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Fascinating People, Fascinating Places

Fascinating People, Fascinating Places

By Daniel Mainwaring
Weekly History podcast from Dan Mainwaring featuring the most Fascinating People and Places. Interviews, articles and more from around the world.
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Tony's List: Saddam and The Students
As the Cold War was winding down, a group of 11 East European teenagers -- barely known to each other -- appeared on the playground at St. Mary's Roman Catholic School in Bishop's Stortford, a quiet town 30 miles from London. How would the town, and their new classmates react to their arrival? And why had they come? In this peculiar three-part story, I recount a tale of daredevil escape, a fake passport, war, the end of communism, and the remarkable story of these 11 people.
25:02
August 12, 2022
Wagga Wagga: World War I Stories
Wagga Wagga: World War 1 Stories On commemorative occasion such as Anzac and Memorial Day, we inevitably reflect on the service of prior generations in The First World War as well as other conflicts. But while these service men and women fought bravely during the conflict, how did the war fit in with their broader lives? Its a topic that Historian Ian Hodges of The Australian Department of Veteran’s affairs has been exploring with regard to World War I. The conflict that saw Australia forge a national identity distinct from the broader British Empire and one that saw the creation of The Australian Imperial Force the nation’s first military force equipped for overseas conflict. To show the affect of the war he focused on one particular city located about 300 miles inland from Australia. It’s somewhat off the beaten bath and a name few outside South Eastern Australia are probably familiar with. Is it pronounced Wagga Wagga? Guest Expert: Ian Hodges of The Australian Department of Veteran’s Affairs Picture: Dept of Lands, Sydney - cropped from old map "County of Wynyard, New South Wales, 1897" at the National Library of Australia, located here Wagga Wagga in 1897 Public Domain File:Wagga Wagga map 1897.jpg Created: 1 January 1897 Music: English: Elgar; Enigma variations, Theme IX. Nimrod Date 1 January 1947 Source https://archive.org/details/EdwardElgar-EnigmaVariations/01ThemeI.C.a.e..mp3 Author John Barbirolli Halle Orchestra, Public Domain
26:25
August 05, 2022
Robespierre: The Reign of Terror
Robespierre: The Reign of Terror On 21 January 1793, a gruesome scene unfolded at the place de la revolution in Paris. After attempting to address the crowd only to have his words drowned out by drums, King Louis XVI the King of France was decapitated by the Guillotine. Spectators rushed forward and soaked their handkerchiefs in his blood to create a macabre souvenir of the event. A critical figure in the demise of Louis XVI was the revolutionary Maximilien Robespierre. He had argued that giving the King a trial would undermine the Republic. His fate was already sealed. As he put it, Louis must perish because our country must live. But just one year later, the incorruptible revolutionary, and reformer would meet the same fate on the very same spot. In this episode, I examine the life or Maximilian Robespierre, his development from a precocious child into a lawyer, then a revolutionary and ultimately – in the eyes of many – a tyrant. SPECIAL GUEST:  Marisa Linton Professor Emerita at Kingston University in London. I am a historian of the French Revolution, also eighteenth-century politics and the Enlightenment. I have written numerous books and articles on the politics of the French Revolution, including, Choosing Terror: Virtue, Friendship and Authenticity in the French Revolution (Oxford University Press, 2013), and, most recently, Terror: The French Revolution and its Demons, with Michel Biard (Polity Press, 2021). I also work as a historical consultant. I am currently working on a study of four leaders of the French Revolution – Maximilien Robespierre, Georges Danton, Louis-Antoine Saint-Just, and Camille Desmoulins. Music: Pixabay Picture: Portrait of Maximilien Robespierre, artist unknown. Public Domain
30:14
July 29, 2022
The Songhai Empire: Africa's Forgotten Super State
On the periphery of the Malian city of Gao, close to the banks of the River Niger, sits an extraordinary pyramid-like structure. Standing 17 meters tall, and reportedly constructed with mud and wood shipped in from Mecca, some 7,000 kilometers away, it is known as the Tomb of Askia. And is believed to be the last resting place of Askia Mohamed I a man who ruled one of Africa’s largest yet less remembered superstates: The Songhai Empire. In this episode, I detail the key events in the meteoric rise and the spectacular demise of this extraordinary empire. And I talk to an expert, professor Mauro Nobili of the Univ of Illinois. His areas of expertise include Mali, Islam, and Arabic manuscripts in West Africa. His published works include Sultan, Caliph, and renewer of the faith Ahmad Lobbo, the Tārīkh al-fattāsh, and the making of an Islamic state in West Africa.Guest speaker: Prof. Mauro Nobili University of Illinois Urbana ChampaignGuest Bio: I am a historian of pre-colonial and early-colonial West Africa, with a specific interest in the area of the modern Republic of Mali and the town of Timbuktu. My special focus is on Muslim societies of the region and their Arabic manuscript heritage. I conduct research in several collections of Arabic manuscripts from West Africa, stored in public or private libraries in Africa (Mali, Nigeria, Senegal, Niger, Ghana, and Ivory Coast), Europe (Denmark and France), and North America (USA). I have worked and published on topics linked to Arabic calligraphies and script styles, Islamic eschatology, genealogies, and the West African chronicle tradition.  