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D Report

By Daniel
A weekly topical conversation.

Host: Daniel

A dialogue at the intersection of culture, education, law, politics, economics, language and “race” deconstruction.
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Bringing Down Monuments to Build Up New Histories

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History of Memories: Mexican School Segregation
Topic:  Education, School Segregation, Mendez v. Westminster, Mexican-American, Segment: History of Memories: Mexican School Segregation Participants:  Gabe  Flores,  Historian.  Doctorate Candidate in History department, UC Riverside Broadcast Air Date: 11/22/19 Time: 5:15 PM (PST) Station: KUCR 88.3 FM Riverside, CA Archive pages: https://soundcloud.com/stoppretending, http://www.dreport.org Send comments about this segment to: comments@dreport.org Segment produced in KUCR, the radio station of the University California in Riverside. Disclaimer: The views expressed are the sole responsibility of the respective speakers and do not represent the endorsed position of the UC Regents, UC Riverside or KUCR.
44:03
November 20, 2020
Rise to Reunite, Al Orto Lado, Family Reunification, US-Mexico Border
Topic:  Rise to Reunite, Al Orto Lado, Family Reunification, US-Mexico Border, Segment: Rise to Reunite: Don’t be Afraid to Take a Stand Against Government Policies of Hate Participants:  Angeline  Chen,  Attorney and Co-founder of Rise to Reunite Broadcast Air Date: 01/17/19 Time: 5:15 PM (PST) Station: KUCR 88.3 FM Riverside, CA Archive pages: https://soundcloud.com/stoppretending, http://www.dreport.org Send comments about this segment to: comments@dreport.org Segment produced in KUCR, the radio station of the University California in Riverside. Disclaimer: The views expressed are the sole responsibility  of the respective speakers and do not represent the endorsed position of  the UC Regents, UC Riverside or KUCR. Discussion Topics: -Rise to  Reunite , “We are a volunteer group of immigration attorneys and community  members dedicated to helping reunite children with their families at the  border.” – Al Otro Lado,   ”   We are a bi-national, social justice legal services organization serving  indigent deportees, migrants, and refugees in Tijuana, Mexico.” -How do we support one another as humans? -There are over 20,000  migrants in  Tijuana, waiting immigration proceeding. – What is the Migrant Persecution Protocol? – Why does the government  send  Central Americans to Tijuana to  wait for their immigration proceeding? – How are the migrant shelters funded? – What is the experience of children at the shelters? -How do we motivate people to do more to help the people seeking asylum? -How do we make sense of the US government’s action of  taking children  from their parents? -What is the difference in the  detention of men  versus detaining women with children? -What is the motive for applying torture tactics on the people being detained? -Why are people purposefully being kept in hieleras,  ice boxes ? -If  border enforcement officers are not following explicit instructions,  then  why  do they puncture water bottles, keep the lights on at night  and take away people’s extra clothing to cause injury? -Are officials being guided by a policy of hatred? -If the courts ended the zero-tolerance policy, then why are families being separated? -What is the relationship between the history of US intervention in Central America and the present immigration movements? -What happens when we recognize the humanity of one another and  question the policies of violence imposed by nations? -What is the lasting trauma effect on children resulting from being detained and separated from their families? -How are national policies different from human policies? -Don’t be afraid to take a stand.
40:50
November 13, 2020
Chicano Research Center: Archives of Chicana/o History
Topic:  Chicano Research Center, Richard Soto, Chicano Movement, Community  History, Books, Segment: Chicano Research Center:   Archives of Chicana/o History Participants:  Richard Soto, founder of  Chicano  Research Center Broadcast Air Date: 1/24/20 Time: 5:15 PM (PST) Station: KUCR 88.3 FM Riverside, CA Archive pages: https://soundcloud.com/stoppretending, http://www.dreport.org Send comments about this segment to: comments@dreport.org Segment produced in KUCR, the radio station of the University California in Riverside. Disclaimer: The views expressed are the sole responsibility of the respective speakers and do not represent the endorsed position of the UC Regents, UC Riverside or KUCR. Discussion Topics: How does the library represent an accumulation of life experiences? How do you move from Vietnam in 1966 to the Chicano Movement of 1968? The Plan de Santa Barbara,1969 What was the Sacramento State University program that recruited community activists to be agents of change by providing scholarships for Bachelors, Teaching degrees or Masters? In 19650’s why were most jobs held by Raza in agriculture, domestic help or as small independent business owners? Why did JC Penny limit its employment of Chicanas/ Chicanos to the Christmas season during the bracero program? How do you take a Chicano history class without books? Have you read the book, North from Mexico: The Spanish-Speaking People of the United States, by Carey McWilliams 1948? Is the 1964 book Mexican-Americans of South Texas (Case Study in Cultural Anthropology) by William Madsen, racist? When did Richard Soto, meet  Jose Montoya and the Royal Chicano Air Force? How do you teach a Chicana history class when the field of Chicana History is being made by the people outside of the class  room? How do you teach Chicano history in reverse by using the daily  newspaper  articles ? Turning 40 books to fill one shelf into 20,000 book  library Who is Oscar Zeta Acosta’s son? Who attended Corky Gonzalez’s Crusade for justice in Colorado? What happened at the second Chicano Moratorium, 1972? What is a Pocho? Are corridos like oral text books? Why did the private collection of books and memorabilia become a public library? Have you read the magazine , Joaquin? Was the biggest success of the Chicano  movement, the  educational attainment of the following generations? The Chicano Research Center is not just a library; the Center is also an archive of Chicano movement. The Smithsonian Museum is interested in the material archived at the Chicano Research  Center. Who has the  1949 poster of  Dolores Fernandez  running  for the pageant  of Reyna De las  fiestas Patrias in Stockton California? Have you read Josefina Fierro: California Blacklisted Latina by  Carlos Larralde  and  Michael Lynch III?
