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Teaching Exceptionally Podcasts

Teaching Exceptionally Podcasts

By CEC
Produced by the Council for Exceptional Children (CEC), this podcast brings you the information you need from the experts you trust, whether you’re a new teacher or a seasoned veteran.
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It’s Just a Game. Or is it?
A booming gaming industry has flooded the market with educational software applications in recent years, but little evidence exists to prove or disprove student achievement using these games. In this podcast, we speak with author Nancy Nelson about the obstacles and benefits of using educational games and apps. Nancy coauthored the article “Considerations for Realizing the Promise of Educational Gaming Technology, which appeared in TEACHING Exceptional Children.
17:34
January 2, 2018
Instead of That, Say This
Children with disabilities perform lower in mathematics than their peers without disabilities, a trend that raises questions about why. In this R2P podcast, we speak with authors Elizabeth Hughes, Sarah Powell, and Liz Stevens about how imprecise language can contribute to students’ difficulty learning math. Elizabeth, Sarah, and Liz coauthored the article “Supporting Clear and Concise Mathematics Language: Instead of That, Say This,” which appeared in TEACHING Exceptional Children. Elizabeth M. Hughes is an assistant professor of special education in the Department of Counseling, Psychology, and Special Education at Pennsylvania State University. Sarah R. Powell is an assistant professor in the Department of Special Education at the University of Texas at Austin. Liz Stevens is a doctoral student in the Department of Special Education at the University of Texas at Austin.
23:29
December 6, 2017
Finally: A Tiered Classroom Management Intervention
Group contingencies—which allow students to earn a reward due to the behavior of one or more students in a group—have a long record of helping teachers manage their classrooms effectively. In this R2P podcast, publications manager Lorraine Sobson speaks with researcher Howard Wills about how the group contingency intervention CW-FIT (class-wide function-related intervention team) can fill the need for a tiered classroom management system that can address the needs of all students. Howard co-authored the article “Student and Teacher Outcomes of the Class-Wide Function-Related Intervention Team Efficacy Trial,” which appeared in Exceptional Children. Howard Wills is an associate research professor at Juniper Gardens Children’s Project, with the University of Kansas.
16:57
September 19, 2017
Getting Vocabulary Instruction Right for Children with Hearing Loss
Children with hearing loss demonstrate lower vocabulary knowledge than their peers with normal hearing. In this R2P podcast, publications manager Lorraine Sobson, speaks with researcher Emily Lund about the need to address this problem with methods of vocabulary instruction that work. Emily co-authored the article “Teaching Vocabulary to Preschool Children with Hearing Loss” which appeared in Exceptional Children. Emily Lund is an assistant professor at Texas Christian University where she teaches speech to students with hearing loss.
16:54
February 24, 2017
New heights in literacy instruction for students with intellectual disability
Recent research indicates individuals with intellectual disability can learn to read at a higher level than previously thought. In this R2P podcast, publications manager, Lorraine Sobson, speaks with researcher Chris Lemons about what this new information means for practice. Listen to learn tips that will help you improve literacy outcomes for these learners. Chris authored the article, 10 Research-Based Tips for Enhancing Literacy Instruction for Students With Intellectual Disability, which appeared in TEACHING Exceptional Children. Chris Lemons is an assistant professor in the Department of Special Education at Peabody College, Vanderbilt.
18:27
February 2, 2017
Self-Management Strategies to Support Students With ASD
In this R2P podcast, publications manager, Lorraine Sobson, chats with Margaret (Maggie) Schulze, about teaching self-management skills to students with ASD. Listen to learn about procedures such as self-monitoring, goal setting, self-instruction, and self-graphing that can help students with disabilities change their classroom behavior. Maggie authored the article Self-Management Strategies to Support Students With ASD, which appeared in TEACHING Exceptional Children. Margaret Schulze is a teaching associate in the Department of Special Education at the University of Washington, Seattle.
18:52
November 22, 2016
Using whole-group strategies to engage all students
In this R2P podcast, publications manager Lorraine Sobson chats with Sarah Nagro about how to engage students with disabilities when teaching to a whole group. Listen to learn how strategies such as hand signals and response cards can help to keep your students tuned in. Sarah co-authored the TEACHING Exceptional Children article, “Whole-Group Response Strategies to Promote Student Engagement in Inclusive Classrooms.” Sarah Nagro is an assistant professor in the Division of Special Education and Disability Research at George Mason University. Her research focuses on teacher preparation in special education with an emphasis on education in inclusive classrooms.
18:57
October 31, 2016
Using morphology in literacy instruction
In this Research2Practice podcast, Lorraine Sobson speaks with Eric Claravall about how to incorporate morphology, which is the study of word structure, into literacy instruction. Listen in to find out how attention to morphology can help you build reading and spelling skills in your students. Eric Claravall is an adjunct professor in the Department of Elementary Education at San Francisco State University. Eric is the author of a recent article in TEACHING Exceptional Children entitled, “Integrating Morphological Knowledge in Literacy Instruction” which outlines four literacy components (morphemic analysis, vocabulary and spelling, contextual reading, and written expression) to create a framework for using morphology in reading and spelling instruction.
10:27
October 3, 2016
Supporting students through grief and loss
In this episode of Research2Practice, Kara Hume joins us to talk about how and why students with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) might express grief differently from their peers who do not have ASD. Listen in to find out how you can best support these students after a loss. Kara Hume is a scientist at the Frank Porter Graham Child Development Institute and Associate Professor in the School of Education at the University of North Carolina–Chapel Hill. She co-authored the TEACHING Exceptional Children article, “Supporting Students With Autism Spectrum Disorder Through Grief and Loss” which outlines eight steps to help school personnel support students with ASD in times of grief.
