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The Hidden Curriculum

The Hidden Curriculum

By Hidden Curriculum
The Hidden Curriculum is a podcast on all the topics you wanted to learn in (econ) graduate school. There are lots of things about the profession that you only hear if you have a great mentor or during networking opportunities. This podcast aims to help decrease that knowledge gap by bringing that information into your headphones!
Artwork by @factorintrinseco. Music by Funk O'Clock by Delicate Beats. Licensed by Premium Beat
Email: hiddencurriculumpodcast@gmail.com
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E20 - Learn about the National Economic Association with Dania Francis

The Hidden Curriculum

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E26 - Tips on mentoring undergraduate students with Jonathan Meer
In this episode we talk with Jonathan Meer on tips to mentor undergraduate students. Jonathan Meer is a University Professor for Undergraduate Teaching Excellence at A&M. He is also a Research Associate of the National Bureau of Economic Research. Jonathan's research focuses on charitable giving and the economics of education. His recent work examines whether fundraising creates new giving, the impact of the minimum wage on search effort, and how the interaction between teacher and student gender affects student performance. Jonathan teachers an online principles to 2500 students a year.  Sebastian Tello-Trillo is an Assistant Professor of Public Policy and Economics at the Frank Batten School of Leadership and Public Policy in the University of Virginia. Alex Hollingsworth is an Associate Professor of Economics at the O'Neill School of Public and Environmental Affairs in Indiana University. Show notes: During the workflow conversation Jonathan mentioned he uses todoist which is a to-do app that Sebastian also uses! Check it out here: https://todoist.com/r/sebaz88_bfprtg He also uses the service "You can book me" https://youcanbook.me, in order to schedule meeting with his students. Jonathan's recommendation of the week is to choose a particular artist for every trip you take. That is only listen to one artist during the whole trip, such that it bonds the trip with that song and may be an easier way to remember a trip! Alex's recommendation of the week is to check out Lego Grad Student. Alex recently bought the Lego grad student calendar! https://brickademics.com Sebastian's recommendation of the week is to check out AERIP. The Association for Economic Research of Indigenous Peoples is a professional association of economists, political scientists, sociologists, policy practitioners, and others who are interested in economic research related to Indigenous peoples across the globe.
44:39
July 20, 2021
E25 - How to approach service in the profession with David Slusky
Service! What is it good for? In this episode we talk with David Slusky about how to manage service as a junior person. David Slusky is an applied microeconomist. His research is on health economics labor economics and public policy. He is the De-Min and Chin-Sha Wu Associate Professor of economics at the University of Kansas, a Research Associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research and a Research fellow at IZA - Institute of Labor Economics in Bonn, Germany.  He's also Associate Chair and Director of Undergraduate Studies at KU, the founder of the Kansas Health Economics Conference, and a co-editor at the Journal of Policy Analysis & Management. Sebastian Tello-Trillo is an Assistant Professor of Public Policy and Economics at the Frank Batten School of Leadership and Public Policy in the University of Virginia. Alex Hollingsworth is an Assistant Professor of Economics at the O'Neill School of Public and Environmental Affairs in Indiana University. The matrix that we keep referring to can be found here: [Link Here] Recommendations of the week: David's first recommendation is any of the recs of the week: Harry Bosch's books, the second recommendation is the board game Mage Knight. David enjoys playing it with the whole fam! Alex recommendation of the week: if you select zoom to be optimized for two screen, you can separate the gallery window from the main screen, this can be useful if you want to separate them! Sebastian's recommendation of the week is to check out the AEA research's highlight podcast, where they interview authors of papers published in AEA journals. It's a great way to consume research!
