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Fordham Campus Ministry

Fordham Campus Ministry

By Fordham Campus Ministry
We invite you to GO F.A.R. with Campus Ministry by participating in our programs and ministries surrounding Faith, Action, and Reflection. Rooted in the Fordham University Catholic, Jesuit identity, Campus Ministry accompanies students of all spiritual backgrounds in their own personal growth. Our initiatives will engage your heart and mind as you explore what you believe and discover how that informs who you hope to become.
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Guided Mediation for Finals with Erin Hoffman
Mrs. Erin Hoffman Associate Director of Campus Ministry for Spiritual and Pastoral Ministries at Lincoln Center, Director of Ignatian Initiatives  Email: ehoffman12@fordham.edu Phone: 212-636-6318 Fax: 212-636-7212 Lowenstein 217B Available For: General Campus Ministry, Post Graduate Volunteer Discernment, Pastoral Counseling, Drop-In Ministry, Social Justice Advocacy
20:58
May 8, 2020
Women Open The Word: Unity in Distance with Stephanie Roddy
Stephanie Roddy Director of Spiritual Retreat Ministries Email: sroddy1@fordham.edu Phone: 718-817-4539 Fax: 718-817-4505 McGinley Center 103 Available For: General Campus Ministry, Social Justice Advocacy, Post Graduate Volunteer Discernment, and Drop-in Ministry
03:45
May 8, 2020
Art Year in Review with Katie Anderson Kuo
Mrs. Kathryn Anderson Kuo Assistant Director of Campus Ministry for Liturgical Ministry Email: kanderson26@fordham.edu Phone: 718-817-0588 Fax: 718-817-4505 University Church 01 Available For: General Campus Ministry, Post Graduate Volunteer Discernment, Drop-In Ministry, Social Justice Advocacy
11:20
May 6, 2020
Finals Week Stress Relief with Katie Anderson Kuo
Mrs. Kathryn Anderson Kuo Assistant Director of Campus Ministry for Liturgical Ministry Email: kanderson26@fordham.edu Phone: 718-817-0588 Fax: 718-817-4505 University Church 01 Available For: General Campus Ministry, Post Graduate Volunteer Discernment, Drop-In Ministry, Social Justice Advocacy
05:23
May 6, 2020
Guided Meditation For Seniors with Fr. George Quickley, S.J.: "I came so that they might have life and have it more abundantly."
Rev. George Quickley, SJ Chaplain, Lincoln Center Email: gquickley@fordham.edu Phone: 212-636-7485 Fax: 212-636-7212 Lowenstein 217 Reflection Song: Believe in Yourself from The Wiz [1978] sung by Diana Ross
18:23
May 1, 2020
Women Open the Word: Sparks of Hope with Vanessa Rotondo, MSE
Vanessa Rotondo - Assistant Director of Operations and Leadership Vanessa received her bachelor’s degree in political science from Fordham College at Rose Hill and completed a double minor in Italian and business administration, the latter at the Gabelli School of Business. As an undergraduate, she served on many student leadership councils and teams through the Office of Campus Ministry. She was the recipient of the 2017 Reverend Joseph P. Fitzpatrick student leadership award, awarded to one senior who exhibits a deep passion for and commitment to social justice and awareness within the Fordham community as well as within the greater New York community. She also worked in political consulting and campaign management as an undergraduate. After graduation, Rotondo matriculated into Fordham’s Graduate School of Education and received her master’s degree in Catholic Educational Leadership in May of 2019, during which she was inducted into Alpha Sigma Nu, the honor society of Jesuit universities, which recognizes students who excel in scholarship, loyalty, and service, and promotes Ignatian values for life. While in graduate school, she was a graduate intern to the Office of Campus Ministry, for Ignatian programming at Fordham. She began working for the Center for Community Engaged Learning as the assistant director for operations and leadership in April of 2019. In September of 2019, she began pursuing a doctorate in religious education in the Graduate School of Religion and Religious Education at Fordham, with the aspiration of becoming a triple Ram.
