coping with the Crisis? Thursday, April 23, 2020 Episode
The Coronavirus: How are Courts Coping with the Crisis? Thursday, April 23, 2020 Episode
The Nation now moves to the end of its second month battling the pandemic. The infection rate has climbed into the hundreds of thousands; the death toll has reached well beyond 45,000. This week we continue our weekly podcast series, “Coronavirus: How are Courts Coping with the Crisis,” in a conversation with our panelists. Numerous courts have been closed for over a month because of the virus. As a result, many are experimenting with court staff teleworking. In fact, we may be witnessing the first truly nationwide experiment ever of court employees teleworking. How are court staff taking to this experiment? How court courts fairing? This episode explores who is teleworking and what do employees need to be successful. We look at union-management relations, equipment allocation, and how do we manage a staff that is almost all home working from their laptops? Now, in the midst of the crisis, many states are opening back up or are at least considering it. Are courts looking to reopen this soon? This week's panel includes: Dorothy Howell is the Division Manager with Probation for the Superior Court in East Orange, New Jersey, which is part of Newark. Dorothy has a bachelor's degree from Rutgers University and is a Certified Court Executive from the National Center for State Courts.  Angela S. VanSchoick is the Court Administrator with the Town of Breckenridge Municipal Court.   She is a licensed macro level social worker in the State of Colorado and Michigan, receiving her MSW from the University of Michigan in 2007. Her focus was on Policy, Evaluation, Community Organization, and Community Social Systems, which has provided her with a solid background to assist her Court and with the Colorado Association for Municipal Court Administration. Mark A. Weinberg is the Court Administrator for the Seventh Judicial Circuit in Daytona Beach, Florida.  Prior to his current position, he was an administrator with the court in Maricopa County, Arizona. He holds a bachelor's degree in public administration from James Madison University and a master's degree in judicial administration from the University of Denver. Richard J. Pierce is the Judicial Programs Administrator of the Judicial District Operations and Programs Department, at the Pennsylvania Administrative Office of the Courts.  Prior to his current position, he was the district court administrator for Cumberland County.  He graduated from Washington and Lee University, and received his Masters in Public Administration from Shippensburg University. Elizabeth Rambo is the Trial Court Administrator for Lane County Circuit Court in Eugene, Oregon.  She graduated with high scholarship from Oregon State University with a BA in history and has an MBA from Portland State University. Michael Roddy is the Executive Officer of the Superior Court of San Diego County.  Prior to his current position he served as the California Administrative Office of the Courts’Regional Administrative Director for the Northern/Central Region, and was Executive Officer of the Sacramento Superior Court. Zenell Brown has garnered respect both as Executive Court Administrator for the Third Circuit Court in Detroit, Michigan, and for her ethical leadership and innovation.  Zenell has a Juris Doctor from Wayne State University Law School, a Public Service Administration Graduate Certificate from Central Michigan University, a Court Administration Certificate from Michigan State University, and is a Certified Diversity Professional from National Diversity Council-DiversityFirst. Leave a question or comment about the episode at clapodcast@nacmnet.org.
35:42
April 22, 2020
The Coronavirus: How are Courts Coping with the Crisis? April 16, 2020 Episode
The Coronavirus: How are Courts Coping with the Crisis? April 16, 2020 Episode
The Nation continues to face the desolation caused by the Coronavirus pandemic. The profound impact of this health calamity continues to bear down on the courts, court staff, our collaborative partners and court users. As part of our continuing weekly podcast series focusing on how courts are coping with the Coronavirus crisis, we look at how courts are turning to technology to help maintain operations. Before the crisis, virtual hearings were a minor part of the court operations landscape. Now they are being aggressively explored as one solution to help keep courts up and running. How effective are they? What are the benefits and drawbacks? What do we need to watch out for? This week’s panelists relate their courts’ experiences with virtual hearings on platforms including, Microsoft Teams, Skype, GoToMeeting, WebEx, Zoom, CourtCall, JAVS, and CourtSmart. Our panelists talk about which virtual hearing platforms courts are using. They discuss security concerns, court rules and state laws, public access, creating the record, and technical problems they have encountered and overcome. Finally, they consider the question “Will this crisis mark a cultural shift in courts’ acceptance of virtual hearings in the future?” Send your questions and comments to CLAPodcast@nacmnet.org Our Panelists Mark A. Weinberg is the Court Administrator for the Seventh Judicial Circuit in Daytona Beach, Florida.  Prior to his current position, he was an administrator with the court in Maricopa County, Arizona. He holds a bachelor's degree in public administration from James Madison University and a master's degree in judicial administration from the University of Denver. Richard J. Pierce is the Judicial Programs Administrator of the Judicial District Operations and Programs Department, at the Pennsylvania Administrative Office of the Courts.  Prior to his current position, he was the district court administrator for Cumberland County.  He graduated from Washington and Lee University, and received his Masters in Public Administration from Shippensburg University. Elizabeth Rambo is the Trial Court Administrator for Lane County Circuit Court in Eugene, Oregon.  She graduated with high scholarship from Oregon State University with a BA in history and has an MBA from Portland State University. Michael Roddy is the Executive Officer of the Superior Court of San Diego County.  Prior to his current position he served as the California Administrative Office of the Courts’Regional Administrative Director for the Northern/Central Region, and was Executive Officer of the Sacramento Superior Court. Zenell Brown has garnered respect both as Executive Court Administrator for the Third Circuit Court in Detroit, Michigan, and for her ethical leadership and innovation.  Zenell has a Juris Doctor from Wayne State University Law School, a Public Service Administration Graduate Certificate from Central Michigan University, a Court Administration Certificate from Michigan State University, and is a Certified Diversity Professional from National Diversity Council-DiversityFirst.
