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ResDance

ResDance

By Dr. Gemma Harman

A podcast dedicated to research methodologies and methods in dance practice, intended for educators, students, practitioners and performers and interdisciplinary researchers curious to learn more about dance research in action.

Series 1 includes 11 brilliant speakers, 15 hours of content and poses new opportunities for collaboration and knowledge exchange. Series 2 and 3 are being recorded and will be launched from May 2022.

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ResDance S2: Episode 11: Considerations around risk-taking and 'newness' in practice-based research with Josh Slater
ResDance S2: Episode 11: Considerations around risk-taking and 'newness' in practice-based research with Josh Slater
ResDance S2: Episode 11: Considerations around risk-taking and 'newness' in practice-based research with Josh Slater Josh Slater shares insight into his creative process and the role of collaboration in his practice making and research. Through situating his thinking around his current PhD practice, Josh discusses his interests in choreographic practise, risk-taking and collaborative practices, more widely. In this episode, Josh reflects upon the approaches he employs and raises points of interest concerning self-reflexivity as a researcher and ways of documenting. Josh Slater is programme leader for dance and senior lecturer at De Montfort University in Leicester, as well as a contemporary dance artist, theatre maker and performer. He is a part-time Ph.D. student at the Centre for Dance Research (C-DaRE) at Coventry University and assistant editor for the Intellect Choreographic Practices Journal.  He has created, and toured dance and theatre works, nationally and internationally, funded by the Arts Council England. Josh’s research interests are focused on choreographic practices, risk-taking, Dance Theatre, improvisation and collaborative practices. Josh is a mentor for emerging dance and movement practitioners and is a Director on the Board of Trustees for Exim Dance Company CIC in Devon and Cheshire Dance in Cheshire. Contact details: E-mail: josh.slater@dmu.ac.uk Twitter: @joshsla Other social media handles: @DMUdance @DMUcirid @CDaRE_CU @dmuleicester Please share this episode with students, educators, practitioners, performers, and interdisciplinary researchers curious to learn more about dance research in action.
32:58
November 22, 2022
ResDance S2: Episode 10: Reflections on dance-making and the creative process with Naomi Lefebvre Sell
ResDance S2: Episode 10: Reflections on dance-making and the creative process with Naomi Lefebvre Sell
ResDance S2: Episode 10: Reflections on dance-making and the creative process with Naomi Lefebvre Sell Dr Naomi Lefebvre Sell shares insight into her choreographic practice, exploring ways of dance-making and the approaches she employs. Through exploration of her creative processes, Naomi highlights the need for openness when considering the body and the richness of working cross-discipline to empower drawing upon a range of perspectives when viewing the body and throughout the dance-making process, more generally. Naomi Lefebvre Sell is a Reader of Choreographic Practice within the Faculty of Dance and Programme Leader for the MA/MFA Creative Practice at Trinity Laban Conservatoire of Music and Dance. Naomi lectures across the BA and MA/MFA programmes within the fields of choreography, performance and research methods as well as supervises Practice as Research PhDs. Originally from Canada, Naomi’s background as a professional dancer includes work with both Butoh and Cunningham-influenced companies. Naomi holds a BFA in Dance from Simon Fraser University and a MA Choreography and PhD in Creative Practice (Dance) from Trinity Laban. She is also a Higher Education Academy Fellow. Naomi’s professional choreographic work has been commissioned and presented across Canada and Europe (since 1998) within festivals such as TanzArt (Germany), Brighton Fringe (UK), Dancing of the Edge (Canada) and Chutzpah! (Canada). Naomi’s practice-led research is published in academic journals and book chapters (Intellect, Frontiers and Routledge), she presents regularly at national and international conferences and is a reviewer for the Frontiers in Psychology Journal. Naomi’s artistic work and teaching is informed by her doctoral research which examined the effect of mindfulness meditation on a creative process of dance making. Naomi’s current research is funded by Arts Council England. Contact details: Twitter: @naomi_sell Staff page: https://www.trinitylaban.ac.uk/study/teaching-staff/dr-naomi-lefebvre-sell/ Please share this episode with students, educators, practitioners, performers, and interdisciplinary researchers curious to learn more about dance research in action.