45:12
November 3, 2020
Peace and Dignity Run: Becoming an Instrument of Healing
Title: Peace and Dignity Run: Becoming an Instrument of Healing Topic:  Peace and Dignity run 2020, Participants: Atl Gonzales, Peace and Dignity ,   Broadcast Air Date:  02/14/2020 Time: 5:15 PM (PST) Station: KUCR 88.3 FM Riverside, CA KUCR station page: http://www.kucr.org Archive pages: https://soundcloud.com/stoppretending, http://www.dreport.org Send comments about this segment to: comments@dreport.org Segment produced in KUCR, the radio station of the University California in Riverside. Disclaimer: The views expressed are the sole responsibility  of the respective speakers and do not represent the endorsed position of  the UC Regents, UC Riverside or KUCR. Discussion Topics: How did the Peace and Dignity Journey begin? What is the generation that was born after World War 2, saw Vietnam war and lived the Chicana movement? What was it like to grow up in Chavez Ravine? What happens to children when they grow up in a violent place? How do we find peace when we have been through violence? What were the respective sources of spirituality for the Brown Berets, Black Panther and American Indian Movement? Spiritual leader Lenard Crow Dog Gustavo Gutierrez, UFW organizer and Peace and Dignity What was the first theme of the Peace and Dignity run? How do indigenous people manifest their right to exist? Why did the first  peace and dignity run occur in 1992? Who were the Chicanos of 1960’s in comparison to the present Chicanos? How was Mexico different for indigenous people before NATFA? Why are Indigenous activists are being murdered in North and South America? What are the present genocidal acts being committed against indigenous people? What is the history of inventing Latino? Why did the Spanish and Portuguese colonizer call themselves Latinos? How does the Latino community outcast the indigenous community? Chicanas are part of the land, part of the Indigenous people. Running can be a healing experience. Why does the Los Angeles marathon start in Chavez Ravine? What does the staff held by the runners represent? What is lost in translating native teachings into the English language? Are our bodies water and fire? Where on our bodies is the center of the universe? What is the spiritual internet, the spiritual network? Thomas Banyacya (June 2, 1909 – 1999), Hopi elder Native people in the Americas are being threatened because of corporations’ Lithium mining interest The runners becomes instruments of healing For more information  visit,  https://peaceanddignity.net/
47:40
October 25, 2020
Politics of COVID-19: Is This Our Chernobyl Moment?
Topics:  Politics, Ruth Bader Ginsburg, 2020 Presidential Elections , Government Bail Outs Title: Politics of COVID-19: Is This Our Chernobyl Moment? Participants:  Dave Poyer, Political Junky Publish Date: 10/2/20 Homepage : http://www.dreport.org Also available on: AnchorFM,  iTunes, RadioPublic, Spotify,  Soundclound Send comments about this segment to: comments@dreport.org Discussion Topics: How much has changed in the world of US Politics? Will the death of judge Ruth Bader Ginsburg affect the Presidential election? Is the American Care Act at risk with a replacement supreme court judge? Why did the democratic party settle for the ACA instead of single payer Medicare system for all? Is government designed to represent the common folks? Was the 2020 Care Act the greatest upward transfer of wealth in recent US History? Is the COVID moment   our Chernobyl moment? Why did we bail out the cruise shop   companies? Does Naomi Klein’s book, The Shock Doctrine   help explain transformative political and capitalism changes? How does the politics of an Appalachian coal town differ from downtown Los Angeles? Is Donald Trump’s wealth equivalent to the 1%? What is the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee? If you can’t raise 2 million dollars just from the   contracts in your cell phone, then the DCCC doesn’t want you? Why did the DCCC oppose Alexandra Ocasio-Cortes’s political run? Are corporate interests shaping the rise of global conservative nationalism? Are people realizing that they are like serfs, or wage-slaves? What    kind of economy do we have where there is over supply of food and homes  yet there is an increasing percentage of people   hungry and without    shelter? Capitalism is full of inconsistencies.
