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Talking Beats with Daniel Lelchuk

Talking Beats with Daniel Lelchuk

By Daniel Lelchuk
The most admired people of our time in science, music, education, sports, entertainment, and the arts are interviewed by Daniel Lelchuk.
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Ep. 44: James Shapiro

Talking Beats with Daniel Lelchuk

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Ep. 60: Mike Espy
“I just believe if you’re elected and they imbue you with trust and faith then you represent them as well as you can…we did that over four terms in the US Congress, went on to become a cabinet secretary, and it’s my goal now to become the next United States Senator for the same reasons.” On today’s special mid-week episode, Secretary Mike Espy is here. Well known as the first African-American congressman from Mississippi since Reconstruction and then as the Secretary of Agriculture for President Bill Clinton, he is now running for the Unites States Senate. In this rare, personal look into the life of such a public figure, we hear moving tales about Espy’s childhood in Yazoo City, Mississippi, and we learn about the experiences that convinced him a life of public service was what he desired most. We also hear, of course, about his favorite music—being from Mississippi, he has lots of music opinions. Mike Espy was born in Yazoo City, MS, and graduated from Howard University and Santa Clara Law School. He returned to practice law in the Mississippi Delta and then became Assistant Secretary of State. He then became Mississippi’s Assistant Attorney General where he was the Director of Consumer Protection. Later, he was elected the first African American Congressman from Mississippi since the Reconstruction Era. After four terms in the US Congress, President-elect Bill Clinton nominated him to be Secretary of the United States Department of Agriculture, the first Black person to hold that position, too. He negotiated foreign trade deals expanding markets for American farmers and took on entrenched interests to adopt badly needed reforms in the food inspection system.  He is now running for the Unites States Senate. He lives with his wife, Portia, in Jackson, Mississippi, and is a proud father and grandfather. -------------------------------------- Please consider supporting Talking Beats with Daniel Lelchuk via our Patreon: patreon.com/talkingbeats In addition to early episode access, bonus episodes, and other benefits, you will contribute to us being able to present the highest quality substantive, long-form interviews with the world's most compelling people. We believe that providing a platform for individual expression, free thought, and a diverse array of views is more important now than ever.
23:21
October 21, 2020
Ep. 59: Bruce Hoffman
“It’s not just violence but the threat of violence that breathes life into terrorism, that gives it its power. For terrorism to have its power, it's not just the victim or the target— it’s the target audience, or the wider vicarious number of victims that terrorists hope to intimidate, coerce, and get them to behave in a different manner than they would have.” On today’s episode, expert on counter terrorism and insurgency Bruce Hoffman. He’s spent more then forty years studying trends, groups, and patterns of terrorism all over the world— but lately his focus has been right here in the Unites States. Fall 2020 is a time that Bruce Hoffman calls “unprecedented” in its threat level and in the fact that so many threats are domesticated right here in the US. With both a look at history and the present, he sees the US invasion of Iraq as the “original sin, the initial cleavage” in the discord between certain sectors of the public and government institutions in this country. What is going to happen election day and beyond? Are people going to feel free to vote their conscience, all over this country, without feeling threatened? Bruce Hoffman is Shelby Cullom and Kathryn W. Davis senior fellow for counterterrorism and homeland security at the Council on Foreign Relations. He has been studying terrorism and insurgency for four decades. He is a tenured professor at Georgetown University’s Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service, where he is the director of the Center for Jewish Civilization. Hoffman was previously director of both the Center for Security Studies and the Security Studies program from 2010-2017. Hoffman is also visiting professor of terrorism studies at the University of St. Andrews in Scotland. He previously held the corporate chair in counterterrorism and counterinsurgency at the RAND Corporation and was director of RAND’s Washington, DC, office and vice president for external affairs. Appointed by the U.S. Congress to serve as a commissioner on the Independent Commission to Review the FBI’s Post-9/11 Response to Terrorism and Radicalization (9/11 Review Commission), Hoffman was a lead author of the commission’s final report. He was scholar in residence for counterterrorism at the Central Intelligence Agency between 2004 and 2006; an advisor on counterinsurgency to the Strategy, Plans, and Analysis office at Multi-National Forces-Iraq Headquarters in Baghdad, Iraq, from 2004 to 2005; and an advisor on counterterrorism to the Office of National Security Affairs, Coalition Provisional Authority, in Baghdad in 2004. Hoffman was also an advisor to the Iraq Study Group and member of the U.S. Congress–directed review of the curriculum, organization, and staffing of the U.S. National Intelligence University. Hoffman holds degrees in government, history, and international relations and received his doctorate from Oxford University. -------------------------------------- Please consider supporting Talking Beats with Daniel Lelchuk via our Patreon: patreon.com/talkingbeats In addition to early episode access, bonus episodes, and other benefits, you will contribute to us being able to present the highest quality substantive, long-form interviews with the world's most compelling people. We believe that providing a platform for individual expression, free thought, and a diverse array of views is more important now than ever.
38:45
October 20, 2020
Ep. 58: Tommy Emmanuel
“Music is not made to be forced. It’s gotta come through you. It’s easy to play a whole bunch of notes, and play fast, and be impressive. But it’s all about emotion. You gotta tap into the emotion of music.” Legendary guitar virtuoso Tommy Emmanuel is here, talking all things guitar and all things music. This is a tough, unusual time for musicians of all walks of life. In this period, when instead of live concerts all around the world and constant touring, Facebook and other social media live streams are filling the void. What keeps the music going? Daniel also gets Tommy to talk about some of the basics of music as he sees it. What IS an arrangement, and what makes a good arrangement? Why are some songs—maybe all really great music, period—timeless? What is it about a good, simple melody that has such power over the listener? This episode, with one of the world’s master instrumentalists, offers great musical and personal insights. And Tommy even has a surprise for us! Tommy Emmanuel is one of the most distinguished and beloved guitarists in the world. One of six children, Tommy was born in Muswellbrook, New South Wales, Australia, in 1955. He received his first guitar in 1959 at age four and was taught by his mother to accompany her playing lap steel guitar. At the age of six in 1961, he heard Chet Atkins playing on the radio. He vividly remembers that moment and said it greatly inspired him. After their father died in 1966, the Emmanuels settled in Parkes. Tommy Emmanuel eventually moved to Sydney, where he was noticed nationally when he won a string of talent contests in his teen years. By the late 1970s, he was playing drums with his brother Phil in the group Goldrush as well as doing session work on numerous albums and jingles. He gained further prominence in the late 1970s as the lead guitarist in The Southern Star Band, the backing group for vocalist Doug Parkinson. During the early 1980s, he joined the reformed lineup of leading 1970s rock group Dragon, touring widely with it, including a 1987 tour with Tina Turner; he left the group to embark on a solo career. Emmanuel and his brother Phil performed live in Sydney at the closing ceremony of the Summer Olympics in 2000. The event was televised worldwide with an estimated 2.85 billion viewers. In June 2010, Emmanuel was appointed a Member of the Order of Australia (AM). In 2012, Governor Steve Beshear awarded Emmanuel the state of Kentucky's honorific title of Kentucky Colonel. -------------------------------------- Please consider supporting Talking Beats with Daniel Lelchuk via our Patreon: patreon.com/talkingbeats In addition to early episode access, bonus episodes, and other benefits, you will contribute to us being able to present the highest quality substantive, long-form interviews with the world's most compelling people. We believe that providing a platform for individual expression, free thought, and a diverse array of views is more important now than ever.