32:18
November 11, 2022
ResDance S2: Episode 9: Choreography and Improvisation with Seke Chimutengwende
ResDance S2: Episode 9: Choreography and Improvisation with Seke Chimutengwende
ResDance S2: Episode 9: ResDance S2: Episode 9: Choreography and Improvisation with Seke Chimutengwende Seke Chimutengwende shares insight into his practice making as a choreographer and performer. Through exploring the notion of collectivity and approaches to authorship, he reflects upon his making experiences and working collaboratively across disciplines that more widely inform his practice. Seke shares insight into his latest work It begins in darkness (premiered in September 2022) and the processes involved in the making and dissemination of the work. Seke Chimutengwende:  www.sekechimutengwende.com Seke is a choreographer, performer, movement director and teacher. In his practice, Seke uses choreography to experiment with collectivity and alternative approaches to authorship and governance; playing with form to shift and question hierarchies. His new work It begins in darkness premiered in September 2022, a group choreography looking at ghosts and haunted houses as metaphors for how histories of slavery and colonialism haunt the present. Seke has also recently choreographed a new group work for Candoco Dance Company, In Worlds Unknown, which premiered in October 2022. Alongside his choreographic work Seke is currently exploring long solo improvisation performances of 50 to 60 minutes and is working as a performer with Forced Entertainment in a new work which will premiere in 2023. He is also working as a dramaturg on Sue MacLaine’s new work, I Maybe Sometime. As a lecturer and teacher, Seke is a visiting lecturer in improvisation and composition at London Contemporary Dance School. Contact details: Email: seke.chim@gmail.com Social media: twitter facebook youtube instagram Useful links Hemsley. A. & Chimutengwende, S. (2021). The Future Stared Back at Us for the First Time: Black Holes Revisited. Contemporary Theatre Review (31), 197-203.https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/10486801.2021.1878509 Tom Cornford (2022) It begins in darkness: https://www.tom6.space/blog/messing-up-mes Please share this episode with students, educators, practitioners, performers, and interdisciplinary researchers curious to learn more about dance research in action.
46:12
November 08, 2022
ResDance S2: Episode 8: the f/ol\d, an impulse for multiplicity in languaging with Glenna Batson and Susan Sentler
ResDance S2: Episode 8: the f/ol\d, an impulse for multiplicity in languaging with Glenna Batson and Susan Sentler
Glenna Batson and Susan Sentler share insight into their 10-year collaboration, honing a practice-based language on bodily folding. Through discussion of their shared thinking and practices rooted in a inter/trans-disciplinary approach, they share insight into their ways of working and reflect upon their processes of making. They discuss their on-going collaborative research rooted in the concept of ‘the fold’ titled: the f/ol\d as somatic/artistic practice and offer thoughtful consideration around the ideas of languaging and the wider value (and power) of what making can offer. Glenna and Susan are currently writing a book entitled: Embodied Practices in Art Making: The Fold (Intellect Books 2023). Glenna Batson is a Professor emeritus of physiotherapy, Glenna has drawn from multiple sources both within and outside of the academy as catalysts for teaching, research, advocacy, and artistic growth.  Glenna has worked at the intersection of dance, movement science and somatic education honing a trans-disciplinary approach to embodied cognition. She has lectured and mentored in higher education within dance, bodymind disciplines and neuro-rehabilitation. She currently teaches Somatics as faculty of dance at Peabody Institute for Johns Hopkins University (Baltimore, MD USA), and is a guest dance educator at Duke University and University of Limerick. Clinical investigations offer fresh insights into integrative medicine, including dance improvisation for Parkinson’s, Alexander Technique & balance and mental imagery in stroke rehabilitation, research pathways underscoring mind-body methodologies. Written scholarship includes chief author of Body and Mind in Motion: Dance and Neuroscience in Conversation., a convergence of somatics, dance and neuroscience, and co-editor/contributor to Dance, Somatics and Spiritualities: Contemporary Sacred Narratives (2014).  Contact details: Email: glenna@glennabatson.net / glenna.batson@gmail.com Website: https://www.glennabatson.net/ Susan Sentler, (she/her), is an independent artist rooted in the field of Dance/Performance working as educator/lecturer, maker/choreographer, researcher, director, curator, dramaturg and performer. She has practiced globally for over 30 years and began teaching in Higher Education since 1992, in early 2000’s meriting Senior Lecturer status from Trinity Laban Conservatoire of Music and Dance. As performer, she danced with the original second company ‘The Ensemble’ of the Martha Graham Dance Company in the 1980’s and has returned to performing in the past 10 years with artists such as Tino Sehgal, Xavier le Roy, Dora Garcia and Jerome Bel. Susan’s practice is inter/trans-disciplinary, anchored by a honed expanded somatic relationship to image, interested in ‘dissolving the indexical’, yielding greater potential of sensorial materiality.  In 2013, she received an MACP (Masters in Creative Practice, Dance Professional Practice) from Trinity Laban in collaboration with Independent Dance, London/UK. Susan was on faculty from 2015 to 2020 at LASALLE College of the Arts Singapore expanding the somatic and creative environment. Susan focuses on gallery/ museum contexts creating/collaborating on ‘responses’ or ‘activations’ within exhibitions as well as durational installations orchestrating moving/still image, objects, sound and absence/presence of the performing body.  Contact details Email: shsentler@gmail.com Instagram: @susansentler  Vimeo: https://vimeo.com/user9690001 
53:09
October 15, 2022
ResDance S2: Episode 7: Considering the value of dance research with Kathryn Stamp
ResDance S2: Episode 7: Considering the value of dance research with Kathryn Stamp
Kathryn Stamp shares insight into her current research interests in the areas of dance, dance in education and the wider value of dance participation. Alongside exploring her research experiences and dance advocacy work, we discuss ideas relating to researcher identity and the sense of value as a dance researcher. Kathryn offers insightful, honest and thought-provoking reflections concerning the questions she asks herself around the value of dance research and emphasises the need to bring voice to the dance sector. Kathryn is a dance research and educator, specialising in inclusive dance practice and research methods. Her interests span inclusive dance, dance in education and exploring the value and impact of dance. Kathryn graduated with an MA in Education (Distinction) from University of Brighton (2016) and holds a first-class BA (Hons) in Dance Studies from Roehampton University (2010). In 2020 Kathryn completed her PhD at C-DaRE and her AHRC-funded research focused on photography-based interventional approaches that sought to change public perceptions about disabled people who dance. Currently, Kathryn's postdoctoral research explores the lived experience of isolated working for disabled dance artists, considering modes of communication, use of technology and change in working practices in light of the COVID-19 pandemic. Kathryn is enthusiastic about transdisciplinary research and has worked for the Centre for Computational Science and Mathematical Modelling on the Energy REV project, exploring stakeholder perspectives on Energy, AI and Ethics. She is one of the project team members for Gap_E[thics], which seeks to explore the concept, understanding and practice of ethics in technological from different disciplinary perspectives. Contact details: Email: ad6869@coventry.ac.uk Twitter:  @kathrynstampy @DanceResMatters Other useful links: https://danceresearchmatters.coventry.ac.uk/ https://makinggood.design/thoughts/tasty Please share this episode with students, educators, practitioners, performers, and interdisciplinary researchers curious to learn more about dance research in action.
