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St. John's College (Annapolis) Lectures

St. John's College (Annapolis) Lectures

By Greenfield Library
Recordings of lectures from St. John's College's Annapolis campus. The recordings include lectures in the Formal Lecture Series, Graduate Institute Wednesday Night Lecture Series, and the annual Erik S. Kristensen Memorial Lecture. The recordings are also available on the College's Digital Archives where you'll find many more lectures not yet available here.
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At the Crossroads of the Cave: Plato and Heidegger on History and Nihilism (Gregory Fried)

St. John's College (Annapolis) Lectures

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On the Discovery of Deductive Science (Curtis Wilson)
Recording of a lecture given on September 14, 1973, by Curtis Wilson as part of the Formal Lecture Series.
01:16:51
September 30, 2022
Recognizing Odysseus (Margaret Kirby)
Recording of a lecture delivered on September 22, 2017, by Margaret Kirby as part of the Formal Lecture Series.
56:53
September 28, 2022
The Ten Commandments (Leon Kass)
Recording of a lecture delivered on September 30, 2016, by Leon Kass as part of the Formal Lecture Series. Kass describes his lecture as, "a close examination and fresh interpretation of the Biblical text (Exodus 20)."
01:03:53
September 27, 2022
Moments in the Liberal Education of Frederick Douglass from My Bondage and My Freedom (Joseph Macfarland)
Recording of a lecture delivered on August 26, 2022, by Joseph Macfarland as part of the Formal Lecture Series. The lecture is the first of the academic year, previously referred to as the "Dean's Lecture", but now called the "Christopher B. Nelson Lecture".
56:11
September 22, 2022
Becoming (A) Woman in La Princesse de Clèves (Patricia Locke)
Recording of a lecture delivered by Patricia Locke, Annapolis tutor on October 2, 2020, as part of the Formal Lecture Series. Ms. Locke describes her lecture: "Madame de Lafayette’s book, La Princesse de Clèves, is one of the earliest novels of psychological realism, while at the same time it offers us an idealized description of an historical milieu. Our protagonist must wend her way through the Valois court, find Mr. Right, and become (a) woman in order to deal with the twin challenges of love and death. I argue that Simone de Beauvoir’s famous sentence, 'one is not born, but becomes, woman,' is tested in this novel. Will young Mlle de Chartres learn how to be 'woman' through her education? Or will she be able to transcend her education through her experience of the passions of jealousy, fear, and grief to become 'a woman' of inimitable virtue?"
55:10
September 20, 2022
Perceptual and Deliberative Imagination in Aristotle’s De Anima (Jason Tipton)
Recording of the National Endowment for the Humanities lecture delivered on April 22, 2022, by Annapolis tutor Jason Tipton as part of the Formal Lecture Series. Mr. Tipton describes his lecture: "Many animals, Aristotle claims, live by imagination.  In an important way, we can understand that imagination is the product of the process of perception and the condition for noetic activity.  It is both an end and a beginning.  Imagination is proto-cognitive and supra perceptual.  The task will be to disentangle imagination from perception and understanding so that we might see the proper unities that come to be."
01:02:03
September 16, 2022
Martin Delany, Frederick Douglass, and the Danger of Political Pessimism (Melvin Rogers)
Recording of a lecture delivered on November 19, 2021, by Melvin Rogers as part of the Formal Lecture Series. Professor Rogers is an Associate Professor of Political Science and the Director of Graduate Studies of Political Science at Brown University.  His current book project is The Darkened Light of Faith: Race, Democracy, and Freedom in African American Political Thought. Professor Rogers describes his lecture: "'One of the fundamental paradoxes of black politics,' writes Barnor Hesse and Juliet Hooker, is 'the invariable futility of directing activism toward a racially governing regime historically founded on the constitutive exclusion and violation of blackness.' This paradox raises a fundamental question: How can African Americans appeal to the nation in the name of freedom and equal standing, if the ethical and political presuppositions of the polity turn on their fundamental exclusion? Although this question animates our contemporary moment, especially with the ascendancy of Afro-pessimism, this essay recovers its initial articulation as well as pessimistic response from the 19th century African American nationalist Martin Delany. And it seeks to distill from Delany’s counterpart, Frederick Douglass, an alternative vision that both resist the paradox and the political logic that gives it shape.