06:48
April 30, 2020
Women Open the Word: 50th Anniversary of Earth Day with Erin Hoffman, MA, MSW
Mrs. Erin Hoffman Associate Director of Campus Ministry for Spiritual and Pastoral Ministries at Lincoln Center, Director of Ignatian Initiatives  Email: ehoffman12@fordham.edu Phone: 212-636-6318 Fax: 212-636-7212 Lowenstein 217B
12:06
April 29, 2020
Nature Meditation with Katie Anderson Kuo
Mrs. Kathryn Anderson Kuo Assistant Director of Campus Ministry for Liturgical Ministry Email: kanderson26@fordham.edu Phone: 718-817-0588 Fax: 718-817-4505 University Church 01 Available For: General Campus Ministry, Post Graduate Volunteer Discernment, Drop-In Ministry, Social Justice Advocacy
08:05
April 29, 2020
Friday Meditation with Joan Cavanagh, PhD
Ms. Joan P. Cavanagh, PhD Director of Campus Ministry for Spiritual and Pastoral Ministries, Director of Campus Ministry at Westchester Campus Email: jcavanagh@fordham.edu Phone: 914-367-3420 Westchester 133 McGinley Center 105 Available For: General Campus Ministry, Spiritual Direction, Post Graduate Volunteer Discernment, Pastoral Counseling, Prayer Services, LBTQ Ministry
09:21
April 24, 2020
Women Open the Word: Recognizing the Risen Christ with Carol Gibney, LMSW
Mrs. Carol Gibney Associate Director of Campus Ministry for Spiritual & Pastoral Ministries, Rose Hill Director of Spiritual Life & Leadership Email: cgibney@fordham.edu Phone: 718-817-4518 University Church 03 Available For: General Campus Ministry, Spiritual Direction, Post Graduate Volunteer Discernment, Pastoral Counseling, Drop-In Ministry, Social Justice Advocacy
06:41
April 20, 2020
Women Open the Word: What Role do you Play? with Katie Anderson Kuo, MA
Mrs. Kathryn Anderson Kuo Assistant Director of Campus Ministry for Liturgical Ministry Email: kanderson26@fordham.edu Phone: 718-817-0588 Fax: 718-817-4505 University Church 01 Available For: General Campus Ministry, Post Graduate Volunteer Discernment, Drop-In Ministry, Social Justice Advocacy
04:31
April 17, 2020
The Eighth Station: Jesus Meets the Women of Jerusalem
The women of Jerusalem wept when they saw how Jesus suffered. Jesus recognised their distress, he broke his silence for the first time, spoke to them and said, ‘Daughters of Jerusalem do not weep for me. Weep for yourselves and for your children’.  Response: We adore you O Christ, and we praise you, because by your Holy Cross you have redeemed the world  Look at Jesus and listen to his message for us today. Weep for the children who are abused. Weep for the women who are victimised. Weep for men and women who suffer from the tyranny of today’s body image that controls their lives and prevents them from feeling lovable. Weep for the young who cannot find a job or a way in life. Weep for the old who are forgotten. Weep for people who starve in the shadow of abundance. Weep for people who are homeless, in exile or seeking refuge. Weep for them.  We Pray: Lord, open our hearts to the suffering of all people in our world. Give us the generosity of spirit to help us recognise their pain, the courage to challenge the systems that place intolerable burdens on them and the compassion to support them.  Spoken Response: Glory be to the Father….
01:56
April 6, 2020
The Seventh Station: Jesus Falls for the Second Time
Stretched to breaking point by his awful scourging, bowed under the weight of the cross, worn out by the abandonment of all his friends, Jesus stumbles again.  Response: We adore you O Christ, and we praise you, because by your Holy Cross you have redeemed the world  All around us people are overburdened by the crosses they carry; they struggle and sometimes fall. There are those who have lost their jobs and feel that they have little hope of finding another, those who live with the prospect of unemployment, and those who struggle to keep others in work. There are those who suffer because of failures in our financial, health and political systems. Jesus is with each one of us however we fall and there he chooses to love and save us.  We Pray: Jesus, from deep within yourself, you found the courage and strength to get up once again and continue the journey. Give us your strength to keep going even when hope is dim.  Spoken Response: Glory be to the Father….
01:35
April 6, 2020
The Sixth Station: Veronica Wipes the Face of Jesus
We Remember Veronica was so moved by the sight of Jesus suffering that she courageously moved out from the crowd to wipe the blood and sweat from his face with a towel. She was rewarded when the image of his face was transferred to the towel. It is a suffering face, disfigured with wounds. Yet this is the only image of himself that Jesus chose to leave with us.  Response: We adore you O Christ, and we praise you, because by your Holy Cross you have redeemed the world  Today the visible face of Christ, the Church, stands before us still wounded and disfigured; disfigured by its own sins of abuse of children and power, and creased with the wounds of hurt and betrayal. The face of Christ calls us to look upon and heal the sin of our Church.  We Pray: Jesus, give your wounded Church the courage of Veronica so that we may wash the face of Christ clean from the disfigurements of our sin. Help us to bring healing to the scars that hide the beauty of your face to our world. Give us the faith to continue to build your Church as a visible sign of your love and compassion.  Spoken Response: Glory be to the Father….