41:38
September 29, 2022
ResDance S2: Episode 6: Reflections on a person-centred approach in a PhD process with Louisa Petts
ResDance S2: Episode 6: Reflections on a person-centred approach in a PhD process with Louisa Petts
ResDance S2: Episode 6: Reflections on a person-centred approach in a PhD process Louisa Petts shares insight into her current PhD research at the Centre for Dance Research (C-DaRE) at Coventry University. Her research advocates for improved access to dance that is meaningful for older populations, whilst questioning whether dance genre and style offer entirely unique experiences of belonging for participants. Through discussing her PhD process, she shares the varying research approaches, methodologies and methods employed in her research and on the wider reflections she has concerning her role and positionality as a researcher. Providing honest and considered reflections on her PhD journey thus far, Louisa highlights the need for continued advocacy for a person-centred approach throughout the research process. Louisa is a PhD candidate at the Centre for Dance Research (C-DaRE) at Coventry University. She is the recipient of the Arts and Humanities Research Council studentship award offered by Midlands4Cities Doctoral Training Partnership. Louisa studied at Trinity Laban Conservatoire of Music and Dance, where she graduated with an MSc Dance Science with Distinction in 2019. Prior, Louisa studied at the University of Roehampton, achieving First Class Honours and receiving the prize for Best Dissertation in BA Dance Studies in 2018. Louisa has worked as a community dance artist delivering dance classes to those living with dementia in assisted living homes and people living with Parkinson’s. She currently works as a lecturer at De Montfort University and bbodance and is an editorial assistant for the Journal of Dance and Somatic Practices. Louisa is also part of the site-specific research project ‘The Shape of Sound’ in collaboration with artist-researcher Petra Johnson and researchers at the Centre for Dance Research (C-DaRE), which explores the embodied technologies of the human inner ear through movement practice. Contact details: Email: pettsl@coventry.ac.uk Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/lou_petts/?hl=en LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/louisa-petts-1702/ Resource links: Petts, L. & Urmston, E. (2022) 'An exploration into      the experience of family caregivers for people living with dementia in a      community dance class', Research in Dance      Education,23(1),126-141, DOI:10.1080/14647893.2021.1993175 Seim, J. (2021) ‘Participant Observation, Observant      Participation, and Hybrid Ethnography’, Sociological Methods &      Research. DOI: 10.1177/0049124120986209. Please share this episode with students, educators, practitioners, performers, and interdisciplinary researchers curious to learn more about dance research in action.
39:45
September 15, 2022
ResDance S2: Episode 5: Reflections on the research process and greater support for dancers’ mental health with Erin Sanchez
ResDance S2: Episode 5: Reflections on the research process and greater support for dancers’ mental health with Erin Sanchez
ResDance S2: Episode 5: Reflections on the research process and greater support for dancers’ mental health with Erin Sanchez Erin Sanchez shares insight into her current PhD research - in the area of dancers’ mental health and psychological skills development during the talent development process. Alongside exploring her current research, we discuss ideas relating to barriers around participant recruitment, the need for a person-centred approach in all research, ethics of care throughout the research process and a greater need for mental support within the dance sector. Erin offers insightful and honest reflections concerning her researcher journey thus far, the questions she finds herself asking herself about the dance sector and poignantly highlights the need for continued advocacy and support in the areas of mental health for dancers. Erin is the Manager of the National Institute of Dance Medicine and Science, and Manager of Health, Wellbeing, and Performance at One Dance UK. Erin holds a BA (Hons) in Dance and Sociology from the University of New Mexico and an MSc in Dance Science from Trinity Laban Conservatoire of Music and Dance in London. She is currently pursuing her PhD in Sport, Physical Education, and Health Sciences from the University of Edinburgh investigating the nature, development and deployment of psychological skills in the pursuit and attainment of high performance in dance. Erin is a registered provider for Safe in Dance International, a member of the International Association for Dance Medicine and Science and holds the qualification in Safe and Effective Dance Practice. She has lectured in dance science and taught dance technique in the United States, UK, Egypt and Malta Biography: https://www.dancersmentalhealth.co.uk/about-us Contact details: Email: erin.sanchez@onedanceuk.org Instagram: @ Eirinn_sanchez (twitter) @ Eirinnsanchez (Instagram) Organisational socials: Instagram      - @onedanceuk @nidms.uk @greymattersuk Resource links: https://www.crowood.com/products/performance-psychology-for-dancers-by-erin-sanchez-dave-collins-aine-macnamara https://www.greymattersuk.com/ Please share this episode with students, educators, practitioners, performers, and interdisciplinary researchers curious to learn more about dance research in action.