27:35
April 15, 2020
The Coronavirus: How are Courts Coping with the Crisis? April 9, 2020 Episode
The Coronavirus: How are Courts Coping with the Crisis? April 9, 2020 Episode
The Coronavirus pandemic continues to devastate and confound the country.  It has been a mere ten weeks since the first case appeared in the United States. This week our panelists talk about communicating in the crisis. How does your court communicate with employees and with justice system partners? How does your court communicate to make major decisions like suspending jury trials and closing courthouses? Finally, what were the lessons learned this week? Our Panelists Mark A. Weinberg is the Court Administrator for the Seventh Judicial Circuit in Daytona Beach, Florida.  Prior to his current position, he was an administrator with the court in Maricopa County, Arizona. He holds a bachelor's degree in public administration from James Madison University and a master's degree in judicial administration from the University of Denver. Angela S. VanSchoick is the Court Administrator with the Town of Breckenridge Municipal Court.   She is a licensed macro level social worker in the State of Colorado and Michigan, receiving her MSW from the University of Michigan in 2007. Her focus was on Policy, Evaluation, Community Organization, and Community Social Systems, which has provided her with a solid background to assist her Court and with the Colorado Association for Municipal Court Administration. Richard J. Pierce is the Judicial Programs Administrator of the Judicial District Operations and Programs Department, at the Pennsylvania Administrative Office of the Courts.  Prior to his current position, he was the district court administrator for Cumberland County.  He graduated from Washington and Lee University, and received his Masters in Public Administration from Shippensburg University. Elizabeth Rambo is the Trial Court Administrator for Lane County Circuit Court in Eugene, Oregon.  She graduated with high scholarship from Oregon State University with a BA in history and has an MBA from Portland State University.  Michael Roddy is the Executive Officer of the Superior Court of San Diego County.  Prior to his current position he served as the California Administrative Office of the Courts’Regional Administrative Director for the Northern/Central Region, and was Executive Officer of the Sacramento Superior Court. Do You Want to Learn More? Coping With Coronavirus on a Personal Level — Mental Health Wellness Tips:  https://courtleader.net/2020/04/01/coping-with-coronavirus-on-a-personal-level-mental-health-wellness-tips/
27:40
April 08, 2020
The Coronavirus: How are Courts Coping with the Crisis? April 2, 2020 Episode
The Coronavirus: How are Courts Coping with the Crisis? April 2, 2020 Episode
The scourge of the Coronavirus is a national emergency unlike anything we have seen in modern times. It is affecting all aspects of our lives and work. The virus is having a profound impact on how American courts are coping. Throughout the crisis, we will have weekly podcast episodes with a “rotating panel” of guests that will answer the question, “How are courts and court administrators dealing with the coronavirus on a daily basis?” This week's panelists: Zenell Brown  is the Executive Court Administrator in Detroit, Michigan.  Zenell has a Juris Doctor from Wayne State University Law School, a Public Service Administration Graduate Certificate from Central Michigan University, a Court Administration Certificate from Michigan State University, and is a Certified Diversity Professional from the National Diversity Council-Diversity First. Mark A. Weinberg  is the Court Administrator for the Seventh Judicial Circuit in Daytona Beach, Florida.  Mark holds a bachelor's degree in public administration from James Madison University and a master's degree in judicial administration from the University of Denver. Angie VanSchoick is the Court Administrator for the Municipal Court in the Town of Breckenridge Colorado. She currently serves as President of the Colorado Association for Municipal Court Administration (CAMCA).  Angie is a licensed macro level social worker in the State of Colorado and Michigan, receiving her MSW from the University of Michigan.  Liz Rambo is the Trial Court Administrator for the Lane County Trial Courts in Eugene, Oregon.  Liz graduated with high scholarship from Oregon State University with a BA in history, has an MBA from Portland State University, and holds a Court Manager certification from the National Center for State Courts. Tracy "T.J." BeMent is the District Court Administrator for the Tenth Judicial Administrative District (which covers superior courts in six circuits and 221 counties). His main office is in Athens, Georgia. T.J. received his undergraduate and graduate degrees from the George Washington University in Washington, DC, and completed his ICM Fellowship in spring 2015. Rick Pierce is the Judicial Programs Administrator for the Judicial District Operations and Programs Department with the Pennsylvania Administrative Office of the Courts.  Rick is a graduate from Washington and Lee University, and received his Masters in Public Administration from Shippensburg University.
23:41
April 01, 2020
Can Courts Lead in Solving the Opioid Crisis?
Can Courts Lead in Solving the Opioid Crisis?