46:33
July 13, 2021
E24 - How does an academic journal work? with Catherine Maclean
In this episode, we talk with Catherine Maclean, a co-editor for the Journal of Policy Analysis and Management (JPAM), on how a journal works? What is the hierocracy and process behind the inner workings of an academic journal? Catherine is an Associate Professor of Economics at Temple University. Professor Maclean's research uses health and labor economic theory to empirically explore the causes and consequences of substance use, mental health, insurance coverage, and labor market outcomes. Professor Maclean is a Research Associate in the Health Economics Program at the National Bureau of Economic Research and a Research Affiliate at the Institute of Labor Economics. She is a Co-Editor at the Journal of Policy Analysis and Management. Professor Maclean's research is supported by the National Institutes of Health, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, and the American Cancer Society. Sebastian Tello-Trillo is an Assistant Professor of Public Policy and Economics at the Frank Batten School of Leadership and Public Policy at the University of Virginia. Alex Hollingsworth is an Assistant Professor of Economics at the O'Neill School of Public and Environmental Affairs at Indiana University. Show Notes: Check out the "TOPS" Seminar series at this link: https://www.tobaccopolicy.org. The Tobacco Online Policy Seminar (TOPS) goal is to provide a free multidisciplinary, international forum for research using experimental or quasi-experimental variation (i.e., a well-defined counterfactual) to study nicotine-tobacco policies, with a particular interest in emerging tobacco products and modified risk tobacco products. Recommendations of the week: Catherine's recommendation of the week is to follow David Powell on Twitter. His handle is @thedavidpowell. His account is primarily lighthearted, punny jokes that relax the feed. Catherine's second recommendation is to get into legos! Alex's recommendation of the week is to have an email template to reply to emails from students' requests about classes. Make sure you have several templates that you can copy and paste when responding to emails. Sebastian's recommendation of the week is to check out JPAM's closer look a podcast on the papers published on JPAM [link here]
01:07:38
July 6, 2021
E23 A story about finding a dissertation topic with Monica Aswani
In this episode we talk with Monica Aswani on the story of how she found a dissertation topic. Dr. Monica Aswani is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Health Services Administration at the University of Alabama at Birmingham. Her research focuses on the distributional consequences of health policy related to payment/delivery reform programs, social safety net eligibility and spending, and health insurance. Sebastian Tello-Trillo is an Assistant Professor of Public Policy and Economics at the Frank Batten School of Leadership and Public Policy in the University of Virginia. Alex Hollingsworth is an Assistant Professor of Economics at the O'Neill School of Public and Environmental Affairs in Indiana University. Recommendations of the week: Monica's recommendation of the week is the book "Economization of Life" by Michelle Murphy. You can check this and all previous book's recommendations in our "Bookshop" library, this is a great way to support the podcast as well! [Link Here] Alex's recommendation of the week is to do a "semester plan". Fortunately, we show you where to start, here is a link of a template for a semester plan. [Link Here] Sebastian's recommendation of the week is to check "Econimate" by Hoai-Luu Nguyen. These are animated-videos that explain papers in a easy way to digest. It's a great way to "keep up" with a literature or to use them in class!  https://www.econimate.com or the YouTube Channel.
34:30
June 29, 2021
E22 - How to respond to referee reports with Ivan Rudik
This week we talk with Ivan Rudik and a document he has been using in order to respond to referee reports. Ivan is the  Ruth and William Morgan Assistant Professor of Applied Economics and Management at Cornell University. Ivan is an Environmental Economist with a PhD from University of Arizona who works on climate change and air pollution.  We discussed a paper on the Journal of Economic Perspective titled "How to Write an Effective Referee Report and Improve the Scientific Review Process" by Jonathan B. Berk, Campbell R. Harvey and David Hirshleifer. (link here) We talked about a document that Ivan uses to respond to referee's, you can download it here (link here) [https://github.com/hollina/template-referee-response] Ivan's recommendation of the week is the book Piranesi (Link here) Alex's recommendation of the week is to check Anki Flashcards, a great way to learn a language or any memory, driven topic! (Link here) Sebastian's recommendation of the week is to check EconBrew a list of economist who are always up to have a coffee all around the world! (Link here)
49:42
June 16, 2021
E21 - What are specifications charts? With Ariel Ortiz Bobea
This episode we talk about specification charts with Ariel Ortiz Bobea. These are charts that visually show how the baseline estimate changes across many types of model adjustments. Ariel Ortiz-Bobea. Ariel is an Assistant Professor of Applied Economics and Policy. He is an applied economist with interests in agricultural, resource and development economics. Ariel was a fellow at Resources for the Future prior to Cornell & special assistant to the minister of the environment in the Dominican Republic prior to grad school. At present, his research program is broadly focused on agricultural sustainability issues with particular emphasis on the statistical and econometric evaluation of climate change impacts on agriculture and other sectors of the economy.  To visually see what a specification chart looks like [click here]. To see AOB's thread on specification chart's and how to implement it in R [click here]. Ariel also spoke about OSWEET, the Online Summer Workshop in Environment, Energy, and Transportation (Economics) if you want more information. Find it here: http://edrub.in/osweet.html If you want to find out more about the paper that Ariel referenced in the episode [click here] Recommendations of the week: Ariel Ortiz Bobea: Comment your code! Alex Hollingsworth: for journals and professional organizations, create a password which has the name of the organization/journal in the password. That way the system is the same, it just changes by organization/journal. Sebastian Tello-Trillo: If you are looking for great images/pictures that are "free" to use. Check unsplash. It is a great source of freely-usable images.
42:26
June 7, 2021
E20 - Learn about the National Economic Association with Dania Francis
This week we talk with Dania Francis about the National Economic Association (NEA). Dania is an Assistant Professor of Economics at University of Massachusetts Boston. Her current research involves using experimental and quasi-experimental methods to identify structural causes of racial and socioeconomic academic achievement gaps. She received her doctorate from Duke University and also holds a master’s degree from Harvard University and a bachelor’s degree from Smith College. She is also a board member of the National Economics Association and a National Academies of Education/Spencer Foundation Postdoctoral Fellowship. She is also in the board of the NEA. From the NEA's site: The National Economic Association (NEA) was founded in 1969 as the Caucus of Black Economists to promote the professional lives of minorities within the profession. In addition to continuing its founding mission, the organization is particularly interested in producing and distributing knowledge of economic issues that are of exceptional interest to promoting economic growth among native and immigrant African Americans, Latinos, and other people of color. Dania has really interesting research on biases in schooling, you can find more information on her site: https://www.daniafrancis.com/research We made reference to the minority report. Which is not the movie, but a report created by CSMGEP. The Minority Report, an annual newsletter, jointly with the American Society of Hispanic Economists (ASHE) and the National Economic Association (NEA). [Link here] If you are interested in research that related to the topic of race, check out the great work put out by two journals: The Review of Black Political Economy and the Journal of Race, Economics and Uncertainty Dania's recommendation of the week is a cooking tip or maybe a cleaning tip? The tip is "Don't out FOG down the drain". FOG meaning, Fats, Oils, and Grease or anything that constitutes within that category. Sebastian's recommendation of the week is to check the YouTube Channel from Ali Abdaal. He is an MD from London and has a lot of tips on productivity. Sebastian finds his demeanor refreshing and entertaining. Alex's recommendation is to get a kitchen thermometer! A simple kitchen tool that can greatly improve your cooking! 