34:58
August 08, 2022
ResDance S2: Episode 4: Reflections on the dancing body with James Hewison
ResDance S2: Episode 4: Reflections on the dancing body with James Hewison
ResDance S2: Episode 4 – Reflections on the dancing body with James Hewison James offers insights into his journey as a dancer, choreographer, educator and researcher, reflecting upon his training and professional experiences, and his current areas of research focus. Through discussion around his different ways of working, he shares thoughts on the role of decision making in his practice and the value of process in improvisation and creative tasks. Throughout this rich and well-considered episode, James reflects upon the questions he asks about his own dancing body. James Hewison (MA, FHEA) is a Senior Lecturer in Dance in the Department of Creative Arts at Edge Hill University. He has made, performed and toured nationally and internationally in professional dance and physical theatre work since 1991. He was a co-founder and Associate Artistic Director of Vtol Dance Company (Dir. Mark Murphy) with whom he performed from 1991 to 2000. James also has extensive international performance credits with Volcano Theatre Company with whom he has worked in a variety of creative roles since 1993. James has additionally performed with CandoCo Dance Company, Emilyn Claid, Adam Benjamin, Kirstie Simson, and Steve Kirkham, and he was a key collaborative artist and researcher in a series of practice-based and professional dance-theatre projects with Helen Bailey and Ersatz Dance from 1999 to 2010. More recently James has created solo performance work and has collaborated on new creative research projects with professional dance and circus artist, Michelle Man, resulting in a series of international performances including most recently, Luze (2017) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xtkDoJNOow0. James’s teaching expertise focuses on embodied practices in dance techniques, improvisation and composition, and performance-making and direction and he has previously worked as an External Examiner at the University of Chichester, Trinity Laban Centre London, and for London Studio Centre. Current research includes contributions to The Shakespeare and Dance Project (USA) on choreographic adaptations of The Sonnets: https://research.edgehill.ac.uk/en/publications/choreographing-the-sonnets-volcano-theatre-companys-love. He is currently leading on a place-seeking choreographic project that explores the experiences of male dancers in the North West of England, and specifically in his home town of Warrington. Email: james.hewison@edgehill.ac.uk Other links: 1) Explorations of Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi’s Flow Theory and its application to Contact Improvisation: https://research.edgehill.ac.uk/en/publications/risk-and-flow-in-contact-improvisation-pleasure-play-and-presence-2. 2) Practice-based research with Michelle Man on the work of surrealist artist and author, Leonora Carrington: https://research.edgehill.ac.uk/en/publications/imaginarium-2 3)Co-editor for the edited collection, Leonora Carrington: Living Legacies. Wilmington: Vernon Press, USA. Cox, A. Hewison, J. Man, M. Shannon, R. (2019). Please share this episode with students, educators, practitioners, performers, and interdisciplinary researchers curious to learn more about dance research in action.
38:12
July 27, 2022
 ResDance S2: Episode 3: Practices of care: autonomy of the performer with Grace Nicol and Temi Ajose Cutting
ResDance S2: Episode 3: Practices of care: autonomy of the performer with Grace Nicol and Temi Ajose Cutting
ResDance S2: Episode 3: Practices of care: themes of autonomy in the context of dance Grace Nicol and Temi Ajose Cutting offer insight into their shared experiences as artists, alongside their current research practices and interests. Through revealing their processes and ways of working, they discuss their shared interest of supporting the wellbeing and needs of dancers both inside and outside of the studio. In this open dialogue, they question the autonomy of the performer, the power dynamics of inviting people to be seen, and invite listeners to consider where power and responsibility lie within these exchanges.   In this episode, they discuss the practice-based collaborative project, Slip Mould Slippery, concerned with body, object and space relations and the power structures that exist around these ideas, exploring how to dismantle these structures through movement practice. This is supported by a new pastoral care offer where they are attempting to redefine the way choreographers work with freelance dance artists. Grace Nicol  Grace Nicol is a London-based choreographer, movement director, and activist. Her choreographic work has been shown predominantly in gallery and museum contexts in London and nationally including; London College of Fashion, Hackney Showroom, Performance Space, NN Contemporary, Tate Modern, V&A Museum, Guest Projects. She has also worked on commercial projects/film (including BBC, NTS, Chivas Regal, i-D, Christian Louboutin). She’s a visiting lecturer and provide mentoring, workshops & talks for institutions/community groups (LCDS, Dance4, AMATA, London Bubble’s Creative Homes etc). She has been featured in various media publications (Hunger, Dazed, Arts Professional). Contact details: Instagram: @gracebnciol Website: www.grace-nicol.com/ Temitope Ajose Cutting Temitope Ajose Cutting is a Bonnie Bird Choreography Award winner (2005) and has created and staged works for venues such as Royal Opera House and ROH2. She has been commissioned by The Place Prize Bloomberg, dance producer Eckhard Thiemann at Woking Dance. Her works have been performed at DanceXchange, RichMix, Dancebase in Edinburgh, Swindon Dance and the Soho Joyce (New York). As a dancer Temitope has worked with Punchdrunk, director Carrie Cracknell at The Gate Theatre and The National, Theo Clinkard and Protein Dance Company (Critally acclaimed Border Tales 2014-2018 creation of En Route 2021) Darcy Wallace at the V&A, Lea Anderson, Joe Moran, Sue Maclaine and Seke Chimutengwende and most recently Lost Dog's A Tale of Two Cities. Temitope also engages with movement direction (Old Vic and National Theatre). In addition to this she has been part of the performance team restaging Joan Jonas retrospective at the Tate Modern, working with choreographer and curator Nefeli Skarmea for artist Megan Rooney at the Serpentine Pavilion and now collaborates with Megan Rooney for her solo shows at Kunsthalle Germany and most recently the Lyon Bianale.  