My current project is an original study of the Timbuktu chronicle known as the Tārīkh al-fattāsh. The chronicle’s complex genesis and authorship is still shrouded in mystery. Notwithstanding the efforts of several scholars, the major obstacle has been the limited access to the actual manuscripts of the chronicle. My research thus comprises an effort to collect all the available manuscript copies of the Tārīkh al-fattāsh, on the basis of which I am producing an innovative analysis of the text. My study is revealing that the Tārīkh al-fattāsh is a novel chronicle written in the 19th century, and not the effort of three generations of scholars who worked on it starting from the early 16th century and eventually interpolated in the 19th century, as previously advanced by most scholars. This 19th-century Tārīkh al-fattāsh was composed by a substantial rework of a 17th-century anonymous work. The manuscripts available allow for a new, comparative edition of the two texts. My work is re-instating the two works to their historical periods and, by throwing light on the political and ideological motivations that lie under their production, as well as the usage of the chronicle themselves, is contributing to improving our knowledge of the intellectual history of West Africa, from the post-medieval period to the immediate pre-colonial time.Mauro's selected works: Amazon booksThe following music was used for this media project:Music: Heroes Of A Thousand Battles by MusicLFilesFree download: https://filmmusic.io/song/8099-heroes-of-a-thousand-battlesLicense (CC BY 4.0): https://filmmusic.io/standard-licenseArtist website: https://cemmusicproject.wixsite.com/musiclibraryfilesPhoto: The Tomb of Askia 
25:58
July 22, 2022
Apartheid South Africa with Gabeba Baderoon
In the years after World War II, hundreds of millions of Africans experienced newfound independence after decades or in some cases centuries of Colonialism.  But in South Africa, the descendants of white settlers, and other European immigrants increased the subjugation of 90 percent of the populace through overtly racist policies under the umbrella term of Apartheid. During the Apartheid era, non-whites couldn't vote, marry, go to school with, or live alongside whites. Many also lost citizenship rights in their own nation.Gabeba Baderoon grew up in this era but as a young woman saw the end of Apartheid.  She is now an Associate Professor of  Women's, Gender and Sexuality Studies, and African Studies at Penn State. Gabeba is also an award-winning poet. In this episode, I talk to Gabeba about South African society under apartheid both broadly and from her own personal experiences.Gabeba Baderoon's work: Amazon profileMusic: PixabayPhoto: An example Apartheid segregation photo 12345 Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 4.0
36:38
July 15, 2022
Australian Penal Transportation (British Crime and Punishment Part Two)
On the 29 April 1770, two men attempted to stop the disembarkation of a group of strange and unwelcome visitors on a beach in what came to be known as Botany Bay in Australia. The interlopers were lead by Captain James Cook of the British Royal Navy, and they were the first Europeans to make landfall in Eastern Australia. This incident had huge ramifications not just for the native Australians but also for people 10,000 miles away in Britain. With the so-called bloody code in force, Britons could face the death penalty for over 200 hundred offences. But the government lacked the infrastructure and the public the appetite for execution on an industrial scale. Australia provided a new avenue for the punishment of criminals. In this episode I discuss penal transportation with historian Brad Manera, Senior Historian and Curator of the Anzac Memorial in Hyde Park, Sydney. He co-authored Australia’s submission to UNESCO which resulted in 11 penal transportation locations in the being listed as World Heritage sites. I began our conversation by asking him to explain the origins of Britain’s Australian colonies. Music: Pixabay Picture: A Guard tower at Port Arthur Penal colony, Tasmania Mundoo Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 4.0 Port Arthur Guard tower.jpg
25:04
July 08, 2022
The Bloody Code : British Crime and Punishment (Part One)
In the 18th and 19th centuries, Britons were subject to a penal system including up to 220 crimes punishable by death. These offences ranged from murder to theft, from arson to wearing blackface while poaching. Even young children, were subject to these draconian penalties. In this episode I explore the era of the so-called "bloody code" and explain how it developed, the level of enforcement, and the reasons for its demise. In this documentary style episode I interview two experts on this era in British History. Dr. Simon Devereaux Associate Professor (History) and Undergraduate Advisor at the University of Victoria Creator of the website The Old Bailey Condemned, 1730-1837 The Visitations of Horace Cotton, Ordinary of Newgate, 1823-1838 (London Records Society, forthcoming) Dr. John Walliss is senior lecturer in criminology in the School of Social Sciences, Liverpool Hope University, UK. His works include: The Bloody Code in England and Wales, 1760–1830  https://lawcrimehistory.pubpub.org/pub/cb2hj558/release/1  https://pearl.plymouth.ac.uk/handle/10026.1/8937 Music and sound: Pixabay
46:54
July 01, 2022
Morris Dancing - The Peculiar British Tradition
Morris dancing -- a traditional type of British folk dance is synonymous with villages fairs and men dressed in white dancing with wooden sticks. But there are many more elements to "Morris" that the stereotypes we are familiar with. In this episode, I explore its origins, and learn how it has expanded around the globe. Today's guests:  Peter Austin, "Bagman" of The Morris Ring - The founding National Association of Morris and Sword Dance Clubs in Britain. Cat Van't Hof & Nat James of the Brandragon Morris in Melbourne, Australia. To learn more about these groups see below: https://themorrisring.org/ In 1934 the Cambridge Morris Men invited five other teams to join them in the formation of a national organisation, the result was that five of the revival clubs - Cambridge, Letchworth, Thaxted, East Surrey and Greensleeves - met at Thaxted in Essex on the 11th May that year to inaugurate The Morris Ring. Cambridge Morris Men describe the start of Morris in Cambridge during the winter of 1911/12 in the 1949 booklet 50 Years of Morris Dancing. Oxford were not at Thaxted, however they sent their apologies and were there in spirit, and agreed with the suggested constitution for the Ring. Helmond Morris(link is external) was the first group to start outside of the UK - in 1935. They even danced during the dark years of World War II! http://brandragon.morris.org.au/ Founded in 2001, we are Melbourne’s only North West Morris Side. What is Morris Dancing? It is traditional English folk dancing! The North West style is done in formations of 4, 6 or 8 dancers – to live music. We wear heavy clogs which were worn in the factories of England during the time just after the Industrial Revolution. The dancing steps are quite simple, but the dancers create interesting visual patterns which comes from hours of practise. If you would like to try Morris dancing, please contact us and come along to a practise any time! We also welcome new musicians to join us! Our current band has members who play the melodeon, the recorder, the drum and other percussion instruments. Music from Pixabay Photo: Morris dancing at Port Sunlight.jpg Morris dancing at the 2011 Port Sunlight Festival, Wirral, England. Reptonix free Creative Commons licensed photos Creative Commons Attribution 3.0
