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DecarboN8 Podcast

DecarboN8 Podcast

By Tina Shield
DecarboN8 is an EPSRC funded network seeking to bring together business, government and academia across the North of England. We aim to create an innovation ecosystem and test bed environment which allows us to trial and accelerate the adoption of low carbon transport solutions. In working across the North, the DecarboN8 network is looking to take a place-based approach recognising that different solutions might be needed for different types of area – but also acknowledging that sometimes we might need this to be joined up and consistent in order to get benefits at scale.
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Place Based Decarbonisation

DecarboN8 Podcast

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Place Based Decarbonisation
The Department for Transport’s Decarbonisation Plan: 'Setting the Challenge' document lists place-based decarbonisation as one of its six key pillars. But what does place-based decarbonisation mean and how might it shape the final Decarbonisation Plan?   
24:21
July 29, 2020
Exploring the economic and societal impacts of the roll out of electric vehicles in the UK
DecarboN8 Future Transport Fuels Webinar Series A series of webinars brought to you by DecarboN8's Future Transport Fuels research theme aimed at academics, students, policymakers, businesses, civil society and anyone interested in the decarbonisation of transport in the UK. Exploring the economic and societal impacts of the roll out of electric vehicles in the UK Over the last four years, CEP has applied its economy-wide approach to analysing the likely wider economy impacts of enabling the roll-out of electric vehicles in the UK. This is seen as a key component of reducing emissions from private transport and facilitating the transition to net zero. In this webinar we will discuss our latest research that explores the macro economic and societal impacts of both investing to reinforce the electricity network and from shifting fueling from fossil fuels to electricity. We will also explore considerations for a ‘Just Transition’ and regulatory and policy implications. Speaker Professor Karen Turner is Director of the Centre for Energy Policy at the University of Strathclyde. She has previously held academic posts at in the Economics Departments at Heriot-Watt, Stirling and Strathclyde Universities. Karen was one of six ESRC Climate Change Leadership Fellows and her main research interests lie in considering and modelling the economy-wide and macroeconomic impacts of energy policy and industry developments. The main focuses of her current work is considering the wider economic and societal value proposition for a range of low carbon energy solutions, including energy efficiency, electric vehicles, industrial decarbonisation and CCUS, through projects funded by UKRI and various government and industry bodies. Karen is currently a member of the Scottish Just Transition Commission, was member of the committee delivering the Royal Society of Edinburgh’s inquiry on Scotland’s Energy Future and is leading a cross-cutting sub-group of a new Royal Society (London) study on the long term role of energy storage. Click here to view the slides that accompanied this presentation on SlideShare
42:38
June 24, 2020
Decarbonising Transport by 2050 – the view from government
DecarboN8 Future Transport Fuels Webinar Series This recording is from a series of webinars brought to you by DecarboN8's Future Transport Fuels research theme aimed at academics, students, policymakers, businesses, civil society and anyone interested in the decarbonisation of transport in the UK. Decarbonising Transport by 2050 – the view from government This webinar will discuss the DfT’s activities on transport decarbonisation including the Transport Decarbonisation Plan, the Science Plan and the R&D required to deliver on the net-zero target, including the challenge in the context of the coronavirus outbreak. Speaker Professor Phil Blythe CEng FIET is Chief Scientific Adviser for the Department for Transport and Professor of Intelligent Transport Systems (ITS) at Newcastle University. Prior to joining the Department for Transport he was Director of the Transport Operations Research Group for 13 years. Phil’s academic focus has been the development of ITS – the use of information, communications and computing technology applied to transport. His research portfolio covers a wide range of areas where ITS has been applied to transport including: road to vehicle communications; road user charging systems; ITS for assistive mobility, smartcards and radio frequency identification (RFID), wireless / smartdust technologies, electromobility and future intelligent infrastructure. His research is also forward-looking and attempts to bridge the technology-policy gap in terms of what technologies may evolve to meet future policy objectives or influence future policy thinking to meet the challenges. Phil is Vice-President of the Institute of Engineering and Technology (IET), is a member of their Lectures Committee and supports the IET in the UK and abroad in areas such intelligent transport, connected and autonomous vehicles, electro-mobility and smart cities and on the Big Data / Internet of Things agendas. In March 2012 Phil was awarded the Reece-Hills Medal for a lifetime personal contribution to ITS. Click here to view the slides that accompanied this presentation on SlideShare
41:05
June 24, 2020
The Role of Bioenergy in the UK's Decarbonisation Strategy
DecarboN8 Future Transport Fuels Webinar Series A series of webinars brought to you by DecarboN8's Future Transport Fuels research theme aimed at academics, students, policymakers, businesses, civil society and anyone interested in the role that bioenergy might play in the decarbonisation of transport in the UK. The Role of Bioenergy in the UK's Decarbonisation Strategy  This webinar will introduce bioenergy as low carbon sustainable energy option that may be applied to decarbonise multiple sectors in the UK and beyond. Bioenergy is highly flexible, where through a wide range of biomass fuel and technology options can provide heat, power and transport fuels to decarbonise the UK energy sector, and advanced chemicals to drive the UK bio-economy. In contrast to most other renewable technologies, bioenergy is intrinsically linked to the land, people, industry and environmental systems - these close interactions mean bioenergy systems can both impacts and benefits. It is therefore important that bioenergy is developed sustainably so it continues to be a valuable contributor to the UK energy system. Dr Andrew Welfle, University of Manchester has a background and interests in environmental, energy and engineering themes. As a member of the Tyndall Centre for Climate Change Research, Andrew's research focuses on sustainability, climate change and bioenergy themes. Andrew is currently a member of the UK's Supergen Bioenergy Hub research programme where he is the Topic Representative of the Bioenergy Vectors Research Theme. In the past Andrew has worked as a sustainability consultant, and has carried out bioenergy research for the UK Department of Energy & Climate Change and the Department for Transport. Click here to view the slides that accompanied this presentation on SlideShare
52:01
June 24, 2020
DecarboN8 Launch
Recording of the presentations given at the DecarboN8 Launch event held in November 2019.
02:24:10
June 17, 2020