1:02:04
October 2, 2020
It’s Not a Trend: History of Police as Violence and Community Voices for Accountability
Topics:  History, Police Violence, Police accountability. Labor, Community Safety Title: It’s Not a Trend: History of Police as Violence and Community Voices for Accountability Participants:  David Chavez,  Historian Release Date: 09/18/20 Homepage : http://www.dreport.org, "If we are really  being serious of  pushing  for public  safety or for  having  a dignified humanity or seeing life as precious, we not only  have to abolish the police in its current form  and the way law  enforcement is right now,  but we also  have to  abolish the cop in our  head…” —  David Chavez Discussion Topics: What is the history of police violence in USA? What did the Black Panthers and Brown Berets say about violence from the police? Were the police  held accountable for starting riots to stop the labor movement? What was the police involvement in the Haymarket Massacre of  May 4, 1886? What was the police involvement in the Black Wallstreet Massacre of Tulsa Oklahoma May 31 and June 1, 1921? When did police take part in lynching? “It’s not [ a trend] to bring up the issue of police violence,  In fact it is historical”- David Chavez How do the military patterns of no-knock raids in Afghanistan become visible in the no-knock raids by police at home. The attention on police violence has grown to the point that Teen Vogue has articles addressing police abuse. Why do people try to frame the attention on police accountability as an inverse discussion to police killed on duty? For some communities calling the police for help means risking injury by the same police that respond to the call. What is the connection between the present police and the slave patrols of the 1800’s? What is state abandonment? How can we examine the relationship between Whiteness and policing? Can people perceive themselves as White by being on the side of police? Is the police  an organization that is anti- labor movement? What happens when we apply police accountability as an employment issue? How do we learn to self-regulate our movements as a  response of fear of being targeted by the police?
53:15
September 18, 2020
History and Anthropology Perspectives: Past, Present (COVID-19), and Future of Labor and Society
Topics:  History, Anthropology, Labor Rights, Society,  Society Changes Title: History and Anthropology Perspectives: Past, Present (COVID-19), and Future of Labor and Society Participants:  Elliot Kim,  Historian Release Date: 09/08/20 Homepage : http://www.dreport.org, Send comments about this segment to: comments@dreport.org “The only justice that exists in this world is that which we create...”- Elliot Kim Discussion Topics: “Hustory” is the human story. What happens when you intersect labor rights as lived experiences with the academic perspective of a Historian? How does the long history of people advocating for a just compensation of their labor, connect to the present COVID19 labor      issues? Why do we need to work 40 hours a week? How will our work patterns change as a result of COVID-19? How did the “unskilled worker” get reclassified as an essential worker? Is there a difference between Hazard-pay and Equitable-pay? What happens to the people that cannot do their jobs remotely? Can we update an employment model that is approximately 200-years-old? How do we recognize dignity in all labor? Are the creative opportunities of employment changes being co-opted to reproduce exploitation of labor? Did Adam Smith believe it was economically more advantageous to convert a slave into an employee? Do employers only see workers as non-human capital? As a human being, how do you want to participate on this planet? People power Ludlow Massacre of April 20, 1914. Why did the Colorado National Guard and Colorado Fuel and Iron Company guards attack 1,200 striking coal miners and their families in Ludlow, Colorado? How do we dream big? Dream beyond the  expectations of being reasonable. Have you read Looking Backward by Edward Belamy? What is the utopian vision for labor for an equitable  world? What is the difference between a living wage, family wage and a fair wage? Does the arc of history bend toward justice or chaos? Change is constant. Are expressions of our power as individuals, able to change our reality? Did COVID-19 sever our sense of collective work experiences? How fast can we change society, to make it more equitable for everyone that is currently struggling? Can we turn around society for the better in a week? History happens through incremental  changes but also through abrupt shifts and marked moments. Was Emit Till killed as a result of a lie from Carolyn Bryant? What is your perception of time? How do we image the future? How do we acknowledge our own agency to do better?
