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That Anthro Podcast

That Anthro Podcast

By Gabriella Campbell
Welcome to the podcast dedicated to Anthropology. On this podcast we will investigate different topics in anthropology, as well as interviewing a wide range of guests to hear about some of their experiences and learn about the remarkable research they are producing. This podcast is based out of UC Santa Barbara, and guests will include professors, graduate students, alumni and more.
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Environmental Impacts of North American Colonization with Elic Weitzel
Welcome to the podcast, Elic Weitzel, a PhD candidate in the Anthropology department at University of Connecticut, who is using an archaeological approach to studying the environmental impacts of colonization on Native American groups and animal populations. Elic has wanted to be an archaeologist since the 6th grade, and was always fascinated by ecology, the environment and history. He grew up in Pennsylvania surrounded by natural beauty, and would hike part of the Appellation trail that was just right by his house. A turning point for his academic trajectory was reading The Hadza by Frank Marlowe (https://www.ucpress.edu/book/9780520253421/the-hadza) which utilizes a behavioral ecological approach in examining this hunter-gatherer society. Elic was so fascinated and impressed by this approach that he adopted behavioral ecology as the theoretical framework of his dissertation. We also discuss how selecting a field school early on in his journey ended up setting his trajectory for where he would conduct his dissertation research. We also chat about the importance of cold emails, and opportunities to volunteer on field projects once you’ve had some experience under your belt. He details the questions he’s asking in his dissertation about the ecological consequences of European colonization particularly in Southern New England. He explains how all sorts of environmental shifts occur as a direct result of colonization, and that prior to colonization Native Americans were managing the environment through controlled burning and other management strategies. Something in his research that surprised him was finding such accurate and detailed accounts from 17th century European colonial documents that described the environment of New England. Follow @thatanthropodcast on Instagram, and @ThatAnthroPod on Twitter for more behind the scenes content. Brought to you in collaboration with the American Anthropological Association check out their podcast library here https://www.americananthro.org/StayInformed/Content.aspx?ItemNumber=1629 Twitter: @ElicWeitzel Piece on the Ecology of the First Thanksgiving: https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/the-ecology-of-the-first-thanksgiving/ Sapiens Podcast: Could the Coronavirus Pandemic Be Good for the Environment? https://www.sapiens.org/archaeology/pandemic-environment/ Popular Archaeology: Farmers and Warriors https://popular-archaeology.com/article/farmers-and-warriors/
47:48
January 19, 2022
The Benefit of Interdisciplinary Studies with Lauren Malone
Welcome Undergraduate Anthropology and Religious Studies major Lauren Malone. Lauren is currently studying at the University of Tennessee Knoxville, and has made it a point to work in a lot of different labs on campus including working with paleoethnobotanical, zoo archaeological and forensic collections. She is a dedicated scholar, who happens to be 1st generation, and is an incredible person. I really enjoy my chats with fellow undergrads the most because it means making real connections with my fellow students, and reminding each other we are strong and capable. This semester she’s pursuing a museum internship, in hopes of further developing her anthropological toolkit! Follow @thatanthropodcast on Instagram, and @ThatAnthroPod on Twitter for more behind the scenes content. Brought to you in collaboration with the American Anthropological Association check out their podcast library here https://www.americananthro.org/StayInformed/Content.aspx?ItemNumber=1629
58:58
January 12, 2022
Language and Culture with Dr. Kendra Calhoun
Introducing UC Santa Barbara alum and current UCLA postdoc Dr. Kendra Calhoun! Kendra is a sociocultural linguist who has broad research interests and experiences but her current projects are focused on African American language and culture in new media forms, such as TikTok. She did her graduate education at UCSB under Dr. Bucholtz, before pursuing post doctoral studies at UCLA. She comments on how being a Black woman in academic affected her journey and how she found community within a predominantly white program. My favorite part of the interview was discussing her memories of the rise and fall Vine, MySpace, Facebook and the impact each had on culture. Her newest project focusing on African American speech and videos on TikTok is fascinating!! This is one of those must listen episodes, including a chat on why referring to scholars of color as “well-spoken” or "articulate" is a racist micro aggression. I appreciate Kendra’s vulnerability and poise navigating explaining the connotations of phrase, and I think everyone can benefit from understanding how our language can belittle minority communities, particularly from a the perspective of a linguist. Follow @thatanthropodcast on Instagram, and @ThatAnthroPod on Twitter for more behind the scenes content. Brought to you in collaboration with the American Anthropological Association check out their podcast library here https://www.americananthro.org/StayInformed/Content.aspx?ItemNumber=1629 https://www.amazon.com/Articulate-While-Black-Barack-Language/dp/0199812985 https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/zoras-daughters/id1523068454 https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/good-one-a-podcast-about-jokes/id1203393721 https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/gastropod/id918896288 https://kendrancalhoun.com/
59:57
December 15, 2021
Antiquity of Money with California Archaeologist Dr. Lynn Gamble
On today’s episode we explore California Archaeology with Dr. Lynn Gamble. We discuss her graduating from UCSB, returning as a professor, and the golden age of archaeology at UCSB. We also touch on her work with the Kumeyaay and the Chumash indigenous American tribes. Some of her research ground breaking research has involved Chumash bead use as money! Enjoy!