43:36
April 27, 2021
E19 - Tips on navigating the tenure track with a young family with Lindsey Bullinger
In this episode we talk with Lindsey Bullinger about her experience dealing with raising a child, while having a partner that works a lot!. Lindsey is n Assistant Professor in the School of Public Policy at Georgia Tech. Her research examines how public policies affect children and families’ health and well-being, especially low-income families. Lindsey has started to work on how the pandemic has affected domestic violence. She has a paper forthcoming at the American Journal of Health Economics (link here). She also wrote a piece for the Ashecon Newsletter talking about measuring domestic violence and child maltreatment (link here). Her work has been published in American Journal of Health Economics, Journal of Health Economics, Journal of Policy Analysis & Management, Review of Economics of the Household, Contemporary Economic Policy, ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, Housing Policy Debate, Children and Youth Services Review, Health Services Research, American Journal of Public Health, JAMA Pediatrics, and Maternal and Child Health Journal. It has been funded by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation, the Horowitz Foundation for Social Policy, the Spencer Foundation, and Pew Charitable Trusts. She earned my Ph.D. from Indiana University in April 2018. Sebastian Tello-Trillo is an Assistant Professor of Public Policy and Economics at the Frank Batten School of Leadership and Public Policy in the University of Virginia. Alex Hollingsworth is an Assistant Professor of Economics at the O'Neill School of Public and Environmental Affairs in Indiana University. Lindsey's recommendation is to take "work walks". This means, having your schedule "zoom-meetings" as a phone conversation in which you can walk and talk at the same time. Two birds, one-stone! Alex's recommendation of the week is the book "Statistical Rethinking", is a book that helps introduce Bayesian statistics from an intuitive way! In addition to the book, the author Richard McElreath has recorded lectures on Bayesian statistic that pair will with the book. Sebastian's recommendation of the week is the application Castro. This is an app to consume podcasts. The main feature that makes it different from others is that you can set it up as an inbox, where you decide which episodes you want to listen or not. Is a great tool when you follow several podcasts, but you don't really want to listen to all episodes.
49:18
March 9, 2021
E18 - Tips on mentoring graduate students with Trevon Logan
In this episode we talk with Trevon Logan about his workflow & tips for mentoring. Trevon is the Hazel C. Youngberg Distinguished Professor of Economics and Dean, College of Arts and Sciences at "The" Ohio State University. Trevon holds a BS from University of Wisconsin, and PhD in economics from Berkeley. He is also an NBER fellow and director of the AEA mentoring program! He currently serves on the editorial boards of Explorations in Economic History, Historical Methods and Demographic Research. Professor Logan specializes in economic history, economic demography and applied microeconomics. Sebastian Tello-Trillo is an Assistant Professor of Public Policy and Economics at the Frank Batten School of Leadership and Public Policy in the University of Virginia. Alex Hollingsworth is an Assistant Professor of Economics at the O'Neill School of Public and Environmental Affairs in Indiana University. Recommendations of the week: Trevon's recommendation of the week is try different vinegars! Lots of things to explore so why not try a different vinegar on your next stop at the supermarket Alex's recommendation is to use "issues" in Github to communicate with co-authors as oppose to emails! It almost work like chat for a specific project. Sebastian's recommendation is to add a bit of evaporated milk in your "home" ramen. Makes things more creamy. I got this tip Dr. Guanyi Yang. Second is to use the "Archive" feature in your email. Start using it now and start clearing your inbox! Archiving just puts emails in a folder and out of your inbox, so if you've dealt with something, then archive it. 