01:53
April 3, 2020
The Fifth Station: Simon Helps Jesus
We Remember the Simon the Cyrene, a stranger in the city, did not know Jesus. But that did not matter. What matters here is that in this moment of need Simon was capable of lending his shoulders to one whose own had given out, of offering his strength to one who had nothing left, of taking on himself the cross, which Jesus could no longer carry.  Response: We adore you O Christ, and we praise you, because by your Holy Cross you have redeemed the world  We Name the Look at Jesus who lies hidden and unknown beneath every person in need. Across our world we see human suffering in the faces of strangers, in the faces of those struggling for democracy in the Middle East and beyond, in the faces of those dealing with the loss of life and destruction of property. People we know of, but do not know, must live with the aftermath of the ravages and destructive forces of nature – coping with floods and drought, with the devastating effects of climate change… We Pray: Lord, help us to grasp our opportunities to be a Simon in our world. In those times when we can help, let us have the generosity to do so. May we continue the spirit of Simon through our support of agencies and all who work to alleviate suffering in our world. Lord, may we have the humility to accept all the Simons along our road who reach out to help us in our moments of need.  Spoken Response: Glory be to the Father….
02:05
April 3, 2020
The Fourth Station: Jesus Meets his Mother
When Jesus and his mother meet they just look at each other – words cannot express how they feel. What he saw in his mother’s eyes must have hurt him more than the raw pain of his wounds. This for Jesus is the most painful time of all. This is his bereavement.  Response: We adore you O Christ, and we praise you, because by your Holy Cross you have redeemed the world  Jesus carries the heaviest burden of the loss of his family; the sundering of the earthly, loving relationship between mother and child. This was not of his making. The violence inflicted upon him etched into the very heart of his mother, as she watched the agony of her son. We see Mary’s pain in the mothers and fathers who watch their children giving up their life to drugs, addictions and suicide, in the women and men who suffer violence and the ongoing threat of violence in their home from spouse or child. We see Mary’s pain in the child coping with the breakdown of a parent’s marriage, in the couple trying desperately to rebuild their relationship and family anew.  We Pray: Jesus, we remember the gaze that rested between you and your mother. In that moment of pain there was also a moment of deep and enduring love. Jesus, give us the courage to bring that love into the deepest recesses of our homes, to our children and to our spouses, to those places of fracture and disharmony in our circle of relationships.  Spoken Response: Glory be to the Father….
02:14
April 3, 2020
The Third Station: Jesus Falls for the First Time
Jesus falls. Here Jesus shows us that being heroic does not mean staying on one’s feet at all costs. Being heroic means getting up again after falling and starting off on the road chosen. Human beings will never resign themselves to stay flat on the ground. Like Jesus, they will get up again, pick up their crosses and keep on searching for a promised land of total liberation. Response: We adore you O Christ, and we praise you, because by your Holy Cross you have redeemed the world Look at Jesus fall under his cross. He might have fallen into the gutter or be slouched into a doorway on skid row. He doesn’t look much like God there, but he didn’t look like God when he fell into the dirt on the way to Calvary either. The crowds look on with disdain at this man whom they see as a sinner, who has been condemned to death by the authorities. Like the crowd, we often have only condemnation and rejection for those we see as sinners. We judge them without knowing about their trials, scourging and crowning with thorns. Do we even suspect the part we might have played in knocking them down? What do we do to help them? We Pray: Jesus, it’s easy to see your image in saints. Help us to see you in the sinners too. You had a place in your heart for the divorced Samaritan woman, Zacchaeus, the good thief, and for those who crucified you. Give us this same compassionate heart. Spoken Response: Glory be to the Father….
02:25
April 3, 2020
The Second Station: Jesus Takes Up His Cross
Jesus was led away carrying the cross by himself. A cross is not just a piece of wood, it is everything that makes life difficult. Jesus carried the crosses of his life without complaint, as a poor person and as an itinerant prophet. In the calm and courageous way, he put up with the threats of the Pharisees and the lack of understanding of his own disciples. In the way that he carried all the burdens of his life but, in particular, the way in which he carries this awful, final burden, he transforms the cross from a symbol of condemnation into one of liberation. Response: We adore you O Christ, and we praise you, because by your Holy Cross you have redeemed the world There are burdens that we all carry, some are very obvious and others we take great care to hide. There are the burdens of illness, pain and disability, of old age, dependence, and caring for someone who no longer knows who we are. There are the burdens of constant fear, of loneliness and of isolation. The invitation of Jesus on the cross is to hand over these burdens to him. We Pray: May we see your presence Lord in all the burdens we carry today. Help us to share our burdens more freely, not to be afraid to acknowledge our fears and our pain. May we be more aware of the crosses that others bear and make time to alleviate their burden. May your face shine on each one of us through the crosses we bear. Spoken Response: Glory be to the Father...