52:51
December 08, 2021
A Fascinating Pompeii Discovery with Emery Baty
Welcome to the podcast my dear friend and colleague, Emery Baty (they/them). I'm extremely thankful for the vulnerability all my guests exhibit when telling their stories, but I'm particularly thankful to Emery for being so honest about their identity as non-binary and how they have come into their own identity. Not only do we talk about gender issues, but we also dive into the exciting field school discovery Emery was a part of this summer in Pompeii with ArchaeoSpain. Emery was a part of the team that uncovered a very rare burial of a Pompeiian. We also discuss their high school laboratory experiences at UC Berkley, and how it inspired them going forward. We also gush about our dogs and how coincidentally met before we even knew the others major. Enjoy! Follow @thatanthropodcast on Instagram, and @ThatAnthroPod on Twitter for more behind the scenes content. Brought to you in collaboration with the American Anthropological Association check out their podcast library here https://www.americananthro.org/StayInformed/Content.aspx?ItemNumber=1629
01:08:35
December 01, 2021
Global Archaeologist Dr. Brian Fagan
We begin this episode with Dr. Brian Fagan, legendary archaeologist and independent scholar, detailing the various animals he has. We then touch on a wide range of topics: his philosophy about teaching, the UCSB campus back in the beginning and the growth in the 80’s, as well as his time as a student at Cambridge. He details what classes were like at Cambridge, and how different the class style was from UCSB. He found the transition to large classes at UCSB much more in-personal. What he is perhaps best know for is his writing, he has 9 publications - with 2 coming out this year. About 8 years ago he patterned with Nadia Durrani, who is a co-author on several of these publications. He says having her as a writing partner has been incredible and they edit seamlessly, while also her own experiences add a new depth to the work because she can speak to things he’s not an expert in (human diversity, feminism, Middle Eastern culture). We also discuss his many hobbies, including sailing, sea kayaking, yacht journaling, raising rabbits, and even driving luxury cars. Check out his most recent book Climate Chaos https://www.publicaffairsbooks.com/titles/brian-fagan/climate-chaos/9781541750883/ Follow @thatanthropodcast on Instagram, and @ThatAnthroPod on Twitter for more behind the scenes content. Brought to you in collaboration with the American Anthropological Association check out their podcast library here https://www.americananthro.org/StayInformed/Content.aspx?ItemNumber=1629
01:14:13
November 17, 2021
The Archaeology Cowboy with Griffin Fox
This week, my lab mate Griffin Fox sits down to chat with me about his experiences thus far in archaeology. Griffin's collegiate journey began at Moorpark Community College (California), where he began to take Native American studies and archaeology classes. He then had the opportunity to work with Dr. Andrew Kinkella (Season 1 Episode 39) on two indigenous American sites, as his first field training. Griffin reflects on his time in community college and offers advice for anyone considering transferring to a 4-year University afterwards.  In 2019, Griffin transferred to UC Santa Barbara, where he hit the ground running and started an internship with Kaitilin Brown his first day on campus! We reflect on our time working together for the P.L. Walker Bioarchaeology and Biogeochemistry laboratory, our team's effort in the recovery of Jack Cantin's remains and what it meant for Griffin. We also divulge some of our antics in the field including building a yurt, and protecting lizard eggs.  The work Griffin did with Kaitlin Brown has recently submitted for publishing, after a successful virtual presentation at the SCA's this year.    Follow @thatanthropodcast on Instagram, and @ThatAnthroPod on Twitter for more behind the scenes content. Brought to you in collaboration with the American Anthropological Association check out their podcast library here https://www.americananthro.org/StayInformed/Content.aspx?ItemNumber=1629
55:25
November 03, 2021
Human Energetics Research with Dr. Cara Ocobock
Welcome Professor of Anthropology and Director of the Human Energetics Laboratory at Notre Dame, Dr. Cara Ocobock. We begin the episode by breaking down a piece Dr. Ocobock wrote for Sapiens called “Sexism Still Winning at the Olympics” https://www.sapiens.org/biology/olympics-sexism-regulations/. She explains how this article came about, and how it was important to collect lines of evidence surrounding the issue that were accessible for freshmen through seniors in her anthropology of sports class. Discussions from these classes helped bust myths students thought to be true, like that testosterone is the sole key to athletic success, and it inspired her to take this piece to a wider audience at Sapiens. She details her own experiences with sexism and harassment as a female athlete, but explains how it was an experience she has taken a lot from. https://www.sapiens.org/biology/female-male-athletes-differences/ Cara also is very close with her family, and during the pandemic she decided to create a lab manual of science experiments for her niece Ruby. Well, upon completion she posted it on Twitter and it’s been a HUGE success! Check it out for FREE below. Ruby’s Lab Manual: https://sites.nd.edu/cara-ocobock/outreach/rubys-laboratory-manual/ Her academic research focuses on cold climate populations and the physiological adaptations required to survive in harsh environments. Primarily, her conducts her research in Finland studying brown fat and human energetics. She also co-hosts a podcast! Sausage of Science Podcast: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/sausage-of-science/id1340030371 Follow @thatanthropodcast on Instagram, and @ThatAnthroPod on Twitter for more behind the scenes content. Brought to you in collaboration with the American Anthropological Association check out their podcast library here https://www.americananthro.org/StayInformed/Content.aspx?ItemNumber=1629
54:27
October 27, 2021
The Human Scaffold with Josh Berson
Welcome to the podcast Dr. Joshua Berson, an independent researcher, author, and former Berggruen fellow who received his PhD in History and Sociology of Science at the University of Pennsylvania. Josh has penned three novels, Computable Bodies, The Meat Question, and The Human Scaffold. https://www.ucpress.edu/book/9780520380493/the-human-scaffold https://www.bloomsbury.com/us/computable-bodies-9781472530349/ https://mitpress.mit.edu/books/meat-question We gush about our love of paper books and how we miss spending hours reading at bookstores. I ask how or if this affected the way he has written to his audience, knowing they most likely wouldn’t be picking up the book in a store. This leads him into speaking about the process and thoughts put into his first book Computable Bodies. Next we touch on his second publication, the Meat Question, again diving into process and how the book formed over many years. He describes the goal of this book as to put the idea of what it means to be human and to consume animals in broader terms than just arguments for health and environment. Josh guides us through each step of inspiration, revision, and the review process in detail. Even describes what the face of meat looked like to him. Ultimately it was a paper he wrote “The Charisma of Meat” that sparked the substance of the book. The paper that inspired the Human Scaffold, his most recent publication was a 2004 paper by Joseph Henrick, and the discourses it launched. Josh enjoyed the technical questions it proposed, but wanted to examine empirical archaeological data from Tasmania for a new take. He also explains the takeaways he hopes readers get from reading the Human Scaffold. My sincerest thanks to the Berggruen Institute for working with me! https://joshberson.net/ https://www.berggruen.org/people/joshua-berson/ Follow @thatanthropodcast on Instagram, and @ThatAnthroPod on Twitter for more behind the scenes content. Brought to you in collaboration with the American Anthropological Association check out their podcast library here https://www.americananthro.org/StayInformed/Content.aspx?ItemNumber=1629
01:19:02
October 20, 2021
Alaskan Anthropology with Pippa Kenner
Join me in welcoming Pippa Kenner! An anthropologist who has spent her career working in Alaska with native communities and the federal government. She has great stories and advice to share about ethnographic research, the realities of working in Alaska, and how she got started working with the federal government. Enjoy!
