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Enterprise Incidents with Scott & Steve

Enterprise Incidents with Scott & Steve

By Steve Morris & Scott Mantz
Welcome aboard "ENTERPRISE INCIDENTS," the ultimate 55TH ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATION of the GREATEST “STAR TREK” SERIES of them all: “THE ORIGINAL SERIES!” Co-Hosted by respected “STAR TREK” enthusiast SCOTT MANTZ and filmmaker STEVE MORRIS, “ENTERPRISE INCIDENTS” is a fun, passionate and exciting deep-dive podcast that analyzes and reviews every episode (in production order) with a fresh new perspective, personal recollections and loads of fascinating trivia about how those classic episodes came to be! Live Long and Prosper and ENJOY!
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26) This Side of Paradise

Enterprise Incidents with Scott & Steve

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71) Let That Be Your Last Battlefield
Following our deep dive discussion of "Let That Be Your Last Battlefield," we hope you will enjoy our special interview with Lou Antonio, who played "Lokai." A 50,000-year chase through the galaxy comes to a head on the starship Enterprise, when Commissioner Bele of the planet Cheron finally catches up with his rebellious opponent, Lokai. That puts Captain Kirk in the middle of a heated battle between two warring factions, the outcome of which could lead to the destruction of the Enterprise by Kirk's own hand. Whenever "Star Trek" has been praised for exploring social issues, "Let That Be Your Last Battlefield" is usually the first episode that's mentioned. Whether or not that makes it a great episode depends upon your appreciation for its heavy-handed approach, but a closer look actually reveals more subtleties and layers than it is often given credit for. It also features superb performances from guest stars Frank Gorshin (Bele) and Lou Antonio (Lokai), not to mention the standout scene where Kirk threatens to destroy the Enterprise. But without question, the most important aspect of "Battlefield" is its message about the absurdity of racism, which is just as timely and relevant now as it was in the late-1960s. You can support Enterprise Incidents right here (think of it as a "tip jar"): https://anchor.fm/enterpriseincidents You can follow Enterprise Incidents on social media at: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/EnterpriseIncidents Twitter: @enterincidents Follow Scott Mantz @moviemantz on Twitter and Instagram Follow Steve Morris @srmorris on Twitter and @srmorris1 on Instagram
02:30:20
October 02, 2022
70) That Which Survives
When the Enterprise is suddenly hurled 1,000 light years away from a planet it was exploring, Captain Kirk and his landing party are left stranded on its barren surface without food or water. Mr. Spock immediately sets the Enterprise back on course to its original position, but soon realizes that the starship is rigged to explode. In the meantime, Captain Kirk, Dr. McCoy and Lt. Sulu must figure out a way to survive the elements while defending themselves against a mysterious woman whose touch means instant death. There's not much to say about "That Which Survives," except for how out of character Spock seems to be when it comes to his condescending treatment of the Bridge crew (the same can be said about Kirk's treatment of Sulu on the planet's surface). But regardless, "That Which Survives" overcomes these flaws to succeed as an entertaining-enough late-3rd Season episode, mostly thanks to the performance of guest star Lee Meriwether as the deadly planetary guard, Losira. You can support Enterprise Incidents right here (think of it as a "tip jar"): https://anchor.fm/enterpriseincidents You can follow Enterprise Incidents on social media at: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/EnterpriseIncidents Twitter: @enterincidents Follow Scott Mantz @moviemantz on Twitter and Instagram Follow Steve Morris @srmorris on Twitter and @srmorris1 on Instagram
01:29:41
September 18, 2022
69) Wink of an Eye
The Enterprise responds to a distress call from the planet Scalos, only to arrive and find that its inhabitants have died off with no survivors. But in fact, a few Scalosians have survived and are living at such a highly accelerated rate that they move “in the wink of an eye.” Their plan: to bring Captain Kirk up to their speed in an effort to help repopulate their species while leaving the Enterprise in a deep freeze until the rest of its crew can be called upon to do the same. “Wink of an Eye” may not make any sense on a scientific level, but if you shut off your mind and just go with it, it fits the bill as an entertaining- enough “Star Trek” episode, especially by late 3rd Season standards. You can support Enterprise Incidents right here (think of it as a "tip jar"): https://anchor.fm/enterpriseincidents You can follow Enterprise Incidents on social media at: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/EnterpriseIncidents Twitter: @enterincidents Follow Scott Mantz @moviemantz on Twitter and Instagram Follow Steve Morris @srmorris on Twitter and @srmorris1 on Instagram
01:44:03
September 11, 2022
68) Plato's Stepchildren
The Enterprise responds to a distress call from Platonius, a planet of telekinetically powerful people led by Parmen, who is dying from an infected leg. After being cured by Dr. McCoy, Parmen insists that the ship's surgeon stay behind on the planet permanently, which of course he refuses to do. That's when Parmen and his people -- who have fashioned themselves after the readings of Plato -- use their powers to force Captain Kirk and Mr. Spock into humiliating acts of torture, which will continue until Dr. McCoy succumbs to Parmen's wishes. For an episode that is generally (and justifiably) regarded as one of the worst of the series, "Plato's Stepchildren" certainly has its merits, the most significant of which is that it features what is often cited as the first high-profile interracial kiss on broadcast television. And then there are the scenes between Captain Kirk and kind-hearted Alexander, which speak to the ideals that represent what "Star Trek" is all about, and William Shatner and guest star Michael Dunn perform these scenes beautifully. Guest: Dan Madsen (Former President: Official Star Trek Fan Club, Official Star Wars Fan Club) You can support Enterprise Incidents right here (think of it as a "tip Jar"): https://anchor.fm/enterpriseincidents You can follow Enterprise Incidents on social media at: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/EnterpriseIncidents Twitter: @enterincidents Follow Scott Mantz @moviemantz on Twitter and Instagram Follow Steve Morris @srmorris on Twitter and @srmorris1 on Instagram
02:07:58
September 04, 2022
67) Day of the Dove
On this super-sized episode of "Enterprise Incidents," we're excited to feature an exclusive interview with actress Susan Howard, the very first woman to play a Klingon on "Star Trek." We're also honored to be joined for our deep dive of the 3rd Season classic "Day of the Dove" by Laurie Ulster, Senior Editor at TrekMovie.com. After being lured to the planet Beta XII-A by imaginary distress calls, the Enterprise crew and the Klingons are forced into direct conflict by a powerful alien force that draws its strength from violence and hatred. That conflict escalates when the Klingons commandeer the Enterprise, which is sent spiraling out of control towards the edge of the galaxy. Unless Captain Kirk can find a way to reason with the Klingon Commander Kang, overcome the influence of the alien force and regain control of the Enterprise, both crews will be condemned to fight each other in futile bloody violence for all eternity. If there ever was an episode of Season 3 that truly has it all, it's "Day of the Dove." It's exciting, action-packed and briskly-paced, and it features a timely call for peace that resonates just as strongly now as it did back in 1968. It also features a magnificent, scene-stealing performance from Michael Ansara as Kang, who set a new standard for the way the Klingons would be portrayed on every other "Star Trek" series that was yet to come. You can support Enterprise Incidents right here (think of it as a "tip jar"): https://anchor.fm/enterpriseincidents You can follow Enterprise Incidents on social media at: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/EnterpriseIncidents Twitter: @enterincidents Follow Scott Mantz @moviemantz on Twitter and Instagram Follow Steve Morris @srmorris on Twitter and @srmorris1 on Instagram
02:46:17
August 28, 2022
66) For the World is Hollow and I Have Touched the Sky
Soon after Dr. McCoy is diagnosed with a rare disease that leaves him with one year to live, the Enterprise encounters Yonada, an asteroid that's on a collision course with an inhabited planet. But as Captain Kirk and Mr. Spock soon discover, Yonada is not an asteroid, but is in fact a spaceship designed to look like an asteroid -- the truth of which is being withheld from its own people. That's where McCoy meets Natira, the High Priestess of Yonada. They immediately become smitten with each other, leading him to make the decision to stay behind to live out the rest of his days with her. But if time is running out for McCoy, it is also running out for the people of Yonada. If Kirk and Spock cannot figure out a way to put the ship back on course, they will have to blow it out of the sky in order to save billions of people from annihilation. After 2 1/2 seasons on "Star Trek," DeForest Kelley finally gets to shine in a love story for Dr. McCoy, and he is terrific with guest star Katherine Woodville. But instead of making that a great episode, "For the World is Hollow and I Have Touched the Sky" is merely a good episode and -- dare we say it? -- a "touching" one that reveals a little-seen side of our beloved ship's surgeon. You can support Enterprise Incidents right here (think of it as a "tip jar"): https://anchor.fm/enterpriseincidents You can follow Enterprise Incidents on social media at: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/EnterpriseIncidents Twitter: @enterincidents Follow Scott Mantz: @moviemantz on Twitter and Instagram Follow Steve Morris: @srmorris on Twitter and @srmorris1 on Instagram
01:44:28
August 21, 2022
65) The Tholian Web
We are honored and excited to be joined for our deep dive of "The Tholian Web" by the co-writer of this excellent third season classic, Judy Burns. While searching an area of uncharted space for the USS Defiant, the Enterprise finds its sister starship in a state of distress. In addition to not registering on the ship's sensors, Captain Kirk leads a landing party to board her, only to find that the entire crew is dead after apparently having killed each other. What could have caused this? Before they can find the answer, the Defiant starts to phase into another dimension, and Captain Kirk is trapped aboard her when she disappears for good. That leaves Mr. Spock in command, and he must decide how long to keep the Enterprise in harm's way until they can retrieve him. But time is running out: the captain's oxygen supply is dwindling, and Dr. McCoy must find an antidote to the ravages of the unstable space they're in before the entire crew falls prey to the same madness that infected the crew of the Defiant. As if the stakes weren't high enough, Mr. Spock must also contend with an alien race called the Tholians, who proceed to ensnare the invading Enterprise in an energy web that, when finished, will trap them there for good. The stakes are indeed high -- and they keep getting higher -- in "The Tholian Web," a landmark "Star Trek" classic that's brimming with gripping suspense, stellar performances and groundbreaking visual effects that still hold up to this day. Despite the unfortunate drama that went on behind the scenes, "The Tholian Web" ultimately prevailed as one of the finest episodes of the third season, if not the series as a whole. You can support Enterprise Incidents right here (think of it as a "tip jar"): https://anchor.fm/enterpriseincidents You can follow Enterprise Incidents on social media at: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/EnterpriseIncidents Twitter: @enterincidents Follow Scott Mantz @moviemantz on Twitter and Instagram Follow Steve Morris @srmorris on Twitter and @srmorris1 on Instagram
02:14:46
August 14, 2022
Supplemental -- Remembering Nichelle Nichols
On this special podcast episode of "Enterprise Incidents," we honor Nichelle Nichols by counting down her best moments as Uhura on "Star Trek." You can support Enterprise Incidents right here (think of it as a "tip jar"): https://anchor.fm/enterpriseincidents You can follow Enterprise Incidents on social media at: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/EnterpriseIncidents Twitter: @enterincidents Follow Scott Mantz @moviemantz on Twitter and Instagram Follow Steve Morris @srmorris on Twitter and @srmorris1 on Instagram
47:53
August 11, 2022
64) The Empath
During their attempt to rescue a research team from a soon-to-be-destroyed planet, Captain Kirk, Mr. Spock and Dr. McCoy are abducted by an alien race called the Vians, who mercilessly use them as laboratory experiments for unknown purposes. Those purposes may have to do with the presence of a beautiful young mute woman they refer to as "Gem," who possesses the power to absorb pain from others. But before the true motive of the Vians can be revealed, Kirk, Spock and McCoy are faced with the threat of extreme torture, the likes of which they may not survive. If there was ever a love-it or hate-it episode of "Star Trek," it's "The Empath." Those who hate it are presumably turned off by the sadistic nature of the Vians, while those who love it are taken by the underlying themes of empathy and selflessness, not to mention the great display of compassion shown between our heroes. Count us among the latter, for despite all the pain and suffering, "The Empath" ultimately succeeds as a touching, powerful and uplifting episode that's marked by a beautiful score and magnificent performances from the entire cast. You can support Enterprise Incidents right here (think of it as a "tip jar"): https://anchor.fm/enterpriseincidents You can follow Enterprise Incidents on social media at: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/EnterpriseIncidents Twitter: @enterincidents Follow Scott Mantz @moviemantz on Twitter and Instagram Follow Steve Morris @srmorris on Twitter and @srmorris1 on Instagram
01:44:51
July 31, 2022
63) Is There In Truth No Beauty?
