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Histoire Source | Source Story

Histoire Source | Source Story

By Histoire Source | Source Story

A conversational series for Canadian history teachers. We speak to historians, archivists, creators, artists, curators, sociologists, anthropologists about one primary source and ask: What is the source? What is the story? How can it challenge Canadian history?

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Using molasses to explore colonialism and capitalism with Xaiver Campbell and Samantha Cutrara
Using molasses to explore colonialism and capitalism with Xaiver Campbell and Samantha Cutrara
How are Jamaica and Newfoundland connected? How can we put ourselves into recipes to connect with the people who made the ingredients possible?    Join Xaiver Campbell as he shows the sticky history of molasses. Xaiver uses molasses as a way to explore empire, enslavement, colonialism, and capitalism through the creation, transportation, and consumption of the sweetener. We explore ways for students to put themselves into recipes to connect to the past and how we can use our historical imagination to connect to people who were not able to leave their own records behind. Learn more about Histoire Source | Source Story: http://www.sourcestory.ca/
35:02
December 21, 2022
Apprendre à lire, écrire et compter au Québec en 1900: des leçons racistes et sexistes avec Catherine Larochelle & Christine Chevalier-Caron
Apprendre à lire, écrire et compter au Québec en 1900: des leçons racistes et sexistes avec Catherine Larochelle & Christine Chevalier-Caron
Comment les stéréotypes sexistes et racistes diffusaient-ils dans la province de Québec au début du dernier siècle ?    Les manuels scolaires consistent en l’un des éléments de réponses les plus importants. L’usage du manuel Mon premier livre. Lire – écrire – compter – éducation – instruction : manuel des commençants pendant près de 40 ans en témoigne d’ailleurs, alors que tantôt les enfants y apprennent à compter avec des stéréotypes antinoirs, plus tard ils y pratiquent leur grammaire avec des stigmates orientalistes.  Pour en discuter, nous avons fait appel à l’historienne Catherine Larochelle, autrice du livre L’école du racisme: la construction de l’altérité à l’école québécoise.
53:06
November 28, 2022
Shingwauk School Reunions: Centring both truth and community when teaching about residential schools with Krista McCracken and Samantha Cutrara
Shingwauk School Reunions: Centring both truth and community when teaching about residential schools with Krista McCracken and Samantha Cutrara
Did you know that the TRC was funded through the work of residential school survivors? When we are teaching residential school histories, how can we ensure these survivor voices are remembered and represented?    Join Krista McCracken, an award winning public historian and archivist who works as the Researcher/Curator at Shingwauk Residential Schools Centre, as they share photos and documents from the first reunion of the Shingwauk Residential School in 1981. These early reunions marked the (informal) beginnings of the Shingwauk Residential School Archives, which were, and continue to be, built by the community from the need and desire to record, remember, and share.   Drawing on the power of community archives, Krista emphasizes how bringing oral histories, survivor-centred stories, and art into our conversations about residential schools can strengthen these conversations by uplifting survivor voices.    Learn more about Histoire Source | Source Story: http://www.sourcestory.ca/
34:51
September 29, 2022
A Speech for the Future: Richard Van Camp and Dene Chief Frank T’Seleie’s 1975 Speech with Richard Van Camp and Samantha Cutrara
A Speech for the Future: Richard Van Camp and Dene Chief Frank T’Seleie’s 1975 Speech with Richard Van Camp and Samantha Cutrara
How does a speech change the trajectory of a nation? How do specific moments of time stick with a person and inspire a spirit of reconciliation?   Join Dogrib Tłı̨chǫ author Richard Van Camp as he shares Chief Frank T’Seleie’s speech against the Mackenzie Valley Pipeline in 1975. Chief Frank T’Seleie of Fort Good Hope, N.W.T, spoke at the Government of Canada commissioned inquiry, called the Berger Inquiry, about the proposed Pipeline between Alaska and mainland USA. Drawing from his 28 years of lived experience, this passionate and powerful speech was one of the key pieces of testimony that halted the proposed pipeline. Inspired by this speech, Richard Van Camp worked closely with former-Chief T’Seleie on “Like a Razor Slash,” a contribution to the groundbreaking comic collection This Place, published by Portage & Main Press/HighWater Press. Richard brings joy and passion to a discussion of resilience and reconciliation, sharing the powerful words of Frank T’Seleie’s speech, which continue to inspire and call people to action.   To learn more and for a full list of links visit: http://www.sourcestory.ca/