Over 10 million Americans misused opioids in 2018, which includes over 800,000 heroin users. In 2016, there were more than 64,000 overdose deaths in the United States; in 2017 overdose deaths jumped to over 70,000. This is a number that continues to grow in at least 23 states. Opioid addiction is a crisis that defies age and sex differences; it defies county and state lines; up to now it has defied all attempts to curb this plague. No one questions that opioid addiction is a national crisis and it is not slacking off. Are the nation’s courts ready to take the lead in fighting this epidemic? What needs to be done and who should do it? Judge O. Duane Sloan with the Circuit Court in the Fourth Judicial District of Tennessee and Director Deborah Taylor Tate, head of the Administrative Office of the Courts for the Supreme Court of Tennessee and Co-Chair of the National Judicial Opioid Task Force, will discuss the recent Task Force Report and the efforts by the Nation’s Courts to take the lead in solving this countrywide crisis. Leave a comment or question about the episode at clapodcast@nacmnet.org. About the Speakers Judge O. Duane Sloan is a judge with the Circuit Court in the Fourth Judicial District of Tennessee. In 2019 the Chief Justice of the United States John G. Roberts awarded Judge Slone the National Center for State Courts’ William H. Rehnquist Award for Judicial Excellence, one of the highest judicial honors in the country. He has been recognized for his groundbreaking work helping people with opioid use disorder. Combatting the opioid epidemic is not just a professional commitment for Judge Slone. It’s personal.  In 2011, Judge Slone and his wife, Gretchen, adopted an infant son who was born suffering from withdrawals as a result of his birth mother’s opioid use. Judge Sloan is also the 2018 recipient of the National Center for State Courts, “Distinguished Service” Award; the 2017 Tennessee Association of Recovery Court Professionals, “Judges Making a Difference” Award; and the 2016 Tennessee Public Health Association, “Visionary” Award, given for work in reducing incidences of births with Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome, including innovations in rural Tennessee to provide healthy housing and access to prenatal medical and behavioral health care. Deborah Taylor Tate is the Director of the Administrative Office of the Courts for the Supreme Court of Tennessee, the Conference of State Court Administrators and the Co-Chair of the National Judicial Opioid Task Force for state courts across the nation. She is a licensed attorney and Supreme Court Rule 31 mediator, who, in addition to her presently held office, also serves as Distinguished Senior Scholar at the Free State Foundation and Adjunct Lecturer at Vanderbilt University School of Nursing. She was twice-nominated to the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) by President George W. Bush and unanimously confirmed by the U.S. Senate in 2005. She served as Commissioner of the FCC until 2009, serving as chair of two Federal Joint Boards overseeing over $7B in advanced telecommunications services. At the time of her presidential appointment, Ms. Tate was serving as the chairman and director of the Tennessee Public Service Commission. Her previous state positions also include executive director of the Health Facilities Commission and as senior staff -assistant General Counsel for then-Governor, Senator Lamar Alexander and a Senior policy advisor to Governor Don Sundquist for mental/behavioral health.  . Ms. Tate received both her undergraduate degree and Juris Doctorate (J.D.) from the University of Tennessee and attended Vanderbilt Law School.
57:06
March 16, 2020
Is It Time for a Fresh Look at Cell Phones and Courts?
Is It Time for a Fresh Look at Cell Phones and Courts?
For better or worse we can no longer live without our Smartphones. We use them to talk and text our friends; they keep our appointments, pictures, and business notes; they help us with research; they track of our children; they allow us to call 911 in an emergency. It’s a wonder how we ever lived without them, yet they have been here a mere 13 years, arriving in 2007. Smartphones have become a part of court process. They carry messages, photos, and information that are evidence in court hearings and trials. Yet, many courts forbid people from even having them in the courthouse. Must courts accept that Smartphones are everywhere? Is there a middle ground that can be reached?  Justice Cynthia Cohen, Jeffrey Morrow, and TJ BeMent,  share their insights and conclusions about this critical issue. This is an interesting podcast episode for listeners curious about Smartphones, courtroom security, self-represented defendants, courts, and court administration. Leave a comment or question about the episode at clapodcast@nacmnet.org. About the Speakers Cynthia J. Cohen is a retired Associate Justice of the Massachusetts Appeals Court, where she served from March, 2001 until January, 2017.  Since her retirement, she has volunteered as an Access to Justice Fellow, working on special projects for the Massachusetts Access to Justice Commission.  While on the Appeals Court, Justice Cohen was a Commissioner on the second Access to Justice Commission.  She also chaired the SJC Steering Committee on Self-Represented Litigants, which, over a seven-year period, developed a number of court system initiatives to address the needs of litigants without counsel, including Limited Assistance Representation, judicial guidelines for hearings involving self-represented litigants, and training programs for judges and court staff. Jeffrey P. Morrow has been the Massachusetts Trial Court Director of Security since September 2013. In this capacity Director Morrow is responsible for the management of security operations in the Commonwealth’s 100 courthouses and for oversight of over 1,000 court officers and security staff. Prior to his appointment as the security director, Mr. Morrow served as a special agent with the Naval Criminal Investigative Service for over thirty-one years where his assignments included both executive and field assignments in the areas of criminal investigations and national security matters.  Director Morrow is a graduate of St. Anselm College in Manchester, NH and holds a Master of Policy Management degree from the McCord School of Public Policy at Georgetown University.  Tracy "T.J." BeMent is the District Court Administrator for the 10th Judicial Administrative District of Georgia. The 10th JAD covers the general jurisdiction superior courts in six circuits in 21 counties. He was previously the Court Administrator for the Athens-Clarke County Courts in Athens, Georgia, where he worked with all six levels of trial courts in the county. He acts as the primary liaison to the state and county governments and serves as a resource for the judges and judicial staff on many issues. Mr. BeMent administers nearly $2 million in state and federal grants and is a federal grant peer reviewer. He has been working in the courts for more than 15 years. Prior to coming to Georgia, he was the Assistant Court Administrator for the Las Vegas Justice Court and previously the Clerk of Court and Chief Administrative Officer of the District of Columbia's Office of Administrative Hearings. He received his undergraduate and graduate degrees from the George Washington University in Washington, DC, and completed his ICM Fellowship in spring 2015. 