53:05
October 13, 2021
Food is a Fundamental Human Right with Dr. Megan Carney
Please join me in welcoming Dr. Megan Carney, Professor of Anthropology at the University of Arizona to the podcast! She also received here graduate degree at UC Santa Barbara! Dr. Carney is a sociocultural anthropologist who works with migrant communities conducting ethnographic research on food insecurity as well as the social dynamics of displacement and migration. A lot of her early work, that composed her first book, was conducted in Santa Barbara, working with migrant women from Mexico and Central America (Honduras, and Guatemala), examining the issue of food insecurity in an agriculturally productive region. "The Unending Hunger:" https://www.ucpress.edu/book/9780520285477/the-unending-hunger After completing her PhD, Megan immediately began working in Italy in 2014 coinciding with the Arab Spring. She was fascinated by the discourses surrounding immigration at the time. Immigrants coming across the Mediterranean were dying at sea due to governments refusing to take responsibility, a real crisis that is a result of social and political failings. Megan published her second book on this subject entitled “Island of Hope, Migration and Solidarity in the Mediterranean:” https://www.ucpress.edu/book/9780520344518/island-of-hope Terra Firma film: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Terraferma_(film)  She herself identifies with the right to food/food sovereignty movement that is dissatisfied with food security being the end goals. This movement believes this is not sufficient rather, they want to push to make food a human right. Currently the US does not recognize food as a human right, so right to food is working against transnational food companies, and working towards making food a fundamental human right. They think food is not a commodity, and it should not be controlled by private companies trying to make a profits. They believe there should be dignity in how food is distrusted. Dr. Carney also lays out techniques for ethnographic life history interviews and shares some stories. She talks about the transition to the University of Arizona in 2017 and outlines then classes she teaches and has created, as well as the topics she’s passionate about teaching like “black food matters.” She discuses the research and ethnographic data collection process, and discusses the benefits of long term ethnographic work. She explains why writing the second book was actually harder to write than the first. She is also the Director of the Center for Regional Food Studies, a center that conducts research related to issues locally in borderland regions but is also involved across critical food studies.  https://crfs.arizona.edu/ Follow @thatanthropodcast on Instagram, and @ThatAnthroPod on Twitter for more behind the scenes content. Brought to you in collaboration with the American Anthropological Association check out their podcast library here https://www.americananthro.org/StayInformed/Content.aspx?ItemNumber=1629
01:14:24
October 06, 2021
Revised: Community Driven Archaeology and CRM with Katie Seeber
Welcome to the podcast, Katie Seeber! Katie is an archaeologist who focuses on community and heritage archaeology, with her most recent project and dissertation focusing on the Historic Mitchelville Freedom Park, the first town of freed slaves. Katie also breaks down her experiences with CRM Archaeology, as well as questioning why indigenous voices and presence was absent on certain projects she worked on. She explains incredibly upset she was to see that the tribes had no idea about the projects she was a crew member on, and knew going forward community based archaeology would be the center of her work. She offers some key tips for fieldwork and CRM, how to negotiate for a fair wage, and the importance of setting boundaries with your teammates.  She pursued graduate studies so she could be a crew chief, and run her own projects with ethical, sustainable, and community driven goals. She looked to do a degree in community and heritage archaeology, and the only people she could find doing similar work, were working in the Northeast, which brought her to Binghamton. Katie prioritizes valuing all team members and using everyone’s unique set of skills to achieve their best work. She emphasizes the importance of developing niche skills that can add value to fieldwork, in her case this was becoming an expert in electrolytic reduction. Electrolytic reduction is the chemical process of rebuilding metal artifacts once they have been excavated. https://www.katieseeber.com/research https://twitter.com/seebeegeebees?lang=en https://www.redbubble.com/i/sticker/That-Anthro-Podcast-Sticker-by-thatanthropod/89065514.JCQM3 Follow @thatanthropodcast on Instagram, and @ThatAnthroPod on Twitter for more behind the scenes content. Brought to you in collaboration with the American Anthropological Association check out their podcast library here https://www.americananthro.org/StayInformed/Content.aspx?ItemNumber=1629
01:21:54
September 30, 2021
Tales from a Shipwreck Mermaid - Dr. Maddy McAllister
Welcome back listeners to Season 2 Episode 1 of That Anthro Podcast. On this episode Dr. Maddy McAllister, a maritime archaeologist in Australia, gives us a glimpse into her job, researching shipwrecks!  Maddy breaks down what maritime archaeologists study, what types of tools and historical documents they use, as well as correcting some common misconceptions about excavating underwater. Growing up she loved history, nautical tales, and the ocean. She was also an avid diver from the age of 14, so the field of maritime archaeology allowed her to combine all her passions. Before taking a job as a senior curator at the Museum of Tropical Queensland (https://mtq.qm.qld.gov.au/), she worked in cultural resource management for the state of Australia surveying reported shipwrecks. Her recent research at the Museum has focused on reported, but unidentified shipwrecks putting together the pieces of the mystery like a cold case detective. Most recently, the Museum reopened to the public after renovations and an exhibit refresh, allowing Maddy too curate and update some exhibits she's particularly proud of.  Follow @thatanthropodcast on Instagram, and @ThatAnthroPod on Twitter for more behind the scenes content. Brought to you in collaboration with the American Anthropological Association check out their podcast library here https://www.americananthro.org/StayInformed/Content.aspx?ItemNumber=1629
49:43
September 22, 2021
Looking back on one year of podcasting, a chat with host Gabriella Campbell and Noah Hayes
In this episode, host of That Anthro Podcast Gabriella Campbell reflects on one year of creating the podcast, and more generally her journey in Anthropology. Friend and colleague, Noah Hayes, takes over the interviewer role to ask the questions. Learn about how I got interested in Anthropology, what the real first episode of the podcast was, my favorite thing about being a podcaster, my future academic plans and more!