57:47
September 14, 2022
Gender, Intersectionality, and Marx’s Value Theory (Sarah Vitale)
Recording of a lecture delivered on October 29, 2021, by Sarah Vitale as part of the Formal Lecture Series. Dr. Vitale is Assistant Professor of Philosophy and Co-Editor of Radical Philosophy Review at Ball State University. Dr. Vitale describes her lecture: “Marxist feminists have approached the question of what comes first – patriarchy or capitalism – in many ways, but there are two main threads: dual systems theories and single systems theories. In the first, capitalism and patriarchy are two separate systems existing alongside one another, creating different oppressions. In the other view, capitalism and patriarchy are part of the same system and cannot be understood properly apart from one another. In my presentation, I will consider one recent attempt towards a single systems theory – the intersectional feminist approach. Intersectionality, an important contribution by Black feminists to the discourse on oppression and emancipation, diagnoses an important problem. However, I will argue that to apply the intersectional approach to the relationship between capitalism and patriarchy requires a different approach to capitalism than most intersectional feminists – and perhaps most Marxists – use. I will suggest that despite the best intentions, intersectional approaches to the question of capitalism and patriarchy end up functioning as dual systems theories depending on an ahistorical notion of gender. If we want to examine and dismantle capitalism and patriarchy, we must understand how patriarchy or the gender order in capitalism is a capitalist gender order. To do so, I suggest we look to a relatively recent turn in Marxist theory called Wertkritik or value criticism, which has also made significant contributions to the conversation about gender and capital.”
43:05
September 07, 2022
Time and Nature in Lucretius' De Rerum Natura (Gisela Berns)
Recording of a lecture delivered on March 8, 1974, by Gisela Berns as part of the Formal Lecture Series.
54:21
September 02, 2022
God and Philosophy in Descartes' Meditations (Henry Higuera)
Recording of a lecture delivered on October 27, 2017, by Henry Higuera as part of the Formal Lecture Series.
59:53
August 31, 2022
"We the Heroes" or "We the People?" Leadership in the Homeric Epic (Johannes Haubold)
Recording of a lecture delivered on September 24, 2021, by Johannes Haubold as part of the Formal Lecture Series. Dr. Haubold is a Professor of Classics at Princeton University. Dr. Haubold describes his lecture: "This lecture investigates some fundamental problems of leadership as they emerge from the Homeric epics. It asks what happens when heroic leaders (Achilles, Agamemnon, Hector, Odysseus) ignore the needs of their people and end up failing them, despite their duty of care (a scenario expressed by recurring formulas in which leaders, as ‘shepherds of the people’, repeatedly and catastrophically ‘destroy the people’). The paper moreover asks whether ancient audiences in specific settings, most importantly the ancient Athenian festival of the Panathenaea, identified with epic leaders or their people.”
50:37
August 29, 2022
God and Ostriches: Queer Birds in the Book of Job (Ron Haflidson)
Recording of a lecture delivered by Ron Haflidson, Annapolis tutor, on September 25, 2020, as part of the Formal Lecture Series.  Mr. Haflidson offers this description for the lecture: "In the Book of Job, God and Job seem to disagree about ostriches. I use that disagreement as a means to explore Job’s spiritual crisis and God's response to it. This inquiry will involve numerous—often wondrous—facts about ostriches. The lecture presupposes no prior familiarity with the Book of Job (or ostriches)."
49:35
August 26, 2022
The Enduring Relevance of Thucydides’ Peloponnesian War (Jeffrey R. Macris)
Recording of a lecture delivered on April 6, 2022, by Jeffrey R. Macris as part of the LCDR Erik S. Kristensen Lecture Series. Twenty-four centuries ago the ancient Greek world erupted in a fratricidal war that pitted Athens and its allies versus Sparta and theirs. Exiled by his Athenian peers, the general Thucydides penned a history of the Peloponnesian War that drew upon eyewitness accounts and objective evidence. His quest to seek an objective truth, free from bias or national hyperbole, has earned for him the title of “father of scientific history.” Dr. Macris’ lecture, entitled “The Enduring Relevance of Thucydides’ Peloponnesian War,” explores why students of history, international affairs, and war still debate and find meaning in his work today. Dr. Macris is the Deputy Director of the Naval Academy's Stockdale Center. Previously he was a Presidential Visiting Fellow at Yale University as well as a professor in the Naval Academy’s History Department where he earned the 2016 Military Professor of the Year Award. He has published several academic articles as well as two books on the Great Powers of the Middle East. The lecture is part of a joint lectures series between St. John's College and the U.S. Naval Academy to honor the memory of Lieutenant Commander Erik S. Kristensen. An alumnus of the United States Naval Academy and the St. John's College Graduate Institute, Kristensen, a Navy SEAL, was killed in the line of duty in Afghanistan in 2005. This lecture series aims to create even greater ties between the two schools, as well as to educate the public about civil-military relations and the place of the liberal arts in the education of naval and military professionals.