44:43
February 17, 2020
Is Bail Reform Working? Charlotte’s Revealing Story
Is Bail Reform Working? Charlotte’s Revealing Story
It has been estimated that nationally, more than 60 percent of people in jail have not been convicted of a crime, they are awaiting trial. Almost 500,000 defendants are in jail pretrial because they cannot afford to post bail. Three-quarters of pretrial detainees have been charged with a drug or property crime. They could remain incarcerated for days, months, and sometimes even years. They could lose their jobs, lose contact with loved ones, and lose the ability to care for their families. Many courts across the country are implementing bail reform. Bail reform allows more defendants charged with lower-level crimes to stay out of jail before trial, stay on their jobs, and stay in the community. What has been the experience of those courts that have implemented bail reform? Judge Roy Wiggins and Judge Elizabeth Trosch, from North Carolina’s 26thJudicial District in the City of Charlotte, discuss their Court’s experience implementing bail reform. How is it working and what we can expect? This is an intriguing podcast episode for listeners curious about bail, bail reform, managing pretrial defendants, courts, and court administration. Leave a comment or question about the episode at clapodcast@nacmnet.org. About the Guest Speakers Judge Elizabeth Trosch has presided over both Civil and Criminal District Courtrooms, with an emphasis on Juvenile Law, Domestic Violence, Drug Treatment Court and Child Support Enforcement. In her capacity as a District Court Judge, Judge Trosch has also presided over the Mecklenburg County Youth Treatment Court and consistently volunteers to hold truancy court at a local elementary school. She is State Certified Juvenile Court Judge and has earned Domestic Child Sex Trafficking Judicial Institute Certificate. Judge Trosch is a graduate of Hollins College, where she earned a B.A. in Philosophy and Social Psychology. She earned her law degree at Wake Forest University School of Law where she was a recipient of the North Carolina State Bar Pro Bono Service Award. Judge Roy H. Wiggins received his Bachelor of Science in Business Administration, in 1984 (Deans List, Honor Roll) from East Carolina University. He received his Juris Doctor (Cum Laude) from the Campbell University School of Law in 1990. He was with the Mecklenburg County District Attorney’s Office (Assistant District Attorney) from 1991 to 1995. He was in private practice from 1995 to 2018. In 2018 he was appointed by North Carolina Governor Roy Cooper to serve as a District Court Judge. Sonya L. Harper has been Director of Mecklenburg County's Criminal Justice Services Department since June 2016. She came to the County from The National Association of Drug Court Professionals, where she worked as project director and point of contact for the National Drug Court Resource Center. In that role, she provided instruction and technical assistance on program development and program improvement processes to more than 2,800 drug courts throughout the United States and its territories. Sonya earned a bachelor of arts degree in criminal justice from the University of North Carolina at Wilmington, and a master of public administration degree from Appalachian State University.
41:21
January 13, 2020
Dealing with the Generations: What Do Good Managers Understand?
Dealing with the Generations: What Do Good Managers Understand?
Managing the multigenerational workplace is more demanding today than ever before. Why is it now such a challenge? One reason: we are living and working longer. If you were born today, you could expect to live 79 years, that is 18 years longer than if you were born in 1935. Another reason: technology is changing our lives and the rate of that change is increasing. Once, just being a 30-year veteran of an organization made you a valued expert. Today, we are valued for our technical expertise in mastering artificial intelligence, cybersecurity, and social media. Does assigning traits to the different generations help or hurt when managing the workplace? What insights do we have for today’s managers dealing with up to four generations working side-by-side? Zenell Brown, Alisa Shannon, Rene Armenta, and Kelly Hutton discuss what it means to oversee a court with so many different age groups working together. This is an absorbing podcast episode for listeners curious about generational differences, managing the generations, courts, and court administration. Leave a comment or question about the episode at clapodcast@nacmnet.org. Guest Speakers As a Court Administrator, Zenell Brown has garnered respect for her ethical leadership and innovation. She has built her approach on three pillars: communication, leadership responsibility and accountability, and diversity and inclusion. She has shared her “Justice for All” leadership and organizational wisdom at local, state, and national level conferences for court managers and teams.  Zenell continues to add to her current credentials of Juris Doctor (Wayne State University Law School), Public Service Administration Graduate Certificate (Central Michigan University), Court Administration Certificate (Michigan State University), and Certified Diversity Professional (National Diversity Council-DiversityFirst). Rene Armenta was born and raised in Tucson, AZ, He graduated from Rincon High School and started his career with the courts in early February of 2019 at the Pima County Juvenile Courthouse, assisting both  clients and court staff, directing them to their appointment, and providing assistance on court date information. Recently transitioning to the downtown Superior Courthouse as a Case Management Specialist assisting on the Family Law Bench, he assists in the efficiency of caseflow by processing court documents, ensuring court dates and times are correctly scheduled, assisting in scheduling Pro Tems and so much more. Alisa Shannon has served as a civil servant for the past twenty plus years. She is the Deputy Court Administrator of the Third Judicial Circuit of Michigan - Criminal Division. In this role, Alisa oversees the management of the criminal case processing departments and works tirelessly to build strong relationships and help to administer criminal justice in a fair, professional, and efficient manner. In addition to overseeing the operations of the Criminal Division, Alisa has led many court-wide leadership committees. As a trusted leader, she directed the state’s largest trial court through the Strategic Planning process. Much of her career success can be attributed to her ability to build relationships, create supportive environments, and advocate on behalf of others. Alisa has earned a Master Certification in Business Leadership and Management, with a specific focus on Strategic Decision-making, Strategic Leadership, and Strategic Management from Michigan State University. She is a certified trainer in Restorative Practices and in the art of having Crucial Conversations. She served on several committees with the National Association of Pretrial Services Agencies, and most recently represents the court on the Diversity and Inclusion Advisory Board of the Michigan Diversity and Inclusion Council.
37:51
December 17, 2019
Social Media and the Courts: How Do We Deal with This Growing Reality?
Social Media and the Courts: How Do We Deal with This Growing Reality?