35:21
June 23, 2022
Witches of Denmark
Witches have existed in Denmark since primitive times. Though in the past, many were categorized as "cunning folk" since they were concerned with good deeds rather than ill. But in the late 16th century, anyone carrying around runes, whipping up potions, or practicing traditional folklore suddenly found themselves in danger. King Christian IV, developed a preoccupation with all forms of witchcraft. His definition included practically anything religious or spiritual outside of conventional Lutheranism. What followed were a series of witch hunts that saw huge numbers of innocent people burnt at the stake. In this episode I investigate the witches of Denmark. Their origins, their practices, and how the good were for a time treated differently from the bad.  Audio from Pixabay
26:43
June 17, 2022
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00:30
June 16, 2022
Rome's 5 Craziest Emperors (Episode 1) Commodus
The Roman Emperor Commodus is best know for Joaquin Phoenix's portrayal of him in the movie Gladiator. There is little doubt the ranks as one of Rome's craziest emperors. In this Wednesday bonus mini-cast, I separate fact from fiction and examine the man behind the legend. Pictures credit: Actor Joaquin Phoenix at the 68th Berlin International Film Festival 2018 Harald Krichel Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Russell Crowe (34450751620).jpg Russell Crowe Eva Rinaldi from Sydney Australia Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 2.0 Empereur Commode.JPG Tête de l'empereur Commode, musée d'Éphèse, Selçuk, Turquie. Bachelot Pierre J-P Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0
04:12
June 15, 2022
The Druids with Ellen Evert Hopman
Druids are synonymous with Stonehenge and the Summer Solstice but are these modern druids representative of their ancient forbears? And who exactly were the druids? Many people base their knowledge of the druids on brief remarks made by Roman Emperor Julius Caesar. But, there are many other sources – from Ireland – that provide us with much more information on this ancient group. In this episode, I talk to author and Druid Priestess Ellen Evert Hopman, of the Tribe of the Oak Druid Grove.  In her books A Legacy of Druids, and Being a Pagan she researched modern-day druids. We discuss contemporary Druidism as well as the ancient rituals and traditions of the group. Credits: Interviewee: Ellen Evert Hopman Personal Website: www.elleneverthopman.com Group website: www.tribeoftheoak.com Audio: Pixabay Image: Queen Maeve and the Druid. Stephen Reid. Public Domain.
27:00
June 09, 2022
Putin's False Flag: The Moscow Apartment Bombings of 1999
On 13 September 1999 Gennadiy Seleznyov speaker of the Duma announced to the Russian parliament that a terrorist attack had hit the remote and hitherto unremarkable city of Volgodonsk. The bombing did occur but not until 3 days later. But it was this incident in conjunction with other bombings that set in motion a series of events that salvaged the reputation of President Boris Yeltsin and laid the stage for his protege Vladimir Putin to come to power. But Selezynyovs apparent clairvoyance wasn’t the only indication that something more sinister was afoot. And many people believe the second Chechen war was launched on the basis of a false flag attack concocted by Vladimir Putin. In this episode, I talk to the acclaimed journalist David Satter – formerly the Moscow correspondent for The Financial Times, and special correspondent for The Wall Street Journal. He was the first investigative reporter to detail what he believes was a bloody conspiracy to bring Putin to power. Aside from his journalistic work, David Satter has written five books about Russia including Age of Delirium: The Decline and Fall of the Soviet Union which was adapted into a documentary film, and more recently he authored The Less You Know, The Better You Sleep: Russia's Road to Terror and Dictatorship under Yeltsin and Putin. In December 2013, he was expelled from Russia having been accused of violating migration laws. A claim that he denies and has been widely derided. Like many before and since his real crime appears to have been His actual offense appears to have been his efforts to expose the true nature of an opaque and sinister regime. Music and Sound: Pixabay Guests: David Satter (on Wikipedia) Audio: Public domain Cover photo: Vladimir Putin Creative Commons
26:53
June 05, 2022
Everton Football Club: Success, Stagnation & Aspiration
Founded in 1878, Everton are nine times English football champions but recent decades have seen the club slide into mediocrity. In this episode, I talk to fans who witnessed relegation in the 1950s, The Golden Vision and Holy Trinity of the 1960s, the pinnacle of success in the 1980s, and the rollercoaster ride since. Featured Interviewees: Isaac Chisnall Dominic Hodgson Derek Knox Lyndon Lloyd John McFarlane Ant Welsh Picture: Everton F.C. team 1909 public domain Music/sound: BBC
27:30
May 25, 2022
Astronomer and Astronaut: Hubble from each perspective with Steven Hawley
Heroes of Space. Part III In 1990, astronaut Steven Hawley deployed the Hubble telescope in space as part of the crew of the space shuttle Discovery. Kansas-born Hawley was among the civilians selected to be part of the space program on the basis of his expertise in a specific area: astronomy. One of his subsequent trips into space involved completing maintenance on HST. More recently, he has used it at ground level during his research work. In this episode, I talk to Professor Hawley about Hubble, his time as an astronaut, and the impact of HST. Featuring: Professor Steven Hawley Music: Pixabay Sound and pictures: public domain from NASA