30:33
August 24, 2022
Teaching Poetry, Revelation, Mathematics, and Respect for Truth (Ted Hadzi-Antich)
Recording of a lecture delivered on July 8, 2020, by Ted Hadzi-Antich as part of the Graduate Institute Summer Lecture Series. Ted Hadzi-Antich, chair of the political science department at Austin Community College, presents a talk about teaching the first book of Euclid’s Elements in the context of other works studied in the Great Questions seminar. This lecture includes some animated presentations of Euclid propositions, including 1.47.
01:26:57
August 22, 2022
Johann Sebastian Bach and The Six Suites for Cello Solo - A Fanciful and Extravagant Allegory (Steven Hancoff)
Audio recording of a lecture delivered on April 21, 2017, by Steven Hancoff as part of the Formal Lecture Series.
01:10:18
August 19, 2022
The Meaning of Rome (Michael Grenke)
Audio recording of a lecture delivered on December 2, 2016, by Michael Grenke as part of the Formal Lecture Series.   Mr. Grenke describes his lecture: "Shakespeare's Cymbeline has at its center a love story.  Two young lovers marry without permission and against conventional expectations.  The young lovers vow fidelity, as in many marriages, and profess themselves and their affections to be each other's exclusive property.  This vow is challenged by a deceitful Italian, named Iachimo, who manufactures the appearance of infidelity.  Remarkably, this Othello-like plot does not end in tragedy.  Instead what ensues in this besieged love affair and in the surrounding events, which include an attempt by Britain to free itself from Roman rule, can be taken as a deep rumination on the possibilities and limits of human possession."
01:13:30
August 17, 2022
Why We Should (Still) Read Beauvoir (Rebecca Goldner)
Recording of a lecture delivered on July 5, 2017, by Rebecca Goldner as part of the Graduate Institute Summer Lecture Series. Ms. Goldner is a tutor at St. John's College in Annapolis. Her talk is about the importance and relevance of the work of Simone de Beauvoir. In particular, her talk focuses on de Beauvoir's seminal work The Second Sex and the perennial questions it asks. From what it means to be a woman, to how this question impacts debates over subject and objectivity, and the way in which we practice the liberal arts, Ms. Goldner's talk places these questions in the context of de Beauvoir's work and shows their relevance for the past and future of liberal education.
47:24
August 15, 2022
America and Russia in the Information Environment: How to Survive in Today’s Social Media Battlefield (David Gioe)
Recording of a lecture delivered on April 21, 2021, by Dr. David V. Gioe as part of the LCDR Erik S. Kristensen Lecture Series. David Gioe is an Assistant Professor of History at the U.S. Military Academy at West Point, a History Fellow for the Army Cyber Institute, and, currently, a Visiting Senior Research Fellow in the Department of War Studies, King’s College, London. In his Global Professorship at King’s College, he is examining why and how state intelligence services have harnessed emerging technologies – social media platforms in particular – to shape the information environment for strategic ends. This interdisciplinary project applies intelligence history, strategic studies and technological perspectives to evaluate and to counter influence operations that seek to advance state security interests in an asymmetric manner short of war. Gioe was an intelligence officer, serving as a counterterrorism analyst and serving multiple overseas tours as an operations officer. His articles have appeared in The Washington Post, The Washington Times, The National Interest, and Foreign Policy. The lecture is part of a joint lectures series between St. John's College and the U.S. Naval Academy to honor the memory of Lieutenant Commander Erik S. Kristensen. An alumnus of the United States Naval Academy and the St. John's College Graduate Institute, Kristensen, a Navy SEAL, was killed in the line of duty in Afghanistan in 2005. This lecture series aims to create even greater ties between the two schools, as well as to educate the public about civil-military relations and the place of the liberal arts in the education of naval and military professions.
47:51
August 12, 2022
At the Crossroads of the Cave: Plato and Heidegger on History and Nihilism (Gregory Fried)
Audio recording of a lecture delivered on November 17, 2017, by Gregory Fried as part of the Formal Lecture Series.