01:31:23
July 15, 2021
Human Behavioral Ecology with Sarah Alami Gouraftei
Welcome Sarah Alami Gouraftei, a PhD candidate at UC Santa Barbara in the Integrative Anthropological Sciences Laboratory (IAS). Sarah grew up in Morocco, and reflects on the social inequalities that were very apparent to her in Casablanca. She says she really saw the harm social injustices can do which ultimately is what really sparked her interests in behavior, the origins of human sociality and social hierarchies, wealth inequality, and gender inequalities. She also talks about how she really admires the solidarity and hospitality of people in Morocco, explaining that in Morocco it is very important for people take care of their social relations. We discuss a project she is looking forward to post-PhD studying social ties, relationships, and gender inequalities in Southeastern Morocco; as well as all the details on the questions she is studying for her dissertation. Lastly, we talk about some of her fondest memories from working in the IAS Lab, and the excellent experiences she has had with her advisor Dr. Micheal Gurven.  https://www.anth.ucsb.edu/people/sarah-alami-gouraftei Follow @thatanthropodcast on Instagram, and @ThatAnthroPod on Twitter for more behind the scenes content. Brought to you in collaboration with the American Anthropological Association check out their podcast library here https://www.americananthro.org/StayInformed/Content.aspx?ItemNumber=1629
53:08
June 09, 2021
Paleolithic Archaeology with Dr. Julien Riel-Salvatore
Find more info on Dr. Riel-Salvatore and his work here:  https://anthropo.umontreal.ca/repertoire-departement/professeurs/professeur/in/in19299/sg/Julien%20Riel-Salvatore/ https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Julien-Riel-Salvatore Follow @thatanthropodcast on Instagram, and @ThatAnthroPod on Twitter for more behind the scenes content. Brought to you in collaboration with the American Anthropological Association check out their podcast library here https://www.americananthro.org/StayInformed/Content.aspx?ItemNumber=1629
52:02
May 26, 2021
Underwater Archaeology in Belize with Dr. Andrew Kinkella
Welcome Professor of Archaeology at Moorpark College, Dr. Andrew Kinkella! To start off our discussion we go back to Dr. Kinkella’s undergraduate days at UC Santa Barbara, and how it guided his journey in Anthropology. Hear about his Intro to Archaeology teacher, Professor Brian Fegan, and how his captivating teaching style inspired Kinkella to want to do the same thing in his teaching. We emphasize the importance of work life balance, having outside passions, and taking a double major or classes outside of your major. He breaks down his first internship and field experience with Anabelle Ford in Belize looking at Maya sites, and how it ignited a love of traveling and fieldwork. He also breaks down his various roles at Moorpark College, including running the Moorpark College Archaeological Program. Also make sure you check out Dr. Kinkella's Youtube channel "Kinkella Teaches Archaeology" for more awesome lessons and info! https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCaREZDSg-l3pOyu0AW3tfjA Follow @thatanthropodcast on Instagram, and @ThatAnthroPod on Twitter for more behind the scenes content. Brought to you in collaboration with the American Anthropological Association check out their podcast library here https://www.americananthro.org/StayInformed/Content.aspx?ItemNumber=1629
01:13:13
May 06, 2021
Archaeology and Conservation Projects in Peru with Dr. Alicia Boswell
Alicia Boswell is an Assistant Professor in UC Santa Barbara’s History of Art and Architecture department, and focuses her research (and teaching) around themes of ancient Andean Archaeology, conservation, cultural heritage, craft production, cultural landscapes and much more that we will discuss in today’s episode. Since she began her journey as an undergraduate Peru has been an important area of study for her. She talk about her project working outside of Trujillo, and what she loves about working in and exploring Peru. Dr. Boswell also addresses Western biases in archaeology and how research is progressing in Peru, describing it as the researchers just now catching up on this ancient indigenous knowledge. We also talk about her impressive efforts to promote conservation and community work in local communities through M.O.C.H.E. Inc while she pursued her research questions in the area. https://www.arthistory.ucsb.edu/people/alicia-boswell https://www.linkedin.com/in/alicia-boswell-80364080/ Follow @thatanthropodcast on Instagram, and @ThatAnthroPod on Twitter for more behind the scenes content. Brought to you in collaboration with the American Anthropological Association check out their podcast library here  https://www.americananthro.org/StayInformed/Content.aspx?ItemNumber=1629
58:01
April 28, 2021
This Anthro Life Breakdown with Adam Gamwell
This episode with Adam Gamwell is jam packed with great conversations, stories about serendipitous timing and pertinent advice for anyone looking for new, creative ways to apply their anthropological knowledge more broadly. Adam tells about his graduate school experiences at Brandies, and how traveling to Peru as a graduate student ended up shaping his research to focus on quinoa. He also discusses how he started his podcast This Anthro Life (https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/this-anthro-life/id871241283?i=1000493151025) and how it has morphed over the years, including his new goals for the podcast’s future. Then we dive into how he co-formed the American Anthropological Associations podcast library and the wonderful products and events that have stemmed from that collaboration. One of my favorite moments of the episode is how Adam describes the vibe of This Anthro Life saying, “TAL aims to capture the vibe of someone saying ‘Oh Anthropology, I took a class on that I college. I only took one but it’s the class I’m always going to remember.’” Find Adam at the various social media listed below TAL - www.thisanthrolife.org Adam’s website - Gamwell.design Missing Link Studios - https://www.missinglink.studio/ LinkedIn - https://www.linkedin.com/in/adamgamwell/ Twitter - twitter.com/gamwell Follow @thatanthropodcast on Instagram, and @ThatAnthroPod on Twitter for more behind the scenes content. Brought to you in collaboration with the American Anthropological Association check out their podcast library here https://www.americananthro.org/StayInformed/Content.aspx?ItemNumber=1629
55:41
April 21, 2021
Skin Pigmentation Research in Biological Anthropology with Dana Al-Hindi
This week I sat down to talk to Biological Anthropology graduate student Dana Al-Hindi, a member of Brenna Henn's laboratory at UC Davis (http://hennlab.ucdavis.edu/), who is looking at human phenotypic variation in hunter-gather populations in Africa. Her research primarily focuses on identifying the genetic architecture of skin pigmentation within the Khoe-San using a genome-wide association approach, and functionally verifying pigmentation genes using CRISPR driven gene knock-out in zebrafish. Dana breaks down her journey into genetic studies and anthropology, why she loves it, and how she intends to use her research and voice to push towards more diverse research in all areas of the world. She also gives us some insight into other projects she is working on, including one on eye pigmentation.  Follow @thatanthropodcast on Instagram, and @ThatAnthroPod on Twitter for more behind the scenes content. Brought to you in collaboration with the American Anthropological Association check out their podcast library here https://www.americananthro.org/StayInformed/Content.aspx?ItemNumber=1629
43:31
April 14, 2021
Association of Feminist Anthropologists Celebrates Women's History Month
Join me in welcoming Dr. Srimati Basu (President elect of the Association of Feminist Anthropology) and Dr. Michelle Ramirez (Active member of the Association of Feminist Anthropology) who are both accomplished researchers in the field of cultural anthropology and gender studies. Listen to us talk about the women who inspire us, their work in feminism, how we can adapt our language to be more inclusive as scientists, and general ideas on our efforts to decolonize Anthropology! Find out more about Dr. Ramirez here who works on examining sexuality, gender, cancer survivorship, Pentecostalism, and healing in women https://faculty.usciences.edu/faculty/ramirez-michelle . Find out more about Dr. Basu here https://gws.as.uky.edu/users/sbasu2  https://www.gofundme.com/f/that-anthro-podcast-fundraiser?utm_source=customer&utm_medium=copy_link&utm_campaign=p_cf+share-flow-1 Follow @thatanthropodcast on Instagram, and @ThatAnthroPod on Twitter for more behind the scenes content. Brought to you in collaboration with the American Anthropological Association check out their podcast library here https://www.americananthro.org/StayInformed/Content.aspx?ItemNumber=1629