Blogs and podcasts are a growing fixture on our social landscape. There are now more than 750,000 podcasts produced and over 48 million people a week listen to a podcast. Estimates are that billions of people worldwide read one or more blogs on the internet. This is a fact that courts face along with all government institutions. When grappling with the media, courts can no longer deal simply with the city newspaper and local television reporters. Bloggers and podcasters demand equal treatment with traditional media outlets. What advice do we have for courts that are facing the challenge of social media’s blogs and podcasts? Darren Toms and Stephen Thompson talk about how courts can deal with the growing phenomenon of social media’s focus on the justice system. This is a fascinating podcast episode for listeners interested in courts, court administration, social media, blogs, and podcasts. Leave a comment or question about the episode at clapodcast@nacmnet.org. Guest Speakers A child of the northeast, Stephen Thompson earned a bachelor’s degree from Boston University, served a tour in the Peace Corps teaching English as a foreign language in West Africa, and earned a master’s degree from the Columbia Graduate School of Journalism. He worked for more than twenty years as a newspaper reporter and editor, most of it at the now-defunct Tampa Tribune, before he was hired by the Sixth Judicial Circuit to be its public information officer in 2014. Darren Toms is the public information officer and community outreach coordinator for the Cuyahoga County Common Pleas Court in Cleveland, Ohio, where he works with the media and community groups on a regular basis. Darren is the president-elect of the Conference of Court Public Information Officers (CCPIO) and recently hosted the organization’s annual meeting in Cleveland. Prior to joining the Court in 2013, Darren spent 16 years at Newsradio WTAM 1100, the news-talk station in Cleveland, as news director, anchor and reporter. Darren also spent seven years in television news. A graduate of the E.W. Scripps School of Journalism at Ohio University, Darren is a native of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Do You Want to Learn More? Access to link to these articles to learn about blogs and podcasts. https://www.cbsnews.com/news/cbs-news-poll-the-jump-in-popularity-in-podcasts/ https://www.podcastinsights.com/podcast-statistics/ https://discoverpods.com/why-are-podcasts-popular/
38:22
November 19, 2019
What Generation X and Millennials are Saying About the Workplace: Three Perspectives
What Generation X and Millennials are Saying About the Workplace: Three Perspectives
The Pew Research Center estimates that right now there are more Millennials than Baby Boomers in America. By 2030 Millennials and Gen Zs will make up 75% of the workforce. A Gallup Poll found that 21% of Millennials had changed jobs within the last year, that’s three times more than other generations.  On top of this demographic shift, technological innovation is increasing exponentially. The American workforce is racing toward a major generational transformation within the next ten years. Will the emerging generations demand new ways of doing business and managing employees? How will the generations impact the courts? What can court administrators do today to prepare for this sea change? Tina Mattison, Stacy Worby, and Paulina Pasquarelli talk about the up-and-coming generations as they flex their social and economic muscle. What it mean to management and the workplace. This is a compelling podcast episode for listeners interested in generational differences, managing the generations, courts, and court administration. Leave a comment or question about the podcast at clapodcast@nacmnet.org. About the Guest Speakers Tina Mattison is the Deputy Court Administrator for the Pima County Juvenile Court.  In her position, Ms. Mattison oversees Juvenile Probation, Detention, Court, Children and Family Services, Facilities and Security, as well as the budget of $22 million.  Pima County Juvenile court is a general jurisdiction court located in Arizona, with over 400 multi-generational employees.  Previously, she worked for the California court system in Riverside and Orange County.  Ms. Mattison has been a member of the National Association for Court Management since 1998. Stacy Worby serves as the State Jury Coordinator for the Alaska Court System. In that capacity she is responsible for the coordination and operation of the centralized processes for the court’s jury management systems. Additionally, she provides jury procedure training and guidance for personnel in 40 court locations statewide. Prior to serving as the State Jury Coordinator, she managed a staff of jury clerks in Anchorage (the state’s largest general jurisdiction court). Stacy has enjoyed managing staff of all generations since 1998. Paulina Pasquarelli has served the 15thJudicial Circuit in Palm Beach County, FL since 2015. In her current role as the Mental Health Case Manager, she is responsible for the operations of the Circuit’s Mental Health Specialty Division which focuses on the issue of competency to proceed in felony cases. Ms. Pasquarelli holds a Bachelor of Arts degree in Political Science from Palm Beach Atlantic University. In addition, Ms. Pasquarelli serves as a member on NACM’s Membership Committee and Early Career Professionals (ECP) Subcommittee. She hopes she can encourage fellow millennials to view judicial administration as a career instead of a job.
21:50
October 14, 2019
Suddenly He Was There: Is Your Court Prepared for a Shooting Tragedy?
Suddenly He Was There: Is Your Court Prepared for a Shooting Tragedy?