1:20:38
September 5, 2020
Cultivo Nepantla:Working with Mycelium, Knowledge and Community
Topic: Cultivo Nepantla, Mycelium, Cancun, Mushrooms, Sustainable Future, Title: Cultivo Nepantla:Working with Mycelium, Knowledge and Community. Participants: Susie Sanchez Valenzuela and Alfonso Enrique Valenzuela, Founders of Cultivo Nepantla Release Date: 08/20/20 Time: 5:15 PM (PST) Homepage : www.dreport.org, Send comments about this segment to: comments@dreport.org  Discussion Topics: Find out about Cultivo Nepanta on: –Instagram.com/cultivo_nepantal –facebook.com/ cultivo- nepantla   –youtube.com- Clean Cancun-Sustainable Urban Mushroom Farm  How does your perspective change, if you move from Riverside to Cancun? Do you ask yourself, “who are we?,” “where do we come from?” How do we explain a  leaving the United states to older generations  that risked so much to enter the United States? Would our movements be more free-flowing, if national borders did not exist? Did the grand-parents of our grand-parents have the same life questions that we have today? What are some things that you cannot take with you when you move from the United States to Mexico? What does it mean to be “Mexican- American” in Mexico? How do we acknowledge that our past experiences are preparation for this time we are now living? Can we accept starting from zero as a necessary experience of growth? How do we convert non-assets in the United States into assets in Mexico? How did COVID-19 affect the tourist industry in Cancun? COVID-19 shut down global economies but also created new opportunities? What does the term Nepantla mean? Nepantla means, occupying the spaces in-between. Creating a bridge with people, knowledge and community. How does the mushroom connect our world in endless ways? What is the circular economy? This moment is asking for something new. What can we learn from mushrooms? Mycelium connects our natural world. Can Mycelium be used to breakdown   cardboard? What are the rules for how resources are produced, distributed and consumed  in the local economy? What are the many possibilities for Cultivo Nepantla? Can we convert waste into food? Follow Cultivo Nepantla on social Media. What is the funding campaign to support the growth of Cultivo Nepantla? COVID-19 transformed how we look but cannot transform what we  care  about. Creating a network of  knowledge and support. How are we preparing for the future after COVID-19? How can we support and participate  with Cultivo Nepantla? Donate to  Cultivo nepantial here:
45:08
August 19, 2020
Qualified Immunity: Unreasonable Standards
Topic: Qualified Immunity, Law, Police Accountability, Right to jury trial Title: Qualified Immunity: Unreasonable Standards Participants:  John Burton, Civil  Rights Attorney  www.johnburtonlaw.com Release Date: 08/02/20 Homepage : http://www.dreport.org, Send comments about this segment to: comments@dreport.org Discussion Topics: What is qualified Immunity? How does qualified immunity relate to the national mass movements for police accountability? The modern era of police misconducted litigation starts in the 1960’s with the Warren Court. What is the Federal Civil right act of 1871? Why is section 1983 of  1871 Civil right  act important? What is an unreasonable seizure under the 4th amendment? How did the good faith defense under common law turn into qualified immunity? If the officer did not know that her/ his actions violated a prior existing law, then does  qualified immunity apply? Is qualified immunity judge-made? Is an unreasonable arrest, a violation of the 4th amendment? Does qualified immunity undercut congressional policy and the intent of section 1983 of Civil rights Act of 1871? How do you overcome qualified immunity? If  the police officers did not know that their actions apply to a  violation of a specific law, then   qualified immunity averts a trial? How does qualified immunity deprive plaintiffs from their 7th amendment right, a right to jury trial? How did video change the perception of police actions of abuse? How did cases of police misconduct change after the 1992 Rodney King case? What is the relationship of police militarization and the current issue of police abuse? What is the role of police in a capitalist society? Is qualified immunity intended to protect the personal assets of police officers as individuals? If an officer violates the constitution, then the agency of the officer is responsible  for the damages? Can police officers be held to the same legal standard as drivers and doctors? How does qualified immunity maintain class relationships intact? Why  does the repeated practice of relying on prior cases of constitutional  violations to prove as standards, results in a deterioration potential  clear standard to serve as objective tests? Qualified Immunity takes the decisions of a trial from the jury and gives it to the judges? What are current supreme court cases dealing with qualified immunity? Congress has the power to end qualified immunity.