27:18
May 12, 2022
The Space Race with Historian Dr. Cathleen Lewis
Heroes of Space. Part II In the aftermath of World War II, the United States and USSR quickly turned their attention to space. In this episode, I talk to one of the world's leading experts on space history: Dr. Cathleen Lewis curator of International Space Programs and Spacesuits at the Smithsonian Institution’s National Air and Space Museum. We discuss the early efforts to send animals and later humans into space. The culture of the competing space programs including the role of women, and the technological developments that took us from Sputnik to the Space Shuttle. Contributors: Dr. Cathleen Lewis Ph.D. George Washington University. Music: Pixabay Audio: Sputnik's radio beep 1957. Neil Armstrong speech on the moon landing. Apollo 13 radio call. Harrison Schmidt moon recording. Courtesy of NASA Public Domain Image: Astronaut Edwin E. Aldrin, Lunar Module (LM) pilot, salutes the U.S. flag. Public Domain NASA
24:28
May 07, 2022
Gallipoli Part Two: The Forging of The Anzacs
The Anzac landings in Gallipoli quickly descend into chaos as Braund and other commanders try to lead their men to victory against overwhelming odds.  In this episode, I explore the story of the tragic tale of George Braund, Henry Edward White, and so many others. I interview two experts in the field: Brad Manera, and Ian Hodges, who provide fascinating insights into the battle, the legacy of Gallipoli, and how it helped forge the Anzac and Australian identities. With thanks to: Brad Manera, Senior Historian, and Curator of The Anzac Memorial Ian Hodges, Historian from the Australian Department of Veteran's Affairs Advance Australia Fair recorded 1915, courtesy of The British Zonophone Company. Public Domain Herbert Asquith recording 1909. Public Domain Simon Jackson as the voice of Lt William Malone Jack Timothy as the voice of the government clerk Sound Effect from Pixabay National Archives of Australia
35:07
April 30, 2022
Gallipoli Part One: For King and Empire
In August 1914, New South Wales politician George Braund was tasked with forming the 2nd Infantry Battalion of the newly created Australian Imperial Force. One of his recruits was Henry Edward White. Both men had some prior military experience, and like many of their countrymen, they had been born in England. When the call came to defend the British Empire against the Central Powers of Europe, they quickly enlisted and within a few months set sail for Europe. But they never reached the proposed journey's end: training grounds in England. Instead, they were unexpectedly propelled into action in the Gallipoli peninsula.  In this episode, I explore the story of these two soldiers and the evolution of the Australian armed forces prior to and during the tragic yet heroic events of Gallipoli. I interview two experts in the field: Brad Manera, and Ian Hodges, who provide fascinating insights into the background, the people, and the events that helped to forge the national identity of a nation. With thanks to: Brad Manera, Senior Historian, and Curator of The Anzac Memorial Ian Hodges, Historian from the Australian Department of Veteran's Affairs Advance Australia Fair recorded 1915, courtesy of The British Zonophone Company. Public Domain Herbert Asquith recording 1909. Public Domain Simon Jackson as the voice of Lt William Malone Jack Timothy as the voice of the government clerk Sound Effect from Pixabay National Archives of Australia
33:05
April 23, 2022
Explore Your Carlow or Irish Roots
Do you have Irish ancestry? Are you intrigued about the history of Carlow? John Kelly of the Carlow Historical and Archaeological Society offers advice and resources for anyone thinking of making a visit or delving into genealogical research. This is bonus content attached to The Battle of Carlow and the 1798 Irish Rebellion episode. Links:  Carlow Historical and Archaeological Society Carloviana Archives Irish Genealogy Free National Site Roots Ireland
02:47
April 08, 2022
The Battle of Carlow and the 1798 Irish Rebellion
On the 24 May 1798, simultaneous revolts across cities and towns in Ireland signified the start of the long anticipated Irish rebellion. The insurectionists -- many of whom were members of The Society of United Irishmen -- were both protestant and catholic, rich and poor. But they shared a vision of an Irish republic -- free from British rule. In this episode, I investigate the events surrounding the rebellion, recall its progress and aftermath with a focus on events in the small South Eastern town of Carlow. Professor Thomas Bartlett, Emeritus Professor at the University of Aberdeen, is one of the leading experts on Irish history in this era. He provides his insights on the background to the rebellion and the events that unfolded. Additionally, historian John Kelly, Editor of The Carloviana, and member of The Carlow Histrocial and Archeaological Society shares his expertise on the tragic events in Carlow.  Credits: Guest interviewees: Prof. Thomas Bartlett John Kelly Audio: Boolavogue performed by Sarak Kinsella Sound Effects from Pixabay Additional Resources: Carlow Historical and Archeaological Society Carloviana
36:22
April 08, 2022
Westboro Baptist Church: Shirley Phelps-Roper Interview
When you hear people talk about zealots and religious hate groups, you tend to think of some dour old cave dweller with a long beard or a 17th century puritan with an obscenely large and seemingly unnecessary buckle on his hat. You don’t typically think of a smiling, colorfully dressed, personable wife and mother who drops terms of endearment like “hun” into conversation while discussing serious topics such as hellfire and brimstone. But just down the road from where I live here in Kansas, a small Calvinist protestant congregation – the Westboro baptist church – has made international headlines for their novel approach to funerals. Instead of offering flowers and sympathy cards and attending services for friends and family, they hold signs proclaiming damnation for the deceased and frequently show up at the funerals of strangers. They’ve also been particularly critical of anyone engaged in sexual activity outside of procreation and male/female marriage. In fact