53:49
February 23, 2021
E17 - Tips on prioritizing mental and physical health with Jevay Grooms
This week we talk with Jevay Grooms. Jevay is an Assistant Professor with the Department of Economics at Howard University. She is an applied microeconomist with research areas of interests that lie at the intersection of public economics, health economics, and studies of poverty and inequality.  Sebastian Tello-Trillo is an Assistant Professor of Public Policy and Economics at the Frank Batten School of Leadership and Public Policy in the University of Virginia. Alex Hollingsworth is an Assistant Professor of Economics at the O'Neill School of Public and Environmental Affairs in Indiana University. Notes: Jevay talked about National Panel Study of COVID-19, which is a on-going survey with questions regarding how people have been affected by COVID19. Jevay has a set of papers using these data set and you can find more information about them here. She also has a piece summarizing what we know on how COVID has affected people's mental health on the Ashecon newsletter which can be found here. Finally she wanted to promote the AEA summer program. A program by the American Economic Association aimed at underrepresented people in the economics profession who are thinking about going to a PhD program in Economics but are not quite sure. This is a great program for them! Jevay's recommendation of the week is a quote from the CDC: "Be Kind to your Mind". It's a simple quote that reminds us that as we need to be kind to other people, our bodies, we also need to be kind to our minds. Keep that in mind ;). Sebastian's recommendation of the week is to think about two quotes at the same time: "Perfect is the enemy of good" and "Incremental is the enemy of the fundamental". These are two things that are always at odd with each other, specially in the policy making world. Be aware of who is making what type of argument when talking to people! Alex's recommendation of the week is to use headspace! an app that helps your with relaxation and "winding" down, specially right before going to bed. 
39:58
February 16, 2021
E16 - Tips on how to connect research and policy with Delegate Sally Hudson
In this episode we talk with Delegate Sally Hudson about her transition out of academia into public service. Sally is labor economist who studies recruiting and retention in the public sector. In addition to being a teacher and a community organizer she is also a member of the Virginia House of Delegates, representing the 57th district. She holds a PhD in Economics from MIT and a BA from Sandford. In this podcast she shared what her journey was and her take on how junior and non-juniors could start thinking about affecting policy.  Sebastian Tello-Trillo is an Assistant Professor of Public Policy and Economics at the Frank Batten School of Leadership and Public Policy in the University of Virginia. Alex Hollingsworth is an Assistant Professor of Economics at the O'Neill School of Public and Environmental Affairs in Indiana University. Recommendations of the week: Sally came in with a cooking-rec of the week and that is to put peanut sauce on pizza! Try it before you form opinions! Our second recommendation of the week is from Alex, and he recommends to try marmite as a seasoning item. Put it in your chili and let us know! Sebastian's cooking recommendation is to have hoisin sauce at home. It's somewhat sweet, deep sauce that goes with most things! Alex has another-one (cue DJ Khaled) which is to check Color Brewer 2. It's a website you can thinker with to find a combination of colors that are friendly towards individual with color-blindness. 
45:58
February 9, 2021
S1E15 -Tips on how to approach co-author relationships with Ebehi Iyoha
In this episode we talk about how to deal with co-authors as a junior person, how to divvy up labor and setting expectations. This topic was brought to us by Ebehi Iyoha. Ebehi is a PhD student  in Economics at Vanderbilt University and a Job Market Candidate this year! She studies study inter-firm networks and their impact on economic growth through firm productivity and international trade. She is also a columnist for Stears Business where she talks about the Nigerian economy (click here). Sebastian Tello-Trillo is an Assistant Professor of Public Policy and Economics at the Frank Batten School of Leadership and Public Policy in the University of Virginia. Alex Hollingsworth is an Assistant Professor of Economics at the O'Neill School of Public and Environmental Affairs in Indiana University. Shownotes: Ebehi's fun fact is that she is been participating in "NaNoWriMo" or National Novel Writing Month since 2009. This is a time in a year when people commit to writing a novel in a single month. It's a very awesome initiative and you can learn more about it on their site: https://nanowrimo.org We also talk about a book that Alex and Ebehi enjoyed called "Who Fears Death", this is a science fantasy novel by Nigerian-American writer Nnedi Okorafor. You can find this and other books we've recommended in our Bookshop "Book list". (click here) Ebehi has two recommendations of the week, first is a novel called "A Girl is a Body of Water" by Jennifer Nansubuga Makumbi. A story about a young girl who does not know much about her family history and her journey to find it. (click here) Her second recommendation of the week is to check out pandas-profiling, a python package for quick and easy exploratory data analysis. (click here) Alex's recommendation of the week is the application called Cyberduck. It's similar to filezilla and great for sharing and storing files across many devices. (click here) Sebastian's recommendation of the week is the free ebook "Publishing in the Economics Profession" by Sebastian Galiani & Ugo Panizza as editors. They have several articles on issues regarding the publishing process and it's a great resource for starting to dig into that topic. (click here)
44:34
January 5, 2021
S1E14 - Tips to prepare for online interviews and presentation with Trang Hoang