40:42
August 3, 2020
Towards Definitions of Indigena and Chicana Membership: A Conversation
Topic: Indigena, Indigenous Identity, Chicana Studies, Chicana Community Title:  Towards Definitions of Indigena and Chicana Membership: A Conversation Participants:  Dean Mayorga Broadcast Air Date: 07/10/20 Time: 5:15 PM (PST) Station: KUCR 88.3 FM Riverside, CA KUCR station page: http://www.kucr.org Archive pages: https://soundcloud.com/stoppretending, http://www.dreport.org Send comments about this segment to: comments@dreport.org Segment produced in KUCR, the radio station of the University California in Riverside. Disclaimer: The views expressed are the sole responsibility of  the respective speakers and do not represent the endorsed position of  the UC Regents, UC Riverside or KUCR. Discussion Topics: Have you read the article, How the Chican@ Discourse Silences Indigenous Peoples from Mexico + Central Americans? Available at, https://medium.com/@jessicabhdz/how-the-chican-discourse-silences-indigenous-peoples-from-mexico-central-americans-b72b5897ad26 Is there a difference between being indigenous and identifying as indigenous ancestry or indigenous descendant? What does Indigeneity mean within Chicana and Brown context? What is relationship between defining indigenous and racism? Is indigenous classification marked by assessments of being other than or less than White? Chicana is an inclusive term? What is the difference between Chicana Studies as academic and   outside Chicana lived experience? How do we take ownership of own experiences and our own names? “The book of indigeneity cannot close off at colonization.” – Dean Chicanas   express old and new traditions How do we learn to own our ways of membership? Is there a disconnection between the field of Chicana studies and the communities of Chicanas, Chicanx and Chicanos? An act of remembrance Why does the nation-state want to erase indigenous definitions and instead accept Hispanic and Latino labels? How did the theory of mestizaje influence Chicana Studies and Chicana communities? What happens to mesitizaje discourse if we access race deconstruction   material? How did the adoption in belief in mestizaje produce a platform of loss? What is the role of colorism for light skinned Chicanx/Chicanas/Chicanos? Can you take a DNA test to find out if you are indigenous or Spanish? Indigeneity is political and How does the Hispanic and Latino movement erase indigenous definitions? How do we acknowledge the power to control the terms we will use to name ourselves? Do you have to apologize for being person that has moved from one land  base to another? What is the role of social media in redefining Chicanisma? Is Chicana Studies changing more now than before? Is being Chicana in constant flux? How did Chicanas get repackaged as Hispanics? The politics of renaming. How often is Chicana Studies updated?
47:02
July 13, 2020
Bringing Down Monuments to Build Up New Histories
Topic: Confederate Monument Removal, Public History Title: Bringing Down Monuments to Build Up New Histories Participants:  Daisy Ocampo, Ph.D., Historian.  Assistant Professor in California State University San Bernardino Broadcast Air Date: 07/03/20 Time: 5:15 PM (PST) Station: KUCR 88.3 FM Riverside, CA KUCR station page: http://www.kucr.org Archive pages: https://soundcloud.com/stoppretending, http://www.dreport.org Send comments about this segment to: comments@dreport.org Segment produced in KUCR, the radio station of the University California in Riverside. Disclaimer: The views expressed are the sole responsibility of  the respective speakers and do not represent the endorsed position of  the UC Regents, UC Riverside or KUCR. Discussion Topics: How is public memory created through public spaces? How are communities challenging public monuments? Why was Andrew Jackson called “Indian Killer?” What is the historian perspective on the current movements to remove public monuments that are perceived as racist? Public monuments are statements of power? National monuments signal specific histories that are remembered but also specific histories that are suppressed. The physical narratives are being re-written to challenge the dominance of colonial histories. How is history contested? Why  is the figure of Christopher Columbus celebrated in the United States  if Columbus did not set foot on the land currently labelled as United  States of America? Are statues like textbooks in their historical function? Why is Junipero Sera Celebrated in California? What is role of racial discourse in the analysis of public history? For some people the statues represent heroes, while for others the same figures represent  terrorists. What were the different reactions to writing on the cross on top of Mount  Rubidoux in Riverside? What was the name of  the indigenous village that resided at the base of the place currently called Mount Rubidoux? Frank Miller and President Taft bought the property to place the cross on top of Mount Rubidoux ow do you decolonize places and monuments? What is the difference between Whiteness, White Supremacy and White people? What is the documented process of manufacturing Whiteness?