We're thrilled to welcome back director Ralph Senensky for our deep dive of his sixth and final "Star Trek" episode, the sublime third season classic "Is There In Truth No Beauty?" When the Enterprise is assigned to transport a Federation ambassador back to his homeworld, the mission turns out to be both dangerous and delicate. It's dangerous because the Medusan ambassador must be contained, or the sight of his formless appearance will drive anyone insane. And it's delicate because the ambassador's devoted aid, Dr. Miranda Jones, has a complex relationship with their accompanying technical specialist, Laurence Marvick, who is smitten with her. When Marvick's jealousy takes a wild turn for the worst, the Enterprise is sent spiraling out of the galaxy into the intergalactic void, and only a fragile mind link between the Medusan ambassador and Mr. Spock can put the ship back on course. After producing two back-to-back episodes that are generally regarded as among the worst of the series, "Star Trek" rebounded in a big way with "Is There In Truth No Beauty?" In addition to featuring a deeply moving story written by Jean Lisette Aroeste, the episode is graced with inspired direction from Ralph Senensky, an epic score composed by George Duning and, above all else, magnificent performances from Leonard Nimoy and guest stars Diana Muldaur and David Frankham.  You can support Enterprise Incidents right here (think of it as a "tip jar"): https://anchor.fm/enterpriseincidents  You can follow Enterprise Incidents on social media at:  Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/EnterpriseIncidents  Twitter: @enterincidents  Follow Scott Mantz @moviemantz on Twitter and Instagram  Follow Steve Morris @srmorris on Twitter and @srmorris1 on Instagram
02:19:02
July 24, 2022
62) Spock's Brain
After crossing paths with an alien vessel, a mysterious woman materializes on the Enterprise, only to knock the entire crew unconscious. When everyone comes to, they are horrified to discover the body of Mr. Spock clinging to life in Sickbay after having his brain removed with remarkable surgical precision. With very little to go on except a faint ion trail, Captain Kirk pursues the would-be culprit across the galaxy to an unexplored star system, where he must choose between three possible planets to find Spock's brain and have it restored in time to save his life. After mounting a trailblazing letter-writing campaign to save "Star Trek" from cancellation, fans were duly rewarded (or punished?) for their efforts when "Spock's Brain" was chosen to launch the third season on September 20, 1968. Since then, it has gained the notorious reputation as being the worst "Star Trek" episode of all time. But is it really that bad? Is it worse than, say, "And the Children Shall Lead" or "The Way to Eden?" The fact is, "Spock's Brain" starts off strong and features a stellar score composed by Fred Steiner. It isn't until the third act that it "jumps the shark," but one thing's for sure: "Spock's Brain" is never dull, so for that reason alone, maybe it's not so bad after all. You can support Enterprise Incidents right here (think of it as a "tip jar"): https://anchor.fm/enterpriseincidents You can follow Enterprise Incidents on social media at: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/EnterpriseIncidents Twitter: @enterincidents Follow Scott Mantz @moviemantz on Twitter and Instagram Follow Steve Morris @srmorris on Twitter and @srmorris1 on Instagram
02:00:53
July 17, 2022
61) And the Children Shall Lead
The Enterprise responds to a distress call from a Federation outpost on the planet Triacus, only to arrive and find that the entire research team is dead from apparent suicide. What could have caused this? Only the surviving children know for sure, but they're too wrapped up in playing "Ring Around the Rosie" to care about their dead parents. After beaming back to the Enterprise, Captain Kirk discovers that the children are acting as a conduit to spread an evil force across the galaxy, and that force has incapacitated the entire crew from doing anything stop it. And so it goes with "And the Children Shall Lead," which has been widely panned for decades as one of the worst episodes of the entire series. But after producing four strong episodes in a row, how could the third season have taken such a big nosedive, and so quickly? Turns out it was a perfect storm of having a first-time "Star Trek" writer and a first-time "Trek" director being overseen by a new producer who didn't really get what "Star Trek" was all about. And then there was the ill-advised casting of attorney Melvin Belli in the key role of the "friendly angel." Though other fine episodes would soon follow, "And the Children Shall Lead" deserve its notorious reputation as the nadir of "Star Trek," and it sadly marks the beginning of the end of a once-great series. You can support Enterprise Incidents right here (think of it as a "tip jar"): https://anchor.fm/enterpriseincidents You can follow Enterprise Incidents on social media at: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/EnterpriseIncidents Twitter: @enterincidents Follow Scott Mantz @moviemantz on Twitter and Instagram Follow Steve Morris @srmorris on Twitter and @srmorris1 on Instagram
02:02:30
July 10, 2022
60) The Enterprise Incident
After displaying irrational behavior, Captain Kirk orders the Enterprise to change course past the Neutral Zone and into Romulan space, where the ship is swiftly captured by the enemy. The apparent betrayal by Mr. Spock during the Romulan Commander's intense interrogation leads Kirk to lunge violently towards his First Officer, who reacts by applying the Vulcan Death Grip, killing his friend and captain. But as it turns out, this is all a front for Kirk and Spock to carry out the real mission at hand: to steal an advanced version of the Romulan Cloaking Device, which can avoid detection from starship sensors and pose and even greater threat to the Federation. Inspired by the real-life "Pueblo Incident" that dominated headlines throughout 1968, writer Dorothy Fontana fashioned yet another beloved "Star Trek" classic with "The Enterprise Incident." It was the fourth of four terrific episodes produced so far for the third season, and it marked the return of Alexander Courage to score his first episode since "The Naked Time" back in the first season. But the true standout here is guest star Joanne Linville, who gave a magnificent performance as the Romulan Commander, had fantastic chemistry with Leonard Nimoy and helped "The Enterprise Incident" triumph as one of the very best episodes of the third season. Guest: Adam Nimoy (Director: "For the Love of Spock") You can support Enterprise Incidents right here (think of it as a "tip jar"): https://anchor.fm/enterpriseincidents You can follow Enterprise Incidents on social media at: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/EnterpriseIncidents Twitter: @enterincidents Follow Scott Mantz @moviemantz on Twitter and Instagram Follow Steve Morris @srmorris on Twitter and @srmorris1 on Instagram
02:29:30
July 03, 2022
59) The Paradise Syndrome
While performing a quick survey of an idyllic planet doomed for destruction, Captain Kirk goes missing and is knocked unconscious by an advanced alien device, leaving Mr. Spock in command to avert a disastrous asteroid collision. With the Enterprise long gone, Kirk finally comes to, but has lost his memory and is embraced as a god by the planet's primitive inhabitants. Over the course of the next two months, Kirk falls in love and finds happiness with his newfound tribe, but that paradise will be short-lived, unless Spock can figure out a way to deflect the asteroid in time to save the planet. Hailed by many as one of the finest episodes of the third season (if not the entire series), "The Paradise Syndrome" is a beautiful and powerful "Star Trek" classic that's marked by a terrific screenplay, a sublime score, glorious location shooting and stellar performances from the entire cast -- especially William Shatner and guest star Sabrina Scharf as Miramanee.   You can support Enterprise Incidents right here (think of it as a "tip jar"): https://anchor.fm/enterpriseincidents You can follow Enterprise Incidents on social media at: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/EnterpriseIncidents Twitter: @enterincidents Follow Scott Mantz @moviemantz on Twitter and Instagram Follow Steve Morris @srmorris on Twitter and @srmorris1 on Instagram
01:49:30
June 26, 2022
58) Elaan of Troyius
During a diplomatic mission to prevent a war between two neighboring worlds, the Enterprise must transport Elaan, the Dohlman of Elas, to the planet Troyius, where she must marry the ruler of that planet in an effort to keep the peace. That's easier said than done, since Elaan is extremely volatile, demanding and difficult to deal with. That means trouble for Captain Kirk, who reluctantly takes it upon himself to teach her manners and customs before the Enterprise reaches Troyius. But unbeknownst to Kirk, Elasian women have a power that men cannot resist: a love potion hidden in their tears that will enslave any man who touches them. When Kirk does just that, he falls under her spell, and the entire mission is thrown into jeopardy. If that wasn't enough, the Enterprise is being trailed by a Klingon warship. Its motives: unknown. "Star Trek" meets Shakespeare's "The Taming of the Shrew" in "Elaan of Troyius," an outstanding third season episode that really does have it all: action, suspense, jeopardy, heart, humor and -- most definitely -- romance. "Elaan of Troyius" features stellar direction by writer-director John Meredyth Lucas, a stellar score composed by Fred Steiner and a fantastic performance by guest star France Nuyen. Guest: Larry Nemecek (author: "Star Trek: The Next Generation Companion"; host: "The Trek Files") You can support Enterprise Incidents right here (think if it as a "tip Jar"): https://anchor.fm/enterpriseincidents You can follow Enterprise Incidents on social media at: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/EnterpriseIncidents Twitter: @enterincidents Instagram: @enterpriseincidents Follow Scott Mantz @moviemantz on Twitter and Instagram Follow Steve Morris @srmorris on Twitter and @srmorris1 on Instagram
01:49:58
June 12, 2022
57) Spectre of the Gun
After ignoring a warning buoy to stay away, Captain Kirk and his landing party are punished for violating Melkotian space by being made to appear as the Clanton gang in a facade of Tombstone, Arizona, on October 26, 1881. According to history, the "Clantons" -- in this case, Kirk, Spock, McCoy, Scotty and Chekov -- will meet their fate later that day at the OK Corral in a gunfight with the Earps and Doc Holliday. Captain Kirk tries everything he can to avoid the showdown and prove his peaceful intentions, but history cannot be changed -- or can it? Despite all of the cards stacked against it (and there were many), Season 3 of "Star Trek" got off to a pretty terrific start -- at least, in terms of its production order -- with "Spectre of the Gun," superbly written by the always-reliable Gene L. Coon (under his pseudonym "Lee Cronin"). While the end result is basically a rehash of the first season classic "Arena" (also written by Coon), "Spectre of the Gun" ultimately succeeds as one of the third season's finest episodes, thanks to a clever and surreal setting, intense direction by Vincent McEveety, a stellar score composed by Jerry Fielding and strong performances from the entire cast. Guest: Marc Cushman (author, "These Are the Voyages") Your "Star Trek" library is not complete without author Marc Cushman's definitive history "These Are the Voyages" -- you can order your very own signed (and even inscribed) copies right here: http://www.jacobsbrownmediagroup.com/ You can support Enterprise Incidents right here (think of it as a "tip jar"): https://anchor.fm/enterpriseincidents You can follow Enterprise Incidents on social media at: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/EnterpriseIncidents Twitter: @enterincidents Instagram: @enterpriseincidents Follow Scott Mantz @moviemantz on Twitter and Instagram Follow Steve Morris @srmorris on Twitter and @srmorris1 on Instagram
02:07:48
June 05, 2022
Supplemental -- Season 3 Preview
If there's one thing that most -- if not all -- "Star Trek" fans can agree on, it's that the third season simply was not as good as the first two. But that's not to say that it was bad. In fact, it was better than it probably deserved to be, given that the meager budget was cut once again, and some of "Star Trek's" most talented creative forces left for good, such as Story Editor Dorothy Fontana and Cinematographer Jerry Finnerman. And then there's Gene Roddenberry himself, who distanced himself even further from "Star Trek" after NBC dumped it on Friday nights at 10pm. But despite everything stacked against its favor, Season 3 had some pretty great episodes, including "Day of the Dove," "All Our Yesterdays," "The Paradise Syndrome" and "Is There in Truth No Beauty?" Listen to how and why all these changes took place on our Season 3 Preview. You can support Enterprise Incidents right here (think of it as a "tip jar"): https://anchor.fm/enterpriseincidents You can follow Enterprise Incidents on social media at: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/EnterpriseIncidents Twitter: @enterincidents Instagram: @enterpriseincidents Follow Scott Mantz @moviemantz on Twitter and Instagram Follow Steve Morris @srmorris on Twitter and @srmorris1 on Instagram
01:06:12
May 29, 2022
Supplemental -- Season 2 Wrap-Up