Temitope continues to make her own work producing a work at The Southbank in collaboration with critically acclaimed writer Jay Bernard My Name is my Own 2019 and the creation of her solo work Lady M (at home with Lady Macbeth) Choreodrome 2021. Contact details: Email: temi.group11@gmail.com Instagram: @temitope_ajosecutting 
37:51
July 12, 2022
ResDance S2: Episode 2: The Embodied Researcher with Angela Pickard
ResDance S2: Episode 2: The Embodied Researcher with Angela Pickard
ResDance S2: Episode 2: The Embodied Researcher with Professor Angela Pickard  Professor Angela Pickard shares rich insights into her research practices in Dance Education from a variety of perspectives. Reflecting upon the role qualitative methodologies play in facilitating a person-centred approach, we discuss the value of working collaboratively; the importance of longitudinal research when capturing experience and the wider role of a multifaceted approach when gaining insight into the social world in which those in the research inhabit. Through insight into her ethnographic and auto-ethnographic research approaches, she further highlights the need for a person-centred focus within a research setting. Angela is a Professor of Dance Education at Canterbury Christ Church University, where her research is focussed on dance education and performance science. She is interested in relationships between body and identity(ies) in dance and embodiment, drawing on sociology (Bourdieu), pedagogy and psychology. Angela is Editor in Chief for the international journal Research in Dance Education and on the Editorial board for Journal of Dance, Medicine and Science. Contact: angela.pickard@canterbury.ac.uk Google scholar profile: https://scholar.google.co.uk/citations?hl=en&user=2X-dbjIAAAAJ&view_op=list_works Please share this episode with students, educators, practitioners, performers, and interdisciplinary researchers curious to learn more about dance research in action.
42:54
July 06, 2022
ResDance S2: Episode 1 - Immersion with Thea Stanton
ResDance S2: Episode 1 - Immersion with Thea Stanton
ResDance S2: Episode 1 - Immersion with Thea Stanton Thea Stanton explores the notion of an immersive choreographic practice, reflecting upon her experiences as both a choreographer and researcher. She offers insightful and honest reflections concerning her positionally as a researcher, the role of lived experience in her research and how indigenous theory continues to inform her practice-based research. Thea is an indigenous Chilean British researcher, choreographer and teacher. She is currently a PhD candidate at the University of Chichester where she is exploring the notion of an immersive choreographic practice. Contact: theastantondance@gmail.com Website: www.theastantondance.com Instagram: @thea_tre Please share this episode with students, educators, practitioners, performers, and interdisciplinary researchers curious to learn more about dance research in action.
39:27
June 21, 2022
ResDance S1: Episode 11 The intersections between practice and philosophy with Erin Manning
ResDance S1: Episode 11 The intersections between practice and philosophy with Erin Manning
ResDance Episode 11: The intersections between practice and philosophy Dr Erin Manning offers rich insights into her experiences as a theorist, philosopher and practicing artist. Erin explores ideas around the role of experience and how we value and situate the body in society and wider practice. We also discuss theoretical ideas concerned with the relation between sensation and thought in movement and the merging of research, teaching and creation in her practice. Throughout the episode, Erin offers honest insights into her journey thus far and her current research interests in the transversality of the three ecologies, the social, the environmental and the conceptual. Dr Erin Manning is a professor in the Faculty of Fine Arts at Concordia University (Montreal, Canada). She is also the founder of SenseLab (www.senselab.ca), a laboratory that explores the intersections between art practice and philosophy through the matrix of the sensing body in movement. Erin studies in the interstices of philosophy, aesthetics and politics, concerned, always, about alter-pedagogical and alter-economic practices. 3e is the direction her current research takes - an exploration of the transversality of the three ecologies, the social, the environmental and the conceptual. An iteration of 3e is a land-based project north of Montreal where living and learning is explored. Legacies of SenseLab infuse the project, particularly the question of how collectivity is crafted in a more-than human encounter with worlds in the making. Contact details: Email: erintango@gmail.com Websites: http://www.senselab.ca http://www.erinmovement.com http://www.inflexions.org Please share this episode with students, educators, practitioners, performers, and interdisciplinary researchers curious to learn more about dance research in action.