44:45
July 5, 2020
Violence Is Not Always an Option: Police, Trauma and Transformation
Topic:   Police Violence, Police reform, Civil Rights, Law Title: Violence Is Not Always an Option: Police, Trauma and Transformation Participants:  Pascual Torres  J.D, Esq. Broadcast Air Date: 06/26/20 Time: 5:15 PM (PST) Station: KUCR 88.3 FM Riverside, CA KUCR station page: http://www.kucr.org Archive pages: https://soundcloud.com/stoppretending, http://www.dreport.org Send comments about this segment to: comments@dreport.org Segment produced in KUCR, the radio station of the University California in Riverside. Disclaimer: The views expressed are the sole responsibility of  the respective speakers and do not represent the endorsed position of  the UC Regents, UC Riverside or KUCR. Discussion Topics: Ollin  is  a Nahuatl word  that  loosely translates into movement. How do you introduce healing and transformation into the law? Abuse of Power: Violence, It calls you back,   Article  available  on Peoples college of Law website: http://www.peoplescollegeoflaw.edu/the-abuse-of-power-violence-it-calls-you-back/ How was it to grow up in the 90’s in Boyle heights? What is the relationship between the current police practices and the history of colonization? Are police officers legally permitted to strike someone with closed fists? Is there an “us versus them” mentality within the police? Why do some communities get protected and served while other communities get harassed? Race, class, and education level will determine who gets justice and who gets war? What is justice by zip code? The police are a tool of colonization. Why is violence always an option for police? Why is the age of 13 when we learn to start to fear police violence? When you are constantly under surveillance  by the police, you begin to self-monitor yourself? Did the police give you “Dodger baseball cards?” If you criminalize a certain sector of the community, it doesn’t matter how you treat them? How does colonization and trauma connect to violence? “The untamed violence against our communities is no longer an option,”- Pascual Torres Police violence is a problem that cannot be transferred to the next generation, it must be solved now. What is the history of the police in the United States? What is trauma?  Trauma is an experience that  stays with you for a long time and impacts you negatively. What if the police violence is purposeful to traumatize communities in order to continue the colonizing effect? Can we change the job requirements to be  a police officer? What does it mean to defund the police? Justice is part of the healing process. Do we have a system where everyone is accountable for their actions? How was the law used to colonize people? If you don’t transform your trauma, you transmit the trauma.
40:05
June 26, 2020
Children Born for This Moment: A Parenting Conversation
Topic   Fatherhood, Covid19 and  national Uprising movements Title: Children Born for This Moment: A Parenting Conversation Participants:  Terrance Steward, State-Wide Director of Time Done  and  David Chavez  Historian , ABD Broadcast Air Date: 06/19/20 Time: 5:15 PM (PST) Station: KUCR 88.3 FM Riverside, CA KUCR station page: http://www.kucr.org Archive pages: https://soundcloud.com/stoppretending, http://www.dreport.org Send comments about this segment to: comments@dreport.org Segment produced in KUCR, the radio station of the University California in Riverside. Disclaimer: The views expressed are the sole responsibility of  the respective speakers and do not represent the endorsed position of  the UC Regents, UC Riverside or KUCR. Discussion Topics: How is Covid-19 and the response to advocate for police accountability adding pressures to parenting? What are the new conversations with our children regarding Covid-19 and Police violence? How do we balance our engagement with politics of an outside world and the relationships with our children? How did schooling change for our children when schools shut down? How is school going to be for children next year? How do we explain everything that is happening in this world to our children without scaring them? How do we prepare our children to deal with racism? When schools shut down, parents went into teacher-mode. Children can understand racism and anti-black violence. Are parents ready to send their children to physical classrooms this upcoming fall? How do we manage our concern for our families and our concern to stay engaged in the world that we care about? When did we realize that the shutdown might place our families at risk? Is it safe to take your children to the grocery store? It was surreal moment to see people’s fears empty  stores of grocery supplies. How do you create a phone tree to build community support? How do we talk to our children to make sure they are OK? Many of our children have been at protests since the age of two. How do we keep our children from internalizing the hate? We  must tell our kids, they were born for this moment too The children know that there is a reason why we are staying home and why  we go outside  to protest. How do we help our children understand that this moment will not stay like this forever and that there is a change coming?
39:51
June 21, 2020
061220_Rising Up Toward Freedom: Optimism and Hope
Topic   National Uprisings Against Police Brutality,  George Floyd, Police  Reform Title: Rising Up Toward Freedom:  Optimism and Hope Participants:  Denise Spencer, MBA Broadcast Air Date: 06/12/20 Time: 5:15 PM (PST) Station: KUCR 88.3 FM Riverside, CA KUCR station page: http://www.kucr.org Archive pages: https://soundcloud.com/stoppretending, http://www.dreport.org Send comments about this segment to: comments@dreport.org Segment produced in KUCR, the radio station of the University California in Riverside. Disclaimer: The views expressed are the sole responsibility of  the respective speakers and do not represent the endorsed position of  the UC Regents, UC Riverside or KUCR. Discussion Topics: Did Covid-19 create a catalyst for change in this country and other countries? How do we create a new normal that is inclusive? This is a painful time, but it is also a hopeful time. We must be encourage by the bravery and tenacity of this upcoming youthful generation. The murder of George Floyd and the lives of all the people that were cut short will give us life and gives freedom. How do we build a world where the children of today do not  get to know the kind of oppression experienced by the past? How has the police historically used violence to create and enforce the category of “people of color?” Why  do some people tell us to wait and be patient for society to change,  when we stand on the benefit of generations before us that were  impatient and fought to change things for the better? The  movement of protest is representative of the United States because  “every community” is standing in solidarity in support that Black lives  matter. Is this the beginning of revolutionary change? “A taste of freedom is what I long for…”- Denise Spencer We owe the mass movement of uprising our hope. How did the Covid-19 shelter in place protocols create a population of greater awareness? How  do we make peace with the contradictions of aspiration stories of  liberty and freedom, while understanding that the United States was  built on legally supported inequality? Can the police be both good and bad? What is the effect being able to prove police abuse through video? Racism is a mechanism of control to help the people in the money maintain their status. The increments of change that we have seen in our lifetime come from the type of revolutionary action we see today. This is not the time to throw up our own roadblock in our minds, we must the people   fighting for a better world. We owe it to people protesting on the streets, to let go of our [academic] rhetoric and join them. The days of oppression will end, we demand police reform. Why did the White House put a second fence?