We've been saying this all along here on "Enterprise Incidents," and now we really think it's true: the second season of "Star Trek" was its very best -- not just of "The Original Series," but quite possibly the entire history of "Star Trek" dating back to 1966! But what were the best episodes and finest moments that made Season 2 reach such stellar heights? Who were the best guest stars? What were the most thrilling scenes? Which episodes were actually improved by our deep-dive reassessments? What were the standout moments featuring Kirk, Spock, McCoy and the rest of the cast? And what to make of that crazy Prime Directive? Listen to our wrap-up of Season 2, and all will be answered, and then some! You can support Enterprise Incidents right here (think of it as a "tip jar"): https://anchor.fm/enterpriseincidents You can follow Enterprise Incidents on social media at: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/EnterpriseIncidents Twitter: @enterincidents Instagram: @enterpriseincidents Follow Scott Mantz @moviemantz on Twitter and Instagram Follow Steve Morris @srmorris on Twitter and @srmorris1 on Instagram
01:30:20
May 22, 2022
56) Assignment: Earth
When the Enterprise travels back in time to the year 1968 to observe how Earth survived desperate measures without destroying itself, it intercepts a transporter beam of a man in a 20th Century business suit — plus his cat. The mysterious stranger calls himself Gary Seven, and he claims to be on a mission to save mankind from itself so it can eventually evolve into a peaceful society. Captain Kirk finds that hard to believe, but when Mister Seven escapes to the planet’s surface with the intention of sabotaging the launch of an orbiting nuclear platform, Kirk and Spock must decide whether they should try to stop him or let him carry out his mission — and every second they delay could have catastrophic repercussions on Earth’s future and the fate of the human race. Season 2 of “Star Trek” came to a close with “Assignment: Earth,” which was originally intended to be a pilot for a new television series. The pilot didn’t sell, and although it feels at times like Kirk and Spock are guest stars on their own show, “Assignment: Earth” still fits the bill as a unique, entertaining and suspenseful episode that features standout performances from Robert Lansing and Teri Garr, the latter of whom would soon gain greater fame for starring in the likes of “Young Frankenstein,” “Close Encounters of the Third Kind” and “Tootsie,” among many other iconic movies. Special guest: Daren Dochterman (Host: “Inglorious Treksperts”; Visual Effect Supervisor: “Star Trek: The Motion Picture— 4K Director’s Edition”) You can support Enterprise Incidents right here (think of it as a "tip jar): https://anchor.fm/enterpriseincidents You can follow Enterprise Incidents on social media at: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/EnterpriseIncidents Twitter: @enterincidents Instagram: @enterpriseincidents Follow Scott Mantz @moviemantz on Twitter and Instagram Follow Steve Morris @srmorris on Twitter and @srmorris1 on Instagram
01:53:29
May 15, 2022
55) The Omega Glory
When the Enterprise arrives at the planet Omega IV to find one of its sister starships, the USS Exeter, already in orbit, Captain Kirk beams aboard with a landing party to find that only the uniforms remain after a deadly infection crystalized and killed its crew. Only Captain Ron Tracey survives, and he's on the planet's surface armed with his phaser and interfering with the natural order between two primitive warring societies. Since the landing party is now infected and cannot return to the Enterprise, Captain Kirk must figure out a way to enforce Starfleet regulations and discipline Captain Tracey for violating the Prime Directive. Written early on by "Star Trek" creator Gene Roddenberry and previously considered for the second pilot, "The Omega Glory" finally made it to the second season as a notoriously flawed episode that is often derided by fans as one of the worst of the series. But is it really that bad? Sure, it goes off the rails in the last act, but it still has its merits as an intense and action-packed episode with amazing cinematography and fully-committed performances. And then there's that final rousing speech from Captain Kirk, since no one can recite the Preamble to the Constitution quite like William Shatner. You can support Enterprise Incidents right here (think of it as a "tip jar"): https://anchor.fm/enterpriseincidents You can follow Enterprise Incidents on social media at: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/EnterpriseIncidents Twitter: @enterincidents Instagram: @enterpriseincidents Follow Scott Mantz @moviemantz on Twitter and Instagram Follow Steve Morris @srmorris on Twitter and @srmorris1 on Instagram
01:47:40
May 08, 2022
54) The Ultimate Computer
The Enterprise is chosen to test a groundbreaking new computer system called the M-5 Multitronic Unit, which was programed by Dr. Richard Daystrom to think on its own and run a starship without human interference. Captain Kirk has no choice but to go along with a series of war games that, if successful, could render his own position as a starship captain obsolete. The first test goes off without a hitch, but when further testing pushes the M-5 to the brink of self-preservation, Kirk and Spock must figure out a way to disconnect the computer and pull the plug completely before thousands of lives are lost. Once again on "Star Trek," it's man vs. machine, but as written by Dorothy "D.C." Fontana, it's more like man vs. himself, which makes it a far more compelling and provocative episode from the second season. In addition to being faced with an existential crisis, Captain Kirk must also engage in a battle of wits with Dr. Daystrom (brilliantly played by William Marshall), who is facing a psychological crisis of his own. And as for the concept of a computer-run spaceship that turns to murder to preserve itself, that should sound familiar, since it was the basis for Stanley Kubrick's cinematic masterpiece "2001: A Space Odyssey," which opened in theaters on April 3, 1968. But for those keeping track, "The Ultimate Computer" aired for the first time on March 8, 1968, beating "2001" to the punch by almost a month. Special Guest: Dave Rossi (Associate Producer: "Star Trek: Enterprise"; Visual Effects Producer: "Star Trek: The Original Series" Remastered) You can support Enterprise Incidents right here (think of it as a "tip jar"): https://anchor.fm/enterpriseincidents You can follow Enterprise Incidents on social media at: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/EnterpriseIncidents Twitter: @enterincidents Instagram: @enterpriseincidents Follow Scott Mantz @moviemantz on Twitter and Instagram Follow Steve Morris @srmorris on Twitter and @srmorris1 on Instagram
02:00:47
May 01, 2022
53) Patterns of Force
When the Enterprise travels to the planet Ekos to search for a revered Federation historian named John Gill, they discover that the entire planet has fashioned itself after the Nazi regime of old Earth, with Gill as their "Fuhrer." What's worse, the Ekosians are already in the process of rounding up immigrants from their neighboring world of Zeon for extermination, and they are about to launch a full-scale attack on that planet to wipe the out the Zeon race completely. In order to avert the attack, stop the genocide and get to the bottom of why Gill would so blatantly violate the Federation's Prime Directive of non-interference, Kirk, Spock and McCoy must infiltrate the underground resistance and earn their trust -- but time is running out. As one of the weaker entries of what has otherwise been a stellar second season, "Patterns of Force" served as evidence that "Star Trek" was starting to get stuck in a rut -- another parallel Earth story, another violation of the Prime Directive -- not to mention the premise itself, which was totally absurd and about as subtle as a sledgehammer. But even a problematic episode such as this one still has its merits, the most important of which are its messages, specifically that "absolute power corrupts, absolutely," and that if we do not learn from our mistakes, then we will be condemned to repeat them. Plus, it's "Star Trek," and even when the episode isn't great, we still love watching our beloved heroes Kirk, Spock and McCoy do their thing. You can support Enterprise Incidents right here (think of it as a "tip jar"): https://anchor.fm/enterpriseincidents You can follow Enterprise Incidents on social media at:  Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/EnterpriseIncidents  Twitter: @enterincidents  Instagram @enterpriseincidents  Follow Scott Mantz @moviemantz on Twitter and Instagram Follow Steve Morris @srmorris on Twitter and @srmorris1 on Instagram
01:41:22
April 24, 2022
52) Return to Tomorrow
We're thrilled to once again be joined by legendary director Ralph Senensky for our deep dive of his 5th "Star Trek" episode, "Return to Tomorrow." After being lured by a distress signal to a distant planet in an unexplored region of the galaxy, the Enterprise crew encounters the last three surviving members of a long-dead civilization. Led by Sargon, these powerful beings, now housed in receptacles, need the consent of Captain Kirk, Mr. Spock and Dr. Ann Mulhall to temporarily house their bodies, so they can build android robots for themselves that will permanently host their forces of energy. But the being inhabiting Spock's body has no intention of vacating his flesh-and-blood host, and he will stop at nothing to keep it, even if it means killing Sargon -- and, in effect, Captain Kirk and Mr. Spock -- to do it. Despite some inconsistencies and contrivances, "Return to Tomorrow" overcomes its flaws to ultimately succeed as an engaging and entertaining "Star Trek" episode. That's largely due to a number of factors, including a standout performance from Leonard Nimoy, a beautiful score composed by George Duning and, perhaps most of all, the rousing and passionate delivery of Captain Kirk's iconic "Risk is our business!" speech by William Shatner. You can support Enterprise Incidents right here (think of it as a "tip jar"): https://anchor.fm/enterpriseincidents You can follow Enterprise Incidents on social media at: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/EnterpriseIncidents Twitter: @enterincidents Instagram: @enterpriseincidents Follow Scott Mantz @moviemantz on Twitter and Instagram Follow Steve Morris @srmorris on Twitter and @srmorris1 on Instagram
02:08:09
April 17, 2022
51) By Any Other Name
When Captain Kirk and his landing party respond to a distress call from an alien race called the Kelvans, they have the tables turned on them when they are immediately captured and held as hostages. The reason: high radiation levels in their own galaxy will eventually make life there impossible, so the Kelvans need the Enterprise to make the 300-year return journey back to their home world to deliver the message about this new galaxy that their race can conquer and occupy. Since the Kelvans have taken on human form, Captain Kirk's only hope in defeating them lies in engaging them on a human level and stirring up their newfound emotions, reactions and temptations. Written by D.C. Fontana and Jerome Bixby, "By Any Other Name" packs a lot into its 50-minute running time and really does have it all: action, suspense, drama, conflict, romance and -- in an abrupt and remarkably effective shift in tone -- humor (and lots of it). The result is an engaging, briskly-paced and very entertaining "Star Trek" classic that fully deserves to rank up there with the very best of them. Special guest: Mark A. Altman (Host: "Inglorious Treksperts"; Author: "The 50 Year Mission"; Executive Producer: "Pandora"; Writer-Producer: "Free Enterprise") You can support Enterprise Incidents right here (think of it as a "tip Jar"): https://anchor.fm/enterpriseincidents You can follow Enterprise Incidents on social media at: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/EnterpriseIncidents Twitter: @enterincidents Instagram: @enterpriseincidents Follow Scott Mantz @moviemantz on Twitter and Instagram Follow Steve Morris @srmorris on Twitter and @srmorris1 on Instagram
01:43:12
April 10, 2022
50) A Piece of the Action
Put your choppers down, that's no way to treat our special guest for our 50th podcast episode of "Enterprise Incidents!" We excited to be joined by respected entertainment journalist and acclaimed author Ed Gross, who shares his archive interview with "A Piece of the Action" director (and legendary TV producer) James Komack. A hundred years after being visited by an Earth vessel, the Enterprise arrives at the planet Sigma Iotia II, where it discovers a world steeped in chaos and run entirely by gangsters. During their investigation into the cause of this parallel culture, Captain Kirk, Mr. Spock and Dr. McCoy are captured by notorious crime boss Bela Okmyx, who wants a hundred phasers (or "heaters") to knock off the other bosses and take full control. That's when they discover the root of the contamination: a book left behind by the previous ship called "Chicago Mobs of the Twenties." In an effort to clean up their mess and unify the planet, Captain Kirk realizes that the best way to reason with the Iotians is to speak their language, which he attempts to do with often humorous results. "The Trouble with Tribbles" may be the most popular of the comedic "Star Trek" episodes, but "A Piece of the Action" is the bigger fan-favorite, because it's funniest and the coolest of the bunch. It's also the most irresistible, thanks to game performances by William Shatner and Leonard Nimoy, not to mention guest stars Anthony Caruso and Vic Tayback, who are clearly having a ball. As a result, you'd be hard-pressed to find a more fun and gleefully-entertaining episode of "Star Trek" than "A Piece of the Action." In fact, the odds are astronomical -- except at night, on Tuesday. Right? You can support Enterprise Incidents right here (Think of it as a "Tip Jar"): https://anchor.fm/enterpriseincidents  You can follow Enterprise Incidents on social media at: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/EnterpriseIncidents Twitter: @enterincidents Instagram @enterpriseincidents Follow Scott Mantz @moviemantz on Twitter and Instagram Follow Steve Morris @srmorris on Twitter and @srmorris1 on Instagram