In this episode, we talk with Trang Hoang about preparing for video interviews and presentations. Trang is a Ph.D. Candidate in the Department of Economics at Vanderbilt University. She was an International Economics Ph.D. Fellow at Dartmouth College in the fall of 2019. Her areas of research include international trade, development, and applied microeconometrics. Her job market paper has received two awards: one for "Best Graduate Student Paper" in the FREIT-EIIT conference and a second one for "Best Paper in Applied Economics" from the Econometric Society Winter School at the Delhi School of Economics. You can check it out here. Sebastian Tello-Trillo is an Assistant Professor of Public Policy and Economics at the Frank Batten School of Leadership and Public Policy in the University of Virginia. Alex Hollingsworth is an Assistant Professor of Economics at the O'Neill School of Public and Environmental Affairs in Indiana University. Show notes: In this episode we talked about hardware that we use. We don't think you need to invest as much as we did, but if you want to know what we use, for microphone we use the Samson Q2U USB. For Webcam we both use the Logitech C920.  We also recommend getting some "light" whether that's coming from a ring light, or a lamp. In terms of recommendation of the week, Trang recommends getting and Apple iPad with the apple pencil. It's a pricey item but she feels she has gotten value out of it. Sebastian's recommendation is to check the application called readwise. Is an application that takes the highlights you've made on many e-books or articles and sends you an email with some of those highlights every so often. This is a great way to "remember" what you once highlighted. Alex's recommendation of the week is the paper "The Environmental Bias of Trade Policy" by Joseph S. Shapiro. Here the abstract of that article: "This paper describes a new fact, then analyzes its causes and consequences: in most countries, import tariffs and non-tariff barriers are substantially lower on dirty than on clean industries, where an industry's “dirtiness” is defined as its carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions per dollar of output. This difference in trade policy creates a global implicit subsidy to CO2 emissions in internationally traded goods and so contributes to climate change. This global implicit subsidy to CO2 emissions totals several hundred billion dollars annually. The greater protection of downstream industries, which are relatively clean, substantially accounts for this pattern. The downstream pattern can be explained by theories where industries lobby for low tariffs on their inputs but final consumers are poorly organized. A quantitative general equilibrium model suggests that if countries applied similar trade policies to clean and dirty goods, global CO2 emissions would decrease and global real income would change little." (Click here)
35:49
December 24, 2020
S1E13 - Tips to keep in mind while in graduate school with Marianne Bitler
In this episode we talk with Marianne Bitler on general tips to keep in mind while in graduate school. Marianne Bitler is a Professor of Economics at UC Davis. She is an applied microeconomist whose line of work lies within public economics, health economics and labor economics. She has also worked at UC Irvine, the Public Policy Institute of California, the RAND Corporation, the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve, and the Federal Trade Commission. She is a research associate with the National Bureau of Economic Research and a research fellow at IZA. She just completed chairing a National Academy of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine Panel on Improving Consumer Data for Food and Nutrition Policy Research for the Economic Research Service, USDA and she is a co-editor of the American Journal of Health Economics. Sebastian Tello-Trillo is an Assistant Professor of Public Policy and Economics at the Frank Batten School of Leadership and Public Policy in the University of Virginia. Alex Hollingsworth is an Assistant Professor of Economics at the O'Neill School of Public and Environmental Affairs in Indiana University. Show notes: We refer to a "Failure CV". The path to have a "successful" CV is non-linear, and we usually only see people's success (i.e. published papers) but we don't get to see their failures. Doug Webber, has an example of this on his website. Marianne's book recommendation is "Administrative Burden: Policymaking by other Means" Donald P. Moynihan (Author)  Pamela Herd (Author). (click here) Alex's recommendation of the  week is to "print like a referee" so that you can see the tables and figures as referees may see them. Sebastian's recommendation is the book "Range" by David Epstein. The thesis of the book is simple, in a world that values specialization, having "range" could prove a very useful tool to pair up with specialization. (click here). We talk about the book "Do the Work: Overcome Resistance and Get Out of Your Own Way" by Steven Pressfield (click here) ****************Contest Rules*********************** - You have to be a Job Market Candidate (Defined as someone who is finishing their PhD and going on the Job Market to get their first job after graduated school) - Listen to today's episode and make a note of our guest's recommendation of the week - Choose one of your favorite episode - Send us an email to hiddencurriculumpodcast@gmail.com with Marianne's recommendation and your favorite episode! Also gives us your name and your email address. You could also leave us a voice message on Anchor, be sure to leave us your email and name! - You have 7 days from the episode to make you submissions. That is, we will take submissions until December 23rd - We will randomize the entries and pick a winner. We are hoping to announce the 1st winner on our subsequent podcast (we'll send you an email if you win)
49:30
December 16, 2020
S1E12 How to approach networking with Jennifer Doleac