today, here in Kansas City they are holding a protest against comedian Jim Gaffigan who as they put it was raised in the grotesque idolatry and perversion of the catholic pedophile machine. As a Catholic myself, and coincidentally a fan of Gaffigan, I’ve always been curious about this group not in terms of what they do – as that’s been pretty well documented. But rather why they do it. The Bible prompts me to go to Mass once a week and to try not to do anything that can’t be offset by a few Hail Marys after confession. The same book or rather collection of books has had a profoundly different impact on them. With covid restrictions still in effect – I reached out to spokesperson Shirley Phelps-Roper whose father Fred, now deceased, founded the church. She agreed to a Skype interview. Now, this is the bit where ordinarily I’d jump into the audio but on this occasion, I have to offer a trigger warning. It would take a while to list everything that might be triggering in the following interview, but pretty much if you’re not in good standing as a member of the Westboro baptist church then you will hear something from Shirley that could well offend you. If you’re OK with that and like myself curious to hear how they reconcile conventional understandings of Christianity with their activities, then buckle in. With thanks to Shirley Phelps-Roper and The Westboro Baptist Church Sounds from Pixabay
38:09
April 01, 2022
Season 3 Preview
In season 3 Dan talks to NASA astronauts Jim Wetherbee and Steve Hawley as well as Smithsonian space historian Cathy Lewis. He discusses Gallipoli with Australian Department of Veteran's Affairs historian Ian Hodges and explores the 1798 rebellion in Ireland with Prof. Tom Bartlett and Carlow historian John Kelly. He delves into race relations with The New Black Panther's Tamara Jones and tackles the controversial Westboro Baptist church with Shirley Roper-Phelps. The TV sci-fi classic Doctor is discussed with actor David Gooderson and director Michael E Briant, as well as an exploration of UFOlogy with Prof Greg Eghigian, Clas Svahn, Bill Konkolesky and Robert Sheaffer. 
02:23
March 29, 2022
Grand Orange Lodge of Ireland
In the Spring of 2019, Scottish police launched investigations into incidents at two football matches. In the first, Aberdeen fans were accused of using colorful language to suggest that English football manager Steven Gerrard was an Orange man. A few weeks later, Aberdeen’s own manager Derek McInnes was targeted with similar chants from Celtic fans. The fact that fans from Aberdeen – a largely secular city could find themselves on either side of this type of incident is indicative of the fact that many of us have little understanding of the subject. For one thing, when you remove the accompanying pejoratives, any actual member of the Orange Order would be quite proud of his membership and his heritage. But it’s this kind of conflict, based around misunderstanding and prejudice that I was all too familiar with having grown up in the 1980s. On one hand, we saw in the news how the IRA a nominally Catholic terrorist group would plant bombs and do battle with nominally protestant groups like the UVF. But somehow, in the back and forth, amid accusations of doing right and wrong, a group of people known as the Orange Order would get drawn into the conflict seemingly just for holding commemorative marches. Meanwhile, outspoken firebrand protestant politician Ian Paisley was often held up by rivals as the archetypal Orange man even though he had long since left the group. Incidentally, the apparently extremist Paisley went on to form a close friendship with former IRA leader Martin McGuinness. The stereotypes you hear are of presbyterian, Scots Irish doing battle with Irish Catholics. But anyone with even a cursory knowledge of Irish history could tell you this was an inaccurate oversimplification. As someone with mixed Irish and English, Catholic, and Protestant heritage, I’ve always been curious to learn more about the Orange Order. Who they are, what are their origins, and what they actually believe. And above all, to understand the group in the context of its origins versus what it represents today. I was fortunate enough to find an expert in the field. Dr. Jonathan Mattison, Curator of the Museum of Orange Heritage. Music from Pixabay.com
28:46
March 26, 2022
Modern Day Hero: NASA Astronaut Jim Wetherbee
Heroes of Space. Part I I have always had a fascination with heroic figures. In the modern world, it's difficult to think of a task requiring more courage and skill than flying as a test pilot -- unless of course you decide to go into space. Jim Wetherbee is one man who did both. A decorated Navy veteran, NASA pilot and commander, he later brought his skills to the private sector. It was here that he realized his experience could provide valuable lessons not just to businesses but to private citizens conducting mundane every day tasks. His book: Controlling Risk in a Dangerous World, provides not just incredible anecdotes from his extraordinary career. It also provides valuable guidance that each of us can apply to our every day lives. In this episode I have the honor to talk to the real-life spaceman who lived every kid's dream.  I highly recommend Jim's book "Controlling Risk in a Dangerous World" which you can find on his official website: Jim Wetherbee as well as retailers including Amazon. Available in both hardcover and paperback, here is an overview: Jim Wetherbee, the only five-time Space Shuttle commander, presents thirty techniques that astronauts use—not only to stay alive in the unforgiving and deadly environment of space, but also to conduct high-quality operations and accomplish complex missions. These same techniques, based on the foundational principles of operating excellence, can help anyone be successful in high-hazard endeavors, ordinary business, and everyday life. Controlling Risk shows you how to embrace these techniques as a way of operating and living your life, so you can predict and prevent your next accident, while improving performance and productivity to take your company higher. You can also learn more about Jim at his official website: https://www.jimwetherbee.com/about-1 Episode Credits: Jim Wetherbee Capitan US Navy Ret., NASA Astronaut sound from Pixabay.com Cover art: Space Shuttle Columbia launching. Public domain. 