01:48:18
April 03, 2022
49) The Immunity Syndrome
While investigating the loss of the Starship Intrepid and an entire star system containing billions of inhabitants, the Enterprise discovers the cause to be a giant space amoeba that is about to reproduce. In an effort to figure out how to destroy it before it kills billions more, Captain Kirk must send a shuttlecraft on a suicide mission into the heart of the amoeba, and he must decide which of his trusted officers is more qualified to go: Mr. Spock or Dr. McCoy. After being rushed into production when NBC-TV picked up “Star Trek” for the balance of the second season, “The Immunity Syndrome” feels contrived, lacks finesse and qualifies as one of the weaker episodes of the series. But it still has its merits, the first of which is the amazing visual effects, which were groundbreaking when it aired in 1968 and still hold up to this day. “The Immunity Syndrome” also contains great dramatic conflict, as Captain Kirk agonizes over which of his closest friends he must send to their uncertain death. You can support Enterprise Incidents right here (just think of it as a "tip jar"): https://anchor.fm/enterpriseincidents You can follow Enterprise Incidents on social media at: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/EnterpriseIncidents Twitter: @enterincidents Instagram: @enterpriseincidents Follow Scott Mantz @moviemantz on Twitter and Instagram Follow Steve Morris @srmorris on Twitter and @srmorris1 on Instagram
01:27:20
March 27, 2022
48) The Gamesters of Triskelion
What a huge honor to be joined for our deep dive of “The Gamesters of Triskelion” by our very special guest Walter Koenig, who of course played Mr. Chekov in the original “Star Trek” series and the first seven feature films! While preparing to beam down to Gamma II for routine maintenance of its automated facilities, Captain Kirk, Lt. Uhura and Mr. Chekov are whisked away to the distant planet Triskelion, where they are to be trained as drill thralls and fight for the amusement of their powerful oppressors, known as the Providers. After his investigation of Gamma II shows no signs of the landing party, Mr. Spock follows his instincts and takes the Enterprise halfway across the galaxy in an effort to continue his search, despite continued resistance from Dr. McCoy and Mr. Scott. Meanwhile, Captain Kirk discovers the true identity of the Providers, with whom he wagers the biggest gamble of his life in an effort to save his crew and free the inhabitants of Triskelion once and for all. While it doesn’t come close to representing “Star Trek” at its best, “The Gamesters of Triskelion” still qualifies as a solid, entertaining and action-packed episode in its own right that features terrific production values, well-choreographed fight scenes and committed performances from William Shatner and guest star Angelique Pettyjohn. You can follow Enterprise Incidents on social media at: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/EnterpriseIncidents Twitter: @enterincidents Instagram: @enterpriseincidents Follow Scott Mantz @moviemantz on Twitter and Instagram Follow Steve Morris @srmorris on Twitter and @srmorris1 on Instagram
01:42:20
March 20, 2022
47) Obsession
We're excited to once again be joined by director Ralph Senensky for our deep dive of "Obsession," the 4th episode of "Star Trek" he directed for The Original Series. After a malevolent force claims the lives of three crewmen, Captain Kirk is convinced that the culprit is the same deadly force that killed 200 crew members from the USS Farragut on his watch as a young lieutenant 11 years before. Among those killed were Kirk's commanding officer, the young son of whom is now serving as an ensign aboard the Enterprise. Driven by guilt and a lust for vengeance, Kirk puts his career on the line and his crew in harm's way in an effort to hunt down and destroy this gaseous creature once and for all before it continues its killer reign of terror across the galaxy. Like "The Doomsday Machine" before it, "Obsession" is another take on "Moby Dick" in space, but this time Kirk is Ahab, and the whale is the gaseous cloud creature from Kirk's past. On every level, "Obsession" holds up as a taut, tense and exciting "Star Trek" classic, and it further deepens the dynamic between Kirk, Spock and McCoy while also featuring superb performances by William Shatner and guest star Stephen Brooks. You can follow Enterprise Incidents on social media at: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/EnterpriseIncidents Twitter: @enterincidents Instagram: @enterpriseincidents Follow Scott Mantz @moviemantz on Twitter and Instagram Follow Steve Morris @srmorris on Twitter and @srmorris1 on Instagram
01:53:16
March 13, 2022
46) A Private Little War
During a routine expedition to a serene planet he once visited 13 year before, Captain Kirk is shocked to discover that a conflict has broken out between two formerly peaceful societies -- the hill people and the villagers. Making matters worse, the villagers are armed with flintlocks, weapons that are far beyond their current state of evolution, but have been furnished to them by the Klingons. That forces Kirk into making the difficult decision to interfere and arm the hill people with the exact same weapons in an effort to establish a balance of power. But first, he must convince their peaceful leader, Tyree, that this is the correct route, even though he is vehemently opposed to fighting of any kind. In what is perhaps the most controversial episode of "Star Trek," "A Private Little War" made history when it aired in 1968 for being the first dramatic television series to directly address U.S. foreign policy in Vietnam. But that's where its relevancy is just beginning, for it applies to proxy wars of all kinds that have been raging around the world for years -- and continue to do so to this very day. As a result, " A Private Little War" remains a brutal, powerful and provocative episode that offers no easy answers or happy endings, which, unfortunately, is precisely the point. You can follow Enterprise Incidents on social media at: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/EnterpriseIncidents Twitter: @enterincidents Instagram: @enterpriseincidents Follow Scott Mantz @moviemantz on Twitter and Instagram Follow Steve Morris @srmorris on Twitter and @srmorris1 on Instagram
02:06:01
March 06, 2022
45) Journey to Babel
While transferring a ship full of volatile Federation ambassadors to a crucial interplanetary conference, the Enterprise is pursued by a mysterious alien vessel with unknown motives. That increases tension among the passengers, which include Spock’s human mother, Amanda, and his Vulcan father, Ambassador Sarek, with whom he has been estranged for years. When Sarek falls ill and Captain Kirk is attacked and seriously wounded by one of the alien passengers, Spock insists on taking command of the Enterprise, which leaves him unwilling to perform the vital blood transfusion needed to save his father’s life. It’s hard to imagine another “Star Trek” episode that has more going on in it than “Journey to Babel,” but it all comes together seamlessly, thanks to a brilliant teleplay by Dorothy Fontana, the always-proficient direction of Joseph Pevney and stellar performances from the entire cast. “Journey to Babel” is a beloved “Star Trek” classic that literally has it all — action, suspense, heart and even a little bit of humor — which is why it still has the last word and holds up to this very day. You can follow Enterprise Incidents on social media at: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/EnterpriseIncidents Twitter: @enterincidents Instagram: @enterpriseincidents Follow Scott Mantz @moviemantz on Twitter and Instagram Follow Steve Morris @srmorris on Twitter and @srmorris1 on Instagram
02:14:60
February 27, 2022
Supplemental -- Star Trek VI: The Undiscovered Country Q&A
For the past 40 years, director Nicholas Meyer has talked endlessly about “Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan,” but he hardly ever gets to talk about “Star Trek VI: The Undiscovered Country,” the second “Trek” film he directed, and the one that reunited the Original Series cast for the last time. That’s what makes this conversation so special. To mark the 30th Anniversary of “Star Trek VI” — first released on December 6, 1991 — “Enterprise Incidents” co-host Scott Mantz moderated a pre-screening conversation with director Nicholas Meyer, producer Steven-Charles Jaffe and composer Cliff Eidelman at the Skirball Cultural Center in Los Angeles, California. It was a fun and informative conversation, and we’re happy to share it exclusively on “Enterprise Incidents.” You can follow Enterprise Incidents on social media at: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/EnterpriseIncidents Twitter: @enterincidents Instagram: @enterpriseincidents Follow Scott Mantz @moviemantz on Twitter and Instagram Follow Steve Morris @srmorris on Twitter and @srmorris1 on Instagram
38:29
February 20, 2022
44) Bread and Circuses
We're excited to once again be joined by director Ralph Senensky for our deep dive of "Bread and Circuses," the third "Star Trek" episode he directed, and one that marked a turning point for both the series and the legendary studio that produced it. The search for survivors from a lost survey vessel leads the Enterprise to a planet that closely resembles 20th Century Earth, with one glaring exception -- on this parallel world, the Roman Empire never fell, and slaves are forced to fight in brutal gladiatorial games that are broadcast on national TV. After beaming down to continue their search, Captain Kirk, Mr. Spock and Dr. McCoy are captured by Merik, the former commander of the lost ship who sacrificed his crew in an effort to save his own life. Now Kirk is forced into the same situation, and he must find a way to escape with Spock and McCoy back to the Enterprise without violating the Prime Directive. For an episode that has so much going on, it's surprising that "Bread and Circuses" isn't held in higher regard with relation to the rest of the series. In addition to being an intense, action-packed and ambitious episode, it's also an effective satire of network television that has become even more relevant in the age of reality TV. And it's all perfectly-balanced by returning director Ralph Senensky, resulting in yet another "Star Trek" classic that represents the very best of the series. You can follow Enterprise Incidents on social media at: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/EnterpriseIncidents Twitter: @enterincidents Instagram: @enterpriseincidents Follow Scott Mantz @moviemantz on Twitter and Instagram Follow Steve Morris @srmorris on Twitter and @srmorris1 on Instagram
02:41:33
February 13, 2022
43) The Trouble with Tribbles
We're honored to be joined for the duration of our deep dive on "The Trouble with Tribbles" by none other than its legendary writer, David Gerrold! Among Gerrold's many accomplishments over the years, he is the recipient of the 2022 Robert A. Heinlein Award, honoring a lifetime of outstanding achievements in science fiction writing. When the Enterprise is summoned by a distress call from Space Station K-7, Captain Kirk is irritated to find that the so-called "emergency" requires him to do nothing more than protect some storage compartments full of a special form of wheat. But it turns out that the emergency is quite real, since that wheat is needed to revitalize nearby Sherman's Planet, a strategically-positioned territory that the Klingons also have a vested interest in. Just when Kirk thought he had his hands full with stuffy Federation bureaucrats and a shipload of Klingons itching for a fight, along comes an interplanetary hustler, who offers the Enterprise crew a cute, furry little creature that has a penchant for reproduction. Over the years, "The Trouble with Tribbles" has become so famous that even people who have never seen "Star Trek" before know what a Tribble is. But for those who have seen it -- and, in many cases, hundreds of times -- "The Trouble with Tribbles" has earned its iconic status in "Star Trek" lore, due to a cleverly-constructed teleplay by David Gerrold, brilliant direction by Joseph Pevney and superb performances from a game cast that fully embraced the episode's delightful and comedic tone. After all, the image of Captain Kirk buried under a mountain of Tribbles is enough to bring a smile to anyone's face, as does everything else about this timeless classic. You can follow Enterprise Incidents on social media at: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/EnterpriseIncidents Twitter: @enterincidents Instagram: @enterpriseincidents Follow Scott Mantz @moviemantz on Twitter and Instagram Follow Steve Morris @srmorris on Twitter and @srmorris1 on Instagram
02:20:10
February 06, 2022
42) I, Mudd