Shooting incidents are becoming a scourge on the American landscape and courthouses are certainly not immune. An incident can last only seconds but the trauma to court staff and the unsuspecting public can live on and on. If a calamity occurs, we face the triple challenge: emergency decisions and communications, dealing with law enforcement and a crime scene, and maintaining or reestablishing ongoing operations. What can your staff and your court do to prepare? What do we keep in mind if it happens? What can we learn from professionals who have dealt with these issues in real time? Patricia Norwood-Foden, Lt. Adam Sibley, Lance Wilson, and Deputy U.S. Marshal Addison Friedman talk about working through tragedy and restoring a degree of normalcy. This is an intriguing episode for listeners interested in emergencies, active shooter situations, courthouse security, and court administration. Leave a comment or question about the podcast at clapodcast@nacmnet.org. Guest Speakers Patricia Norwood-Foden has been the District Court Administrator for the 15th Judicial District of Pennsylvania, Chester County, since 2009.  Prior to her current position, she was the Minor Judiciary Administrator and has worked in the judiciary system since 1991.  Ms. Norwood-Foden is a graduate of East Stroudsburg University with a Bachelor of Arts degree in Political Science, earned a paralegal certification from Penn State University and successfully completed the judicial administration certification program offered by Michigan State University.  She is currently pursuing her Master of Legal Studies degree from West Virginia University.  Lance Wilson retired in 2017 after a 35 year career in court administration.  Lance was District Court Executive/Clerk of Court for the U.S. District Court for the District of Nevada (1995-2017).  Previously he was Clerk of Court for the U.S. District Court for the Middle District of Pennsylvania (1991-1995) and as a Chief Deputy/Deputy in Charge for the U.S. District Court for the District of Arizona(1987-1991).  Lance started his career in judicial administration with the Maricopa Superior Court in Phoenix, Arizona.   Lance holds a Master of Science Degree in Judicial Administration from the University of Denver College of Law and a Bachelor of Science Degree in Criminal Justice/Minor in Fine Arts, from Alvernia College.    Lieutenant Adam Sibley served in law enforcement since 2008, and is currently employed with the Chester County Sheriff’s Office in Pennsylvania.  Throughout the past ten years, Adam has been involved with the Sheriff’s Office Judicial Security Unit and Protective Intelligence Unit responsible for anticipating, deterring, and investigating threats of violence against court staff and other participants within the Chester County court system.   Addison Friedman started with the U.S. Marshals Service in January of 2011. His first duty assignment was in D.C. Superior Court located in Washington, D.C. Deputy Friedman spent three and half years in D.C. before returning back home to Charlotte, NC in March 2015. He is now assigned to the Western District of North Carolina-Charlotte office. Deputy Friedman has held numerous collateral duties to include Use of Force Instructor, Training Coordinator, and COOP Manager.  Since April 2017, Deputy Friedman has been assigned to the FBI Joint Terrorism Task Force (JTTF). In October 2018, Deputy Friedman coordinated a full scale active shooter exercise at the Charlotte Federal Courthouse, which included all Judges, Clerks, U.S. Marshals, Local Law Enforcement, Fire Department, EMS, and the local hospital.
47:02
September 16, 2019
The Network’s On the Phone: Pulling Back the Curtain on High Profile Trials
The Network’s On the Phone: Pulling Back the Curtain on High Profile Trials
From O.J. Simpson, to Trayvon Martin and Casey Anthony, we have become used to the media targeting trials and turning them into spectacles. Many in the public see them as entertainment; often they become a lightning rod for political controversy. All the while jurors must be protected and citizens must be able to conduct their regular business with the court. These challenges can prove an enormous test for a typical trial court. When do you know a trial will turn into a media event? What can your court do to prepare? Michelle Kennedy and Karen Levey share their experiences dealing with high profile trials in their courts.  This is an intriguing episode for listeners interested in high profile trials, media relations, jury security, and court administration. Leave a comment or question about the podcast at clapodcast@nacmnet.org.  About the Guest Speakers Karen Connolly Levey Chief Deputy Court Administrator has been with the Ninth Judicial Circuit for 28 years. Ms. Levey is responsible for all Due Process Services, including Jury Services, Court Reporting, Court Interpreting, and Problem Solving Courts. Ms. Levey also serves as the Circuit-wide representative for Security issues. She is responsible for the Circuit’s comprehensive public information, media relations and civic outreach efforts. She serves as official court spokesperson.  Ms. Levey is responsible for managing the Court’s social media sites, providing professional support for legislative issues, handling public record requests and handling the Court’s strategic planning efforts. She has a Bachelor of Science in Journalism and a Master of Arts in Political Science both from the University of Florida. Prior to coming to work for the Circuit, she worked for a Federal Congressman, worked as a Regional Planner and as an Agent for the Federal Bureau of Investigation. As public information officer for the Eighteenth Judicial Circuit, Michelle Kennedy is responsible for handling the logistics and administrative issues related to high profile trials. In preparation for State vs. Zimmerman, she met with media representatives and law enforcement officials for months prior to the trial to develop strategies to accommodate the needs of an international press corps and ensure a safe and efficient process for all involved.   Michelle’s duties also include supervising the probate and guardianship division and managing many of the due process services provided by the courts. She has been with the Eighteenth Judicial Circuit since June of 2000. Prior to that, she served in community relations positions at the Brevard County Sheriff’s Office and various non-profit agencies.  Michelle currently serves as President of the Florida Court Public Information Officers Association. She is a graduate of Florida State University where she majored in Communications and Political Science. Would You Like to Learn More? National Center for State Courts - Managing High Profile Cases for the 21st Century www.NCSC.ORG/HPC Conference of Court Public Information Officers - Association for Court Communicators www.CCPIO.org
39:35
August 09, 2019
Held for Ransom: How Safe is Your Data?
Held for Ransom: How Safe is Your Data?