In this episode we talk about how to approach networking with Jennifer Doleac. Jennifer Doleac is an Associate Professor of Economics at Texas A&M University, and Director of the Justice Tech Lab. She is also a Research Fellow at IZA, and a Research Affiliate at the Institute for Research on Poverty, the University of Chicago Crime Lab, and the Wilson Sheehan Lab for Economic Opportunities. Jennifer studies crime and discrimination, with particular emphases on prisoner reentry and the effects of technology on public safety. She also organizes the Texas Economics of Crime Workshop (TxECW), and also has a podcast! Probable Causation, a podcast about law, economics, and crime. Sebastian Tello-Trillo is an Assistant Professor of Public Policy and Economics at the Frank Batten School of Leadership and Public Policy in the University of Virginia. Alex Hollingsworth is an Assistant Professor of Economics at the O'Neill School of Public and Environmental Affairs in Indiana University. Show Notes We referred to Parkinson's law, which is the adage that "work expands so as to fill the time available for its completion". For non-research tasks, Jen schedules a finite amount of time, and she aims to finish those task by the amount of time allotted. For research tasks, her schedule is more flexible as she just assigns a amount of time (e.g. 2 hours) but won't put a specific tasks to get done. Jen also mentioned that she enjoys reading the book "The War of Art" right before a getting into a project to her get pumped up! Check this an other books recommendations in our ever-growing list of books recommended by our guests. (Click here). Jen also recommends checking out gather.town and the podcast Women at Work (click here) ****************Contest Rules*********************** - You have to be a Job Market Candidate (Defined as someone who is finishing their PhD and going on the Job Market to get their first job after graduated school) - Listen to today's episode and make a note of Jen's recommendation of the week - Choose one of your favorite episode - Send us an email to hiddencurriculumpodcast@gmail.com with Jen's recommendation and your favorite episode! Also gives us your name and your email address. You could also leave us a voice message on Anchor, be sure to leave us your email and name! - You have 7 days from the episode to make you submissions. That is, we will take submissions until December 15th - We will randomize the entries and pick a winner. We are hoping to announce the 1st winner on our subsequent podcast (we'll send you an email if you win)
53:13
December 8, 2020
S1E11 - Transitioning from Private to Academia with Benjamin Hansen
In this episode we talk with Benjamin Hansen. Ben is the WE Miner Professor of Economics at the University of Oregon. He is an applied-micro economist whose research focuses on crime, health, and other topics in labor and public economics. We talk with Ben about this transition from the private-consulting sector to academia. Sebastian Tello-Trillo is an Assistant Professor of Public Policy and Economics at the Frank Batten School of Leadership and Public Policy in the University of Virginia. @dsebastiantello Alex Hollingsworth is an Assistant Professor of Economics at the O'Neill School of Public and Environmental Affairs in Indiana University. @ajhollingsworth  Notes:  Ben recommends watch "unidentified" and learn the truth about unidentified objects in the world. Alex recommends to check the app Zwift - an app for cyclers! Sebastian recommends to schedule "calls" with friends and family. It may feel weird to put your loved ones in your schedule as a task, but it's a great way of getting it done! 
35:07
November 19, 2020
S1E10 - Tips on advising students towards the Market with John Cawley
On this episode we talk with John Cawley on tips to prepare students for the job market. This episode is directed for people who are getting started with advising PhD Students. John talks about his process, and the process at Cornell. John is a Professor in the Department of Policy Analysis and Management, and the Department of Economics, at Cornell University. He is co-Director of Cornell's Institute on Health Economics, Health Behaviors and Disparities. His research focuses on the economics of risky health behaviors; in particular, those that relate to obesity. Sebastian Tello-Trillo is an Assistant Professor of Public Policy and Economics at the Frank Batten School of Leadership and Public Policy in the University of Virginia. @dsebastiantello Alex Hollingsworth is an Assistant Professor of Economics at the O'Neill School of Public and Environmental Affairs in Indiana University. @ajhollingsworth Notes:  John invites everyone to check out the Virtual Seminar on the Economics of Risky Health Behaviors (VERB) on this site VERBseminar.org. John has also worked putting a job-market guide, you can find the updated version here (Click Here). He is also in the AEA ad hoc Committee on the Job Market and they put out reports on their site (Click Here) Recommendation of the week: John's recommendation of the week is to check the Netflix show "Love on the Spectrum". Sebastian's recommendation of the week is to get a monitor arm. There are many options, here is one that I've used this past year (Click Here) Alex's recommendation of the week is the book "How to take Smart Notes" (Click Here). Alex also worked on a set of slides with job market tips and he is sharing it with us  (Click Here) 
47:16
November 4, 2020
S1E9 - How to handle multiple projects with Melissa Spencer