When an android posing as a crewman hijacks the Enterprise to an uncharted planet, Captain Kirk discovers the true culprit to be his old nemesis, Harry Mudd. His plan: to strand Kirk and his crew on the planet, where they will be served by a race of androids, while he escapes to his freedom on the Enterprise. But Mudd's plan backfires when the androids turn on him and decide to leave him behind with the rest of Kirk's crew, while they set out across the galaxy to conquer the human race and "protect" mankind from itself. The stakes are indeed high in "I, Mudd," which is a stark contrast to the more lighthearted, fun and madcap tone that permeates it. It's a total departure from anything ever attempted before on "Star Trek," but the producers and cast members make it work by leaning into the farce of it all and running with it. Everyone is clearly having a ball, especially William Shatner and returning cast member Roger C. Carmel as Harcourt Fenton Mudd. You can follow Enterprise Incidents at: Facebook https://www.facebook.com/EnterpriseIncidents Twitter @enterincidents Instagram @enterpriseincidents Follow Scott Mantz @moviemantz on Twitter and Instagram Follow Steve Morris @srmorris on Twitter and srmorris1 on Instagram
01:44:16
January 30, 2022
41) The Deadly Years
Upon their arrival at the planet Gamma Hydra IV to resupply the Federation science team stationed there, the Enterprise crew is shocked to discover that all of the colonists have died or are dying of a bizarre affliction that has caused them to age rapidly. But soon after beaming back to the Enterprise, Captain Kirk, Mr. Spock and the rest of the landing party find that they too have started aging at an accelerated rate -- that is, all except Mr. Chekov, the reasons for which could provide the key to their survival. With less than a week to live until their bodies give out -- and less time than that before senility sets in -- it's a race against time to find a cure and reverse the aging process. The hits just keep on coming in "The Deadly Years," a provocative, superbly-acted and emotionally resonant Season 2 episode that is far better than it is often given credit for. Chalk it up to a concept that has gained relevancy over the years, especially among longtime fans who have come to relate to its themes, resulting in an unqualified "Star Trek" classic that has quite literally gotten better with age. You can follow Enterprise Incidents. on social media at: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/EnterpriseIncidents Twitter: @enterincidents Instagram: @enterpriseincidents Follow Scott Mantz @moviemantz on Twitter and Instagram Follow Steve Morris @srmorris on Twitter and @srmorris1 on Instagram
02:24:48
January 23, 2022
40) Mirror Mirror
After negotiations to establish a dilithium mining treaty with the peaceful Halkans reach an impasse, Captain Kirk, Dr. McCoy, Lt. Uhura and Chief Engineer Scotty beam back to the Enterprise during a volatile ion storm, only to be swept away to a parallel universe, where the barbaric Empire rules with a savage iron fist. It is here on the Imperial Starship Enterprise that Captain Kirk must follow through with orders to destroy the Halkans unless they comply with the Empire's demands, or he will face imminent death at the hands of the cunning alternate version of Mr. Spock. It’s a race against time to get back to the prime universe in “Mirror Mirror,” a gripping, imaginative, exciting and extremely entertaining “Star Trek” classic that’s firing on all cylinders with superb direction, an amazing teleplay, a thrilling score, fantastic production values, a rousing conclusion and magnificent performances — especially from Leonard Nimoy, who really is quite brilliant with his slightly altered and more intimidating flip version of Mr. Spock. You can follow Enterprise Incidents on social media at: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/EnterpriseIncidents Twitter: @enterincidents Instagram: @enterpriseincidents Follow Scott Mantz @moviemantz on Twitter and Instagram Follow Steve Morris @srmorris on Twitter and @srmorris1 on Instagram
02:56:35
January 16, 2022
39) The Apple
While exploring the seemingly idyllic tropical paradise of Gamma Trianguli VI, the Enterprise crew discovers a subservient society of humanoids that worship a powerful godlike machine called Vaal, which cares for its beings and keeps them happy, but also keeps them in a state of arrested development for the sole purpose of serving it. But when Vaal attacks the invading landing party and uses a powerful energy force to pull the Enterprise down from the sky, Captain Kirk takes matters into his own hands and risks violating the Prime Directive in a last-ditch attempt to save his ship and free the natives from Vaal's eternal rule. At its best, "The Apple" qualifies as a subpar episode that's derivative of some of the far more superior episodes that preceded it. But even a subpar episode of "Star Trek" is still an entertaining one, especially one from "Trek's" landmark second season. Such is the case here, thanks to a brisk pace, impressive set design and stellar production values. And upon closer reflection, "The Apple" is a far more compelling and provocative episode than it is often given credit for, especially when you consider that Vaal has only itself to blame for taking its people out of the Garden of Eden. You can follow Enterprise Incidents on social media at: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/EnterpriseIncidents Twitter: @enterincidents Instagram: @enterpriseincidents Follow Scott Mantz @moviemantz on Twitter and Instagram Follow Steve Morris @srmorris on Twitter and @srmorris1 on Instagram
01:57:51
January 09, 2022
Supplemental -- Star Trek: The Motion Picture (Part 2)
The Cine-Files episode featuring Steve Morris, John Rocha and Scott Mantz on "Star Trek: The Motion Picture" concludes with Part 2 of their deep dive. Now that Mr. Spock has rejoined the crew, the Enterprise is finally ready for its close encounter with V'Ger, an enormous and incredibly powerful destructive force that, as it turns out, is actually just looking to join with its creator. That's where the similarities between the first "Star Trek" feature and the classic Season 2 episode "The Changeling" continue, and in ways that are both obvious and subtle. But some of the biggest revelations on where these two stories actually connect will really blow your mind, as you will discover for yourself in Part 2 of "Star Trek: The Motion Picture." You can follow Enterprise Incidents at: Facebook https://www.facebook.com/EnterpriseIncidents Twitter @enterincidents Instagram @enterpriseincidents Follow Scott Mantz @moviemantz on Twitter and Instagram Follow Steve Morris @srmorris on Twitter and srmorris1 on Instagram
01:29:14
January 08, 2022
Supplemental -- Star Trek: The Motion Picture (Part 1)
As every fan of the original "Star Trek" series knows, the classic Season 2 episode "The Changeling" and the first feature film "Star Trek: The Motion Picture" have a whole lot in common -- so much, in fact, that fans have often referred to that first movie as "Where Nomad Has Gone Before." And, actually, it's true! That's why we're following our "Enterprise Incidents" deep dive of "The Changeling" with the deep dive conversation of "The Motion Picture" that co-hosts Steve Morris & John Rocha did on their podcast series "The Cine-Files," where they were conveniently joined by special guest (and "Enterprise Incidents" co-host) Scott Mantz. And as it turns out, their love for "The Motion Picture" ran so deep (and so long) that they had to divide it into two parts. In Part 1, an alien of unbelievable destructive power is heading towards Earth, and the only Federation Starship in interception range is the USS Enterprise. But after going off in separate directions for the past 2 1/2 years, it turns out that the original bridge crew is a little rusty, not to mention the fact that Admiral Kirk pulled a nasty move to get the Enterprise back. Plus, the Enterprise has been completely refit, and Scotty is still working out the kinks. And what of Mr. Spock, who rejoins the crew with questionable motives? There's a lot going on in just the first half of "Star Trek: The Motion Picture," a largely underrated film that has actually aged better than any other "Star Trek" movie over these years and now stands as one of the very best of the bunch. You can follow Enterprise Incidents at: Facebook https://www.facebook.com/EnterpriseIncidents Twitter @enterincidents Instagram @enterpriseincidents Follow Scott Mantz @moviemantz on Twitter and Instagram Follow Steve Morris @srmorris on Twitter and srmorris1 on Instagram
01:57:01
January 08, 2022
38) The Changeling
While investigating the annihilation of an entire star system containing four billion inhabitants, the Enterprise comes under heavy attack from Nomad, a very small and extremely powerful cylindrical device of high intelligence that -- as Kirk and Spock will soon discover  -- at least partially originated from Earth. Its mission: to travel the galaxy and sterilize all life forms that it deems to be imperfect. That mission takes a dire turn for the worst when Nomad mistakenly identifies Captain Kirk as its creator, leading it to plot a new course to its point of origin, where it will carry out its prime function of death and destruction. "The Changeling" may not be a particularly groundbreaking episode of "Star Trek," but it sure is a gripping, well-made and entertaining one that features many iconic "Star Trek" moments. But what really sells it are the phenomenal performances of William Shatner and Leonard Nimoy, for it is their commitment to their craft that truly brings Nomad to life. You can follow Enterprise Incidents at: Facebook https://www.facebook.com/EnterpriseIncidents Twitter @enterincidents Instagram @enterpriseincidents Follow Scott Mantz @moviemantz on Twitter and Instagram Follow Steve Morris @srmorris on Twitter and srmorris1 on Instagram
01:29:06
January 02, 2022
37) Wolf in the Fold
While visiting the planet Argelius II for medical leave, Chief Engineer Montgomery Scott is suspected of killing a local woman after being caught red-handed with the murder weapon. During an investigation conducted by planetary officials, two more women are killed, and Scotty is once again the number one suspect. Torn between respecting planetary diplomacy and trying to save his trusted engineer, Captain Kirk does everything in his power to defend Scotty, until a deeper investigation using the Enterprise computers reveals the culprit to be a sinister force of evil that emanated from old Earth before venturing out across the galaxy. "Wolf in the Fold" is an atypical episode of "Star Trek" that remains remarkably effective, thanks to intricate plotting, a gripping pace, moody cinematography, superb performances and a seamless shift in genres and tones. It all comes together in true "Star Trek" fashion, and above all else, "Wolf in the Fold" is a very entertaining episode that showcases the acting talents of James Doohan as Scotty. You can follow Enterprise Incidents on social media at: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/EnterpriseIncidents Twitter: @enterincidents Instagram: @enterpriseincidents Follow Scott Mantz @moviemantz on Twitter and Instagram Follow Steve Morris @srmorris on Twitter and @srmorris1 on Instagram
01:47:40
December 19, 2021
36) The Doomsday Machine
The Enterprise responds to a distress call from one of its sister starships, the USS Constellation, only to find it destroyed by a massive killing machine that emanated from another galaxy. It's purpose: to destroy planets, consume the leftover debris to refuel itself and then move on to the next star system to repeat the process. Guilt-ridden over the loss of his crew and hell-bent on revenge, the Constellation's lone survivor, Commodore Matt Decker, takes command of the Enterprise, orders an irrational attack on "that thing" and puts the entire crew in harm's way in an effort to destroy it once and for all. It's "Star Trek" meets "Moby Dick" in "The Doomsday Machine," an all-time classic and fan favorite that features high drama, gripping action, a brilliant screenplay (written by Norman Spinrad), briskly-paced direction (by Marc Daniels), an epic score (composed by Sol Kaplan) and -- perhaps most of all -- one of the greatest performances by a guest star on "Star Trek" (William Windom as Commodore Matt Decker). Special Guest: Dave Rossi (Associate Producer: "Star Trek: Enterprise"; Visual Effects Producer: "Star Trek: The Original Series" Remastered) Special Guest: Norman Spinrad (Writer, "The Doomsday Machine") You can follow Enterprise Incidents at: Facebook https://www.facebook.com/EnterpriseIncidents Twitter @enterincidents Instagram @enterpriseincidents Follow Scott Mantz @moviemantz on Twitter and Instagram Follow Steve Morris @srmorris on Twitter and srmorris1 on Instagram
02:29:39
December 12, 2021
35) Amok Time
After his logical first officer is examined for displaying strange and bizarre behavior, Captain Kirk is informed that Mr. Spock will die unless he returns to his home planet of Vulcan to take part in an ancient mating ritual. Upon their arrival, Kirk and Dr. McCoy accompany their friend to a private ceremony that is presided over by a top Vulcan official, but the proceedings soon take a deadly turn when Spock is forced by his mate to fight another potential suitor to the death -- his friend and commanding officer, James T. Kirk. For loyal fans who helped turn Mr. Spock into the most popular character of the series, "Star Trek" could not have picked a better episode to launch its stellar second season, which rewarded them with their first trip to Vulcan. And more than five decades later, "Amok Time" remains one of the best and most beloved episodes of "Star Trek," thanks to a brilliant screenplay written by Theodore Sturgeon, an epic score composed by Gerald Fried and magnificent performances from the entire cast -- especially Leonard Nimoy, who gives what just may be his greatest performance as Mr. Spock. You can follow Enterprise Incidents on social media at: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/EnterpriseIncidents Twitter: @enterincidents Instagram: @enterpriseincidents Follow Scott Mantz @moviemantz on Twitter and Instagram Follow Steve Morris @srmorris on Twitter and @srmorris1 on Instagram
02:12:09
December 05, 2021
34) Who Mourns for Adonais?