02:30
April 3, 2020
The First Station: Jesus is Condemned to Death
1: Jesus is Condemned to Death  We Remember Jesus was captured at night, the Cross of Jesus taken away by soldiers, stripped of his garments, interrogated, tortured, crowned with sharp thorns and now handed over to be condemned to death by Pontius Pilate – death on a cross.  Response: We adore you O Christ, and we praise you, because by your Holy Cross you have redeemed the world. Jesus is condemned unjustly by those who did not understand him and by those who were frightened of what he did and said. Perhaps they sensed that this man could make a difference, that he could turn their world upside down.  We continue to condemn people unjustly today. People are condemned because of the colour of their skin, their gender, their beliefs, because they are born with a disability, because they don’t conform to our way of thinking, the list is endless. There are also the people who have been justly condemned, who have been found guilty, served their sentence and asked for forgiveness. Does our society really forgive; really believe that people can change or do we continue to condemn them over and over again?  We Pray: Jesus, what a terrible injustice to see you condemned to death. Your own people, the Roman judges and the soldiers didn’t recognise that you were the Son of God. Give us the grace to see, respect and love you in all people, both innocent and guilty. Change our hearts that we may see with new eyes those we might otherwise condemn.  Spoken Response: Glory be to the Father….  Sung Response: Were you there when Jesus was condemned?
02:27
April 3, 2020
Stations of The Cross
During this time of self isolation, take some time away from your screens and pray with us, the stations of the cross through our podcast channel. Find a nice quiet place and put your headphones in and reflect as we accompany Jesus on his journey to Calvary, let us take a moment to remember how difficult that journey was. The streets of our towns are filled with people who carry their personal crosses, who are bruised, battered and broken. Through these Stations of the Cross, Jesus is inviting us to journey with him and to reflect on his suffering as it continues in the lives of his people. In solidarity with all who suffer, let us pray that we will be open to whatever he wants us to see, hear and understand.
01:01
April 2, 2020
Women Break Open the Word w/ Joan Cavanagh, Ph.D [April 1, 2020]
Enter into today’s readings with reflections from women in our community. Joan Cavanagh, Ph.D., is a familiar presence at Fordham University, where she has ministered for 22 years in various capacities. Currently she is the director of spiritual and pastoral ministry for the University, and she serves as the director of Campus Ministry at the Westchester campus. During her time at the University, Joan earned both a master’s degree in counseling and a Ph.D. in educational leadership from the Graduate School of Education. At Fordham, Joan wears many hats. She offers spiritual direction and pastoral counsel, works with student leaders of faith-based clubs, accompanies LGBTQ students, and provides bereavement outreach to students who have lost a loved one. During her time at Fordham she has developed and staffed many student retreats and has chaperoned international Global Outreach projects and concert choir tours. She is involved in much of Fordham’s spiritual programming, and she accompanies faculty and staff who take part in the Spiritual Exercises of St. Ignatius, known as the retreat in everyday life. She loves that her work helps members of the Fordham community to find God in the midst of ordinary lives. Joan is a huge fan of Ignatian spirituality, which has shaped her worldview and helped her to thrive. She is deeply grateful for her ministry at Fordham University.
08:27
April 1, 2020
Women Break Open the Word: Sr. Judith Kubicki, CSSF reflects The Solemnity of the Annunciation
Enter into today’s readings with reflections from women in our community. Dr. Judith Marie Kubicki, CSSF, is a Felician Franciscan Sister from Buffalo, New York. Previous to her faculty appointment at Fordham, she served as Academic Dean at Christ the King Seminary, a Graduate School of Theology in East Aurora, New York. Dr. Kubicki has degrees in music, English, and theology. She serves as liturgical music reviewer for the ecumenical liturgical journal Worship and writes a column on hymnody for the GIA Quarterly. She is a past president of the North American Academy of Liturgy (NAAL) and former convener of its Liturgical Theology Seminar. She currently serves as convener for the Liturgy/Sacraments Topic Session for the CTSA. Dr. Kubickis current research is on the theology of classic Christian hymn texts.
05:04
April 1, 2020