36:33
September 13, 2022
Creating Nature: Ecological imperialism and Sunnyside Beach with Dr. Dale Barbour & Dr. Samantha Cutrara
Creating Nature: Ecological imperialism and Sunnyside Beach with Dr. Dale Barbour & Dr. Samantha Cutrara
What are the colonial forces that create the spaces we consider “natural”? How does capitalism and imperialism shape the history of public spaces like beaches?   Join Dr. Dale Barbour as he discusses the history of Toronto’s Sunnyside Beach. Using historical photographs and archival renderings, Dr. Barbour discusses how Sunnyside Beach developed over the first half of the  20th century.    This video is the second of two summer-themed conversations that we partnered with NiCHE-Canada. NiCHE, or the Network in Canadian History & Environment,  is a Canadian-based network of researchers and educators who work at the intersection of nature and history.    Learn more about their work at: https://niche-canada.org/  Learn more about Histoire Source | Source Story: http://www.sourcestory.ca/
35:24
June 16, 2022
Perdita Felicien’s intergenerational story of and the highs and lows of sport with Dr. Jenny Ellison & Dr. Samantha Cutrara
Perdita Felicien’s intergenerational story of and the highs and lows of sport with Dr. Jenny Ellison & Dr. Samantha Cutrara
How can bringing in intergenerational stories help deepen our understanding of sport? How have Caribbean-Canadian women shaped Canadian identity?   Join Dr. Jenny Ellison (Canadian Museum of History) as she shares artifacts from world champion hurdler Perdita Felicien, which are now in the Canadian Museum of History’s collection. From shoes, to luggage tags, to home photos of her childhood bedroom, Dr. Ellison brought familiar, yet juxtaposed, artifacts together to tell Perdita’s story of the highs and lows of sport.    This conversation touches upon themes such as intergenerational communities and challenges, Caribbean Canadians’ contributions to the 20th century, and the ways ordinary school activities - like track and field days - can result in finding extraordinary talents   This video is the first of two summer-theme conversations that we partnered with NiCHE-Canada. NiCHE, or the Network in Canadian History & Environment, is a Canadian-based network of researchers and educators who work at the intersection of nature and history. Full links at: sourcestory.ca
36:30
June 09, 2022
An Inuk in Korea: Eddy Weetaltuk’s 20th century life with Dr. Isabelle St-Amand & Dr. Samantha Cutrara
An Inuk in Korea: Eddy Weetaltuk’s 20th century life with Dr. Isabelle St-Amand & Dr. Samantha Cutrara
How can a veteran’s memoir engage students in conversations about settler colonialism, residential schools, and the ethics of war? What can we learn about 20th century Canada through the lens of an Inuk who fought both at home and abroad? Join Dr. Isabelle St-Amand (Queen’s University) as she shares Eddy Weetaltuk’s memoir From the Tundra to the Trenches (University of Manitoba Press). Eddy Weetaltuk, an Inuk man, joined the Canadian military to fight in the Korean War (1950-1953) under a false name. This exciting and funny memoir covers his experience at war, as well as his experiences growing up in James Bay and attending a church-run day school and his experiences returning home from war to increased racism. Dr. St-Amand brings her enthusiasm and passion to this conversation, to talk about we can use the memoir as a whole to challenge Canadian history. For a full list of links and lesson ideas, check out our website at: sourcestory.ca
39:06
June 02, 2022
Féminisme noir et Black power: utiliser les archives pour mieux connaitre le Congrès des femmes noires avec Samia Dumais & Christine Chevalier-Caron
Féminisme noir et Black power: utiliser les archives pour mieux connaitre le Congrès des femmes noires avec Samia Dumais & Christine Chevalier-Caron
Avez-vous déjà entendu parler du Congrès des femmes Noires du Canada? Saviez-vous que ces femmes étaient particulièrement actives dans les années 1970?  Si l’historiographie a été peu bavarde à leur sujet, la situation est en train de changer alors que de plus en plus d'historiennes s’y intéressent! C’est notamment le cas de Samia Dumais qui vient nous parler de certaines des archives de l’organisation. Lors de cette discussion, notre invité ne se contente pas de décrire les archives : elle nous explique comment celles-ci peuvent permettre de renouveler les connaissances de plusieurs champs historiographiques, comme l’histoire des féminismes de la deuxième vague et celle du Black Power.