While exploring the planet Pollux IV, the Enterprise is held captive by an alien super-being who claims to be the Greek god Apollo. His demands are that the crew abandon ship, settle on his planet and worship him like their human ancestors did 5,000 years before. Since they are no match for Apollo's mythological powers, Captain Kirk's only hope lies in reasoning with Lt. Carolyn Palamas, the ship's Archaeology and Anthropology officer, who becomes smitten with Apollo after he chooses her to be his mate. In what is perhaps one of "Star Trek'" deepest and most thought-provoking episodes, "Who Mourns for Adonais?" takes the "ancient astronaut" theory and runs with it. The writing and direction are both superb, and the production design, wardrobe and original score are all fantastic. But the key to the success of this episode lies with the magnificent, fiercely-committed and heartbreaking performance of Michael Forest, who portrays Apollo as a charismatic and empathetic, yet ultimately tragic, figure. You can follow Enterprise Incidents on social media at: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/EnterpriseIncidents Twitter: @enterincidents Instagram: @enterpriseincidents Follow Scott Mantz @moviemantz on Twitter and Instagram Follow Steve Morris @srmorris on Twitter and @srmorris1 on Instagram
02:12:26
November 21, 2021
33) Friday's Child
When the Enterprise travels to Capella IV to secure a mining treating for a rare mineral that's essential to supporting life on other planets, Captain Kirk, Mr. Spock and Dr. McCoy are taken prisoner when they get caught up in a coup to overthrow the tribal leadership and interrupt the execution of Eleen, the pregnant widow of the assassinated ruler. Making matters worse, the Klingons are also there for the minerals, and for the moment, they have the upper hand. When the Enterprise is lured away by a distress call, Kirk, Spock and McCoy are on their own, but they really have their hands full when they discover that Eleen does not want the unborn child she is carrying. Written by D.C. Fontana, "Friday's Child" is a fast-paced action-adventure that features superb performances, top-notch production values and terrific costume design. And while the whole never really comes together to be greater than the sum of its parts, "Friday's Child" remains a solid and entertaining "Star Trek" episode that effectively balances action, heart and humor. You can follow Enterprise Incidents on social media at: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/EnterpriseIncidents Twitter: @enterincidents Instagram: @enterpriseincidents Follow Scott Mantz @moviemantz on Twitter and Instagram Follow Steve Morris @srmorris on Twitter and @srmorris1 on Instagram
01:45:18
November 14, 2021
32) Metamorphosis
We're excited to once again be joined by Ralph Senensky for our deep dive on "Metamorphosis," the second "Star Trek" episode he directed. When the Shuttlecraft Galileo is thrown off course by a powerful field of energy, Captain Kirk, Mr. Spock, Dr. McCoy and Assistant Commissioner Nancy Hedford are forced to make an emergency landing on a small planet in an asteroid belt. But they are not alone. Also marooned there for many years is a man named Zephram Cochrane, who knows a lot more than he is letting on about why they are really there. But time is running out -- Commissioner Hedford must be taken to the Enterprise to be treated for a rare disease, so she can be cured in time to stop a war on a distant planet. But when Kirk's aggressive tactics to escape wind up aggravating the situation even worse, he is forced to re-think his strategy and try a different approach when the true identity of their captor becomes clear. Over the years, "Metamorphosis" has hardly ever been mentioned as being one of "Star Trek's" best episodes. But it should be, because it's a sensitive, brilliantly-written and beautifully-directed story about love, compassion, communication and tolerance that represents what "Star Trek" is all about. And it's bolstered even further by gorgeous cinematography, a sublime musical score and superb performances from William Shatner and guest star Elinor Donahue. Like a fine wine, "Metamorphosis" has aged extremely well, and it has properly come to be reappraised as one of "Star Trek's" finest hours. You can follow Enterprise Incidents on social media at: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/EnterpriseIncidents Twitter: @enterincidents Instagram: @enterpriseincidents Follow Scott Mantz @moviemantz on Twitter and Instagram Follow Steve Morris @srmorris on Twitter and @srmorris1 on Instagram
02:43:42
November 07, 2021
31) Catspaw
When one crew member of the Enterprise turns up dead and two others (Scotty and Sulu) go missing, Captain Kirk, Mr. Spock and Dr. McCoy beam down to a mysterious and foreboding planet to investigate. There's were they encounter three witches, a black cat, a giant castle and two seemingly-humanoid lifeforms named Korob and Sylvia, who display incredible powers until their true motives (and their true identities) become clear. To this day, "Catspaw" remains the only "Star Trek" episode specifically produced as a holiday special (of course, to coincide with Halloween), but it was actually the first episode to be filmed for "Trek's" landmark second season. Despite the shortcomings of the story written by Robert Bloch, and with far better episodes soon to follow, "Catspaw" remains something of a guilty pleasure for "Star Trek," and it's actually a lot more fun the less you think about it. You can follow Enterprise Incidents on social media at: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/EnterpriseIncidents Twitter: @enterincidents Instagram: @enterpriseincidents Follow Scott Mantz @moviemantz on Twitter and Instagram Follow Steve Morris @srmorris on Twitter and @srmorris1 on Instagram
01:42:26
October 31, 2021
Supplemental -- Who is James T. Kirk?
Before we get into our deep dive of Season Two, we wanted to share a special episode of “Enterprise Incidents” that we recorded live in front of an audience at Creation Entertainment’s “55 Year Mission” Celebration of “Star Trek” at the Rio Hotel in Las Vegas in August 2021! Throughout the course of our first season, where we re-assessed “Star Trek” as a serialized body of work, we saw The Original Series in a fresh new light and made so many new discoveries — the biggest of which involves the Captain of the Starship Enterprise himself, James T. Kirk. We always thought of Kirk as a bold, brash hero teeming with bravado (which he is), but he had to be a whole lot more than that to make the intelligent, informed and life-saving decisions that he did. So who is James T. Kirk, and how did he get to be this way? Listen to this fun, energetic and revealing live podcast of “Enterprise Incidents” to find out! You can follow Enterprise Incidents at: Facebook https://www.facebook.com/EnterpriseIncidents Twitter @enterincidents Instagram @enterpriseincidents Follow Scott Mantz @moviemantz on Twitter and Instagram Follow Steve Morris @srmorris on Twitter and srmorris1 on Instagram
01:01:29
October 24, 2021
Supplemental -- Season One Wrap-Up (and Season Two Preview!)
As we wrap up our first season of “Enterprise Incidents,” we look back on all of the big revelations that we discovered about Season One of “Star Trek.” By treating the entire first season as a serialized show (as opposed to the stand-alone episode series that it was produced as), we came to see the original “Star Trek” in a fresh new light. What were the biggest things we learned about Captain Kirk, Mr. Spock and Dr. McCoy? Which supporting characters went up in our re-assessment? Which episodes were a lot better (or worse) than we remembered? Who were our favorite guest stars? Which themes, ideas and metaphors resonated on a deeper level after 55 years? And what were the biggest changes made to “Star Trek” as the brave crew of the Starship Enterprise journeyed into Season Two? Find out here, thanks for listening...and keep going boldly! You can follow Enterprise Incidents on social media at:  Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/EnterpriseIncidents Twitter: @enterincidents Instagram: @enterpriseincidents Follow Scott Mantz @moviemantz on Twitter and Instagram Follow Steve Morris @srmorris on Twitter and @srmorris1 on Instagram
01:42:39
October 17, 2021
30) Operation -- Annihilate!
While tracking the progression of mass insanity across the galaxy, the Enterprise arrives at the planet Deneva, where the inhabitants have been infected by invading parasites that control their human hosts with immense pain. If Captain Kirk cannot destroy the parasites and cure the more than one million colonists, he will be forced to make the most difficult command decision of his life in an effort to stop the madness from progressing any further. The landmark first season of "Star Trek" came to a close with "Operation -- Annihilate!", a flawed episode that hardly represents the best of the series, though its depiction of agony certainly one of the most disturbing to endure. But it still has many merits, the biggest of which are the top-notch performances from William Shatner, Leonard Nimoy and DeForest Kelley, who continued to strengthen the incredible dynamic between Kirk, Spock and McCoy. You can follow Enterprise Incidents on social media at: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/EnterpriseIncidents Twitter: @enterincidents Instagram: @enterpriseincidents Follow Scott Mantz @moviemantz on Twitter and Instagram Follow Steve Morris @srmorris on Twitter and @srmorris1 on Instagram
01:36:56
October 10, 2021
29) The City on the Edge of Forever
After an accidental drug overdose induces Dr. McCoy into a wild frenzy, he flees the Enterprise to the desolate planet below, where he jumps through an ancient time portal and alters the course of Earth's history. In order to prevent the Federation from being erased from existence, Captain Kirk and Mr. Spock follow the good doctor back in time to Depression-era New York City, where Kirk soon falls in love with a kind-hearted social worker whose very existence holds the key to restoring Earth's proper timeline. If there ever was a "Star Trek" episode that truly qualifies as being the very best of them all, it's "The City on the Edge of Forever." Written by Harlan Ellison (with a big assist from just about every major writer and producer who worked on "Star Trek" at the time), "City" is an epic triumph on every level, and the palpable chemistry between William Shatner and guest star Joan Collins is as good as it gets. No matter how many times you've seen "The City on the Edge of Forever," it still packs a powerful emotional punch, making it not only "Star Trek's" finest hour, but also one of the greatest episodes of dramatic television ever produced. You can follow Enterprise Incidents on social media at: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/EnterpriseIncidents Twitter: @enterincidents Instagram: @enterpriseincidents Follow Scott Mantz @moviemantz on Twitter and Instagram Follow Steve Morris @srmorris on Twitter and @srmorris1 on Instagram
02:47:30
October 03, 2021
28) Errand of Mercy
When war breaks out between the Federation and the Klingon Empire, the Enterprise is sent to Organia to prevent the Klingons from using the strategically-placed planet as a base. But despite Captain Kirk's appeals to the Council, the peace-loving Organians have no intention of letting the Federation plant their flag there either. Tensions mount when the Klingons arrive, until the endless bickering between Kirk and the Klingon Commander, Kor, leads the Organians to put their foot down and stage a galactic intervention. Just as he did with his stellar teleplay for "A Taste of Armageddon," writer-producer Gene Coon disguises his allegory about the pointlessness of war as a provocative, superbly-written and powerfully-acted science fiction action-adventure. But of course, "Errand of Mercy" truly achieves landmark status by being the first "Star Trek" episode to feature the Klingons, and guest star John Colicos gave a magnificent performance that set the standard for every Klingon that followed over the last 55 years. You can follow Enterprise Incidents on social media at: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/EnterpriseIncidents Twitter: @enterincidents Instagram: @enterpriseincidents Follow Scott Mantz @moviemantz on Twitter and Instagram Follow Steve Morris @srmorris on Twitter and @srmorris1 on Instagram
02:22:35
September 26, 2021
27) The Devil in the Dark
The Enterprise responds to a distress call from the mining colony on the planet Janus VI, where a mysterious creature is lurking in the shadows and killing its people. In a desperate attempt to get the essential operation up and running again, Captain Kirk and Mr. Spock must track down the alien life form through a sprawling maze of subterranean tunnels, where they soon come face to face with it and learn its true motives. Written by producer Gene Coon, "The Devil in the Dark" is widely hailed as one of the finest episodes of "Star Trek" of all time, if for no other reason because it represents the truest form of what the series was all out. The creature that was initially seen as something to be feared turns into an object of our compassion, thanks to the willingness of Kirk and Spock to communicate with it -- or, rather, her. We fear what we do not understand, and when we take the time to understand and learn from the experience, we realize there is actually nothing to fear at all. It is a lesson that "The Devil in the Dark" taught effectively in 1967, and it is one that we can all still learn from in the 21st Century. You can follow Enterprise Incidents on social media at: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/EnterpriseIncidents Twitter: @enterincidents Instagram: @enterpriseincidents Follow Scott Mantz @moviemantz on Twitter and Instagram Follow Steve Morris @srmorris on Twitter and @srmorris1 on Instagram
01:44:01
September 19, 2021
26) This Side of Paradise
We're excited and honored to be joined for our deep dive on "Enterprise Incidents" by Ralph Senensky, who made his "Star Trek" directorial debut with the beloved classic "This Side of Paradise." The Enterprise arrives at Omicron Ceti III, a planet which is being bombarded by deadly Berthold rays, expecting to find no signs of life from the colonists who previously settled there. But to Captain Kirk's surprise, everyone is alive and well -- and extremely happy -- thanks to the euphoric effect of drug-like spores produced by an alien plant. After the colonists refuse to evacuate, the spores quickly spread to infect the crew of the Enterprise, leading them to mutiny as they desert the ship to join the colony. That includes the normally loyal and unemotional Mr. Spock, who defies his friend and commanding officer after falling in love with the colony's botanist, Leila Kalomi. Marooned on the Enterprise, Captain Kirk must figure out a way to neutralize the effect of the spores and return his crew to normalcy -- but how can he counteract paradise? And does he have the right to even try? As written by Dorothy "D.C." Fontana, "This Side of Paradise" was a brilliant and subtle allegory about the drug counterculture of the 1960s, and it has since stood the test of time to triumph as a beautiful, sensitive and deeply moving "Star Trek" masterpiece that features superb performances from William Shatner, Leonard Nimoy and exquisite guest star Jill Ireland. Learn more about Ralph Senensky's incredible body of work through his website: http://ralph-senensky.blogspot.com Follow Enterprise Incidents on social media at: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/EnterpriseIncidents Twitter: @enterincidents Instagram: @enterpriseincidents Follow Scott Mantz @moviemantz on Twitter and Instagram Follow Steve Morris @srmorris on Twitter and @srmorris1 on Instagram