40:11
March 19, 2022
UFOs Part Two: The Experiencers
In this episode, I delve deeper into the world of UFOs beyond the Hollywood flying saucers. I talk to four experts from the fields of academia, journalism, and research who have thoroughly investigated the phenomena either as skeptics or experiencers. Featuring: Professor of History Professor Greg Eghigian of The Pennsylvania State University Clas Svahn of https://www.ufo.se/ Bill Konkolesky author of Experiencer: Raised in Two Worlds https://www.amazon.com/Experiencer-Raised-Worlds-William-Konkolesky/dp/0557115809 and State Director of MUFOn Michigan State Chapter https://www.guidestar.org/profile/30-0186467 Robert Sheaffer author of Bad UFOs: Critical Thinking About UFO https://www.amazon.com/dp/1519260849/ref=cm_sw_su_dp http://debunker.com/ Audio: A five-minute clip of Orson Wells' 1938 War of the Worlds Broadcast Mercury Theatre - Orson Welles - CBS, Public domain, via Wikimedia Commons Pixabay.com Gimbal is a US military video of an unidentified aerial phenomenon (UAP) United States Navy, Public domain, via Wikimedia Commons Maj. Gen. John A. Samford's Statement on Flying Saucers Department of Defense, Public domain, via Wikimedia Commons
31:22
March 11, 2022
UFOs Part One: The Beginning of the Phenomena
In this episode, I delve deeper into the world of UFOs beyond the Hollywood flying saucers. I talk to four experts from the fields of academia, journalism, and research who have thoroughly investigated the phenomena either as skeptics or experiencers. Featuring: Professor of History Professor Greg Eghigian of The Pennsylvania State University Clas Svahn of https://www.ufo.se/ Bill Konkolesky author of Experiencer: Raised in Two Worlds https://www.amazon.com/Experiencer-Raised-Worlds-William-Konkolesky/dp/0557115809 and State Director of MUFOn Michigan State Chapter https://www.guidestar.org/profile/30-0186467 Robert Sheaffer author of Bad UFOs: Critical Thinking About UFO https://www.amazon.com/dp/1519260849/ref=cm_sw_su_dp http://debunker.com/ Audio: A five-minute clip of Orson Wells' 1938 War of the Worlds Broadcast Mercury Theatre - Orson Welles - CBS, Public domain, via Wikimedia Commons Pixabay.com Gimbal is a US military video of an unidentified aerial phenomenon (UAP) United States Navy, Public domain, via Wikimedia Commons Maj. Gen. John A. Samford's Statement on Flying Saucers Department of Defense, Public domain, via Wikimedia Commons
29:27
March 04, 2022
Racism and The New Black Panther Party in Kansas City
Tamara Jones is a prominent civil rights activist and outspoken critic of well-documented instances of racism and corruption involving the Kansas City Police Force. More controversially, she is the Minister of Justice for The New Black Panther Party and is involved in The New Black Panthers for Self Defense -- two groups condemned by the American Defence League, and The Southern Poverty Law Center as anti-semitic, racist, and anti-government groups. I spoke to Tamara about her experiences in Kansas City and the ideology of these groups. 
27:49
February 25, 2022
UFO: The Skeptics and the Believers: Preview of season 3
Coming in March 2022. Dan investigates the UFO phenomena on Fascinating People, Fascinating Places. Guests include Professor Greg Eghigian of Penn State University,  MUFON state director of Michigan William Konkolesky, author Robert Sheaffer, and journalist and Vice Chairman of UFO-Sweden Clas Svahn.  Art and music courtesy of Pixabay.com
00:51
January 28, 2022
Romania 1989
The Romanian revolution of 1989 was the result of the country’s long tradition of simultaneously resisting and embracing outside forces and influences. It’s a process that stretches back to the second century AD when the Roman Emperor Trajan conquered the area and plundered its gold. Goths, Hun, Bulgars, Magyars, and Ottomans followed. Each group was fiercely resisted before being driven out by heroic figures like Vlad The Impaler. But each invasion force left its legacy producing a nation that is more heterogeneous than its neighbors. Like the surrounding Slavic countries Romania embraced Orthodox Christianity. But unlike its Yugoslavian, Bulgarian and Ukrainian neighbors it used the Latin alphabet. Indeed, Romanian is the language most closely tied to modern Italian, while the majority of the Balkan nations speak in Slavic, Turkic, or Greek. Sound Effects: Pixabay BBC John Simpson BBC1 News English: Address from the Brandenburg Gate (Berlin Wall). Full text at Wikisource Date12 June 1987SourceUniversity of Virginia Miller Center for Public Affairs President Kennedy's "Ich bin ein Berliner" speech. Transcript available.[1] Date26 June 1963SourceKennedy Presidential Library[2]AuthorJohn F. Kennedy
35:32
January 15, 2022
The Black Hand Serbia (Gavrilo Princip)
On 28 June 1914, a young Serb named Gavrilo Princip sat outside a Delicatessen in Sarajevo, reflecting on his role in a botched assassination attempt on Archduke Ferdinand – heir to the Austro-Hungarian empire. To his surprise, the intended target suddenly came back into view. This time there would be no mistake. He calmly approached the car and fired two shots. One at Ferdinand, the other at his wife Sophie. Each proved fatal. This violent crime which led directly to the outbreak of World War I, wasn’t the act of a lone wolf gunman.  It was just the latest and most devastating in a series of terrorist acts performed by members of the Serbian Black Hand. In this episode, I explore the shadowy group’s origins, their activities, and how their ultimate dream was realized in 1918 though few of them were alive to see it. This is an original production by www.danielmainwaring.com Audio effects and music Pixabay
28:56
January 07, 2022
King Charles II of England