01:01:16
August 10, 2022
Aristotle on the Impossibility of Defining Life (Christopher Frey)
Recording of a lecture delivered on October 1, 2021, by Christopher Frey as part of the Formal Lecture Series. Dr. Frey is an Associate Professor in the Philosophy Department at the University of South Carolina. Dr. Frey describes his lecture: "What unites the millions of biological species that populate our universe and sets them apart from its inanimate remainder? Why should we consider activities as diverse as an amoeba dividing, a saffron crocus blooming, a Bengal tiger stalking its prey, and a human contemplating the heavens to be manifestations of a single thing, namely, life? This is one of the central questions Aristotle confronts in De Anima. He attempts to answer it in a familiar way: he provides a definition of life’s principle—the soul. But he is pessimistic about his purported definition’s adequacy. Life, Aristotle insists, cannot be defined properly. By his own lights, this renders any attempt to define soul, including his own, “foolish.” But what is it about life that makes definition impossible? And if we cannot define life, is there any unity at all to be found in the remarkable variety of ways that organisms pursue their lives?”
53:05
August 08, 2022
Reading and Teaching the Constitution (Steve Steinbach)
Recording of a lecture delivered on June 29, 2022, by Steve Steinbach as part of the Graduate Institute Summer Lecture Series. Mr. Steinbach was a partner at a law firm in Washington D.C before leaving the legal profession for teaching. He is now the chair of the History department at Sidwell Friends, and is the author of With Liberty and Justice for All?: The Constitution in the Classroom. Mr. Steinbach describes his talk: "Is the Constitution of the United States a 'great book' in the St. John’s tradition? How might the document be read, taught, and understood intelligently, whether in the nation’s classrooms or our wider civic discourse? The lecture will explore the Constitution’s continuing relevance by focusing in part on two critical 'constitutional moments' from the past: the Alien and Sedition Acts controversy and the Dred Scott case."
37:60
July 26, 2022
Looking in Freshman Lab II – Measurement and Equilibrium: How Measuring, Weighing, and Counterbalancing Can Inspire Us to Look at Things Differently (Robert Druecker)
Video recording of two lectures delivered on February 25 and 26, 2022, by Annapolis tutor Robert Druecker as part of the Formal Lecture Series. The lectures are the second in a three-part series on Freshman Lab. Druecker describes his lectures: "This will be the second in a series of lectures for freshman on ways of looking they encounter in Freshman Laboratory. In the second segment of the class, the students are invited, in various ways, to consider the mathematization of nature. They may come to see certain phenomena as μαθήματα, that is, as objects of study leading to acts of insight. While they also investigate these phenomena empirically, our question in the lecture will be whether they can be viewed in ways that lead to insight. The phenomena considered at the beginning— the characteristics of length and heaviness and various sorts of equilibrium—may introduce the students to some new ways of looking. The lecture will highlight those ways. Questions: Are they new in your experience? Are they helpful in learning from your studies in the lab?”
01:19:28
July 18, 2022
It’s Just Talking: Legal Advocacy and the Vital Role of Listening (Gabriela Quercia Kahrl)
Video recording of a lecture delivered on July 6, 2022, by Gabriela Quercia Kahrl as part of the Graduate Institute Summer Lecture Series.   Ms. Kahrl is the Associate Director of the Chacon Center for Immigrant Justice at the University of Maryland Carey School of Law.   As part of the partnership between the Annapolis Graduate Institute and the Carey School of Law, Ms. Kahrl  speaks about liberal education and the role of listening in legal advocacy, reflecting on the nature of conversations, oral advocacy as a kind of conversation, and why and how listening is a vital legal skill. Her lecture draws from texts/authors, including Simone Weil, the Bible, and Plato, and includes examples of legal practice. 
36:50
July 15, 2022
Looking in Freshman Lab I: A Path to Experiencing the Blossoming of Things? (Robert Druecker)
Video recording of two lectures delivered by Robert Druecker, Annapolis tutor on September 11 and 12, 2020, as part of the Formal Lecture Series. The lectures are the first in a three-part series on Freshman Lab. Mr. Druecker describes the lectures: "Part One gives a sense both of what students at the beginning of Freshman Laboratory read about looking at plants and of how they look at trees and other plants. Part Two considers one 'Big Picture' that they might paint, if they follow the guiding thread of the impulse-to-sprout, encountered in those first few classes."