02:13:04
September 12, 2021
25) A Taste of Armageddon
For the past 500 years, the planet Eminiar VII and its nearest neighbor have been engaged in a war fought solely by computers, where those marked as casualties must report to disintegration chambers to have their deaths recorded. After ignoring repeated warnings to stay away, the Enterprise is marked as a target and classified as destroyed, which means the landing party will be held captive until the entire crew beams down to report to their deaths. Captain Kirk is about to take a mighty big gamble in his efforts to not only save the Enterprise, but to also stop this computerized war at all costs, even if it means potentially unleashing the real horrors of war unless peace can finally be achieved. "A Taste of Armageddon" has held up as a big, bold, briskly-paced and very entertaining "Star Trek" classic, but it has also come to resonate with much greater relevancy and even some controversy over the years -- and for very valid reasons, as our heated discussion on the latest "Enterprise Incidents" clearly demonstrates. Special guest: Robert Meyer Burnett (Director: "Free Enterprise"; Producer: blu-ray features, "Star Trek: The Next Generation" and "Star Trek: Enterprise"; Host: "Robservations") You can follow Enterprise Incidents on social media at: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/EnterpriseIncidents Twitter: @enterincidents Instagram: @enterpriseincidents Follow Scott Mantz @moviemantz on Twitter and Instagram Follow Steve Morris @srmorris on Twitter and @srmorris1 on Instagram
02:16:47
September 05, 2021
Supplemental -- Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan
On February 1st, 2017, Scott Mantz walked into Steve Morris' house for the very first time. They had never met before, nor had they even spoken, but over the next two hours, they discovered a deep connection through their lifelong love of Star Trek. This early episode of The Cine-Files was not only a transformative moment for the Cine-Files podcast and the first appearances of one of their favorite guests, but it was also the beginning of great friendship and, although it took a few years, the prototype episode for what would eventually become Enterprise Incidents.  You can find over 200 other great episodes of The Cine-Files here.  http://tinyurl.com/zzdpjwm You can follow Enterprise Incidents on social media at: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/EnterpriseIncidents Twitter: @enterincidents Instagram: @enterpriseincidents Follow Scott Mantz @moviemantz on Twitter and Instagram Follow Steve Morris @srmorris on Twitter and @srmorris1 on Instagram
01:50:56
August 30, 2021
24) Space Seed
Far out in deep space, the Enterprise encounters the S.S. Botany Bay, a 200-year-old Earth vessel with a crew of 72 in a state of suspended animation. What Captain Kirk is about to discover is that this "crew" is actually a renegade group of genetically-engineered super-beings led by Khan Noonien Singh, an ambitious and charismatic leader who immediately sets out to revive his people, take over the Enterprise and use the powerful starship to conquer the galaxy. Between guest star Ricardo Montalban's magnetic performance, his dynamic chemistry with William Shatner and the fact that he inspired what is inarguably the greatest "Star Trek" movie of them all, "Space Seed" will always be highly regarded as a beloved and absolute classic. The story resonates deeper than ever, the writing is sharp and the acting is superb -- and as soon as it's over, you want to watch "Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan" all over again. You can follow Enterprise Incidents on social media at: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/EnterpriseIncidents Twitter: @enterincidents Instagram: @enterpriseincidents Follow Scott Mantz @moviemantz on Twitter and Instagram Follow Steve Morris @srmorris on Twitter and @srmorris1 on Instagram
02:32:02
August 29, 2021
23) The Return of the Archons
When the Enterprise travels to the planet Beta III to search for the survivors of a long-lost starship, Captain Kirk discovers an arrested culture where the inhabitants behave in a collective, orderly and tranquil demeanor during the day, only to lose their minds in an overly aggressive and downright violent fashion during a nighttime event called "festival." Making matters worse, members of the Enterprise crew become transformed -- or "absorbed" -- when they fall under the spell of the planet's mysterious and powerful leader, known only as Landru, whose true identity will force Kirk and Spock to pull the plug on this mechanical society. "The Return of the Archons" is a big, bold, effective and downright surreal episode that has a lot to say, and the producers of "Star Trek" have spared no expense to say it with the most ambitious and lavishly-produced episode of the first season. And at a time when the world was facing the threat of life under the Communist party, the message of "The Return of the Archons" rings loud and clear -- that freedom isn't a gift; it has to be earned -- and "Star Trek" was (and still is) the best series of its kind to deliver that all-important and aspirational message. You can follow Enterprise Incidents on social media at: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/EnterpriseIncidents Twitter: @enterincidents Instagram: @enterpriseincidents Follow Scott Mantz @moviemantz on Twitter and Instagram Follow Steve Morris @srmorris on Twitter and @srmorris1 on Instagram
01:55:26
August 22, 2021
22) Tomorrow is Yesterday
A freak accident sends the Enterprise hurtling through space and back in time to Earth in the late 1960s, where it is detected and classified by the U.S. military as an Unidentified Flying Object. Complicating matters further, Captain Kirk is forced to beam aboard an Air Force pilot named John Christopher, whose duty it will be to report everything he is now seeing about this vast starship from the future. Kirk and Spock must figure out a way to return the Enterprise to its own time, but not before they must return Captain Christopher to Earth without jeopardizing the history of the future. With the stakes so very high, it's remarkable how much levity is featured in "Tomorrow is Yesterday," the second Original Series teleplay written by Dorothy "D.C." Fontana. The result is "Star Trek's" first full-on comedy, and it's a delightful episode, but the humor never comes at the expense of the quality, the high drama and the superb performances that had come to represent the series at its finest. You can follow Enterprise Incidents on social media at: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/EnterpriseIncidents Twitter: @enterincidents Instagram: @enterpriseincidents Follow Scott Mantz @moviemantz on Twitter and Instagram Follow Steve Morris @srmorris on Twitter and @srmorris1 on Instagram
01:57:20
August 15, 2021
21) The Alternative Factor
After a cataclysmic disturbance threatens the foundation of civilization, Captain Kirk comes face-to-face with the culprit -- a maniacal lunatic named Lazarus, who will stop at nothing to destroy a duplicate version of himself who exists in a parallel universe. With the fate of the galaxy hanging in the balance, Kirk and Spock must figure out a way to stop the matter and anti-matter versions of Lazarus from coming together, or they will wipe out everything in existence. After producing 20 prior episodes of groundbreaking television, it was only a matter of time until "Star Trek" came up short with a colossal failure. The concept was ambitious, but the episode that came out of it was convoluted, confusing and boring -- and it made absolutely no sense whatsoever. It was a troubled production all around, no doubt hampered by the casting of Robert Brown, who was called in at the 11th hour to replace the episode's original guest star. But true to form for "Star Trek," "The Alternative Factor" does have its merits, and our revealing deep dive conversation about the drama behind the scenes makes for a fascinating episode of "Enterprise Incidents!" You can follow Enterprise Incidents on social media at: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/EnterpriseIncidents Twitter: @enterincidents Instagram: @enterpriseincidents Follow Scott Mantz @moviemantz on Twitter and Instagram Follow Steve Morris @srmorris on Twitter and @srmorris1 on Instagram
01:59:07
August 08, 2021
20) Arena
After a surprise attack on a distant colony leads the Enterprise to pursue the attacking vessel across the galaxy to an uncharted solar system, a powerful alien force banishes Captain Kirk and the lizard-like commander of the Gorn vessel to a barren asteroid, where they must fight to the death for the fate of their crews. Kirk is no match for his much stronger adversary, so he must rely on his ingenuity to construct a weapon out of the native elements, and he must do so in time to defeat his enemy and save the Enterprise before he is overcome with exhaustion. "Arena" has stood the test of time as one of the very best episodes of "Star Trek," and for many reasons. It's a gripping and fast-paced action-adventure, it introduced one of "Star Trek's" most iconic aliens and it features William Shatner at the top of his game. But perhaps most of all, "Arena" was written by producer Gene Coon, whose brilliant screenplay not only shows Captain Kirk learning from his mistakes, but also demonstrating a noble display of compassion to make a strong case for the promising future of humanity. You can follow Enterprise Incidents at: Facebook https://www.facebook.com/EnterpriseIncidents Twitter @enterincidents Instagram @enterpriseincidents Follow Scott Mantz @moviemantz on Twitter and Instagram Follow Steve Morris @srmorris on Twitter and srmorris1 on Instagram
01:47:15
August 01, 2021
19) The Squire of Gothos
While speeding through a star desert roughly 900 light years from Earth, the Enterprise encounters a rogue planet whose sole inhabitant -- an extremely powerful and rather jovial alien being named Trelane -- holds Captain Kirk and his crew captive while treating them as playthings for his amusement. When Kirk engages Trelane in a battle of wits in an effort to free the Enterprise, they play a high-stakes version of the most dangerous game -- the outcome of which will reveal the true identity of their mysterious captor. "The Squire of Gothos" is a fun, lighthearted and very entertaining episode, but it is also a subtle anti-war statement that holds a mirror up to the more violent and aggressive side of human behavior. But without question, the big reason why "The Squire of Gothos" achieves classic status is because of William Campbell, who was clearly having a ball with his playful performance as the mischievous Trelane, and his chemistry with William Shatner was fantastic -- both of which make Campbell one of the finest guest stars to ever grace the Hollywood soundstages of "Star Trek." You can follow Enterprise Incidents on social media at: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/EnterpriseIncidents Twitter: @enterincidents Instagram: @enterpriseincidents Follow Scott Mantz @moviemantz on Twitter and Instagram Follow Steve Morris @srmorris on Twitter and @srmorris1 on Instagram
02:18:10
July 25, 2021
18) Shore Leave
After a grueling 3-month period that leaves the Enterprise crew exhausted and in dire need of rest and relaxation, they discover a planet that's literally too good to be true: peaceful, lush, idyllic, seemingly uninhabited and, in the words of Dr. McCoy, "like something out of Alice in Wonderland" -- in other words, the perfect place for Captain Kirk to authorize shore leave. But when members of the scouting party start to have mysterious encounters with figments of their imagination, they soon find themselves trapped on a world where their imaginations could be their own worst enemies. "Shore Leave" is an atypical episode of "Star Trek"; there's simply no other episode quite like it. It's loaded with humor, but it's dramatic when it needs to be, and it's surreal to the point where it feels more like a fantasy than science fiction. But it is a testament to the actors and the producers that it all still works within the framework of "Star Trek," resulting in an episode that's fresh, fun and very entertaining. Plus it gives a lot of background into Captain Kirk's past...with sometimes painful results! You can follow Enterprise Incidents on social media at: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/EnterpriseIncidents Twitter: @enterincidents Instagram: @enterpriseincidents Follow Scott Mantz @moviemantz on Twitter and Instagram Follow Steve Morris @srmorris on Twitter and @srmorris1 on Instagram
01:58:50
July 23, 2021
17) The Menagerie (Part 2)
While the Enterprise speeds on it’s locked course towards Talos IV, more mysterious images from Captain Pike’s imprisonment there 13 years before continue to be used as evidence during the court martial of Mr. Spock. The question: Why would Spock hijack the Enterprise and take his former captain back to this forbidden world, only to put his own life and career on the line and betray his loyalty to his current commander, Captain James T. Kirk? It’s truly astounding how cleverly and imaginatively “Star Trek’s” producers incorporated footage from the unaired original pilot into an all-new adventure, resulting in one of the most sensitive, emotionally powerful and beautifully-rendered payoffs of the entire series. Guest: John Rocha (host: “Outlaw Nation”; co-host: “The Cine-Files”) You can follow Enterprise Incidents on social media at: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/EnterpriseIncidents Twitter: @enterincidents Instagram: @enterpriseincidents Follow Scott Mantz @moviemantz on Twitter and Instagram Follow Steve Morris @srmorris on Twitter and @srmorris1 on Instagram
01:12:02
July 04, 2021
16) The Menagerie (Part 1)
When Mr. Spock kidnaps his disfigured former commander and hijacks the Enterprise across the galaxy to the forbidden world of Talos IV, he not only puts his life and career on the line, but also that of his current commander -- and his loyal friend -- Captain James T. Kirk. Though it was originally conceived for practical purposes to save time and money, Gene Roddenberry and the producers of "Star Trek" made clever and effective use of "The Cage -- the unaired (and very expensive) original pilot -- by framing a powerful and imaginative story around the original footage. The result is "The Menagerie," a beautifully-written and superbly-acted 2-part episode that won a Hugo Award for Best Dramatic Presentation. Guest: John Rocha (host: "Outlaw Nation"; co-host: "The Cine-Files") You can follow Enterprise Incidents on social media at: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/EnterpriseIncidents Twitter: @enterincidents Instagram: @enterpriseincidents Follow Scott Mantz @moviemantz on Twitter and Instagram Follow Steve Morris @srmorris on Twitter and @srmorris1 on Instagram