44:19
January 13, 2022
ResDance S1: Episode 10 Embodied Inquiry with Nicole Brown and Jennifer Leigh
ResDance S1: Episode 10 Embodied Inquiry with Nicole Brown and Jennifer Leigh
ResDance Episode 10: Embodied Inquiry Dr Nicole Brown and Dr Jennifer Leigh offer insight into their shared understandings of embodiment and embodied practice. Through discussion of their research interests and the variety methods and approaches employed in their own research, they explore what an embodied approach can bring to a research project. Reflections of considerations that need to be acknowledged in research, namely reflective practice, self-acceptance and positionally are also explored. The ideas presented are drawn from principles of embodied inquiry from their recent publication: Embodied Inquiry Research Methods (Bloomsbury, 2021). Dr. Nicole Brown Dr Nicole Brown is Director of Social Research & Practice and Education Ltd and Associate Professor at UCL Institute of Education. Nicole’s research interests relate to physical and material representations of experiences, the generation of knowledge and use of metaphors to express what is difficult to express, and more generally, research methods and approaches to explore identity and body work. Her books include Lived Experiences of Ableism in Academia: Strategies for Inclusion in Higher Education, Ableism in Academia: Theorising Experiences of Disabilities and Chronic Illnesses in Higher Education, Embodied Inquiry: Research Methods, and Making the Most of Your Research Journal.  Email: nicole.brown@ucl.ac.uk Website: https://www.nicole-brown.co.uk/ Twitter: @ncjbrown @AbleismAcademia Dr. Jennifer Leigh Dr Jennifer Leigh initially trained as a chemist and somatic movement therapist before completing her doctorate in education at the University of Birmingham (2012). She is currently a Senior Lecturer in Higher Education and Academic Practice at the University of Kent (UK) where she co-chairs the Disabled Staff Network. She is Vice Chair (Research) of the International Women in Supramolecular Chemistry (WISC) network and has led on a paper setting out the ethos of calling in the community to enact change, and a forthcoming book. She has edited two books: Ableism in Academia with Nicole Brown, and Conversations on Embodiment. This year she co-authored Embodied Inquiry with Nicole Brown. Her research interests include marginalisation in academia, academic practice, academic development, and ableism as well as phenomenological and creative research methods in higher education and other applications. Email: j.s.leigh@kent.ac.uk Twitter: @drschniff @SupraChem @SupraLab1
51:20
January 11, 2022
ResDance S1: Episode 9 Collaborative ways of working with Rosa Cisneros
ResDance S1: Episode 9 Collaborative ways of working with Rosa Cisneros
ResDance Episode 9: Collaborative ways of working  Dr Rosa Cisneros discusses her methodology for collaborative and interdisciplinary modes of working when exploring lived experience. Alongside sharing her processes for creating work, Rosa provides insights on the principles that inform her practice and the wider communities she participates with. Lastly, Rosa shares honest reflections on her positionally and the role her cultural heritage plays in her research and practice. Rosa is an Artist and Researcher at Coventry University’s Centre for Dance Research (C-DaRE) and is Principle Investigator at Coventry University for the WEAVE project. Rosa is a film maker, activist and dancer who works closely with many NGOs and public social services. She is involved in and leading various EU-funded projects which aim to make education accessible to vulnerable groups and ethnic minorities, and part of cultural heritage projects that bring dance and digital technologies together. Please share this episode with students, educators, practitioners, performers, and interdisciplinary researchers curious to learn more about dance research in action. Contact details:  Email: ab4928@coventry.ac.uk Website: www.rosasencis.org Twitter: @RosaSenCis Yellow Couch Convos Podcast: https://soundcloud.com/user-566749993 https://pureportal.coventry.ac.uk/en/persons/rosamaria-kostic-cisneros
31:23
January 06, 2022
ResDance S1: Episode 8 Dancing across Screen and in Popular Performance with Sherril Dodds
ResDance S1: Episode 8 Dancing across Screen and in Popular Performance with Sherril Dodds
ResDance Episode 8: Dancing across Screen and in Popular Performance Professor Sherril Dodds shares insight into the methodologies and methods she uses in her research and draws upon themes from screen dance, popular dance, ethnography and textual/ screen dance analysis. In this thought-provoking episode, Sherril discusses her first-hand insight into being an active b-girl in the Philadelphia breaking scene and how these rich experiences continue to inform her wider practice and places her identity as a person, along that of a researcher, at the fore. Lastly, we discuss research for her latest book, Facial Choreographies: Performing the Face in Popular Dance (under contract with Oxford University Press). Sherril is a Professor of Dance and Graduate Programs Coordinator at Temple University. Her