33:26
October 18, 2020
Ep. 57: Michael Shermer
“All culture is appropriation. No culture invents their culture and says ‘this is ours’ and silos it off from everybody else. Everybody borrows everything." Science historian and best-selling writer Michael Shermer is here. Free speech and free expression have been on his mind lately, and that’s what occupies a lot of the conversation. What’s happening with free speech and campus culture? What is the border between “protected speech” and "acceptable speech?” In addition to discussing Michael’s ten commandments of free speech, he and Daniel also talk about Darwin, and why, for Michael, he is the scientist that fascinates him most. Dr. Michael Shermer is the Founding Publisher of Skeptic magazine, the host of the Science Salon Podcast, and a Presidential Fellow at Chapman University where he teaches Skepticism 101. For 18 years he was a monthly columnist for Scientific American. He is the author of New York Times bestsellers Why People Believe Weird Things and The Believing Brain, Why Darwin Matters, The Science of Good and Evil, The Moral Arc, and Heavens on Earth. His new book is Giving the Devil His Due: Reflections of a Scientific Humanist. Follow @michaelshermer. Michael regularly contributes opinion editorials, essays, and reviews to: the Wall Street Journal, the Los Angeles Times, Science, Nature, and other publications. He wrote 214 consecutive monthly columns for Scientific American. He appeared on such shows as The Colbert Report, 20/20, Dateline, Charlie Rose, Oprah, and Larry King Live (but, proudly, never Jerry Springer!). He has been interviewed in countless documentaries aired on PBS, A&E, Discovery, The History Channel, The Science Channel, and The Learning Channel. Dr. Shermer was the co-host and co-producer of the 13-hour Family Channel television series, Exploring the Unknown. His two TED talks, seen by millions, were voted in the top 100. -------------------------------------- Please consider supporting Talking Beats with Daniel Lelchuk via our Patreon: patreon.com/talkingbeats In addition to early episode access, bonus episodes, and other benefits, you will contribute to us being able to present the highest quality substantive, long-form interviews with the world's most compelling people. We believe that providing a platform for individual expression, free thought, and a diverse array of views is more important now than ever.
47:14
October 16, 2020
Ep. 56: Mayor Adrian Perkins
"A lot of the bigger problems that we have to solve, that computers can't solve at this time, are problems that aren't just black and white that numbers can solve. It takes leaders and staff that are diverse in experience, in educational background-- and art helps with that." On today's program, we are joined by a rising star of the Democratic Party, Mayor Adrian Perkins of Shreveport, Louisiana. The Mayor, who is running for the United States Senate, share his story, inspirations, and dreams in this wide-ranging conversation. He and Daniel speak about his early response to the virus for which he was nationally lauded, the role technology can play in making a city safer and more efficient, and how being a Democrat is very different in Cambridge, Massachusetts (where he went to law school at Harvard) and in Shreveport, Louisiana. He also speaks to the role the humanities and the arts can and should play in American cities. Adrian Perkins is the Mayor of Shreveport, Louisiana. He was born in the Cedar Grove neighborhood of Shreveport, attending Arthur Circle, Youree Drive Middle School, and Captain Shreve High School.  In the wake of 9/11, Adrian Perkins accepted a nomination to the United States Military Academy.  There, he was the captain of the track team and the first African-American graduate elected Class President in West Point's history. Perkins deployed to both Iraq and Afghanistan after graduating from West Point.  He achieved the rank of Captain and Company Commander in the United States Army and was awarded the Bronze Star for his service.  After three tours of duty, the Tillman Foundation accepted Perkins into their Tillman Scholar Program, enabling him to attend Harvard Law School, where he was again elected Student Body President. On April 26, 2018, he announced his candidacy for Mayor of Shreveport, and on December 29th, 2018, Adrian Perkins was installed as the  56th Mayor of Shreveport.  -------------------------------------- Please consider supporting Talking Beats with Daniel Lelchuk via our Patreon: patreon.com/talkingbeats In addition to early episode access, bonus episodes, and other benefits, you will contribute to us being able to present the highest quality substantive, long-form interviews with the world's most compelling people. We believe that providing a platform for individual expression, free thought, and a diverse array of views is more important now than ever.
30:25
October 13, 2020
Ep. 55: Chloé Valdary
"Racism or deep-seated feelings of supremacy come from a gaping hole, a deep feeling of insecurity for which one overcompensates." Writer and activist Chloé Valdary joins the podcast for a discussion of her "Theory of Enchantment" program and her feelings on race in America today. She and Daniel discuss how conversations about race have shifted in the past few years. She also makes reference to James Baldwin and Martin Luther King, Jr. as examples of illustrating how love serves as her guiding principal when dealing with every situation she faces.  After spending a year as a Bartley fellow at the Wall Street Journal, Chloé Valdary developed The Theory of Enchantment, an innovative framework for compassionate antiracism that combines social emotional learning (SEL), character development, and interpersonal growth as tools for leadership development in the boardroom and beyond. Chloé has trained around the world, including in South Africa, The Netherlands, Germany, and Israel. Her clients have included high school and college students, government agencies, business teams, and many more. She has also lectured in universities across America, including Harvard and Georgetown. Her work has been covered in Psychology Today Magazine and her writings have appeared in the New York Times and the Wall Street Journal. -------------------------------------- Please consider supporting Talking Beats with Daniel Lelchuk via our Patreon: patreon.com/talkingbeats In addition to early episode access, bonus episodes, and other benefits, you will contribute to us being able to present the highest quality substantive, long-form interviews with the world's most compelling people. We believe that providing a platform for individual expression, free thought, and a diverse array of views is more important now than ever.
42:52
October 11, 2020
Ep. 54: Jacques Pépin
“I know a lot of professional chefs who are very good technicians, can work very fast, and are relatively lousy cooks.” On today’s program, beloved chef Jacques Pépin returns to the program. A Talking Beats favorite, he is out with a new cookbook, “Quick and Simple.” Chef Pépin is here to discuss the book and other ideas for Fall cooking. We are all a little more willing to turn on the oven and the stove now that the weather is turning cooler. So what should we cook? The chef also offers his tips for turning a simple country meal into bourgeois food and finally, into… Michelin quality! One interesting part of the discussion is the comparison to music that comes up. What do great chefs and great musicians have in common? At the end of the conversation, we hear about the amazing unifying power of food and drink—how food can literally break down barriers between disparate people? Chef Pépin makes the perfect case for it. The winner of sixteen James Beard Awards and author of twenty-nine cookbooks, including "A Grandfather's Lessons," "Jacques Pépin Heart & Soul in the Kitchen," and "Essential Pépin," Jacques Pépin has starred in twelve acclaimed PBS cooking series. He was awarded France's highest distinction, the Legion of Honor. -------------------------------------- Please consider supporting Talking Beats with Daniel Lelchuk via our Patreon: patreon.com/talkingbeats In addition to early episode access, bonus episodes, and other benefits, you will contribute to us being able to present the highest quality substantive, long-form interviews with the world's most compelling people. We believe that providing a platform for individual expression, free thought, and a diverse array of views is more important now than ever.