45:29
June 14, 2020
Graduating During Covid-19
Topic  Graduations,  Covid-19, National Uprisings Against Police Brutality Title: Graduating During Covid19 Participants: Lizeth Aguirre,  Chandra and Zion Broadcast Air Date:  06/05/2020 Time: 5:15 PM (PST) Station: KUCR 88.3 FM Riverside, CA KUCR station page: http://www.kucr.org Archive pages: https://soundcloud.com/stoppretending, http://www.dreport.org Send comments about this segment to: comments@dreport.org Segment produced in KUCR, the radio station of the University California in Riverside. Disclaimer: The views expressed are the sole responsibility of  the respective speakers and do not represent the endorsed position of  the UC Regents, UC Riverside or KUCR. How do you prepare to graduate during Covid-19? How do we acknowledge the hard work of students if we are unable to hold a physical graduation ceremony? Covid-19 measures of quarantine and social distancing disrupted our school friendships, colleagues and support. The school transition to online formats severed our opportunities to say goodbye to friends and professors. How did students figure out the housing situation when colleges and universities informed students they had to leave campus? Getting ready for graduation causes anxiety, and fear but also optimism and exciting energy How does the post gradation job hunting season look during the covid-19 national shut down? How do you prepare for your first year of college when the college you plan to attend is under quarantine due to Covid-19? What is the difference between an online education and an in-person school experience? What are your thoughts on graduating during the national uprising against police brutality? How  do we manage our frustration, fears and heart break when seeing people  risk their lives to protest police brutality during a pandemic? How do we support Black Lives Matter? This generation is taking a stand and committing itself to changing the future for the better? How do we walk forward with optimism? We educate ourselves and the people around us to end police brutality. How do we use our college preparation as tool sets to take-on the future? How do we build a community with the tools developed from our college experience?
41:07
June 6, 2020
Self-care: Taking control of our safety
Topic  Self-care,  Covid-19 Title: Self-care, taking control of our safety Participants: Carlos LaMadrid,  Social Work Professional Broadcast Air Date:  05/29/2020 Time: 5:15 PM (PST) Station: KUCR 88.3 FM Riverside, CA KUCR station page: http://www.kucr.org Archive pages: https://soundcloud.com/stoppretending, http://www.dreport.org Send comments about this segment to: comments@dreport.org Segment produced in KUCR, the radio station of the University California in Riverside. Disclaimer: The views expressed are the sole responsibility of  the respective speakers and do not represent the endorsed position of  the UC Regents, UC Riverside or KUCR. Discussion Topics: How do we practice self-care during this moment of concern over Covid-19? As people are sheltering at home, the pressures of hunger, violence and insecurity become more elevated. We are in a period of mourning How has this moment highlighted the different educational and economic disparities? How has the recovery community served as model of coping? What are the systems of polarity as response to stress keep us off balance? How does the moment of sheltering at home create mirrors for self-reflection? During this Covid-19 moment, many of us have become brave enough to ask for help. What does it mean to want to “get back to work?” How  did this moment create an accelerated use of “technology” by people  that previously never used video conferencing for daily communication? What new perspectives will we carry forward as we “open up?” How has our response to Covid-19 shifted the national conversation regarding workers’ rights, housing and economic justice? What was the impact of having “mom and pop” grocery stores open during the moment of insecurity? Some people are scared of the future and other people are optimistic of the future being built. How do we build a society that recognizes that all people are essential? Why are we denying the observance or the recognition of elements of death as we take inventory of Covid-19? What happens when we move from not knowing anyone that has died from Covid-19 to knowing someone that died from Covid-19? What  is necessary for our emotional health, psychological health, spiritual  health and physical health during this period of mourning? What is the psychological effect of not being able to care for your deceased loved-ones because of the Covid-19 pandemic? How do we take control of safety for ourselves? How do we   build hope for the future? You have to do the best you can, not  just for you but for others? Why do I have to take care of myself  first before I can take care of others?