books include Dance on Screen (2001), Dancing on the Canon (2011), Bodies of Sound (co-edited with Susan C. Cook, 2014), The Oxford Handbook of Dance and Competition (2019) and The Bloomsbury Companion to Dance Studies (2019). Her latest book, Facial Choreographies: Performing the Face in Popular Dance is under contract with Oxford University Press. She has been a visiting scholar at Trondheim University in Norway, Griffith University in Australia, Stanford University in the USA, and Blaise-Pascal University in France. She was awarded the 2015 Gertrude Lippincott prize for her article, “The Choreographic Interface: Dancing Facial Expression in Hip Hop and Neo-burlesque Striptease.” She is an active b-girl in the Philadelphia breaking scene. Please share this episode with students, educators, practitioners, performers, and interdisciplinary researchers curious to learn more about dance research in action. Contact: sherril.dodds@temple.edu Staff Profile: https://boyer.temple.edu/about/faculty-staff/sherril-dodds-tue43481 Instagram: @sherrildodds Facebook: @sherrildodds
48:30
December 23, 2021
ResDance S1: Episode 7 Documentation and digital tools in dance research with Rebecca Stancliffe
ResDance S1: Episode 7 Documentation and digital tools in dance research with Rebecca Stancliffe
Dr Rebecca Stancliffe shares insight into the philosophy of technology (technological phenomenology) to consider our relationship to the tools and technologies with which we interact and the analysis and documentation of dance. Sharing her current thinking into how the performing arts ‘sit’ in online spaces, we discuss the translation of knowledge and experience and different ways of seeing. Lastly, Rebecca discusses her thinking, interests and research ideas around participatory arts. Rebecca is a Postdoctoral Research Fellow (Arts and Community) at Trinity Laban Conservatoire of Music and Dance where her evaluation and research activity focuses on participatory arts, arts and health, collaboration, and digital methods in dance.  Alongside her research, Rebecca teaches on the BA Contemporary Dance, BSc Dance Science, MA Performance, MA/MFA Dance Science, and Graduate Diploma programmes at Trinity Laban. Please share this episode with students, educators, practitioners, performers, and interdisciplinary researchers curious to learn more about dance research in action. Contact: R.Stancliffe@trinitylaban.ac.uk Staff Profile: https://www.trinitylaban.ac.uk/study/teaching-staff/dr-rebecca-stancliffe/ Twitter: @r_stancliffe Recent Publications: Chappell, K., Redding, E., Crickmay, U., Stancliffe, R., Jobbins, V., & Smith, S. (2021) The aesthetic, artistic and creative contributions of dance for health and wellbeing across the lifecourse: A systematic review. International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Wellbeing 16(1)https://doi.org/10.1080/17482631.2021.1950891 deLahunta, S., Rittershaus, D., & Stancliffe, R. (2021) Editorial.International Journal of Performance Arts and Digital Media 17(1), 1-6 https://doi.org/10.1080/14794713.2021.1893001 Stancliffe, R. (2021) Differentiating (an)notation practices: An artist-scholar's observations.InternationalJournalof Performance Arts and Digital Media 17(1), 69-85https://doi.org/10.1080/14794713.2021.1885190 Stancliffe, R. (in press) Mediating experience: Online community arts participation, a postphenomenological framing. Bissell, L., & Weir, L. (Eds.) Performance in a pandemic. Routledge Stancliffe, R. (2019) Training the analytical eye: video annotation for dance. Theatre, Dance and Performance Training 10(2), 273-288 https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/19443927.2019.1610039
39:54
December 16, 2021
ResDance S1: Episode 6 Reflections on interdisciplinary methodologies with Clare Parfitt
ResDance S1: Episode 6 Reflections on interdisciplinary methodologies with Clare Parfitt
Dr Clare Parfitt shares with listeners the role of methodologies in her research and reflects upon journey as a researcher. Clare offers honest reflections concerning the translation of different ways of thinking and the potential challenges when asking questions from varying points of view. A thought-provoking episode that puts the researcher and those concerned with the research at the fore. Clare is an interdisciplinary dance scholar working between popular dance studies, memory studies and Atlantic studies. At the University of Chichester she has been a Reader in Popular Dance, an AHRC Leadership Fellow, and she is currently a PhD Supervisor. Clare is Chair of PoP Moves, an international network for popular dance research, and Co-chair of the Memory Studies Association’s Performance and Memory working group. Her edited collection, Cultural Memory in Popular Dance: Dancing to remember, dancing to forget, is due to be published in October 2021 (Palgrave), and she is working on a monograph Remembering the Cancan: Popular dance and the kinetics of memory between France and the Atlantic world (OUP). Contact: c.parfitt@chi.ac.uk Please share this episode with students, educators, practitioners, performers, and interdisciplinary researchers curious to learn more about dance research in action.