40:13
October 9, 2020
Ep. 53: Bill Kristol
"On the one hand I hate to see our whole public life taken over by this person, but on the other hand, we asked for it. We made him president." On a special episode devoted to current political analysis, influential commentator Bill Kristol joins the podcast for a look at where we are and where we are going-- or could be going. He makes some fascinating points and has some candid and sharp observations for politicians in office, and especially, those who are retired. He addresses some of the big questions hanging over us all: What will happen if President Trump does not accept the results of the election, and where do conservatives go post-"this period"-- back to the Republican Party? He and Daniel also have a long exchange about Mozart...as it turns out, they share a love for the Italian operas of Mozart/Lorenzo da Ponte, as well as the piano concerti.  Bill Kristol has been a leading participant in American political debates and a widely respected analyst of American political developments for three decades. Having served in senior positions in the Ronald Reagan and George H.W. Bush Administrations, Kristol understands government from the inside; as a professor at the University of Pennsylvania and Harvard University, he has studied American politics and society from the outside. After serving in the Reagan and George H.W. Bush administrations, Kristol founded The Weekly Standard in 1995 and edited the influential magazine for over two decades. Now, as founding director of Defending Democracy Together, an organization dedicated to defending America’s liberal democratic norms, principles, and institutions, Kristol is in the midst of the national debate on issues ranging from American foreign policy to the future of the Republican Party and the meaning of American conservatism. Kristol frequently appears on all the major television talk shows, and also is the host of the highly regarded video series and podcast, Conversations with Bill Kristol. Kristol received his undergraduate degree and his Ph.D. from Harvard University. -------------------------------------- Please consider supporting Talking Beats with Daniel Lelchuk via our Patreon: patreon.com/talkingbeats In addition to early episode access, bonus episodes, and other benefits, you will contribute to us being able to present the highest quality substantive, long-form interviews with the world's most compelling people. We believe that providing a platform for individual expression, free thought, and a diverse array of views is more important now than ever.
42:09
October 8, 2020
Ep. 52: Senator Heidi Heitkamp
“The democratic party has lost the ability to communicate in rural America. We’re trying to figure out how we can better explain policies to rural America, but also how we can better explain rural America to urban America.” Former Senator Heidi Heitkamp (D-ND) joins the podcast to discuss where American politics are right now. She and Daniel talk about her roots in a big working-class family in a small town in North Dakota, her early passion for public service and leadership, and how maybe Americans really are more united than we might think. Can we get back to that place where Republicans and Democrats have passionate political debates over coffee and then go hang the Christmas lights together, as Senator Heitkamp says? The conversation also includes an informative and moving discussion of Native American peoples and their many continued plights in North Dakota and the country. U.S. Senator Heidi Heitkamp served as the first female senator elected from North Dakota from 2013-2019. Senator Heitkamp grew up in a large family in the small town of Mantador, ND. Alongside her six brothers and sisters, she learned the value of hard work and responsibility, leading her to choose a life of public service. During her six years in the U.S. Senate, Senator Heitkamp quickly became a proven senator who worked across the aisle to fight for North Dakotans. Senator Heitkamp personally showed that if senators work together, it can lead to real solutions. Throughout her time in public service, Senator Heitkamp has stood up for tribal communities and worked to improve outcomes for Native American children, women, and families. The first bill she introduced in the Senate, which became law in 2016, created a Commission on Native Children. Her bill with former Senator John McCain became law to create Amber Alerts in Indian Country. She introduced Savanna’s Act to help address the crisis of missing and murdered indigenous women. And she worked to help address the detrimental impact exposure to trauma can have on children and families – particularly those in Native communities. On the Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs, Senator Heitkamp pushed to provide training and resources for first responders and also worked to combat human trafficking in North Dakota, across the country, and around the world. She helped write legislation, which was signed into law, to crack down on trafficking online, which led to the closure of Backpage.com. Senator Heitkamp previously served as North Dakota’s Attorney General, battling drug dealers, protecting senior citizens from scams, and working to keep sexual predators off streets and away from kids, even after their prison terms were up. Senator Heitkamp received a B.A. from the University of North Dakota and a law degree from Lewis and Clark Law School. She currently serves as a contributor to CNBC, She lives in Mandan, North Dakota with her husband, Dr. Darwin Lange, a family practitioner. They have two children, Ali and Nathan. -------------------------------------- Please consider supporting Talking Beats with Daniel Lelchuk via our Patreon: patreon.com/talkingbeats In addition to early episode access, bonus episodes, and other benefits, you will contribute to us being able to present the highest quality substantive, long-form interviews with the world's most compelling people. We believe that providing a platform for individual expression, free thought, and a diverse array of views is more important now than ever.
39:38
October 6, 2020
Ep. 51: Alvin Cailan and Alexandra Cuerdo
“Filipino food is at the center of the social calendar. It’s at the center of how we live our lives. It’s a way of expressing love and it’s a way of expressing community.” Chef Alvin Cailan, one of the country’s most celebrated Filipino chefs, and award-winning director Alexandra Cuerdo are out with a new cookbook all about Filipino food. The book, titled "Amboy: Recipes from the Filipino-American Dream,” paints a rich and exciting picture of Filipino food and Alvin’s melding of tradition and innovation as he brings this food into the kitchens of America. There are almost four million Filipinos in the Unites States. Why is Filipino food not more commonly found? How should we approach making this in our home kitchens? Alvin Cailan's career began with a classical French culinary education at Oregon Culinary Institute, followed b stints at some of the West Coast's finest restaurants. Chef Alvin first grabbed the public's attention as a trailblazer in the culinary world when he launched the Eggslut food truck in Los Angeles.  Chef Alvin is now focusing on his true passion: bolstering the modern Filipino food movement across the country, and today, he is arguably America's most high-profile champion of it. He is planning to open his next restaurant, Amboy, in Los Angeles soon. He has been featured in prestigious publications like Bon Appetit, Food and Wine, and Bloomberg. Alvin is also the host of the hugely popular The Burger Show on the Complex/First We Feast YouTube channel. Alexandra Cuerdo is a writer and director, recently named one of the 100 Most Influential Filipina Women In the World by the Filipina Women's Network. Her feature directorial debut, Ulam: Main Dish, is the first Filipino food documentary to achieve worldwide distribution, which Jonathan Gold called a "love letter" to Filipino food. Her work has been featured in the New York Times, the Los Angeles Times, BuzzFeed, Vogue, TimeOut, Eater and more. She is based in Los Angeles and New York. -------------------------------------- Please consider supporting Talking Beats with Daniel Lelchuk via our Patreon: patreon.com/talkingbeats In addition to early episode access, bonus episodes, and other benefits, you will contribute to us being able to present the highest quality substantive, long-form interviews with the world's most compelling people. We believe that providing a platform for individual expression, free thought, and a diverse array of views is more important now than ever.