56:13
March 31, 2021
A Story of Us: Lesley Newson and Peter Richerson
This week I interview husband and wife writing duo, Dr. Lesley Newson and Dr. Peter Richerson, on their careers and their newest joint book, A Story of Us: A New Look at Human Evolution. We discuss how they met and decided to write the book in a style that targets a multi-level audience, not just other academics, and why they chose to tell the story of human evolution in a new way. Dr. Richerson feels as if all scientists are storytellers, and while he focuses on the "stones and bones," working with Lesley who has prior experience in publicizing science, helped them create a book that is engaging, educational, and furthers the examination of human evolution. Enjoy!  Please consider donating or sharing to my fundraiser for the Santa Barbara Humane Society: https://www.gofundme.com/f/that-anthro-podcast-fundraiser?utm_source=customer&utm_medium=copy_link&utm_campaign=p_cf+share-flow-1 A Story of Us: A New Look at Human Evolution:  https://www.amazon.com/Story-Us-Look-Human-Evolution/dp/0190883200 Follow @thatanthropodcast on Instagram, and @ThatAnthroPod on Twitter for more behind the scenes content. Brought to you in collaboration with the American Anthropological Association check out their podcast library here https://www.americananthro.org/StayInformed/Content.aspx?ItemNumber=1629
45:07
March 24, 2021
Dr. Jennifer Miller on Stone Age Africa and Ostrich Eggshell Beads
Today Dr. Jennifer Miller from the Max Planck Institute joins us today to talk about her work investigating research questions in Stone Age Africa, focusing on Ostrich eggshell beads (OES). Her PhD focused on these beads and their symbolic and cultural meanings, while also looking more broadly at multiple sites to see if there was any regional change or change throughout time. OES beads have been used for the last 50,000 years in Africa and Asia, and are still produced in Africa today; so she asks, have they changed throughout this time? Is there some sort of evolution evident in the beads themselves that could inform population differences and changes the way lithic and ceramic technologies do? Dr. Miller plans to present and publish these results soon. She also talks about working in cave structures, what technologies they use to map them, and what excavating in Africa is like, particularly a newer project at Panga ya Saidi cave in Eastern Africa ( https://www.shh.mpg.de/1466873 ). We end the episode with her very valuable advice for other researchers, and look forward to what future projects will hold for her.  DONATE HERE: https://www.gofundme.com/f/that-anthro-podcast-fundraiser?utm_source=customer&utm_medium=copy_link&utm_campaign=p_cf+share-flow-1 Check out her publications here: https://www.shh.mpg.de/person/101112/25522  Follow @thatanthropodcast on Instagram, and @ThatAnthroPod on Twitter for more behind the scenes content Brought to you in collaboration with the American Anthropological Association check out their podcast library here: https://www.americananthro.org/StayInformed/Content.aspx?ItemNumber=1629
51:48
March 17, 2021
Anthropology in Anti-Racism Efforts with Dr. Gabriela Torres
Welcome Anthropologist and teacher at Wheaton College, Dr. Gabriela Torres! Check out her books below! "Sexual Violence in Intimacy" volume: https://www.routledge.com/Sexual-Violence-in-Intimacy-Implications-for-Research-and-Policy-in-Global/Torres-Yllo/p/book/9780367338121 Marital Rape volume: https://global.oup.com/academic/product/marital-rape-9780190238360?cc=us&lang=en& Follow @thatanthropodcast on Instagram, and @ThatAnthroPod on Twitter for more behind the scenes content. Brought to you in collaboration with the American Anthropological Association check out their podcast library here https://www.americananthro.org/StayInformed/Content.aspx?ItemNumber=1629
40:30
March 11, 2021
Dr. Michele Koons on Ancient Andean Archaeology and The Denver Museum of Nature and Science
Dr. Michele Koons comes on the podcast today to talk all about her career and path to becoming the Archaeology Curator at The Denver Museum of Nature and Science (https://www.dmns.org/). She explains how her love and passion for ancient peoples and artifacts developed during college, and discusses some of the great opportunities she had to explore her interests throughout her education. She then did her graduate research at Harvard on the Moche peoples of Peru, who lived thousands of years ago. Dr. Koons emphasizes her love for sharing information and knowledge with the public, which inspired her to start doing behind the scenes informational videos on the collections at the museum and sharing them with her Instagram followers.  https://www.gofundme.com/f/that-anthro-podcast-fundraiser?utm_source=customer&utm_medium=copy_link&utm_campaign=p_cf+share-flow-1 Please consider donating!  Follow @dr.michele.koons on Instagram, check out her website here: http://www.drmichelekoons.com/    Follow @thatanthropodcast on Instagram, and @ThatAnthroPod on Twitter for more behind the scenes content.  Brought to you in collaboration with the American Anthropological Association check out their podcast library here https://www.americananthro.org/StayInformed/Content.aspx?ItemNumber=1629
39:04
March 10, 2021
Dr. Layla Brown
Welcome to another episode of That Anthro Podcast, where we dive into all things anthropology. This episode was just as much of a treat to record as it is to listen to, Dr. Layla Brown is a captivating scholar, storyteller, and professor. Dr. Brown is an Assistant Professor of Africana Studies at U Mass Boston, but holds a Phd in Cultural Anthropology, and commonly works and teaches on the subject of Black Feminism and Power. She certainly wowed and inspired me with her views on the Bolivarian Revolution in Venezuela and the parallels with the US Black Lives Matter movements; as well as her teaching philosophy! We dove into her unique childhood growing up in a very politically active community of diverse, international voices, which would later help guide her studies. Please consider checking out one of these links, reading her extraordinary work, or following her on Twitter.  https://www.umb.edu/academics/cla/faculty/layla_brown_vincent Follow her on Twitter @PanAfrikFem_PhD / https://twitter.com/panafrikfem_phd?lang=en https://www.arkrepublic.com/2021/01/09/dr-layla-brown-vincent-envisions-a-better-world-for-her-people/ https://scholar.google.com/citations?user=syYBakcAAAAJ&hl=en (for a list of her publications)  Follow @thatanthropodcast on Instagram, and @ThatAnthroPod on Twitter for more behind the scenes content. Brought to you in collaboration with the American Anthropological Association check out their podcast library here https://www.americananthro.org/StayInformed/Content.aspx?ItemNumber=1629
53:10
March 03, 2021
Anthropology Day 2021
This is my version of a love letter to Anthropology for World Anthroday 2021, where I interview several guests asking them why they love anthropology and what has been the most impactful experience for them during their careers. Check out the many other schools, podcasts, and clubs celebrating Anthroday at the American Association of Anthropologists website https://www.americananthro.org/ParticipateAndAdvocate/Landing.aspx?ItemNumber=13244&navItemNumber=790 Also register to watch my live streamed panel on Increasing Visibility in Anthropology, Feb 18th 2021, https://www.eventbrite.com/e/increasing-the-visibility-of-anthropology-tickets-141387978249 Follow @thatanthropodcast on Instagram, and @ThatAnthroPod on Twitter for more behind the scenes content. Brought to you in collaboration with the American Anthropological Association check out their podcast library here https://www.americananthro.org/StayInformed/Content.aspx?ItemNumber=1629
30:12
February 18, 2021
Anthrodish with Sarah Duignan