01:38:48
July 14, 2022
Patriotism in the 21st Century (Seth Cropsey)
Audio recording of a lecture delivered on April 13, 2016, by Seth Cropsey as part of the LCDR Erik S. Kristensen Lecture Series. The lecture is the first in a newly established joint lectures series between St. John's College and the U.S. Naval Academy to honor the memory of Lieutenant Commander Erik S. Kristensen. An alumnus of the United States Naval Academy and the St. John's College Graduate Institute, Kristensen, a Navy SEAL, was killed in the line of duty in Afghanistan in 2005. This lecture series aims to create even greater ties between the two schools, as well as to educate the public about civil-military relations and the place of the liberal arts in the education of naval and military professions.
58:20
July 12, 2022
Who Should Elect the President? (Steven Crockett)
Audio recording of a lecture delivered on September 16, 2016, by Steven Crockett as part of the Formal Lecture Series.
50:58
July 11, 2022
Augustine on the Foundations of Christian Political Thought (Daniel Burns)
Audio recording of a lecture delivered by Daniel Burns on January 25, 2019, as part of the Formal Lecture Series.
50:60
July 08, 2022
Insane Emotions? (Agnes Callard)
Audio recording of a lecture delivered by Agness Callard on January 11, 2019, as part of the Formal Lecture Series.
51:41
July 07, 2022
Does a Single Photon Exist? (Chester Burke)
Audio recording of a lecture delivered on March 24, 2017, by Chester Burke as part of the Formal Lecture Series. Mr. Burke describes his lecture: "In The Assayer (1623), Galileo Galilei famously proclaimed that 'Philosophy is written in this grand book, the universe, which stands continually open to our gaze.' In this lecture, I propose to consider this statement from the perspective of the history of the book. In examining early modern learning as a bookish enterprise, we come to see the sciences as active, interventionist processes through which knowledge about the world was constructed, book and pen in hand."
58:37
July 06, 2022
Euclid as Teacher (William Braithwaite)
Audio recording of a lecture delivered on July 10, 2019, by William Braithwaite as part of the Graduate Institute Summer Lecture Series. Mr. Braithwaite is a tutor at St. John's College, Annapolis. His talk centers on Euclid's role as an educator not just of mathematics but also of life. In particular, Braithwaite examines the ways in which Euclid's mathematical reasoning has applicability outside of what would be traditionally thought. Using examples from Mark Twain, Abraham Lincoln, and others, this talk deepens an understanding of Euclid as a teacher of logic, mathematics, and life.
56:29
July 05, 2022
Given and Giving: Hegel and Heidegger on the Work of Art (Brendan Boyle)
Audio recording of a lecture delivered by Brendan Boyle on February 22, 2019, as part of the Formal Lecture Series. The beginning of the lecture was not recorded.  
53:19
July 01, 2022
Nietzsche contra Wagner, Wagner contra Nietzsche (Karol Berger)
Audio recording of a lecture delivered by Karol Berger on February 15, 2019, as part of the Formal Lecture Series.
54:27
June 30, 2022
Learning, Knowing, and Remembering in a Digital World (Naomi Baron)
Audio recording of a lecture delivered on July 26, 2017, by Naomi Baron as part of the Graduate Institute Summer Lecture Series.
53:50
June 29, 2022
The Horses of Achilles (Robert Abbott)
Audio recording of a lecture delivered on September 9, 2016, by Robert Charles Abbott, Jr. as part of the Formal Lecture Series.
50:21
June 28, 2022
Poverty in America (Chris Arnade)
Video recording of a lecture delivered by Chris Arnade, Ph.D. on October 30, 2020, as part of the Formal Lecture Series. Dr. Arnade describes his lecture: "What costs do current political and economic forces impose on the worst off among us? We often hear of a divide between 'elites' and 'ordinary people,' but in what does this divide consist? Who are the leaders, and what guides their thinking? Who is left behind, and how do they describe their circumstances? Do ambition and achievement also leave behind certain forms of meaning and dignity? How are the current states of inequality created and preserved, and how are they harmful? How can and should voices from 'the back row' affect us?" Dr. Arnade left his career on Wall Street in 2008 and spent several years traveling in order to interview, photograph, and listen to poor communities around the US. He now works as a writer and photographer covering addiction and poverty in America. He is also the author of Dignity: Seeking Respect in Back Row America. The lecture is introduced by Joe Macfarland.