43:18
October 4, 2020
Ep. 50: Moshe Safdie
"I try to think that anything I do--it could be a house, it could be a small kindergarten--must reach for the kind of spiritual in the sense of the uplifting and make you feel better as a human being." To mark the 50th episode of Talking Beats with Daniel Lelchuk, legendary architect Moshe Safdie joins the program for a wide-ranging discussion and rare look into the depths of one of the world's great visionaries of buildings. What is the role of an architect? What does the intersection of utility and art look like? Can a physical structure ever contain the spiritual power that great music possesses? How does a master architect, who must delegate, inspire, and ultimately empower those around him, resemble a great maestro standing on the podium in front of an orchestra? This is a must-hear conversation for art lovers the world over. Moshe Safdie is an architect, urban planner, educator, theorist, and author. Over a celebrated 50-year career, Safdie has explored the essential principles of socially responsible design with a distinct visual language. A citizen of Israel, Canada and the United States, Moshe Safdie graduated from McGill University. After apprenticing with Louis I. Kahn in Philadelphia, Safdie returned to Montréal to oversee the master plan for the 1967 World Exhibition. In 1964 he established his own firm to realize Habitat ’67, an adaptation of his undergraduate thesis and a turning point in modern architecture. Author of four books and a frequent essayist and lecturer, Safdie’s global practice includes projects in North and South America, the Middle East, the developing world and throughout Asia and Australia. Projects span a wide range of typologies, including airports, museums, performing arts, libraries, housing, mixed use and entire cities. His honors include the Companion of the Order of Canada, the Gold Medal from both the Royal Architectural Institute of Canada and the American Institute of Architects, la Medaille du Merité from the Order of Architects of Québec, Canada, and Israel’s Rechter Prize. The Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum awarded Mr. Safdie the National Design Award for Lifetime Achievement in 2016. -------------------------------------- Please consider supporting Talking Beats with Daniel Lelchuk via our Patreon: patreon.com/talkingbeats In addition to early episode access, bonus episodes, and other benefits, you will contribute to us being able to present the highest quality substantive, long-form interviews with the world's most compelling people. We believe that providing a platform for individual expression, free thought, and a diverse array of views is more important now than ever.
49:42
October 2, 2020
Ep. 49: Dr. Michael Osterholm
"In a given year, only about 20% of the respiratory illnesses that we see are actually caused by influenza. 80% are caused largely by other viral pathogens." Infectious disease expert Dr. Michael Osterholm joins Daniel for a frank assessment of where we are, at the beginning of October, as we as a country and world continue to navigate the torrid waters of the COVID-19 pandemic. Daniel gets the expert doctor, not exactly known for his optimism, to paint us a picture: How have we done at mitigation? What really is the science and effectiveness behind mask wearing? Can indoor air be trusted? When can we go back to the concert hall? This episode is a must-hear-- a sobering picture of where we are and what we need to do in the coming months.  Dr. Osterholm is Regents Professor, McKnight Presidential Endowed Chair in Public Health, the director of the Center for Infectious Disease Research and Policy (CIDRAP), Distinguished Teaching Professor in the Division of Environmental Health Sciences, School of Public Health, a professor in the Technological Leadership Institute, College of Science and Engineering, and an adjunct professor in the Medical School, all at the University of Minnesota. From June 2018 through May 2019, he served as a Science Envoy for Health Security on behalf of the US Department of State. He is the author of the New York Times best-selling 2017 book, Deadliest Enemy: Our War Against Killer Germs, in which he not only details the most pressing infectious disease threats of our day but lays out a nine-point strategy on how to address them, with preventing a global flu pandemic at the top of the list. In addition, Dr. Osterholm is a member of the National Academy of Medicine (NAM) and the Council of Foreign Relations. In June 2005 Dr. Osterholm was appointed by Michael Leavitt, Secretary of the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), to the newly established National Science Advisory Board on Biosecurity. In July 2008, he was named to the University of Minnesota Academic Health Center’s Academy of Excellence in Health Research. In October 2008, he was appointed to the World Economic Forum Working Group on Pandemics. Dr. Osterholm has also been an international leader on the growing concern regarding the use of biological agents as catastrophic weapons targeting civilian populations. In that role, he served as a personal advisor to the late King Hussein of Jordan. Dr. Osterholm provides a comprehensive and pointed review of America's current state of preparedness for a bioterrorism attack in his New York Times best-selling book, Living Terrors: What America Needs to Know to Survive the Coming Bioterrorist Catastrophe. -------------------------------------- Please consider supporting Talking Beats with Daniel Lelchuk via our Patreon: patreon.com/talkingbeats In addition to early episode access, bonus episodes, and other benefits, you will contribute to us being able to present the highest quality substantive, long-form interviews with the world's most compelling people. We believe that providing a platform for individual expression, free thought, and a diverse array of views is more important now than ever.
36:39
October 1, 2020
Ep. 48: Ambassador Michael McFaul
“Putin wants you to believe that he is a return to Russian traditions and to the glory days when Russia was a revered, respected power in the international system.” Former United States Ambassador to the Russian Federation Michael McFaul comes on Talking Beats to talk all things Russia and all things Putin. One of the biggest issues that he and Daniel talk about is the role of Putin in Russian history— where does he fit in? What is he trying to take Russia forward--or back-- to? Over the past fifteen years, Putin has become more emboldened and more brazen with his actions— what will be next? One of the most seasoned Russia experts in the West, Ambassador McFaul has a unique insider perspective and enormous expertise. Michael McFaul is the Ken Olivier and Angela Nomellini Professor of International Studies in Political Science, Director and Senior Fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies, and the Peter and Helen Bing Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution, all at Stanford University. He is also an analyst for NBC News and a contributing columnist to The Washington Post. McFaul served for five years in the Obama administration, first as Special Assistant to the President and Senior Director for Russian and Eurasian Affairs at the National Security Council at the White House (2009-2012), and then as U.S. Ambassador to the Russian Federation (2012-2014). He has authored several books, most recently the New York Times bestseller,  “From Cold War to Hot Peace: An American Ambassador in Putin’s Russia.”  Earlier books include Advancing Democracy Abroad: Why We Should, How We Can; Transitions To Democracy: A Comparative Perspective  (eds. with Kathryn Stoner); Power and Purpose: American Policy toward Russia after the Cold War (with James Goldgeier); and Russia’s Unfinished Revolution: Political Change from Gorbachev to Putin. His current research interests include American foreign policy, great power relations between China, Russia, and the United States, and the relationship between democracy and development.Prof. McFaul was born and raised in Montana. He received his B.A. in International Relations and Slavic Languages and his M.A. in Soviet and East European Studies from Stanford University in 1986. As a Rhodes Scholar, he completed his D. Phil. in International Relations at Oxford University in 1991. --------------------------------------  Please consider supporting Talking Beats with Daniel Lelchuk via our Patreon: patreon.com/talkingbeats  In addition to early episode access, bonus episodes, and other benefits, you will contribute to us being able to present the highest quality substantive, long-form interviews with the world's most compelling people. We believe that providing a platform for individual expression, free thought, and a diverse array of views is more important now than ever.
38:54
September 29, 2020
Ep. 47: Piet Oudolf
“From the moment I started with plants, I felt it had something deeper than what you saw. It was not just about the flower. It had a special appeal--that there’s something we love about plants because we are part of nature.” On this episode, Dutch garden designer Piet Oudolf joins the podcast. He and Daniel talk about the fundamentals of gardening itself and its enormous appeal— even more so these days in times of COVID. What is it about the act of putting seeds into the earth, tending to them, and gaining aesthetic beauty from them as they grow into plants? Where does this impulse come from? What happens to gardens in winter?  One of the most interesting points of the discussion focuses around place and cultures.. How does a garden designer from rural Holland go about approaching gardens in Michigan, England, or New York? Piet Oudolf is one of the most influential garden designers in the world. He is a leading figure of the "New Perennial" movement — his designs and plant compositions using bold drifts of herbaceous perennials and grasses which are chosen at least as much for their structure as for their flower color. Working primarily with perennial plant varieties, Oudolf practices a naturalistic approach to gardening. Taking a cue from architectural design, Oudolf prioritizes the seasonal life cycle of a plant over decorative considerations like flower or colour. He focuses primarily on structural characteristics, such as leaf or seed pod shape, present before and after a plant has flowered. He has designed some of the most important public gardens in the world, including the landscape for the Venice Biennale, RHS Wisley, Millennium Park Chicago, and the High Line New York City. -------------------------------------- Please consider supporting Talking Beats with Daniel Lelchuk via our Patreon: patreon.com/talkingbeats In addition to early episode access, bonus episodes, and other benefits, you will contribute to us being able to present the highest quality substantive, long-form interviews with the world's most compelling people. We believe that providing a platform for individual expression, free thought, and a diverse array of views is more important now than ever.