Welcome to a very special episode of That Anthro Podcast where I interview another Anthropology podcaster, Sarah Duignan of Anthrodish! Check out her podcast here, https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/anthrodish/id1405790655. We talk all things podcasting, graduate school, women in science, how we see the future of the field going and more! Follow @thatanthropodcast on Instagram, and @ThatAnthroPod on Twitter for more behind the scenes content. Brought to you in collaboration with the American Anthropological Association check out their podcast library here https://www.americananthro.org/StayInformed/Content.aspx?ItemNumber=1629
36:44
February 03, 2021
California Archaeology with Dr. John Johnson
Dr. John Johnson, a UCSB alumni, curator of Anthropology at the Santa Barbara Natural History, and adjunct Professor of Anthropology at UCSB, joins us on the podcast today. He has been working and researching on California Archaeology and California Native Americans for over 45 years, and has been a curator at the Santa Barbara Natural History Museum for the duration of those years. He has worked closely with the Chumash, both ancient Chumash cultural materials, historical records, and living members of the tribe such as in his project 6 Generations (https://www.kanopy.com/product/6-generations). 6 Generations follows a Chumash family from the time of the mission to present day. He talks exciting discoveries, his role as a museum curator, and some of his research endeavors recently. Check out the SB Natural History Museum: https://www.sbnature.org/ Follow @thatanthropodcast on Instagram and @ThatAnthroPod on Twitter, for more behind the scenes content. Brought to you in collaboration with the American Anthropological Association check out their podcast library here https://www.americananthro.org/StayInformed/Content.aspx?ItemNumber=1629
38:50
January 27, 2021
Evolutionary Anthropology and Behavioral Ecology with Dr. David Lawson
UCSB Associate Professor Dr. David Lawson joins us on the podcast to introduce his work in behavioral ecology, evolutionary approaches to human behavioral diversity, and anthropological contributions to global health. We also discuss his childhood in Northern Ireland, and how he stumbled into a biology degree at University College London, and then found a love for Anthropology. We compare and contrast his experiences in University in the UK, as well as his experiences teaching at an American institution. He serves as the graduate advisor in the Anthropology dept and highlights how sometimes the American academia PhD track can be limiting. He talks about his dissertation, and his approach to the research; take existing data and learn about the research process and methodology before going out and collecting data. Diving into the complex topic of child marriage, Dr. Lawson explains the context, anthropological and societal reasoning behind this phenomena, how young women in early adolescents have agency, and how his work strives to understand it. For more information on Dr. Lawson and his work: https://www.news.ucsb.edu/2020/020047/child-marriage-misconceptions https://davidwlawson.mystrikingly.com/ Follow @thatanthropodcast on Instagram for more behind the scenes content. Brought to you in collaboration with the American Anthropological Association check out their podcast library here https://www.americananthro.org/StayInformed/Content.aspx?ItemNumber=1629
58:56
January 20, 2021
Business Anthropology with Matt Artz
Welcome Matt Artz, a business anthropologist, podcaster, founder of 2 anthropology consulting companies, and an overall fascinating guest. We dive into the field of user experience, his experience doing a Tedx talk, the importance of publicly disseminating our work as anthropologists, and his new podcasts he is launching this January. We also discuss his masters thesis, and subject of his Tedx talk, the safety and lessons learned for consumers regarding at home DNA tests. Check out his many projects here:  http://mattartz.me/ Tedx talk:  https://youtu.be/H0M_5mgWlTY Instagram/twitter: @mattartzanthro Follow @thatanthropodcast on Instagram for more behind the scenes content. 
33:15
December 30, 2020
Subterranean and Cave Archaeology in Belize with Toni Gonzalez
Toni Gonzalez walks us through her journey to finding archaeology at Pasadena Community College, and how her background in art and art history really set the stage for the way she would go onto study Maya material culture. She also expresses how having family roots in Latin America guided her to conduct her research in Mesoamerica. Her work primarily is in underground or cave spaces, and she gives us the inside scoop on what its like to work underground or enter the dark zone of a cave! Also we talk about working in the remote jungle of Belize, and some of the realities of fieldwork. Learn about Maya culture and chultuns, how they locate them, what they look like and more! We also dive into the field school she runs with her advisor Gerardo Aldana. If you are interested in participating in her field school please contact her at tonigonzalez@ucsb.edu. Check out more of her work here: https://wilson.anth.ucsb.edu/people/toni-gonzalez Follow @thatanthropodcast on Instagram for more behind the scenes content.  Brought to you in collaboration with the American Anthropological Association check out their podcast library here https://www.americananthro.org/StayInformed/Content.aspx?ItemNumber=1629
41:53
December 23, 2020
Mesoamerican Archaeology and Advice with Mallory Melton
Today we dive into the life and research of the lovely Mallory Melton, UCSB PhD candidate. We discuss her road to anthropology, how she overcame certain barriers with the help and support of many mentors. She has distinguished herself in her academic studies, with a string of publications, workshops, guest lectures, honors, awards for being an outstanding TA, and many conference presentations. Her dissertation research focuses on the Mesoamerican sites of El Ujuxte and La Blanca, investigating questions like: How can we look at these plant remains and examine social diversity across these sites? She also explains how Mesoamerican studies rely heavily on indicators such as social diversity to make an argument for urbanized life and urbanism in Mesoamerica. Were people living in groups, such as economic or ethnic enclaves, and can we see this in through the food? She also explores urban sustainability and food security at these sites. She studies other topics in Peru, Southeastern, MIdwestern, and Northwestern America. We also talk about her adorable and smart dog Gizmo! Follow on instagram for more behind the scenes content @thatanthropodcast Brought to you in collaboration with the American Anthropological Association, check out their podcast library here for more anthro content: https://www.americananthro.org/StayInformed/Content.aspx?ItemNumber=1629 Hot links: https://vanderwarker.anth.ucsb.edu/people/mallory-melton https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Mallory_Melton4 Book recommendation: The Life and Death of Ancient Cities: A Natural History by Greg Woolf Article discussed: https://www.jstor.org/stable/482275?seq=1
47:57
December 16, 2020
Sex and Gender in Osteology: Nix Wilson
Welcome to this week's episode with fellow Anthropology undergraduate at UCSB, Nina Wilson. She is one of my classmates who presented a wonderful presentation to our class on sex and gender in osteology, where she discussed some of the outdated terms and issues are in forensic and bioarchaeological research that exclude or ignore the existence of transgender and intersex individuals in the population. One of the main points we try and convey in this episode is intersex people exist and have existed so it is important to evaluate how as scientists we can better represent those individuals in research. Follow @thatanthropodcast on Instagram for more content. Episode brought to you in collaboration with American Anthropological Association - check out their podcast library here: https://www.americananthro.org/StayInformed/Content.aspx?ItemNumber=1629 Podcast recommendation: Trans Panic the podcast https://open.spotify.com/show/0iXA1Gg1cPRfUEq9BIpSUC?si=OqhggwxRTGi5yD86MKgk9g Hot links:  https://www.sapiens.org/biology/transgender-intersex-forensic-anthropology/ https://www.instagram.com/p/CHixIUoh3tW/?igshid=1vx2kso5i0f03 https://www.gaytimes.co.uk/life/hungary-plans-to-ban-same-sex-couples-from-adopting-children/
30:22
December 09, 2020
A breakdown of the hit crime television show Bones - what's real and what's fiction!