On the 30 January 1649, a large crowd gathers beneath a hastily erected scaffold at the Palace of Whitehall, at the stroke of 2pm a nameless masked man delivered a single blow to sever the head of Charles II. 700 hundred years after Alfred the Great sought to establish the Kingdom of England, the English monarchy was no more. A commoner and puritan named Oliver Cromwell was now the country’s de facto dictator. But as Cromwell’s parliamentarians celebrated an end to the violent civil war, the King’s 19-year-old son was determined to avenge his slaying and to restore the monarchy. A decade later, the young pretender would assume his father’s throne. In this episode, I examine the life of King Charles II, from his earliest days, through his exile, his triumphant return, and the remainder of his troubled reign. This is an original production brought to you by Daniel Mainwaring's Fascinating People, Fascinating Places Podcast. For more information visit the website www.DanielMainwaring.com Additional material provided by Dorsey Jackson - https://youtu.be/DxFyjYpKUVE of Dorsey Jackson Global at Compound City Covert art is a bust of Emperor Caligula, Ny Carlsberg Glyptotek made by Louis Le Grand in March 2007 Made available under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported (CC-BY-SA 3.0: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/deed.en). Audio effects and music Pixabay
28:04
December 31, 2021
Preview: Romania 1989
Coming in January I reflect on Romania 1989--- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/daniel-mainwaring5/message
02:33
December 29, 2021
Preview: Romania 1989
Coming in January I reflect on Romania 1989
02:33
December 29, 2021
Empress Theodora
On 1 April 527 AD, an extraordinary event unfolded in the ancient city of Constantinople -- known to the modern world as Instanbul. A 37 year old woman -- a former actress and prostitute dressed in the imperial regalia of Rome -- was crowned as empress of Byzantium -- the Eastern branch and largest remnant of the Roman Empire. But unlike many women who’ve been awarded such titles, Theodora wasn’t just a consort or wife of the Emperor. She was at her husband’s behest and equal partner in the imperial household. She was also the most legitimately powerful woman to dominate Roman or Byzantine history. In this episode, I seek to discover the story behind the empress. Her early life, her struggles and to separate the fact from the fiction. This is an original production brought to you by Daniel Mainwaring's Fascinating People, Fascinating Places Podcast. For more information visit the website www.DanielMainwaring.com Additional material provided by Dorsey Jackson - https://youtu.be/DxFyjYpKUVE of Dorsey Jackson Global at Compound City Covert art is a bust of Emperor Caligula, Ny Carlsberg Glyptotek made by Louis Le Grand in March 2007 Made available under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported (CC-BY-SA 3.0: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/deed.en). Audio effects and music Pixabay
27:05
December 29, 2021
Taize
Every year tens of thousands of young people descend on the small Christian community of Taize in Eastern France. Founded by a Swiss man, Roger Schütz, the ecumenical ministry provides a place of refuge where Christians and non-believers can reflect, pray, study, and engage with their contemporaries from around the globe.  Special Thanks to: Sister Judith Russi sister of Saint Mary of Namur, is the director of Catholic educational charity EducareM Steven Betancourt Assistant Director of Campus Ministry at Loyola University Chicago Brother Sebastien of the Taize Community Picture: Croix de Taizé Surfnico Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Music: Bless the Lord © Ateliers et Presses de Taizé
29:35
December 19, 2021
Mobuto Sese Seko
Mobuto Sese Seko, once described by Ronald Reagan as “a voice of good sense and goodwill” was one of the most powerful and controversial figures of the post-colonial era in Africa. From humble roots, his charisma and intelligence propelled him from obscurity to power of halls of Kinshasa. Music and sound: Simon-Pierre Boka Di Mpasi Londi, "La Zaïroise" United States Navy Band, Public domain, via Wikimedia Commons https://pixabay.com/ Intro from Dorsey Jackson - https://youtu.be/DxFyjYpKUVE of Dorsey Jackson Global at Compound City
30:45
December 11, 2021
Grace O'Malley
Grace O’Malley, her name conjures up images of a wild, sword-wielding pirate terrorizing merchants off the West coast of Ireland. But in reality, she was far from the stereotypical patch-eyed, wooden-legged pirate of folklore. From her point of view, she wasn’t really a pirate at all. In this episode, I explore the woman behind the myth. The high-ranking, educated, intelligent, leader of Connacht who won an admirer if not an ally in the form of Elizabeth I Queen of England. This is an original production brought to you by Daniel Mainwaring's Fascinating People, Fascinating Places Podcast. For more information visit the website www.DanielMainwaring.com Music and Sound Effects: Pixabay Audio Under Public Commons 3.0 JS Bach Toccata and Fugue in D Minor Intro from Dorsey Jackson - https://youtu.be/DxFyjYpKUVE of Dorsey Jackson Global at Compound City
27:31
October 22, 2021
Empress Matilda
On the 1st of December 1135, King Henry I of England died. His choice of successor was controversial but unequivocal. His daughter Matilda -- previously crowned as Empress of the Holy Roman Empire -- would be crowned as the first Queen of England. In theory, she was the most powerful woman in Europe, but neither Henry’s plans nor hers came to fruition. In order to claim her throne, she’d have to overcome treachery, betrayal, and civil war. In this episode, I examine the life of the powerful woman known to history as Empress Matilda. Her rise to prominence, her political alliances which included two marriages, the setbacks she faced, her quest for revenge, and her enduring legacy. This is an original production brought to you by Daniel Mainwaring's Fascinating People, Fascinating Places Podcast. For more information visit the website www.DanielMainwaring.com Music and Sound Effects: Pixabay Audio Under Public Commons 3.0 JS Bach Toccata and Fugue in D Minor Intro from Dorsey Jackson - https://youtu.be/DxFyjYpKUVE of Dorsey Jackson Global at Compound City
31:15
October 15, 2021
East Germany Part Two