34:50
September 27, 2020
Ep. 46: Michael Ian Black
“You’ve got a president who is so wrapped up in his own flawed masculinity that he won’t say that for him to acknowledge this disease is equivalent to him admitting his own weakness, his own powerlessness, his own vulnerability. He won’t wear a mask because he thinks it makes him look weak.” On today’s program, comedian, actor, and writer Michael Ian Black joins the podcast. He is recently out with a new book, entitled “A Better Man: A (Mostly Serious) Letter to My Son.” The book, which takes the form of an extended letter to his college-age son, is both a plea and a roadmap for young boys and men to re-examine what it means to be “manly” and what masculinity really means in the modern world. Long past are the days, according to Michael Ian Black, where masculinity needs to be proven by the classic feats of strength. Yet boys are often afraid to express their emotions, as kids and as they get older— and the results can be disastrous. Is there a remedy for this? Michael Ian Black is a multi-media talent who’s starred in numerous films and TV series, written and/or directed two films, is a prolific author and commentator, and regularly tours the country performing his ribald brand of jokes and observations. He most recently starred in TVLand's “The Jim Gaffigan Show” and Comedy Central’s “Another Period.” He also reprised one of his iconic film roles in Netflix’s “Wet Hot American Summer: Ten Years Later,” and previously in "Wet Hot American Summer: First Day of Camp." His third standup comedy special, “Noted Expert,” was released on Epix. Michael regularly tours the country as a stand-up comedian and lives in Connecticut with his wife and two children. --------------------------------------- Please consider supporting Talking Beats with Daniel Lelchuk via our Patreon: patreon.com/talkingbeats In addition to early episode access, bonus episodes, and other benefits, you will contribute to us being able to present the highest quality substantive, long-form interviews with the world's most compelling people. We believe that providing a platform for individual expression, free thought, and a diverse array of views is more important now than ever.
33:31
September 25, 2020
Ep. 45: Bonnie Glaser
“China is pushing a set of norms and trying to undermine democracies and rule of law around the world and interfering in their societies in ways that is causing a lot of worry.” On this episode, China policy expert Bonnie Glaser joins Daniel to discuss what is happening currently with US-China relations. Where is China building military bases around the world that might shock us? What should Americans think of TikTok, WeChat, and even Zoom? How do Chinese citizens view the surveillance state that is de rigeur in Chinese society? With US-China relations at a low point since at least 1979, the overarching question is: are we headed for an all-out cold war with China? The answer might surprise you. Bonnie S. Glaser is a senior adviser for Asia and the director of the China Power Project at Center for Strategic and International Studies, where she works on issues related to Asia-Pacific security with a focus on Chinese foreign and security policy. She is concomitantly a nonresident fellow with the Lowy Institute in Sydney, Australia, and a senior associate with the Pacific Forum. Ms. Glaser has worked for more than three decades at the intersection of Asia-Pacific geopolitics and U.S. policy. From 2008 to mid-2015, she was a senior adviser with the CSIS Freeman Chair in China Studies, and from 2003 to 2008, she was a senior associate in the CSIS International Security Program. Prior to joining CSIS, she served as a consultant for various U.S. government offices, including the Departments of Defense and State. Ms. Glaser has published widely in academic and policy journals, including the Washington Quarterly, China Quarterly, Asian Survey, International Security, Contemporary Southeast Asia, American Foreign Policy Interests, Far Eastern Economic Review, and Korean Journal of Defense Analysis, as well as in leading newspapers such as the New York Times and International Herald Tribune and in various edited volumes on Asian security. Ms. Glaser received her B.A. in political science from Boston University and her M.A. with concentrations in international economics and Chinese studies from the Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies. --------------------------------- Help support Talking Beats with Daniel Lelchuk via our Patreon: patreon.com/talkingbeats In addition to early episode access, bonus episodes, and other benefits, you will contribute to us being able to present the highest quality substantive, long-form interviews with the world's most compelling people. We believe that providing a platform for individual expression, free thought, and a diverse array of views is more important now than ever.
45:03
September 22, 2020
Ep. 44: James Shapiro
“The reason great works of art sustain themselves for over 400 years whether it’s a Mozart horn concerto or the Tempest is because when that work was created it spoke with great immediacy to its audiences.” James Shapiro, specialist of the works and life of William Shakespeare, joins Talking Beats for a look into the origins of Shakespeare’s popularity in the United States and the role his works play today. Why is Shakespeare taught and read everywhere? Why are his plays so immediately relevant 400 years after the fact? What can we always be learning from the great master dramatist and poet, who is both current and ahead of us at once? Professor James Shapiro of Columbia University is author of Rival Playwrights: Marlowe, Jonson, Shakespeare (1991); Shakespeare and the Jews (1995), which was awarded the Bainton Prize; Oberammergau: The Troubling Story of the World's Most Famous Passion Play (2000); 1599: A Year in the Life of William Shakespeare (2005), winner of the Theatre Book Prize as well as the BBC Samuel Johnson Prize; Contested Will: Who Wrote Shakespeare? (2010), winner of the Lionel Trilling Award in 2011; and 1606: The Year of Lear, which won the James Tait Black Prize. He has co-edited the Columbia Anthology of British Poetry, served as the associate editor of the Columbia History of British Poetry, and edited a volume on Shakespeare in America for the Library of America.  He has also co-authored and presented a 3-hour BBC documentary, The King and the Playwright (2012).  He has been awarded fellowships by the Guggenheim Foundation, the NEH, the Cullman Center for Scholars and Writers, and the Huntington Library.  He is currently at work on a book on Shakespeare in a Divided America.  He serves on the Board of Directors of the Royal Shakespeare Company, and in 2011 was inducted into the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. His most recent book is Shakespeare in a Divided America: What his Plays tell us About our Past and Future. Please consider supporting Talking Beats with Daniel Lelchuk via our Patreon: patreon.com/talkingbeats  In addition to early episode access, bonus episodes, and other benefits, you will contribute to us being able to present the highest quality substantive, long-form interviews with the world's most compelling people. We believe that providing a platform for individual expression, free thought, and a diverse array of views is more important now than ever.
32:57
September 20, 2020
Ep. 43: Melissa Clark
“I’m always curious. I always want to try something new. I’m always delving into the ‘what if.’” On this special episode to coincide with Rosh Hashanah, the Jewish New Year, Melissa Clark returns to the podcast. She and Daniel talk about why Jewish food is so diverse around the world, how there is so much more to Rosh Hashanah than matzo balls and brisket, and her general recommendations for fall cooking. They also go over her current favorite music, which is very different than last time she was on the show! Melissa  Clark has written thirty-eight cookbooks, including her latest, Dinner in French.  Other books include collaborations with some of New York City’s most celebrated chefs, including Daniel Boulud (Braise), David Bouley (East of Paris), Andrew Feinberg (Franny’s), Claudia Fleming (The Last Course), Bruce and Eric Bromberg (Blue Ribbon Cookbook), and former White House pastry chef Bill Yosses (The Perfect Finish). Her work has been honored with awards by the James Beard Foundation and IACP (International Association of Culinary Professionals), and has been selected for the Best Food Writing series. Melissa is a regular guest on the Today show and Rachael Ray. She has also been a judge on Iron Chef America. She’s been a frequent guest host on the NPR radio show The Splendid Table and is a regular guest on The Leonard Lopate Show on WNYC. Please consider supporting Talking Beats with Daniel Lelchuk via our Patreon.  patreon.com/talkingbeats In addition to early episode access, bonus episodes, and other benefits, you will contribute to us being able to present the highest quality substantive, long-form interviews with the world's most compelling people. We believe that providing a platform for individual expression, free thought, and a diverse array of views is more important now than ever. 