Have you ever seen Dr. Temperance Brennan aka "Bones" solving crimes with Agent Booth on TV? Well, it is the very thing that inspired me to pursue becoming a forensic anthropologist, and today I talk about the inaccuracies of some of the methods, but also where they shone with realistic science! This was just a fun way for me to ramble about Osteology, share my favorite bone, some ways to sex and age skeletal remains and honestly just express my love for the show! I hope you enjoy this fun episode.  Podcast recommendation: I Dig It podcast https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/i-dig-it/id1513077239 Follow us on instagram for more behind the scenes content @thatanthropodcast This episode was produced in collaboration with the American Anthropological Association you can check out their other anthropology related podcasts here: https://www.americananthro.org/StayInformed/Content.aspx?ItemNumber=1629
23:01
December 02, 2020
Channel Islands Archaeology with Dr. Torben Rick
Today, Dr. Torben Rick, researcher and curator of North American Archaeology at the Smithsonian, joins us today to talk all about his work on the Channel Islands throughout the years. Dr. Rick is a UCSB undergraduate alumni, and completed his masters and phD at University of Oregon. We discuss some of his fond memories of his time as a fellow Gaucho, how he got interested in archaeology, and what sparked his love for the archaeology of the Channel Islands. We then move into his time at the Smithsonian, what his favorite parts of working in a museum are, and what his day to day responsibilities include (even during remote COVID times)! We touch on the importance of interdisciplinary research in the field, and how past archaeological work can inform our current day environmental issues. Prepare to be entertained and amazed by his fascinating work, check him out here; https://profiles.si.edu/display/nRickT9182008 Instagram: @thatanthropodcast Email: thatanthropodcast@gmail.com Please consider leaving a rating and review if you enjoy! Brought to you in collaboration with the American Anthropological Association, check out their podcast library here: https://www.americananthro.org/StayInformed/Content.aspx?ItemNumber=1629
36:21
November 25, 2020
A Discussion on Race and Gender with Professor Raquel Pacheco
This week's episode touches on some of the hard hitting questions and research being done by Dr. Raquel Pacheco, an assistant professor at UCSB, on race, gender, and migration, specifically focusing on researching these issues in Mexico.  Dr. Pacheco grew up in a border town, and identifies as Chicana (defined as a woman who embracers her Mexican culture and heritage, but simultaneously, recognizes the fact that she is an American) and takes the time to explain her cultural affiliations as well as how she ended up falling in love with Anthropology. We discuss the book she is working on as well as the many fascinating projects she has done, as well as how she has tackled teaching Anth 125: The Anthropology of Gender at UCSB. Lastly, we touch on her inspiration, her partner Georgette Gomez who ran for Congress this term.  Please enjoy and consider looking up her work, https://www.anth.ucsb.edu/people/raquel-pacheco. This weeks book recommendation: A Women's Place in the Andes, Engaging Decolonial Feminist Anthropology.  This episode is brought to you in collaboration with the AAA (American Association of Anthropologists) check out their podcast library here: https://www.americananthro.org/StayInformed/Content.aspx?ItemNumber=1629
41:36
November 18, 2020
Ecology and Animal Behavior with Ronnie Bailey-Steinitz
Join me today for an incredibly fascinating and informative episode with pHd student Ronnie Bailey-Steinitz and her work with monkey's in Uganda, as well as some inspiration and fieldwork advice. We discuss her research questions and how she non-invasively studies food-web interactions and how different species interact within an ecological community. We also discuss her meeting her idol Jane Goodall, what drives her, and how she hopes her work is impacting conservation efforts! Links: https://www.roamingecologist.com/ Ronnie's book recommendation: “Improbable Destinies: Fate, Chance, and the Future of Evolution” by Jonathan Losos Ronnie's podcast recommendation: The Common Descent Podcast 
30:07
November 11, 2020
Zooarchaeology and Environmental Archaeology with Dr. Sarah McClure
This week we dive into a wide range of subjects with Dr. Sarah McClure, a professor of Anthropology and Archaeology at UCSB. From her transition back to UCSB as a professor, her new role organizing and expanding UCSB's faunal collection, curating bones collected from PL Walker's lab, finding a love for anthropology, and shining a light on the badass empowering women in Anthropology. Dr. McClure's work encompasses examining faunal and human bones, examining diet and agriculture, and overarching environmental questions primarily working in the Mediterranean. Check out her most recent publication here which we discuss in the episode: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1002/oa.2878. She also discusses her mentor Mindy Zeder, and her moto on how to succeed in academia "you have to be excellent and you have to be persistent."
30:21
October 28, 2020
Get to Know Host Gabriella Campbell
Hey podcast listeners! Wondering what’s going on with me behind the scenes? Or maybe you’re new here and you wanna learn more about me, Gabriella Campbell, the host of That Anthro Podcast? Well this is the episode for you! I’ll talk about my classes, my dog, sustainable Christmas presents and companies, forensics projects, grad school and more! Enjoy! xo Gabby
22:42
October 21, 2020
Anthropology of Fire with Jordan Thomas
Welcome UCSB PhD student Jordan Thomas to the podcast this week! Jordan chats with us today about his work as a wildland firefighter and how it has influenced and impacted his anthropological studies. We also chat about his journey to becoming an environmental and cultural anthropologist! Check out his work below: Book of the week: Zeitoun by Dave Eggers  Links to Jordan's writings: https://www.independent.com/2018/11/27/unnatural-disaster-california-fires/ https://www.latimes.com/opinion/story/2020-10-14/wildfires-california-climate-change-denial https://jtanthropology.com/ 
37:02
October 14, 2020
Archaeoethnobotany and Diversity in Anthropology with Dr. Amber VanDerwarker
Please welcome Dr. Amber VanDerwarker an archaeologist, or an archaeobotanist to be more specific, and professor of 13 years at UC Santa Barbara. Dr. VanDerwarker chats with us today about her journey as a first generation college student, what motivated her to become an anthropologist and teacher, diversity in the field, and her own research. This is a jam-packed episode, and there is much of Dr. VanDerwarker's work we did not have the chance to cover including her book published in 2015, with her husband Dr. Greg Wilson of UCSB "The Archaeology of Food and Warfare" which I would encourage you to check out if you are interested. Also check out her lab website here, https://vanderwarker.anth.ucsb.edu/ for more info on the Integrative Subsistence Laboratory at UCSB! 