02:06:59
June 27, 2021
15) Court Martial
After the Enterprise encounters a severe ion storm that results in the disappearance and presumed death of a crewman, Captain Kirk is held responsible and is ordered to stand trial for negligence and perjury. With his future as a starship commander on the line, Kirk's only hope lies with a scrappy and very old fashioned defense attorney, but his sworn testimony is still no match for the damning evidence provided by his main accuser: the computer logs of the Enterprise. Once again, "Star Trek" deftly explores the conflict of man versus machine -- and, in effect, man versus himself -- in "Court Martial," a superbly-acted, socially relevant and very entertaining episode that's filled with aspirational and unforgettable moments. Special Guest: Dave Rossi (Associate Producer: "Star Trek: Enterprise"; Visual Effects Producer: "Star Trek: The Original Series Remastered") You can follow Enterprise Incidents on social media at: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/EnterpriseIncidents Twitter: @enterincidents Instagram: @enterpriseincidents Follow Scott Mantz @moviemantz on Twitter and Instagram Follow Steve Morris @srmorris on Twitter and @srmorris1 on Instagram
02:16:46
June 20, 2021
14) The Galileo Seven
During a mission to explore a volatile deep space quasar, the shuttlecraft Galileo is thrown off course and forced to make an emergency landing on an unexplored — and very hostile — planet. Cut off from the Enterprise and under attack from giant ape-like creatures, mission commander Spock is forced to make difficult life-or-death decisions — his logical approach to which increases tensions among the stranded members of the landing party. If “The Conscience of the King” was criticized for not having enough action, then this next episode certainly made up for it with a briskly-paced survival story of high drama, action and suspense. But what really makes “The Galileo Seven” stand out is the gripping character study of Mr. Spock, who faces internal struggles between his human half and his Vulcan half during his first command. You can follow Enterprise Incidents at: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/EnterpriseIncidents Twitter: @enterincidents Instagram: @enterpriseincidents Follow Scott Mantz @moviemantz on Twitter and Instagram Follow Steve Morris @srmorris on Twitter and @srmorris1 on Instagram
02:04:18
June 13, 2021
13) The Conscience of the King
The play’s the thing in “The Conscience of the King,” when Captain Kirk suspects that the former governor of a distant colony who ordered the execution of 4,000 inhabitants is now disguising himself as a Shakespearean performer. When Kirk sets out on a personal quest to learn the truth, he puts his career, his life and even the crew of the Enterprise on the line. If there was ever a “Star Trek” episode that has aged well over the years, it’s “The Conscience of the King.” Though it was initially criticized for being too slow and not having enough action, it has since come to be embraced as a superior episode, a brilliant rendition of Shakespeare in space and an acting tour-de-force for William Shatner and co-stars Arnold Moss and Barbara Anderson. You can follow Enterprise Incidents at: Facebook https://www.facebook.com/EnterpriseIncidents Twitter @enterincidents Instagram @enterpriseincidents You can follow Enterprise incidents at… @enterincidents on Twitter @enterpriseincidents on Instagram Facebook https://www.facebook.com/EnterpriseIncidents Follow Scott Mantz @moviemantz on Twitter and Instagram Follow Steve Morris @srmorris on Twitter and srmorris1 on Instagram
02:01:20
June 06, 2021
12) Miri
On the far reaches of the galaxy, the Enterprise responds to a distress signal emanating from what appears to be an exact duplicate of Earth, only to discover that its entire adult population has been wiped out by a man-made pandemic. Only the children remain, and they too will eventually become infected, but not before Captain Kirk and the rest of the landing party contract the deadly disease first. It’s a race against time to find a cure in an overlooked episode that effectively served as an allegory for the generation gap of the 1960s, but now resonates with much greater significance after the worldwide pandemic of 2020. “Miri” is the “Star Trek” equivalent of “Lord of the Flies,” and it’s an exceptionally well-acted and more powerful episode than it is often given credit for. You can follow "ENTERPRISE INCIDENTS" on social media at… Twitter: @enterincidents Instagram: @enterpriseincidents Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/EnterpriseIncidents Follow Scott Mantz @moviemantz on Twitter and Instagram Follow Steve Morris @srmorris on Twitter and srmorris1 on Instagram
01:38:60
May 30, 2021
11) Dagger of the Mind
After a desperate prisoner escapes from the Tantalus Penal Colony to the Starship Enterprise demanding asylum, Captain Kirk launches an investigation into the alleged mistreatment of the colony's inmates by its revered director, Dr. Tristan Adams. Accompanied by Dr. Helen Noel, Kirk beams down to Tantalus to learn the truth, only to discover that Dr. Adams is running the colony like a nightmarish chamber of horrors. For the second “Star Trek” episode in a row, Captain Kirk comes face-to-face with a mad scientist. And like the episode before it, “Dagger of the Mind” is a thought-provoking, deeply-engaging, well-written and superbly acted episode that also features a “Star Trek” landmark — the first appearance of the Vulcan Mind Meld. Follow "Enterprise Incidents" on social media… Twitter: @enterincidents Instagram: @enterpriseincidents Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/EnterpriseIncidents Follow Scott Mantz @moviemantz on Twitter and Instagram Follow Steve Morris @srmorris on Twitter and @srmorris1 on Instagram
01:40:44
May 23, 2021
10) What Are Little Girls Made Of?
The Enterprise arrives at the distant frozen world of Exo III in an effort to search for Dr. Roger Korby, a brilliant scientist who has been missing and is presumed dead. But not only is Korby found to be alive and well, he takes Captain Kirk prisoner in an attempt to convince him of his bold plan to create a master race of immortal mechanical beings. “What Are Little Girls Made Of?” is an often-overlooked episode that effectively explores the concept of what it means to be human, and it ultimately succeeds as a compelling, provocative, highly-stylized and very well-acted episode. It’s also the first time that “Star Trek” examined the conflict of humanity versus machine (and, in effect, humanity versus itself), but it sure wouldn’t be the last. You can follow Enterprise incidents at… Twitter: @enterincidents Instagram: @enterpriseincidents Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/EnterpriseIncidents
01:55:17
May 16, 2021
9) Balance of Terror
After a series of unprovoked attacks on Earth outposts situated near the Romulan Neutral Zone, Captain Kirk risks interplanetary war and engages in a battle of wits with the Commander of the attacking Romulan Bird of Prey. The Enterprise must pursue and destroy the enemy vessel before it escapes back to its homeland, but Kirk has another pressing matter to contend with: a racist bridge officer who suspects that Vulcan science officer Mr. Spock is actually a Romulan spy. It all adds up to a brilliant episode that’s filled with high drama, gripping suspense, brisk pacing, strong characterization, magnificent performances and a gut-wrenching emotional payoff that still packs a powerful punch. “Balance of Terror” is more than just one of “Star Trek’s” finest hours; its one of the best hours of dramatic television ever produced. You can follow "ENTERPRISE INCIDENTS" on social media at… Twitter: @enterincidents Instagram: @enterpriseincidents Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/EnterpriseIncidents Follow Scott Mantz @moviemantz on Twitter and Instagram Follow Steve Morris @srmorris on Twitter and @srmorris1 on Instagram
02:00:26
May 09, 2021
8) Charlie X
While the Enterprise is en route to Earth Colony 5, Captain Kirk becomes the reluctant father figure to an unusual passenger named Charles Evans. The teenager displays incredible powers, but he lacks the discipline to use them, which soon turns the Enterprise into a hell ship that terrorizes its crew. As we will come to see many times on “Star Trek,” absolute power corrupts, absolutely — especially when that infinite power lies in the hands of an adolescent young man with raging hormones. “Charlie X” is a superior episode that’s gripping, suspenseful, powerful and haunting, and it’s the first “Star Trek” episode to be written by Dorothy “D.C.” Fontana, whose incredible contributions to the series over the next three years cannot be overstated. You can follow Enterprise incidents at… @enterincidents on Twitter @enterpriseincidents on Instagram Facebook https://www.facebook.com/EnterpriseIncidents Follow Scott Mantz @moviemantz on Twitter and Instagram Follow Steve Morris @srmorris on Twitter and sumorris1 on Instagram
01:40:12
May 02, 2021
7) The Naked Time
“No beach to walk on...” In this all-time classic that can truly be defined as epic, the Enterprise literally and figuratively spirals out of control when an unusual disease is brought aboard the ship and quickly spreads to infect the crew. “The Naked Time” is marked by a seamless shift in tones, as it starts from a slow build of suspense, then progresses to reveal moments of levity until it finally culminates with a desperate race against time to find a cure. But above all else, “The Naked Time” features bravura performances across the board, especially from Leonard Nimoy, who saw his fan mail increase exponentially after this episode aired. You can follow Enterprise incidents at… @enterincidents on Twitter @enterpriseincidents on Instagram Facebook https://www.facebook.com/EnterpriseIncidents Follow Scott Mantz @moviemantz on Twitter and Instagram Follow Steve Morris @srmorris on Twitter and sumorris1 on Instagram
01:29:15
April 25, 2021
6) The Man Trap
Every self-respecting Trekker worth their weight in salt knows that “The Man Trap” was the first episode of “Star Trek” to air on broadcast TV, and for that reason alone, it’s historical significance as a landmark episode is justifiably secured. What every Trekker also knows is that “The Man Trap” doesn’t exactly represent “Star Trek” at its very finest, but upon closer reflection, it reaps many rewards by being the only episode to offer a glimpse into Dr. McCoy’s past, not to mention being a remarkably deep, effectively suspenseful and very entertaining episode in its own right. Just don't get us started on that hand puppet scene... You can follow Enterprise incidents at… Twitter: @enterincidents Instagram: @enterpriseincidents Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/EnterpriseIncidents Follow Scott Mantz @moviemantz on Twitter and Instagram Follow Steve Morris @srmorris on Twitter and sumorris1 on Instagram
01:41:44
April 18, 2021
5) The Enemy Within
"There is only one logical answer — we have an imposter aboard.” When a transporter malfunction splits Captain Kirk into two versions of the same person — one gentle and compassionate, the other mean and fierce — the result is a magnificent “Star Trek” episode that’s loaded with tension, high drama, brilliant performances, provocative themes and one very controversial scene. But by further establishing the dynamic relationship between Kirk, Spock and McCoy, “The Enemy Within” achieves landmark status as an all-time classic. Twitter @enterincidents Instagram @enterpriseincidents Facebook https://www.facebook.com/EnterpriseIncidents Follow Scott Mantz @moviemantz on Twitter and Instagram Follow Steve Morris @srmorris on Twitter and srmorris1 on Instagram
01:49:32
April 10, 2021
4) Mudd's Women
The name’s Mudd — Harcourt Fenton Mudd, aka Harry Mudd! Roger C. Carmel makes his first of two “Star Trek” appearances in this early first season episode, which, quite frankly, doesn’t exactly represent “Star Trek” at its finest. But it still has its merits, among them being an aspirational message that upholds the ideals of what “Star Trek” stood for. You can follow Enterprise incidents at… Twitter: @enterincidents Instagram: @enterpriseincidents Facebook https://www.facebook.com/EnterpriseIncidents Follow Scott Mantz @moviemantz on Twitter and Instagram Follow Steve Morris @srmorris on Twitter and srmorris1 on Instagram
01:09:34
April 03, 2021
3) The Corbomite Maneuver
"Not chess, Mr. Spock -- POKER!" Captain Kirk attempts to pull off the ultimate bluff in "THE CORBOMITE MANEUVER!" This was the first episode to be produced after "STAR TREK" was sold to NBC-TV as a weekly series, and in many ways, it represent's Trek's equivalent of a mission statement -- but why wasn't it the first episode to air? And how does that statement hold up after 55 years? Break out the Tranya, and LISTEN!
01:23:48
March 27, 2021
2) Where No Man Has Gone Before
In what amounts to the greatest do-over in television history, William Shatner takes over the center seat as Captain James "R." Kirk of the Starship Enterprise, and from his very first scene, it was clear that Kirk was the role he was born to play. And not only did "Where No Man Has Gone Before" feature enough action, excitement and adventure to officially sell "Star Trek" as a weekly series, it also still stands as one of the greatest "Star Trek" episodes ever produced. Follow "Enterprise Incidents" on social media...   Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/EnterpriseIncidents  Twitter: @enterincidents  Instagram: @enterpriseincidents  Scott Mantz @moviemantz on Twitter and Instagram  Steve Morris @srmorris on Twitter and @srmorris1 on Instagram
01:27:59
March 20, 2021
1) The Cage
When Gene Roddenberry produced the first "Star Trek" pilot in 1964, the Enterprise was commanded by Captain Christopher Pike, played by Jeffrey Hunter. Even though "The Cage" is commonly referred to as the failed "Star Trek" pilot -- the brass at NBC felt that it "lacked action" and was "too cerebral" -- it was filled with brilliant ideas, thereby making it good enough to grant Roddenberry another try. While Roddenberry knocked it out of the park with the next one, "The Cage" holds up as a fantastic episode in its own right, and one that successfully established the foundation for everything that followed over the next 55 years! Be sure to follow Enterprise Incidents on social media...  Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/EnterpriseIncidents Twitter @enterincidents Instagram @enterprise incidents  Scott Mantz @moviemantz on Twitter and Instagram Steve Morris @srmorris on Twitter and @srmorris1 on Instagram
01:27:43
March 20, 2021
Mission Statement
Welcome to Enterprise Incidents where, in this episodes, Scott and Steve explain their deep connection to Star Trek and why they are so excited to embark on an exploration of The Original Series in Production Order. If you want to follow Enterprise Incidents on social media you can do so on... Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/EnterpriseIncidents  Twitter @enterincidents  Instagram @enterpriseincidents  Scott Mantz @moviemantz on twitter and instngram  Steve Morris @srmorris on twitter and @srmorris1 on instagram
15:26
March 19, 2021