29:32
September 18, 2020
Ep. 42: Tom Nichols
"The American unwillingness to think about foreign policy leaves decision makers with a lot of latitude to go on military adventures." Tom Nichols joins the podcast for a discussion about authoritarian regimes around the world and waves of nationalist, populist leaders coming to power in countries the world over. What do Bolsonaro, Duterte, Orban, and Putin have in common? Where does US President Trump fit in? Tom Nichols also address themes from his well-known book The Death of Expertise, and how the internet and social media in particular drive an anti-expert, sometimes anti-knowledge campaign. He also has a strong warning for listeners: stop getting your news from Facebook and Twitter and use good, old-fashioned trusted news sources instead.  Tom Nichols is a U.S. Naval War College University Professor and an adjunct at the U.S. Air Force School of Strategic Force Studies. He is a specialist on Russian affairs, nuclear strategy, NATO issues, and a nationally-known commentator on U.S. politics and national security. He was a staff member in the United States Senate, a fellow at CSIS and the Harvard Kennedy School, and previously taught at Dartmouth, La Salle, and Georgetown. He is also a five-time undefeated 'Jeopardy!' champion, and was noted in the 'Jeopardy!' Hall of Fame after his 1994 appearances as one of the all-time best players of the game. He is the author of the well-known book The Death of Expertise: The Campaign against Established Knowledge and Why it Matters.
34:56
September 15, 2020
Ep. 41: The Carpenter Trio
"Everything is connected ... classical music and the performing arts don't exist in a vacuum. It's imperative that classical musicians know about the world. They have to know how to adapt to the current environment." On this episode, violist David, violinist sister Lauren, and violinist brother Sean join the podcast for a wide-ranging conversation. They and Daniel, who are longtime friends and colleagues on and off the concert stage, discuss what it means to be in classical music in 2020. They also address musical issues that are of note. How has violin playing changed in the past hundred years? Why is Stradivari the gold standard in violin making? What makes Vivaldi so sunny and special? This episode provides an intimate portrait of musical friendships and collaboration and the inner workings of some of the most interesting classical musicians of today.  The Carpenter Trio, consisting of siblings Lauren, David, and Sean, thrills audiences around the world with their virtuosity, passion, and original fresh arrangements. The founders of the Salomé Chamber Orchestra, the Princeton-educated siblings have carved out an unusual and unique place in the music world. In addition to their robust performing careers, they deal rare instruments through their company, Carpenter Fine Violins.
59:05
September 14, 2020
Ep. 40: Seth Jones
"Terrorism has now become much more than religious Jihadist groups. We now see far right, far left, we certainly see ethno-nationalists...it's a broad concept now." On this special episode on the 19th anniversary of the attacks of September 11th, 2001, counter-terrorism expert Seth Jones joins the podcast for a look at the time leading up to 9/11 and what happened in the aftermath, both immediately and gradually. Where did Osama bin Laden come from? Was he the perfect leader to emerge at just the right time to bring Al Qaeda the worldwide infamy it achieved? How did we wake up altered as a nation on September 12th, 2001? Seth Jones and Daniel also take a look at how terrorism itself has evolved in the past nineteen years. Besides the obvious --the rise of social media and its dominance in communication--what else has fundamentally changed? Where are we headed this fall? Seth G. Jones holds the Harold Brown Chair, is director of the Transnational Threats Project, and is a senior adviser to the International Security Program at the Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS). He teaches at Johns Hopkins University’s School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS) and the Center for Homeland Defense and Security (CHDS) at the U.S. Naval Postgraduate School. Prior to joining CSIS, Dr. Jones was the director of the International Security and Defense Policy Center at the RAND Corporation. He also served as representative for the commander, U.S. Special Operations Command, to the assistant secretary of defense for special operations. Before that, he was a plans officer and adviser to the commanding general, U.S. Special Operations Forces, in Afghanistan (Combined Forces Special Operations Component Command–Afghanistan). In 2014, Dr. Jones served on a congressionally mandated panel that reviewed the FBI’s implementation of counterterrorism recommendations contained in the 9/11 Commission Report. Dr. Jones specializes in counterterrorism, counterinsurgency, unconventional warfare, and covert action, including a focus on al Qaeda and ISIS. He is the author of A Covert Action: Reagan, the CIA, and the Cold War Struggle in Poland, Waging Insurgent Warfare, Hunting in the Shadows: The Pursuit of al Qa'ida after 9/11, and In the Graveyard of Empires: America’s War in Afghanistan. Dr. Jones has published articles in a range of journals, such as Foreign Affairs, Foreign Policy, and International Security, as well as newspapers and magazines like the New York Times, Washington Post, and Wall Street Journal. Dr. Jones is a graduate of Bowdoin College and received his M.A. and Ph.D. from the University of Chicago.
42:39
September 11, 2020
Ep. 39: Dr. Abraham Verghese
"Even when it was 'normal,' it was really far from normal. It was the illusion of things being static when in fact they were incredibly dynamic. The normal we're looking to go back to is hardly desirable." Where have physical examinations gone? Will house calls ever come back? How has COVID-19 and its hyper-reliance on the internet and computers oddly brought increased closeness between doctors and patients? On this episode, Dr. Verghese and Daniel take a deep dive into the heart of what it means to be a doctor and what it means to be a patient in 2020. Dr. Verghese highlights especially the importance of culture and history and their influence on the way a doctor interacts with a patient.  Dr. Abraham Verghese is the author of multiple books, including 'My Own Country: A Doctor's Story,' 'The Tennis Partner,' and' Cutting for Stone.' The physician, born in Ethiopia to Indian parents, was awarded the National Humanities Medal by President Obama in 2016. He serves as Senior Associate Chair of the Department of Internal Medicine at Stanford University Medical School. 
39:31
September 8, 2020
Ep. 38: Jonathan Kay
"If people with real scientific credentials are feeling pressure to deny reality on ideological grounds, that, to me is an even more serious problem than our journalistic community being corrupted by these ideological cults." On this episode, find out what's making journalist and free-thought advocate Jonathan Kay optimistic--and maybe not so optimistic. He and Daniel take a deep dive into the current political climate by addressing political correctness in relation to science, the alarming influence of social media trends on society at large, and increasing tendencies at universities to squeeze free speech in the service of ideology.  Jonathan Kay is the senior editor of Quillette and host of the Wrongspeak podcast. He is the author of the books "Among the Truthers" and "Your Move: What Board Games Teach Us About Life" and the former editor in chief of The Walrus. His writing has appeared in The New Republic, The New York Times, Foreign Policy, and the Literary Review of Canada.  