01:10:14
October 07, 2020
Stories from an Adventuring Archaeologist: Stephanie Black
My friend Stephanie Black joins us today, recording all the way from Sydney Australia! Steph graduated from Macquire University with a degree in archaeology in 2017, and since has been traveling the world doing various archaeological project. Hear about her once in a lifetime experience at the Crenshaw Center in Scotland, what it was really like to work in Dubai in the middle of a desert, and how she is trying to incorporate Australian indigenous history into her social media content. Follow @thatanthropodcast on instagram for more behind the scenes content, and check out Steph @adventuringarchaeologist!
36:02
September 23, 2020
The Many Sides of Fieldwork: Advice, Stories, Must Have Items, and more
Welcome to this week's episode of That Anthro Podcast where I reach out to some of my colleagues to collaborate for their experiences doing anthropological fieldwork! Be prepared to hear our lessons learned, some of our prized items in the field, the importance of electrolytes, and the reality that most of the time you don't find buried treasure! Hear from your host Gabby Campbell, PhD students MacKenzie Wade and Amy Anderson, archaeologist Stephanie Black, and fellow anthropology undergrad Olivia Thompson. Check out our instagram @thatanthropodcast for more behind the scenes content! Thanks for listening!
31:34
September 16, 2020
Ivanna Robledo: graduate school and her thesis
UCSB alumni Ivanna Robledo joins us today on the podcast to talk all things graduate school! Currently working on her MA at Texas State in Biological Anthropology and Forensics, Ivanna hopes to use data such as craniometric measurements from Southern and Central American countries to help improve the ancestry database for helping identify the bodies of migrants who died trying to cross the border into the US.  She also works with Operation Identification, an organization who works along the South Texas border excavating and hopefully identifying migrant remains, https://www.txstate.edu/anthropology/facts/outreach/opid.html. Also mentioned in the episode is an episode of VICE on this Texas State Operation Identification programs, found here https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OE3gIqiNKNA&feature=youtu.be. Also big thank you to Ivanna for recording with me! 
19:46
September 09, 2020
Cannibalism in Jamestown with Noah Hayes
"She was a fourteen year old girl given the name Jane, who just months after her arrival in Jamestown, was not only dead, but also cannibalized. The settlers that she joined on the voyage across the Atlantic left England filled with hope about the potential prospers of the new world.Little did they know, they were sailing straight into their collective demise." -Noah Hayes, 2020. Settle in for this week's episode where fellow 3rd year undergraduate Anthropology major Noah tells our listeners the story of cannibalism in the Starving Time of Jamestown. 
16:47
August 26, 2020
Bioarchaeology and Forensics with Dr. Danielle Kurin
Welcome to this week's episode with UCSB Anthropology Professor Danielle Kurin! In this episode we dive into the field of bioarchaeology, Danielle's personal journey, and her advice to other pursuing a similar career. We also discuss her experiences as a consulting forensic anthropologist for the county, and how those experiences have shaped her view of forensics. 
01:00:49
August 19, 2020
Why Anthropology with Gabriella Campbell
Hello and welcome back to another episode of That Anthro Podcast! In today's episode get to know more about podcast host Gabriella Campbell, from her interests to how she started the podcast and what's next, enjoy this informal episode and to get to know her better! Also re-listen to our previous episodes and follow us on instagram @thatanthropodcast or send us an email at thatanthropodcast@gmail.com
16:11
August 12, 2020
Anthropology in the Amazon with Dr. Jeffrey Hoelle
This week's episode is with guest Dr. Jeffrey Hoelle, a sociocultural anthropologist and professor at UC Santa Barbara where he researches and teaches about environmental and cultural anthropology. Today we dive into his research on the cattle culture in Acre Brazil, the IV Ethnobotany project, as well as his most recent online teaching experiences and ways he hopes to engage students outside of the classroom. Check out his book Rainforest Cowboys: https://www.amazon.com/Rainforest-Cowboys-Ranching-Caribbean-Publication-ebook/dp/B00U1MNUA4/ref=sr_1_1?dchild=1&keywords=rainforest+cowboys&qid=1596565188&sr=8-1 as well as some of his published articles https://enewspaper.latimes.com/infinity/article_share.aspx?guid=0460311f-4989-4759-94c5-63a35a6206ec for even more information and details into his work in the Brazilian Amazon. Also check out the IV Ethnobotany project and Cultivating Communities both amazing locally created IV projects https://www.cultivatingcommunities-islavista.com/
39:53
August 05, 2020
A Deep Dive into Edible Insects with MacKenie Wade
Join me in welcoming UC Santa Barbara PHD student, MacKenzie Wade, an anthropologist and expert in all things edible insects. We dive into her personal history with raising insects and learning how to cook with them in her Kansas State dorm. We also discuss the future of edible insect production and her own related research recently published, https://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.1088/1748-9326/aba1c1. Also check out her page she created to help our local Santa Barbara community learn, discuss, and share information about edible insects found here, https://mkenziewade.wixsite.com/santabarbarabugs, and @santabarbarabugs. MacKenzie's passion for educating others about her research and the wonders of edible insects is incredible and she is such an inspiration. 
29:48
July 29, 2020
Megan Kenner
Recent UCSB graduate Megan Kenner comes on the podcast to talk to us about her history growing up in Alaska and how that lead her to begin researching the CPT1A Arctic Variant in Native Alaskan populations. She discusses her experience working with Alaskan Native groups and the importance of informed consent in Anthropological work.  
21:29
July 22, 2020
Amy Anderson
In today's episode, we will chat with guest Amy Anderson and learn what the living can tell us about the dead. Amy Anderson, a pHD candidate at UCSB, comes on the podcast today to discuss her research on disease ecology, porous cranial lesions, and her work with the Tsimane Health and Life History project. We also discuss her undergraduate field world in Astypalaia, Greece excavating infant remains, and her biggest fieldwork must haves! For more information on Amy, check out her webpage https://www.amyandersonskeletonreader.com/ or her read most recent article "2019. AS Anderson, B Trumble, C Hove, TS Kraft, H Kaplan, M Gurven, AD Blackwell. Old friends and friendly fire: Pregnancy, hookworm infection, and anemia among tropical horticulturalists. American Journal of Human Biology. DOI:10.1002/ajhb.23337."
37:10
July 15, 2020
Introduction to the Podcast
Welcome to That Anthro Podcast! In this trailer you will learn a bit about how and why I started this podcast, and what to expect from episodes going forward. Follow our instagram @thatanthropodcast for updates on the release of our first episode with special guest Amy Anderson, launching July 15. 
03:53
June 15, 2020