18:43
September 30, 2016
Improving social studies understanding for all students
In this podcast, CEC’s Lorraine Sobson speaks with researcher Jeanne Wanzek about ways to improve understanding of social studies content for students with disabilities who are both English learners and non-English learners. Jeanne Wanzek, Ph.D. is the Currey-Ingram Endowed Chair and associate professor in the Department of Special Education at Peabody College where she conducts research examining effective reading instruction and intervention. Jeanne co-authored a recent article in Exceptional Children entitled, “English Learner and Non-English Learner Students With Disabilities: Content Acquisition and Comprehension, which discusses the effectiveness of the comprehension intervention “Promoting Adolescent Comprehension Through Text.”
18:26
September 29, 2016
Writing Your IEP for Stress Management
In this episode of Research2Practice, Brandi Ansley joins us to talk about the importance of stress management for teachers. Stress affects your body, your job performance, and the learning outcomes of your students, so listen as Brandi describes how you can implement a Self-directed Stress Management Plan that will benefit you and your students. Brandi Ansley is a researcher at Georgia State University College of Education. She also conducts workshops for Atlanta area educators on topics such as stress management, interpersonal communication, and social-emotional skills. She co-authored a recent article in TEACHING Exceptional Children entitled, “Optimizing Special Educator Wellness and Job Performance Through Stress Management.”
32:38
September 15, 2016
Math Interventions for Students with Autism Spectrum Disorder
In this episode of Research2Practice, Seth King and Chris Lemons discuss the results of their synthesis of literature relating to math interventions for students with ASD, strategies that seem to promote positive student outcomes, how teachers can identify effective practices to implement in the classroom, and resources for identifying evidence-based practices in mathematics. Seth King, an Assistant Professor at Tennessee Technological University’s Department of Curriculum and Instruction, and Chris Lemons, an Assistant Professor of Special Education at Peabody College at Vanderbilt University.
20:31
August 17, 2016
Blending Wheels for Decoding Practice
In this episode of Research2Practice, Holly Lane and Paige Cullen Pullen are with us to talk about why blending wheels work and how we can use them to help struggling readers with decoding. Holly Lane is an associate professor in the College of Education at the University of Florida. Paige Cullen Pullen is an associate professor at the University of Virginia’s Curry School of Education. They are the authors of a recent article in TEACHING Exceptional Children entitled, “Blending wheels: Tools for decoding practice.”
12:37
July 14, 2016
Teachers Training Paraprofessionals
In this episode of Research2Practice, Matthew E. Brock is here to talk about what new research can tell us about using teacher-trained paraprofessionals to implement peer support arrangements for students with severe disabilities. Matthew Brock is an assistant professor of special education at The Ohio State University and a faculty associate at the Crane Center for Early Childhood Research and Policy. He has two major lines of research. First, he studies the effects of practitioner training on implementation of evidence-based practice and outcomes for students with significant disabilities. Second, he studies avenues for supporting the inclusion of students with significant disabilities in general education classrooms.
20:11
June 7, 2016
Writing and Revision for Students With Learning Disabilities
In this episode of Research to Practice, researchers Cindy Sherman and Susan De La Paz talk about FIX, a writing revision strategy that helps novice writers make better rather than more changes as they revise their work. Cindy K. Sherman is the founder and director of The Write Turn®, an evidence-based program that helps novice and struggling writers plan, write, and revise narrative and expository essays. She is also a speech-language pathologist at E.L. Haynes Public Charter School in Washington, D.C. Susan De La Paz is an associate professor of special education at the College of Education, University of Maryland, College Park. She has expertise in developing and validating reading and writing interventions for adolescents with learning disabilities. She has worked for 15 years with middle and high school teachers, developing writing and history curriculum interventions for students with diverse academic abilities.
17:32
June 7, 2016
How to Approach IEPs Without Losing Your Mind
In this episode, you’ll hear what you need to prepare for your first IEP meetings from legal expert Julie Weatherly. Julie Weatherly, Esq. is the owner of Resolutions in Special Education, Inc., and has provided legal representation and consultative services in the area of educating students with disabilities for 30 years.
14:28
March 7, 2016
Co-Teaching in the Real World
In this episode, co-teaching expert Marilyn Friend is here to talk about some of the biggest challenges facing new co-teachers—and how you can solve them. Marilyn Friend is an internationally renowned author and speaker, and a Past President of CEC. She is currently the professor emerita of education at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro.
11:04
February 2, 2016
Surviving Your First Year as a Teacher
In this episode, we’re talking with Catherine Creighton Martin and Clara Hauth, authors of the brand-new edition of The Survival Guide for New Special Education Teachers, a handbook full of realistic strategies teacher candidates and new teachers need to succeed in their first years in the classroom – and beyond. You’ve got the right stuff to be a special educator, but Catherine and Clara want to give you a helping hand. Catherine Creighton Martin is the mother of a child with a disability, and currently teaches students with disabilities at Fairfax County Public Schools in Virginia, and is an adjunct professor at George Mason University. Clara Hauth is an assistant professor of special education at Marymount University, with more than 10 years of public school service as a special education classroom teacher and as a lead mentor for new teachers.
10:09
December 1, 2015