With Germany divided, the GDR grapples with economic problems and unrest. The erection of the Berlin Wall draws US President John F Kennedy to Berlin, while the state represses the church, and embarks on a nationalized doping campaign to boost performance in sport. The arrival of Gorbachev signals the beginning of the end for Honecker and the Stasi. Feature subjects: Erich Honecker, Erich Mielke, Joseph Stalin, JFK, Ronald Reagan, Mikhail Gorbachev, Munich Olympics, The PLO, Doping, Egon Krenz Cover picture: By Noir, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=1402275 Music and Sound Effects: Pixabay Audio Under Public Commons 3.0 English: Address from the Brandenburg Gate (Berlin Wall). Full text at Wikisource Date12 June 1987SourceUniversity of Virginia Miller Center for Public Affairs President Kennedy's "Ich bin ein Berliner" speech. Transcript available.[1] Date26 June 1963SourceKennedy Presidential Library[2]AuthorJohn F. Kennedy Reagan Brandenburg Gate speech Public Domain National Anthem of Germany. Date 1797 Source Own work AuthorCsifoZsombor
26:20
October 09, 2021
East Germany Part One
In 1949, communist leaders formalized the division of a nation with the creation of the German Democratic Republic. In the West, this was portrayed as an opportunistic act by puppets of the Soviets who wished to impose their ideology on Eastern Europe. But the story of German communism began long before 1949. In this episode, I will examine the roots of the ideology. Its adherents, growth, and the factors that led to the creation of the totalitarian state widely known as East Germany. Featured Subjects: Karl Marx, Friedrich Engels, Rosa Luxemburg, Karl Liebknecht, Walter Ulbricht, Ernest Thalmann, Erich Mielke, Erich Honecker, Lenin, Bela Kun, Max Hoelz, Wilhelm Pieck, Spartakusbund, Kommunistische Partei Deutschlands, Sozialdemokratische Partei Deutschlands Music: Public Domain and Creative Commons 3.0 Choir and orchestra of Bolshoi Theatre, conducted by G. Rozhdestvensky May 2012 Русский: Государственный гимн Советского Союза, 1968 English: National anthem of the Soviet Union in its post-1955 arrangement Sound Effects: Pixabay English: Address from the Brandenburg Gate (Berlin Wall). Full text at Wikisource Date12 June 1987SourceUniversity of Virginia Miller Center for Public Affairs President Kennedy's "Ich bin ein Berliner" speech. Transcript available.[1] Date26 June 1963SourceKennedy Presidential Library[2]AuthorJohn F. Kennedy
28:24
October 01, 2021
The Great Exhibition
The Great Exhibition of 1851 was the world's first global trade fair. Attendees included Charles Dickens, Lewis Carroll, and Karl Marx. But beyond the pomp and ceremony, there were fears of a violent insurrection. Critics implored the Queen to cancel the event. In this episode, I explore the exhibition's founders, critics, highlights, and enduring legacy. Coming Sunday 26 September. Music licensed under Creative Commons 3.0. Handel - Zadok the Priest 2 June 2013 archive.org St Matthew's Concert Choir; Damien Giromella, director
28:24
September 25, 2021
East Germany
As the Nazi regime was defeated, East Germans hoped for a brighter future. Political exiles such as Erich Honecker returned to Berlin and set about rebuilding the nation. But, the fragile alliance of World War II soon collapsed. The Western nations found themselves at odds with the Soviets and Germany was divided. In this episode, I explore the origins of communism in Germany, the rise and the fall of the German Democratic Republic (East Germany). Coming in October 2021 Licensed under Wiki Commons 3.0 English: Portrait of Erich Honecker, leader of East Germany (1971-1989). Cropped using Photo Editor at https://www.befunky.com/ and reuploaded to Wikimedia Commons by Emiya1980 English: Address from the Brandenburg Gate (Berlin Wall). Full text at Wikisource Date12 June 1987SourceUniversity of Virginia Miller Center for Public Affairs President Kennedy's "Ich bin ein Berliner" speech. Transcript available.[1] Date26 June 1963SourceKennedy Presidential Library[2]AuthorJohn F. Kennedy
01:27
September 23, 2021
Caligula
The depraved and sadistic Roman emperor was one of the most reviled figures of antiquity. Allegations of incest, murder, and more bizarrely the promotion of his beloved horse to consul still linger in popular culture today. But was he really the deranged tyrant we learned about in history class or was there another side to him? In this episode, I will explore the truth of the man behind the legend. This is an original production brought to you by Daniel Mainwaring's Fascinating People, Fascinating Places Podcast. For more information visit the website www.DanielMainwaring.com Additional material provided by Dorsey Jackson - https://youtu.be/DxFyjYpKUVE of Dorsey Jackson Global at Compound City Covert art is a bust of Emperor Caligula, Ny Carlsberg Glyptotek made by Louis Le Grand in March 2007 Made available under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported (CC-BY-SA 3.0: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/deed.en). Audio effects and music Pixabay
30:28
September 19, 2021
Short Stories: Seashells
Roman Emperor Caligula raised an army and marched across Gaul with every intention of invading Great Britain. Having set sail, he neared the famous white cliffs of Dover before returning course and disembarking in France. Upon his return, two soldiers: Gaius and Lucius, are surprised to find themselves tasked with something other than battle. This is an original production brought to you by Daniel Mainwaring's Fascinating People, Fascinating Places Podcast. For more information visit the website www.DanielMainwaring.com Cover art is a bust of Emperor Caligula, Ny Carlsberg Glyptotek made by Louis Le Grand in March 2007 Made available under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported (CC-BY-SA 3.0: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/deed.en). Music used is Bach – Toccata and Fugue in D minor, BWV 565 by Carl Weinrich | Music promoted on https://www.chosic.com/ Creative Commons
04:50
September 19, 2021