50:36
June 27, 2022
Jerusalem and Athens: The Family Drama in the Bible and Greek Thought (Ronna Burger)
Audio recording of a lecture delivered by Ronna Burger, Professor of Philosophy at Tulane University, on November 8, 2019, as part of the Formal Lecture Series. Burger describes her lecture topic as follows: "The family is a central concern for the Bible as well as for Greek poetry and philosophy. But there seems to be an important difference in the problem on which each tradition focuses. The dominant theme of the Book of Genesis is the rivalry of brothers (or sisters)—from Cain's fratricide to the attempted fratricide by Joseph's brothers. In Greek thought, on the other hand, the dominant theme is the “Oedipal” relationship of the son to the father (and mother)—from Hesiod's Theogony to Aristophanes' Clouds, Plato's Euthyphro and the tyrannical soul in Book IX of the Republic, with its allusion to Sophocles’ Oedipus Tyrannus. What is the significance of these differing perspectives on the principal problem of the family? Does the contrast shed light on the larger issue of Jerusalem and Athens?" Burger is introduced by Tutor Jason Tipton.
01:10:08
June 24, 2022
The Natural Law of War and Peace (Angelo Codevilla)
Audio recording of a lecture delivered on April 19, 2017, by Dr. Angelo Codevilla as part of the LCDR Erik S. Kristensen Lecture Series. The lecture is part of a joint lecture series between St. John's College and the U.S. Naval Academy to honor the memory of Lieutenant Commander Erik S. Kristensen. An alumnus of the United States Naval Academy and the St. John's College Graduate Institute, Kristensen, a Navy SEAL, was killed in the line of duty in Afghanistan in 2005. This lecture series aims to create even greater ties between the two schools, as well as to educate the public about civil-military relations and the place of the liberal arts in the education of naval and military professions.
52:04
June 23, 2022
Hegel on Reason in History (Mark Alznauer)
Audio recording of a lecture delivered by Mark Alznauer, Associate Professor of Philosophy, Northwestern University, on September 20, 2019, as part of the Formal Lecture Series. Alznauer describes his lecture topic as follows: "Hegel says that the only presupposition that the philosopher brings to history is the simple thought of reason, that reason rules the world. In this lecture, I will compare Hegel’s philosophical histories (of the state, art, religion, and philosophy) to more empirical approaches, paying particular attention to the conceptual form of Hegel’s histories."
56:06
June 22, 2022
Age of Illusions: America after the Cold War (Andrew Bacevich)
Audio recording of a lecture delivered on April 26, 2019, by Andrew Bacevich as part of the LCDR Erik S. Kristensen Lecture Series. The lecture is part of a joint lecture series between St. John's College and the U.S. Naval Academy to honor the memory of Lieutenant Commander Erik S. Kristensen. An alumnus of the United States Naval Academy and the St. John's College Graduate Institute, Kristensen, a Navy SEAL, was killed in the line of duty in Afghanistan in 2005. This lecture series aims to create even greater ties between the two schools, as well as to educate the public about civil-military relations and the place of the liberal arts in the education of naval and military professions. Bacevich is Professor Emeritus of International Relations and History at Boston University.
42:57
June 22, 2022
On the Originals of Fictive Mental Images (Eva Brann)
Recording of a lecture delivered by Annapolis tutor Eva Brann on September 3, 2021, as part of the Formal Lecture Series. Ms. Brann describes her lecture: "Most people have 'mental images,' pictures and voices that don't occur through the eyes and ears but behind them. Most of these are memory images whose originals are things seen or heard in the outside world. Some, however, are inner events, imaginary images that are not copies of reality but our own inventions, for example, dreams. We call these 'images' as well. So what are they images of? What are the originals of fictive mental images? And derivatively, what are the originals of artful fictions such as epics, novels, and paintings? Of whom is Homer's Achilles the truthful portrait?"
45:12
June 06, 2022
Reading Plato’s Meno Online (William Braithwaite)
Recording of a lecture delivered on June 24, 2020, by William Braithwaite as part of the St. John's College, Annapolis Graduate Institute Summer Lecture Series. The final minute of the recording (beginning at 01:02:00) is in audio format only.   Mr. Braithwaite describes his lecture as follows: "Traditionally serving to introduce the study of Plato’s two dozen dialogues, the Meno raises questions about what virtue is and how it is acquired, about what knowledge is—both in itself and in relation to opinion, and about how teaching and learning are connected. I will offer a preliminary, or serious beginner’s, reading of the dialogue, with a view to opening one path to these questions: What are the conditions Plato suggests as ideal or best, indispensable or useful, for learning and teaching? How, and to what extent, are these conditions affected by the differences between face-to-face student-teacher meetings, and meetings among geographically-dispersed teachers and students, mediated by an electronic screen? What sort of community is an 'on-line' community?"
01:03:39
May 31, 2022