43:13
May 31, 2020
Wearing Masks: Racial Prototypes, Stigma and Risks
Topic: Racial profiling during Covid 19, Ahmaud Arbery, Title: Wearing Masks: Racial prototypes, Stigma and Risks Participants: Terrance Stewart, MA State-wide Director of Time Done Broadcast Air Date: 05/21/2020 Time: 5:15 PM (PST) Station: KUCR 88.3 FM Riverside, CA KUCR station page: http://www.kucr.org Archive pages: https://soundcloud.com/stoppretending, http://www.dreport.org Send comments about this segment to: comments@dreport.org Segment produced in KUCR, the radio station of the University California in Riverside.  Disclaimer: The views expressed are the sole responsibility of the respective speakers and do not represent the endorsed position of the UC Regents, UC Riverside or KUCR.  Discussion Topics: For many of us, the shelter in place did not decrease vulnerabilities but intensified our threat levels. Why is risk of death from Covid-19 greater for the African American community than other communities? Many people feel more vulnerable to risk of physical injury from others than from contracting Covid19 Depending on the skin tone, some us wear the mask and signal a threat Why can some people wear bandanas as masks without activating alarm? Are police shifting their practices away from targeting bandanas as suspicion and instead moving toward bandanas as safe? How did the narrative of African-a American communities being more at-risk of contracting Covid-19, result in a heightened fear of African American communities in public? Are the prior systems of violence also quarantined? People that were hungry before the Covid-19 shelter in place policy are now more hungry under the Covid19 quarantine efforts. People that were harassed by the police before the Covid-19 shelter in place policy are now harassed more under the Covid19 quarantine efforts. The stigma applied to certain populations What are the psychological effects of lynching? What is relationships between the infrastructure of caretaking of deceased bodies away from public site and lack of concern of threats of Covid-19? Are we desensitized from seeing people coded as Black being killed? What is the history in United States displaying dead Black bodies? How do we internalize the multiple examples of violence toward the Black community and express it our families? How do we make sense of he killing of Ahmaud Arbery within the context of Covid-19? What is the history of lynching as state sanctioned violence? Why is there a debate of whether the killing of Ahmaud Arbery was a form of racism? How do we define racism? Is the release of Travis McMichael and Gregory McMichael a form of state sanction of their acts? Is racism as American as apple pie? What are the first legal codes that identify people as Black? Why did Travis McMichael and Gregory McMichael suspect robbery if Ahmaud Arbery was jogging? Is every person that jogs suspected of having committed a crime? What are the dictionary associations with the colors black, brown, yellow, red and white? How does our language rewrite our codes of inequality? If we invest in understanding the system, we can build a better future. Why is self-love and self-appreciation threatening to a system that relies on inequality? Why can’t some of run in public because it is perceived as threatening? Have you read the book Bad boys by Ann Ferguson? -Have you seen the film Juice? Why is there a stigma associated with wearing a hoodie? Why do we have to sacrifice our comfort so other people can be more comfortable? Where do people get their ideas about racial prototypes and stigma? If Mexicans, Native Americans and Asians were also Lynched, then why do we only associate lynching with Black communities?  . 
45:36
May 24, 2020
D Report 051520- Nursing COVID-19: Experiences Symptoms and Safety
Topic COVID-19,   Nurse experience, Public Safety Title: Nursing COVID-19: Experiences  Symptoms and Safety Participants: Vanessa  Valenzuela,   Nurse Broadcast Air Date:  05/15/2020 Time: 5:15 PM (PST) Station: KUCR 88.3 FM Riverside, CA KUCR station page: http://www.kucr.org Archive pages: https://soundcloud.com/stoppretending, http://www.dreport.org Send comments about this segment to: comments@dreport.org Disclaimer: The views expressed are the sole responsibility of  the respective speakers and do not represent the endorsed position of  the UC Regents, UC Riverside or KUCR. Segment produced in KUCR, the radio station of the University California in Riverside. Discussion Topics: What are the symptoms of COVID-19? How are nurses adapting to the urgency of care-taking for COVID-19 patients? When did nurses become aware that  COVID-19 was uniquely different from  other cases such as flu virus? What  is the  relationship between the need to flatten the  curve of COVID-19  transmission and the limits of the medical infrastructure’s capacity to  care for patients? Why are some nurses  having to buy their own medical protective supplies? Did nurses think of themselves as first-responders before COVID-19? Why did most people this COVID-19  was less severe than the  common flu? The medical  field is still learning more ab out the effects of  COVID-19. HOW is the general public learning to escalate its  preventative care-taking? Is COVID-19 going to pass during the summer? How do Nurses  respond to the different sources of misinformation? How do  Nurses take care of themselves? How do Nurses take care not to expose their respective  families and  loved ones to COVID-19? What does “normal” look like during this COVID-19 period? Why do some people believe that COVID-19 is not real?
41:43
May 16, 2020