This week we talk with Melissa Spencer about handling multiple projects. Melissa is a PhD student in Economics at the University of Virginia. She is a job market candidate this year! Melissa’s research focuses on well-being of women and minorities, across the areas of reproductive health, infectious diseases & domestic violence. Alex Hollingsworth - is an Assistant Professor in the O’Neill School of Public and Environment Affairs at Indiana University. Follow Alex @ajhollingsworth Sebastian Tello-Trillo - an Assistant Professor in the Frank Batten School of Leadership and Public Policy at the University of Virginia. Follow Sebastian @dsebastiantello Links: We were talking about how to improve "focus" during work. One technique is the Pomodoro technique. You only need a 25 minute timer, but if you care for more fancy apps, Sebastian uses Tide (https://tide.fm/en_US/). He has also heard good things from [Forest]. Alex uses Focus-to-do (https://www.focustodo.cn). Melissa started her own chapter of women in economics at UVA. If you are interested in starting a chapter, she recommends checking out the resources from "Women in Economics at Berkeley" (http://calwomenofecon.weebly.com) In terms of recommendation of the week. Melissa recommends speaking to people that are not economist about your own research. Sebastian's recommendation is to have a "Nice Emails" folder. Save any email in PDF format in this folder for when you are feeling down but also for any potential review you may have in the future Alex's recommendation of the week  is a software that blocks access to fun-website so you can concentrate on your work. It's called self-control (https://selfcontrolapp.com)
42:49
October 22, 2020
S1E8 - How to stay connected with Anne Burton
This week we talk with Anne Burton. Anne Burton is a Economics PhD student (and job market candidate for 2020!) at Cornell University. Her research is primarily concerned with the social welfare implications of risky health behaviors and crime. Before going  to Cornell, She was a Senior Research Assistant in the Fiscal Analysis section at the Federal Reserve Board of Governors in Washington, D.C. from 2012-2015. She graduated from Colby College in Waterville, Maine in 2012 with a B.A. in Economics and Government. Alex Hollingsworth - is an Assistant Professor in the O’Neill School of Public and Environment Affairs at Indiana University. Follow Alex @ajhollingsworth Sebastian Tello-Trillo - an Assistant Professor in the Frank Batten School of Leadership and Public Policy at the University of Virginia. Follow Sebastian @dsebastiantello Show Notes: Anne's paper is on smoking ban's on alcohol and smoking consumption. She also gives a shout out to this paper by Jérôme Ada and Francesca Cornaglia. (Taxes, Cigarette Consumption, and Smoking Intensity) Anne Burton & Barton Willage have compiled a list of conference in economics, which includes online conferences. Check it out! (Click here) We also mention that in terms of tools for keeping connected you may want to try slack, or gather.town Anne's recommendation of the week is to go vote! Sebastian's recommendation of the week is to use "Control + Backspace" instead of "Backspace", this will delete full words and will make your typing experience easier! It takes some time to get used to. If you want more tips to type fast, (click here) Alex's recommendation is the STATA command "ds" (click here). DS can store a set of variables in a local or macro. For example, you can type "ds a*" and this will create a local with all the variables that start with a.
35:51
October 6, 2020
S1E7 - Alex's Research Workflow: Stata, Github, R & Overleaf
This week Alex show us his research workflow. How he starts a project, and moves through the different software of analysis and organizing to produce a paper. Although the this episode contains audio, we have a recorded this on a video format and you can find video here. Listening to the audio may be helpful but we strongly encourage to check out the video.   Note: The audio episode is a shortened version. The portion where we show how to pull your code into overleaf using GitHub is only in the video version.  Co-host: Alex Hollingsworth - Assistant Professor, O’Neill School of Public and Environmental Affairs. Follow Alex @ajhollingsworth Co-host: Sebastian Tello-Trillo - Assistant Professor, Frank Batten School of Leadership and Public Policy. Follow Sebastian @dsebastiantello SHOW NOTES:  Longer video episode with overleaf overview: (click here).   GitHub repo of the code used in the episode: (click here) and associated Dropbox folder: (click here). Alex's tip: use minimum working examples to both debug and build complex code. Example/more explanation: (click here). Other tip: Preferred STATA Graphing Scheme Blind Schemes or `ssc install blindschemes, replace all`  then `set scheme plotplainblind` HT: Coady Wing  Most excellent Keanu movies to watch (from video): Bill and Ted's Excellent Adventure and Point Break   BONUS: Grant McDermott offered a suggestion on twitter: "One suggestion, which will simplify life on the R side, is to use renv instead of manually configuring your project libs. This will automatically snapshot your project environment, create a project-specific library, add to gitignore, etc. Here’s a test repo for you to try out. Video link at the bottom too if you’re interested.  Just clone and run `renv::restore()` and it will take care of everything for you. Pretty sweet. (click here)
37:22
September 24, 2020
S1E6 - Talking with Kelli Marquardt on talking with people outside of your field
This week Alex and Sebastian talk with Kelli Marquardt, a PhD Student at University of Arizona. We talk with Kelli about how to approach people from outside your discipline and similar practices. Kelli is a health economist and is currently studying health disparities on the decisions that health providers make in a variety of situation. Co-host: Alex Hollingsworth - Assistant Professor, O’Neill School of Public and Environmental Affairs. Follow Alex @ajhollingsworth Co-host: Sebastian Tello-Trillo - Assistant Professor, Frank Batten School of Leadership and Public Policy. Follow Sebastian @dsebastiantello Links: Here is the datacamp link for Kelli's recommendation.  This is a mini-course to learn how to do text-analysis by analyzing prince songs.   Academic sequitur, a service that helps you search and keep up to date with research from your topic of interest across fields, or just in your field Alex's recommends checking this website by Jonas Kristoffer Lindeløv that teaches how most models are just linear regressions Unlocking Us is a podcast by Brene Brown, and the episode with Harriet Lerner is particularly awesome as you learn how to form a good apology.