48:28
September 6, 2020
Ep. 37: Ray Chen
"When people feel safe enough to come back to the concert hall I do think we will see a resurgence in classical music." On this episode, noted concert violinist Ray Chen discusses the fascinating, wild times of being a musician during the COVID-19 pandemic. He and Daniel address questions large and small, comfortable and less so. What IS the place of a symphony orchestra right now? What has the classical music world gotten right--and wrong--over the years? How does a musician keep busy when there are few if any concerts? Of course, we also hear what Ray is listening to-- it might surprise you.  Violinist Ray Chen has won a number of international awards and performs as soloist with orchestras all over the world. He is known for his combination of emotion and vitality, whether he is performing in Chicago or Shanghai. He is also passionate about the education of younger generations, reaching out to young classical musicians through his social media channels and fostering online musical communities where music students feel safe, empowered, and motivated. 
39:34
September 4, 2020
Ep. 36: Ambassador Dennis Ross
"Those who have made peace with Israel have also exposed themselves to increased threats from rejectionists in the region." On this episode, Ambassador Dennis Ross talks about what makes a skilled diplomat, the new treaty between the UAE and Israel, and his hopes for future leadership in the Middle East. He also contrasts the 1994 treaty between Israel and Jordan with the 2020 treaty between Israel and the UAE. His favorite music, which is revealed as usual, might surprise you.  Ambassador Dennis Ross, Former Middle East Envoy and the point man for Middle East peace for Presidents George H.W. Bush and Bill Clinton is one of America's most successful and talented diplomats. The Ambassador, who brokered the landmark 1994 peace treaty between Israel and Jordan, also served in important positions under Presidents Reagan and Obama. Currently counselor and William Davidson Distinguished Fellow at The Washington Institute for Near East Policy, Ambassador Ross is also the author of a number of highly-regarded books. His most recent is 'Be Strong and of Good Courage: How Israel's Most Important Leaders Shaped Its Destiny​ (2019),' co-written with his Washington Institute for Near East Policy colleague David Makovsky. 
40:16
September 1, 2020
Ep. 35: Barbara McQuade
"We go about our days thinking more about the safety side of the equation and not necessarily thinking about how every time we give up a little bit of civil liberties we are making ourselves less safe in a different way." Former U.S. Attorney for the Eastern District of Michigan, Barbara McQuade was appointed by President Obama in 2010 and was the first woman to hold the position. She is currently a legal commentator on MSNBC and professor at the University of Michigan Law School. On this episode, she and Daniel talk about her love for teaching, privacy and civil liberties versus government's duty to keep us safe, and the fragile relationship the Department of Justice has with the Executive Branch in our government. 
37:42
August 30, 2020
Ep. 34: Daniel Libeskind
Architect Daniel Libeskind has designed some of the most important cultural structures in the world, including the Jewish Museum Berlin and One World Trade Center. On this episode, he talks about his early life in Poland as a virtuoso accordion player, his entry into the world of drawing and architecture, and how he approaches a new project, from the earliest internal conception through the final result. He also discusses some of his ideas for the future regarding urban living and low-income housing. 
35:34
August 28, 2020
Ep. 33: Suzanne Spaulding
"What happens to US society when public trust in our institutions, such as the just department or the intelligence community, is eroded by malevolent foreign players?" On this episode, Suzanne Spaulding takes listeners on a guided tour of some of the most dire national security threats, with a special emphasis on this fundamental question. National and cyber security expert Suzanne Spaulding has held a number of highly distinguished positions throughout her career including General Counsel for the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence, Legal Adviser to the Director of Central Intelligence’s Nonproliferation Center, and the Presidentially-appointed, Senate-confirmed Under Secretary for the National Protection and Programs Directorate (NPPD) at the Department of Homeland Security. She is currently a member of The Homeland Security Experts Group and Senior Advisor in the International Security program at the Center for Strategic and International Studies.
35:50
August 25, 2020
Ep. 32: Scott Turow
Scott Turow, best-selling novelist and former federal attorney, joins Daniel for a discussion about the intersection of literature and the law-- Scott’s dual passions and professions. 
33:33
August 23, 2020
Ep. 31: Malcolm Nance
Counter terrorism expert Malcolm Nance served twenty years in the US military as a Senior Chief Petty Officer and naval cryptologist and is the best-selling author of numerous books on terrorism and democracy. On this episode, he joins Daniel to discuss the recent poisoning of Alexei Navalny, an overview of Russia's tactics regarding dissidents, and the state of democracies around the world. We also learn what instrument Malcolm played in high school orchestra...it may surprise you!
49:39
August 21, 2020
Ep. 30: Linda Ronstadt
The legendary Linda Ronstadt had a career that spanned five decades, and became one of the most beloved singers in America. During this episode, she and Daniel talk about growing up in a musical family in Arizona, her famous collaboration with Emmylou Harris and Dolly Parton, and her lifelong love for opera.
32:17
August 21, 2020
Ep. 29: Laurence Tribe
Professor Laurence Tribe, legendary constitutional law scholar, joins Daniel for a special episode to discuss the new bi-partisan report from the Senate Intelligence Committee regarding Russia and the 2016 U.S. elections. They also explore Professor Tribe's passion for teaching and of course his taste in music.
29:15
August 19, 2020
Ep. 28: Dr. Eric Topol
Dr. Eric Topol is the Founder and Director of the Scripps Research Translational Institute and the author of three bestseller books on the future of medicine: The Creative Destruction of Medicine, The Patient Will See You Now, and Deep Medicine: How Artificial Intelligence Can Make Healthcare Human Again. On this episode, he and Daniel explore the possibility of a more humanistic doctor-patient relationship through AI, as well as Dr. Topol’s hopes and fears for both the short and long term.
36:19
August 18, 2020
Ep. 27: Jennifer Ackerman
Jennifer Ackerman is the best-selling author of 'The Genius of Birds.' On this episode, she and Daniel explore the amazingly complex and varied world of bird patterns, communication, and emotions-- a field relatively unfamiliar to the public at large until recent years. 
32:01
August 16, 2020
Ep. 26: Lt. Col. Dan Hampton
Lieutenant Colonel (Ret.) Dan Hampton flew 151 combat missions during his twenty distinguished years (1986–2006) in the United States Air Force and is the best selling author of Viper Pilot: A Memoir of Air Combat and Lords of the Sky. On this episode, he and Daniel discuss his new book, Operation Vengeance, which tells the harrowing story of the American military operation to kill Admiral Isoroku Yamamoto, the mastermind of the attacks at Pearl Harbor.
30:38
August 14, 2020
Ep. 25: Charlie Sykes
Political commentator Charlie Sykes. One of the most well-known conservative voices for decades, he shares his hopes and and political ideas for the 2020 election and beyond. His favorite music might come as a surprise...
34:46
August 11, 2020
Ep. 24: Germain Louvet
Germain Louvet is a star principal dancer at the Ballet of the Opéra de Paris. On this episode, he and Daniel discuss the ever-evolving art form and some of the most important figures that moved ballet through the 20th century and continue to do so in the 21st. 
32:51
August 9, 2020
Ep. 23: Sashi Brown
Sashi Brown, attorney and sports executive, has served as Chief Legal Counsel to the Jacksonville Jaguars and General Manager for the Cleveland Browns. He is Currently Chief Planning and Operations Officer of the basketball properties at Monumental Sports & Entertainment, including the NBA’s Wizards and the WNBA’s Mystics. On this episode, he discusses his passion for music, sports, and the law, and role professional athletes play in the world outside sports.
30:05
August 7, 2020
Ep. 22: Larry Tye
Larry Tye is the best-selling author of Bobby Kennedy: The Making of a Liberal Icon and Home Lands. On this episode, he and Daniel take a deep dive into his new book, Demagogue: The Life and Long Shadow of Senator Joe McCarthy.