Ransomware attacks are running rampant throughout the nation. Atlanta, Georgia; Lake City, Florida; Albany, New York; and Del Rio, Texas have all been victims. Most recently the Georgia Administrative Office of the Courts was attacked. Local agencies can be crippled for weeks with no data, no internet, no email, and no way to conduct business.  Is your court prepared? Can you stop it? How would you even know? Rashida Davis and Stephen Nevels recount their experiences battling attacks on their courts.  This is a fascinating episode for listeners interested in cybersecurity, ransomware such as Ryuk and Sam Sam, court technology, and court administration. Leave a comment or question about the podcast at clapodcast@nacmnet.org.  About the Guests Rashida A. Davis serves as the Court Administrator/ Chief Clerk for the Municipal Court of Atlanta. She earned her bachelor’s degree in Political Science from Georgia State University. Ms. Davis graduated from the University of Tennessee College of Law Cum Laude.  Prior to serving in her role as Court Administrator, Ms. Davis served as a Municipal Court of Atlanta Deputy Chief Administrator for two years. She played an instrumental role in developing the annual budget, evaluating technology service development projects, and the creation of standard operating protocols. She also served on strategic planning teams such as the Ransomware Attack Recovery team and the Municipal Court of Atlanta Improvement Task Force. Ms. Davis is a licensed attorney with the State of Georgia. Her legal background primarily  focused on litigation and criminal defense.  As Court Administrator, Ms. Davis is responsible for managing a broad range of policy, intergovernmental relations, and operational functions performed by the Municipal Court of Atlanta. Outside of work, Ms. Davis enjoys volunteerism, international travel and quality time with her family.    Stephen M. Nevels is the Trial Court Administrator for the Piedmont Judicial Circuit consisting of Jackson, Barrow, and Banks Counties, Georgia. Prior to that he was the Judicial Court Administrator for the First District Court of Appeal in Tallahassee, the largest Court of Appeals in Florida. Before that Stephen was Director of Administration for the Georgia Capital Defender’s Office, Director for Georgia’s Conflicts Program, Assistant Director for Judicial Liaison for Georgia Administrative Office of the Courts, District Court Administrator and Deputy Superior Court Administrator for the Fulton County Superior Court in Atlanta, and Senior Court Analyst/Court Consultant for the Florida Office of the State Courts Administrator. Stephen received his Master of Public Administration degree from the California State University in Turlock, California, his Bachelor’s in Pre-Law Political Science from the University of Georgia, and his Associate’s Degree in Criminal Justice from Abraham Baldwin College in Tifton, Georgia. Do You Want to Know More? News article on the Georgia Administrative Office of the Courts ransomware News article on the Baltimore, Maryland ransomware attack News article on the Lake City, Florida ransomware attack News article on the Del Rio, Texas ransomware attack
29:22
July 15, 2019
Is AI Already Here? The Answers May Startle You
Is AI Already Here? The Answers May Startle You
You may not be aware, but artificial intelligence (AI) has already established itself in our daily lives. From Amazon to Alexa, sophisticated algorithms affect much of what we do. The next ten years will see advancements in electronic decision-making, facial recognition, language translation, and voice-to-text. Are you willing to accept the cost in loss of privacy due to AI’s insatiable thirst for data for the benefit in added productivity? What will be the new careers in AI world? Abhijeet Chavan and IV Ashton walk us through some of the inner workings of AI, some expectations in areas like Natural Language Processing, and give us advice on how to prepare for the future of this technology.  This is a fascinating episode for listeners interested in court technology, Natural Language Processing, algorithms, individual privacy, language translation, and emerging technologies. There is a link to a short segment of the book Prediction Machines by Ajay Agrawal, Joshua Gans, Avi Goldfarb, in the Show Notes section on our website.  https://nacmnet.org/podcasts Leave a comment or question about the podcast at clapodcast@nacmnet.org. 
36:57
June 24, 2019
Blockchain: Is It Your Court's Future?
Blockchain: Is It Your Court's Future?
“. . . we’ve been thinking a lot about the explosion of digital evidence. . . terabytes of audio-video footage from body-worn cameras, web cameras at every corner, video recordings from everyone’s smartphone devices . . . Blockchain holds a lot of promise for managing all that.” Blockchain is a tool that could change the way organizations handle money. Its built-in safeguards prevent electronic hacking. Beyond accounting, it could secure the authenticity of court documents and even identities. But are we willing to pay the price for all security? Paul Embley and Di Graski explore the opportunities to courts and the limits of this emerging technology. Di and Paul’s paper, “When Might Blockchain Appear in Your Court?” is narrated available as a bonus episode. The display version is available in the Show Notes section on our website. Leave a comment or question about the podcast at clapodcast@nacmnet.org.  About the Guests Di Graski is grateful to be celebrating her eleventh anniversary with the National Center for State Courts’ Technology team. She is an attorney licensed in Colorado, a certified Project Management Professional, and a member of the IJIS Institute’s Blockchain Working Group. At NACM’s Annual Conference in July 2019, Di will participate in the panel discussion “Artificial Intelligence, Machine Learning, and Data Science.” Paul Embley is the CIO and Technology Division Director at the National Center for State Courts. He began his career in Silicon Valley working for the “who’s who” of high tech (along with the “who’s no longer”). After 25 years in the for-profit sector, Paul shifted to public sector work on integrated justice.
26:56
May 14, 2019
Bonus Episode: When Might Blockchain Appear in Your Court
Bonus Episode: When Might Blockchain Appear in Your Court
“. . . [Blockchain records] could soon be used in a variety of innovative ways to resolve court record keeping challenges. At the same time, Blockchain presents new legal issues that courts must be prepared to address.” This is an audio recitation of a paper written by Di Graski and Paul Embley titled “When Might Blockchain Appear in Your Court?” The paper appeared in the 2018 edition of Trends in State Courts published by the National Center for State Courts.  This episode will appeal to listeners interested in trial courts, court administration, emerging technologies, digital security, and accounting and finance, and emergency response plans. A link to a display version of Di and Paul’s paper, “When Might Blockchain Appear in Your Court?” is in the Show Notes section on our website. Leave a comment or question about the podcast at clapodcast@nacmnet.org.  About the Guests Di Graski is grateful to be celebrating her eleventh anniversary with the National Center for State Courts’ Technology team.  She is an attorney licensed in Colorado, a certified Project Management Professional, and a member of the IJIS Institute’s Blockchain Working Group.  At NACM’s Annual Conference in July 2019, Di will participate in the panel discussion “Artificial Intelligence, Machine Learning, and Data Science.” Paul Embley is the CIO and Technology Division Director at the National Center for State Courts. He began his career in Silicon Valley working for the “who’s who” of high tech (along with the “who’s no longer”). After 25 years in the for-profit sector, Paul shifted to public  