23:33
September 16, 2020
S1E5 - Talking to Chase Eck about building an academic website
This week we talk with Chase Eck. Chase, is a PhD Student at the University of Arizona. His research interests include the optimal design of transfer programs and the effects of occupational licensing in medicine. We talk with him about websites, what to include in them, what to think about, and we include a guide on Alex's website on how to make one for free. Sebastian Tello-Trillo is an Assistant Professor of Public Policy and Economics at the Frank Batten School of Leadership and Public Policy in the University of Virginia. @dsebastiantello Alex Hollingsworth is an Assistant Professor of Economics at the O'Neill School of Public and Environmental Affairs in Indiana University. @ajhollingsworth Links: Alex's guide to create a simple and a free job market website. This link will help you create a website that looks like this one.  Chase's recommendation is to check this "command" in R to estimate fast fixed high dimensional fixed effects. We refer a lot some advice from Sarah Jacobson on how to build your CV which can be found here. Alex's recommendation of the week is to check Dan Quintana's blog. It has a lot of great advice. Sebastian's advice is to check Libro.fm, is an app for reading books that sources the book from small bookstores. Try their monthly plan, very affordable.  We also refer in this podcast to this book from Jonathan Schwabish
35:55
September 10, 2020
S1E4 - Talking with Carycruz Bueno about Postdocs (tips for employees and employers)
This week we talk with Dr. Carycruz Bueno. Carycruz is a postdoctoral research associate at Anneberg Institute at Brown University. She will help us clarify the benefits of being a post-doc and demystify thoughts on this issue. This episode will be helpful for job seekers and job providers! Sebastian Tello-Trillo is an Assistant Professor of Public Policy and Economics at the Frank Batten School of Leadership and Public Policy in the University of Virginia. Alex Hollingsworth is an Assistant Professor of Economics at the O'Neill School of Public and Environmental Affairs in Indiana University. Recommendations for the week: Book: Children of Blood and Bone App: Libby (audio books from your local library) Paper: How You Can Work to Increase the Presence and Improve the Experience of Black, Latinx, and Native American People in the Economics Profession Webpage: Atlas Obscura (travel webpage)
32:30
September 2, 2020
S1E3 - Talking to Emily Nix on Teaching and Lightboards
This week we talk with Emily Nix. Emily is an Assistant Professor of Finance and Business Economics at the USC Marshall School of Business. We talk with Emily about her research & about lightboards, which could be a great tool for online teaching. We talk about how to make one and a number of question about using them.  Sebastian Tello-Trillo is an Assistant Professor of Public Policy and Economics at the Frank Batten School of Leadership and Public Policy in the University of Virginia.  Alex Hollingsworth is an Assistant Professor of Economics at the O'Neill School of Public and Environmental Affairs in Indiana University. Recommendation of the week:  Emily's - Rescue time, Automatic Time-Tracking Software and Alias  (on Hulu).  Sebastian's - Zotero, a reference manager  Alex's: Papership  Show notes:   Alex making a lightboard If you want to learn how to make a lightboard, here are some videos Markers for lightboard  Plexiglass Brackets LED Strip Black Tablecloth Metal Clamps OBS Software - Software to show several screens on your webcam under "one screen".
35:43
August 25, 2020
S1E2 - Tips on your first lecture & class
In this episode, Alex and Sebastian share tips and tricks they have learned that can be helpful for people teaching for the first time. We touch on things we do before our very first lecture and some other expectations for the rest of the semester. Sebastian Tello-Trillo is an Assistant Professor of Public Policy and Economics at the Frank Batten School of Leadership and Public Policy in the University of Virginia. Alex Hollingsworth is an Assistant Professor of Economics at the O'Neill School of Public and Environmental Affairs in Indiana University. Things we mentioned in this episode: Vanderbilt Center for Teaching Sebastian's recommendation of the week: Mortality Effects and Choice Across Private Health Insurance Plans Alex's recommendation of the week: Check Robert Talbert site! Bonus: Checklist Manifesto by Atul Gawande
40:57
August 18, 2020
S1E1 - Tips on managing workflow
On this episode we talk about why having a workflow is important and tips on how to adopt a workflow that fits your needs.  Alex Hollingsworth is an Assistant Professor, O’Neill School of Public and Environmental Affairs, Indiana University. Follow Alex @ajhollingsworth Sebastian Tello-Trillo is an  Assistant Professor, Frank Batten School of Leadership and Public Policy, University of Virginia. Follow Sebastian @dsebastiantello Show Notes : The power of habit by Charles Duhigg  BITSS  - Berkeley Initiative for Transparency in the Social Sciences.  Notion.so - note taking app referral link. 
28:15
August 11, 2020
Promo - "The Hidden Curriculum"
The Hidden Curriculum is a podcast on all the topics you wanted to learn in (econ) graduate school. There are lots of things about the profession that you only hear if you have a great mentor or during networking opportunities. This podcast aims to help decrease that knowledge gap by bringing that information into your headphones! Season 1 is hosted by Sebastian Tello-Trillo and Alex Hollingsworth.  Sebastian Tello-Trillo is an assistant professor of public policy and economics at the Frank Batten School of Public Policy, University of Virginia. Alex Hollingsworth is an assistant professor of economics at the O'Neill School of Public and Environmental Affairs, Indiana University.  Artwork by @factorintrinseco. Music by Funk O'Clock by Delicate Beats. Licensed by Premium Beat
01:11
August 5, 2020