43:07
September 10, 2021
ResDance S1: Episode 5 Dance Health Research: A person-centred approach with Ashley McGill
ResDance S1: Episode 5 Dance Health Research: A person-centred approach with Ashley McGill
Dr Ashley McGill discusses her PhD research investigating the experience of dancing with Parkinson’s (The University of Roehampton and the English National Ballet). Alongside sharing key findings from her research, she questions the role of randomised controlled research designs (RCT) and the wider applicability of research approaches and methods to dance for health research. Ashley poses thought-provoking questions concerning the importance of acknowledging contextual factors and the need for a more person-centred approach in dance for Parkinson’s research. Weblink for Dance for Parkinson's research and publications: http://roehamptondance.com/parkinsons/articles/ Ashley is a visiting lecturer and researcher in Dance and Dance Science at University of Roehampton. Her research interests include the health and wellbeing impact of dance and how dance can benefit people with Parkinson’s. Contact: Ashley.McGill10@roehampton.ac.uk Please share this episode with students, educators, practitioners, performers, and interdisciplinary researchers curious to learn more about dance research in action.
39:52
August 28, 2021
ResDance S1: Episode 4 Dance Health Research with Bethany Whiteside
ResDance S1: Episode 4 Dance Health Research with Bethany Whiteside
Dr Bethany Whiteside shares her experiences and insights of Dance Health Research, with a particular focus on the Engagement work of Scottish Ballet. In this thought-provoking episode we discuss the use of methodologies when capturing lived experiences and highlight the need for a person-centred focus within a research setting. Bethany is a Research Lecturer and Doctoral Degrees Coordinator at the Royal Conservatoire of Scotland. Since 2015, her research and knowledge exchange activity has been closely tied to the Engagement work of Scottish Ballet, Scotland’s national dance company. Contact: B.Whiteside@rcs.ac.uk  Social Media: @bethjwhiteside  Staff Profile: https://pure.rcs.ac.uk/portal/en/persons/bethany-whiteside(cbad9dfc-8171-4c7d-bc2e-f803dac9b2ad).html Please share this episode with students, educators, practitioners, performers, and interdisciplinary researchers curious to learn more about dance research in action.
47:37
August 12, 2021
ResDance S1: Episode 3 Evolving methods in dance research with Imogen Aujla
ResDance S1: Episode 3 Evolving methods in dance research with Imogen Aujla
Dr Imogen Aujla shares insight into the methodologies and methods she uses in research and reflects upon the methodological decisions she takes as a researcher. We discuss the importance of giving participants a voice in a research setting and the role that a mixed methods approach can play in gaining further insight into phenomena. Imogen is a Senior Lecturer in Dance and Dance Science at the University of Bedfordshire. Her research interests include dance psychology, the health and wellbeing impact of dance, and talent identification and development in dance, particularly in inclusive contexts. Contact: imogen.aujla@beds.ac.uk
43:24
August 01, 2021
ResDance S1: Episode 2: Choreographing and Performing with outdoor site with Virginia Farman
ResDance S1: Episode 2: Choreographing and Performing with outdoor site with Virginia Farman
Virginia Farman discusses the methodological approaches used when creating work and shares insight into her current PhD practice.  We discuss the challenges researchers face during the research process and consider how dancers can reveal a vulnerability and understanding of a place. Virginia is an artist- researcher and senior lecturer in dance and choreography at the University of Chichester. Her work is most usually associated with directing across a range of non-theatre locations and diverse situations. Virginia’s current PhD research draws on a portfolio of productions that use, dance, choreographic compositional and somatic practices, to cultivate dynamic exchanges between dancers and outdoor environments. Contact: v.farman@chi.ac.uk Links to recent works: https://vimeo.com/user45294792 Social Media: @vfarman1 Please share this episode with students, educators, practitioners, performers, and interdisciplinary researchers curious to learn more about dance research in action.
45:26
July 20, 2021
 ResDance S1: Episode 1 Researching Site Dance with Victoria Hunter
ResDance S1: Episode 1 Researching Site Dance with Victoria Hunter
Series 1 - Episode 1: Researching Site Dance with Dr Vicky Hunter Vicky Hunter discusses her own methodology for site-based body practice as a mode of exploring site synergies. Alongside sharing her processes for creating work, Vicky shares insights on the theoretical frameworks that more widely inform her practice-based research.   Please share this episode with students, educators, practitioners, performers, and interdisciplinary researchers curious to learn more about dance research in action. About Vicky  Vicky is a Practitioner-Researcher and Reader in Site Dance and Choreography at the University of Chichester.  Contact: v.hunter@chi.ac.uk Website: https://vickyhunter.weebly.com  Staff Profile: https://www.chi.ac.uk/staff/dr-victoria-hunter Academia.edu address: https://chi.academia.edu/VictoriaHunter Recent Publications Monograph publication 'Site, Dance and Body: Movement, Materials and Corporeal Engagement' (2021) is now available from Palgrave, follow this link: click here Special Edition of Choreographic Practices journal (co editor) on 'Dancing Urbanisms': https://www.ingentaconnect.com/contentone/intellect/chor/2019/00000010/00000001/art00001  Co authored book publication with Karen Barbour and Melanie Kloetzel on site dance follow this link: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Positioning-Site-Dance-Global-Perspectives/dp/1783209984 For details of edited volume Moving Sites: Investigating Site-Specific Dance Performance follow this link: http://www.amazon.co.uk/Moving-Sites-Investigating-Site-Specific-Performance/dp/0415713250/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1430142634&sr=1-1&keywords=moving+sites
44:54
June 30, 2021