37:35
August 4, 2020
Ep. 21: Nadieh Bremer
Award-winning data visualization designer and astronomer Nadieh Bremer. On this episode, she discusses how she makes complex data come alive with clarity and beauty. She and Daniel also discuss her major recent project using data from the Hubble Space Telescope for Physics Today.
33:26
August 2, 2020
Ep. 20: Amy Tan
The writer of numerous well-known novels as well as works of nonfiction, Amy Tan joins Daniel in this rare interview for a look into literature, culture, and music. Amy Tan also shares details about her love for opera--- her greatest musical passion. 
43:21
July 31, 2020
Ep. 19: David Frum
David Frum is a senior editor at The Atlantic. From 2014 through 2017, he served as chairman of the board of trustees of the leading UK center-right think tank, Policy Exchange. 'TRUMPOCALYPSE: Restoring American Democracy' is his most recent book. On this episode, he and Daniel take a dive into the November elections, examine the state of free speech, and of course cover some favorite musical choices.
37:49
July 28, 2020
Ep. 18: Chantal Joffe
Acclaimed British artist Chantal Joffe is known for her paintings that blend brutal honesty and familial intimacy. In this extraordinary and rare interview, she brings us behind the scenes to talk about the private process of portrait painting and the artistic inspirations that feed her and provide both stimulation and comfort.
27:53
July 26, 2020
Ep. 17: Julian Lage
Virtuoso jazz guitarist Julian Lage. The former child-prodigy turned beloved mature artist, Lage writes music of a unique and beguiling sound world. In this conversation, he and Daniel discuss musical role models and favorite artists, the up and downsides of social media for the musical development of young people, and ultimately the importance of the examination of one’s self for the artistic process.
35:20
July 24, 2020
Ep. 16: Dr. Alexandra Solomon
Dr. Alexandra H. Solomon is a clinical assistant professor in the Department of Psychology at Northwestern University and a licensed clinical psychologist at The Family Institute at Northwestern University. The author of numerous books, her work has been featured on The Today Show, O Magazine, The Atlantic, Vogue, and Scientific American. On this episode, she discusses her practice with Daniel and the toll the global pandemic is taking on families and relationships. 
35:48
July 21, 2020
Ep. 15: Anders Osborne
Songwriter and guitarist Anders Osborne is known and beloved for the deep personal quality and raw emotion he mixes with supreme guitar mastery. In this intimate conversation, he discusses what Daniel calls “life to music”— how crucial it is for real experiences and true living to mold his textual and musical creations.
28:44
July 19, 2020
Ep. 14: Jacques Pépin
Esteemed culinary authority, chef, educator, and television food personality Jacques Pépin joins Daniel for an in-depth look at his fascinating life and unique career. They discuss his childhood and the war years, his stint in Paris, and his move to America in 1959. Also covered is his love for music and the philanthropic work of his foundation.
33:37
July 17, 2020
Ep. 13: Nancy Maveety
Nancy Maveety returns to talk about the late, historic wrapping-up of this term of the United States Supreme Court. The major cases she discusses regard President Trump's tax returns, federal jurisdiction on Indian reservations in Oklahoma, and the role of faithless electors in our elections. Professor Maveety has written numerous books about the Supreme Court and is Chair of Political Science at Tulane University. 
37:38
July 14, 2020
Episode #12: Wynonna Judd
Legendary country music singer and guitarist Wynonna Judd joins Daniel for a wide-ranging conversation. They discuss her earliest memories with music, her creative process, and her lifelong musical inspirations. It is an intimate portrait of one of America's best-loved musicians. 
39:42
July 10, 2020
Episode #11: Dr. Jonathan Raskin
Dr. Jonathan Raskin, MD is a pulmonologist at both Lenox Hill Hospital and Mt. Sinai Hospital in New York. He contracted COVID-19 in late February. On this episode he shares his harrowing story, which includes two weeks in the ICU, and details of the battle of his lifetime. 
30:13
July 7, 2020
Episode #10: Melissa Clark
Melissa Clark is food columnist for the New York Times and author of over three dozen cookbooks including 'Cook this Now,' 'Chef Interrupted,' and 'Dinner in French.' On this episode she discusses her early love for food, her time studying professional chefs in restaurant kitchens, and even her deep love of opera. 
31:50
July 3, 2020
Episode #9: Robert Siegel
Robert Siegel was host of National Public Radio's 'All Things Considered' for 35 years. The award-winning radio journalist discusses his early beginnings in covering the news, the role of major media organizations, and the changing nature of NPR. 
23:09
June 30, 2020
Episode #8: Harry Shearer
Harry Shearer is the voice behind more than 25 characters on 'The Simpsons.' He is also a former cast member of 'Saturday Night Live,' co-creator and co-star of 'This is Spinal Tap,' and host of the nationally syndicated public radio program 'Le Show.' On this episode, he discusses everything from his eclectic musical tastes to the nature of satire. 
31:10
June 26, 2020
Episode #7: Nancy Maveety
Nancy Maveety, a pre-eminent scholar of the United States Supreme Court, discusses major recent decisions and the role Chief Justice John Roberts plays in shaping the highest court and its perception by the public. Prof. Nancy Maveety is the author of highly regarded books including Representation Rights and the Burger Years, Queen's Court: Judicial Power in the Rehnquist Era, and Justice Sandra Day O'Connor: Strategist on the Supreme Court. She is the Chair of the Department of Political Science at Tulane University. 
39:57
June 23, 2020
Episode #6: January LaVoy
January LaVoy is one of the most celebrated voice actors and book narrators in the country. She has recorded hundreds of books from the Star Wars franchise to works of John Grisham, Harlan Coben, Marcia Clark, James Patterson, and many others. She is also known for her Broadway and TV roles, including starring as Noelle Ortiz on the ABC daytime drama One Life to Live.
27:37
June 19, 2020
Episode #5: Dr. Eddie Glaude, Jr.
Distinguished University Professor of African American Studies at Princeton University, Dr. Glaude is the highly respected author of Democracy in Black: How Race Still Enslaves the American Soul and other books.  
23:39
June 16, 2020
Episode #4: Dr. Alex Shalek
Dr. Alex Shalek is Professor of Chemistry at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and an Associate Member of the Ragon Institute of Harvard, MIT, and the Massachusetts General Hospital. He studies how cells collectively perform systems-level functions in healthy and diseased states and has been studying the effects of COVID-19 on the cellular system. 
27:57
June 13, 2020
Episode #3: Dr. Sunetra Gupta
Dr. Sunetra Gupta, award-winning Professor of Theoretical Epidemiology at Oxford University, discusses the coronavirus pandemic, its dangers, and the disastrous effects lockdowns have on migrant workers.  
26:56
June 9, 2020
Episode #2: Drew Faust
Drew Faust is President Emerita of Harvard University, the first woman president in the history of the University. A renowned historian, she is the author of the best-selling 'This Republic of Suffering: Death and the American Civil War.'
29:13
May 26, 2020
Episode #1: Walter Isaacson
Walter Isaacson is best-selling author of biographies on Albert Einstein, Benjamin Franklin, Leonardo da Vinci, and more.  He is former managing editor of TIME Magazine and CEO of CNN and The Aspen Institute.  He is University Professor at Tulane and co-host of Amanpour and Co. on PBS. 
32:19
May 19, 2020
Trailer
Welcome to Talking Beats with Daniel Lelchuk, the new podcast where extraordinary individuals from all walks of life share their lives, their work, and of course, their favorite music. 
00:51
May 15, 2020