15:35
May 14, 2019
Alaska’s Earthquake: Its Surprising Lessons
Alaska’s Earthquake: Its Surprising Lessons
  Show Notes On November 30, 2018, Anchorage, Alaska, suffered a magnitude 7.1 earthquake followed by thousands of aftershocks.  The quake was larger than the infamous 1989 Loma Prieta, California event.  How did the Alaska Court System’s emergency response plans hold up? What can we learn from Alaska’s experience and its preparations?  Christine Johnson and Alyce Roberts share their experiences and their insights having dealt firsthand with this powerful force of nature.    When we think of earthquakes, we think of California however Alaska’s quake was larger than the infamous 1989 Loma Prieta event (a.k.a. the World Series Quake) which burned a large portion of San Francisco’s marina district. Alaskans still remember the 1964 Good Friday quake: the most powerful earthquake ever to hit North America. This is a thought-provoking episode for listeners interested in trial courts, court administration, disaster recovery, continuity of operations plans (COOP), and emergency response plans. To see a video of the actual quake in one of Alaska’s courtroom access the YouTube video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Kjvpk2Fe6UQ.   Leave a comment or question about the podcast at clapodcast@nacmnet.org.  About the Presenters Christine Johnson has been the Administrative Director of the Alaska Court System since 2009. A life-long Alaskan, she is a graduate of Bryn Mawr College and the University of Michigan Law School. She and her family lived in Anchorage during the 1964 earthquake.      Alyce Roberts is the Special Projects Coordinator for the Alaska Court System.  As a member of the court’s senior staff, she is the AOC’s primary liaison with the clerks of court.  In this capacity, she develops the annual statewide clerks of court conference program, facilitating the sessions and serving as a presenter. Alyce regularly works with court colleagues and justice partners to propose revisions to court rules and develop statewide clerical procedures.  She serves on the Alaska Supreme Court’s Civil Rules Advisory Committee.  She has worked for the Alaska Court System since 1989, holding a number of positions including clerk of court in Anchorage (the state’s largest general jurisdiction court). She serves on the National Association for Court Management’s (NACM) Board of Directors, chairs NACM’s Communication Committee, and she is a Fellow of the Institute for Court Management (2010). 
35:51
April 15, 2019
Artificial Intelligence: What You Need to Know Now
Artificial Intelligence: What You Need to Know Now
Artificial Intelligence (A.I.) has already brought us general business tools that courts can use to assist in automating work, analyzing documents, and conducting legal analysis. As a start, courts will need to put their information into an electronic format that can be used by A.I. tools. They will also need to re-engineer their business practices. Small courts will have to be assertive in making their needs known. But, exactly how will A.I. tools help courts and what will we, as citizens, give up in privacy in order to maximize A.I.’s potential? Alan Carlson along with co-host Rick Pierce discuss how A.I. will be used in the courts and how soon it will be here.  About the Presenter Alan Carlson retired at the end of 2016 after working 40 years in state trial courts. He was the CEO (court administrator, clerk of court, and jury commissioner) of the Orange County (CA) Superior Court, the CEO in San Francisco Superior Court, the Executive Officer of the Monterey Superior Court, and the Assistant Executive officer of the Alameda County Superior Court. Mr. Carlson also was president of JMI, Director of Court Services at the CA AOC, and a Staff Attorney at NCSC. Mr. Carlson received a Distinguished Service Award from the California Judicial Council in 2016, the NACM Award of Merit in 2012, and the ABA Robert B. Yegge Award in 2010. He was inducted as a member of the NCSC’s Warren Burger Society in 2012. He received a law degree from Hastings College of Law and a BS in engineering from University of California at Berkeley. About the Co-Host Rick Pierce, Judicial Programs Administrator, has served in the field of court administration for the past thirty years. Prior to his appointment at the Administrative Office of Pennsylvania Courts, Pierce was the district court administrator for the 9th Judicial District of Pennsylvania, Cumberland County. As judicial programs administrator, he is responsible for implementation of programs and education in court administration at the general and limited jurisdiction court levels. Pierce was elected to the National Association for Court Management Board of Directors in July of 2017 and currently serves as a director and vice chair of the Governance Committee of NACM. Pierce served as the President of the Mid-Atlantic Association for Court Management from 2005-2006.He also served as President of the Pennsylvania Association of Court Management in 2000-2001. A graduate of Washington and Lee University, Pierce received his Master’s in Public Administration from Shippensburg University in 1995.
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March 19, 2019
What Hurricane Florence Can Teach Us
What Hurricane Florence Can Teach Us
Last September, Hurricane Florence devastated North Carolina's families, communities, and its trial courts.  Court administrators Ellen Hancox and Caitlin Emmons tell how they made it through the storm, cared for their families, and managed to keep their courts afloat.  What lessons can we take away from their experience? To cope, people had to come up with “contingency plans for their contingency plans” in order to deal with a storm that upended lives and work. Ellen and Caitlin talk about how their courts and their families endured, including judges who had not fully recovered from the previous hurricane (Matthew). They also describe their efforts at disaster recovery, their emergency plans, and their continuity of operations plans (COOP) during the crisis. Finally, they relate how they overcame unforeseen logistical and legal hurdles. Leave a comment or question about the podcast at clapodcast@nacmnet.org. You can see addition information in the Show Notes section at nacmnet.org/podcasts. About the Presenters  Ellen Hancox has served as the Trial Court Administrator for Cumberland County, N. C. since 2002. She attended the University of Mary Washington and Campbell University School of Law. Before joining the court system, she was in private practice, and her practice was devoted to civil litigation. She is involved in the Cumberland County Bar Association, having served as President. She has served on various committees and boards with the North Carolina Bar Association. Caitlin Emmons graduated from the University of California, Irvine School of Law in 2015. She was a fellow at the Hawaii Appleseed Center for Law and Economic Justice  from 2016-2017. In 2017, Caitlin relocated to North Carolina with her husband who is on active duty serving as a United States Marine. She worked as the Judicial Assistant for Onslow County from September 2017 until January 2019. She is now the Trial Court  Coordinator for Judicial District 4, which includes Onslow, Sampson, Duplin, and Jones counties.   
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March 19, 2019