37:45
May 26, 2022
Ojibwe women and flipping the perspective on colonial sources with Dr. Kai Minosh Pyle & Dr. Samantha Cutrara
Ojibwe women and flipping the perspective on colonial sources with Dr. Kai Minosh Pyle & Dr. Samantha Cutrara
How can we read colonial sources to see greater agency, power, and leadership from Indigenous women? or, how can we read colonial sources to see greater ogimaa? How can flipping the perspective and foregrounding these stories challenge how we understand the past and present?   Join Dr. Kai Minosh Pyle (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign) as they discuss how we can use sources written by white settlers to read between the lines and see more full lives of Indigenous people, women, and LGBTQ2S+ people.  Using “A Narrative of the Captivity and Adventures of John Tanner” or “The Falcon,” Dr. Pyle discusses passages that showcase the leadership and power of Indigenous women, including a woman who may be identified as a Two-Spirited person. We talk about the ways history has been written and interpreted to privilege certain versions of power and the ways flipping the perspective of historical sources can challenge the Euro-colonial progress narratives so common in Canadian history.   Learn more about Histoire Source | Source Story and connect with us: http://www.sourcestory.ca/
42:23
May 12, 2022
L’histoire des noir·e·s est de l’histoire canadienne avec Amadou Bâ & Christine Chevalier-Caron
L’histoire des noir·e·s est de l’histoire canadienne avec Amadou Bâ & Christine Chevalier-Caron
À quand remonte la présence des populations noires sur le territoire aujourd’hui appelé Canada? Qui étaient-elles? Que faisaient-elles?   Amadou Bâ propose certaines réponses à ces questions à travers son ouvrage L’Histoire oubliée de la contribution des esclaves et soldats noirs à l’édification du Canada (1604-1945) et son livre jeunesse John Ware, le cowboy noir de l'Ouest canadien. À l’occasion de sa rencontre avec Christine Chevalier-Caron, ces ouvrages et des historiographies dans lesquels ils s’insèrent sont au cœur d’une passionnante discussion. Lors de celle-ci, Amadou Bâ propose de revoir le récit afin de démontrer que les populations NoirEs du Canada forment un des peuples fondateurs de ce pays. Conscients que le récit historique enseigné dans les écoles de l’ensemble du pays ne permet pas de rendre visible et tangible cette réalité, il propose un livre incontournable pour accélérer l’inclusion des NoirEs dans les curriculums scolaires des provinces. Écouter cette discussion et lire ses livres : un excellent moyen de se familiariser avec l’appart des communautés NoirEs à la société canadienne.
46:32
May 05, 2022
Photography and Oral History to Bring the Past Present in Africville with Amanda Carvery-Taylor & Samantha Cutrara
Photography and Oral History to Bring the Past Present in Africville with Amanda Carvery-Taylor & Samantha Cutrara
How can talking to our Elders be a form of community activism that helps our understanding of the past? How can we use modern photographs to bring historic discussions into the present? Join Amanda Carvery-Taylor (photographer and community builder) as she shares her collection of original photography and oral histories about Africville in her book: A Love Letter to Africville (Fernwood Publishing). These stories of love and joy go beyond the stories of pain that are normally part of the narratives around Africville. Using Amanda’s work, and her methods, you too can tell new stories about community using the words, experiences, and photographs about community Elders. This conversation, and book, is an essential companion to any teaching about Africville, as well as a love letter to the concept of community itself.
40:13
April 28, 2022
Object-based History for Understanding Self and Society with Dr. Madeleine Mant & Dr. Samantha Cutrara
Object-based History for Understanding Self and Society with Dr. Madeleine Mant & Dr. Samantha Cutrara
How can an everyday object like an egg engage students in conversations about history? How can students connect to the past using objects lying around the house? Join Dr. Madeleine Mant (University of Toronto) as she shows an egg-cellent source and how it connects to the 1942 Canadian Food Guide. Dr. Mant uses the egg to show us how we can use everyday objects as an entry point to teach students about the past, their own positionality, and how health history is all around us. Bring meaningful learning into your classroom using the “Anthropology of Health in 100 Objects” project, asking students to connect an object to a theme and answer the questions: What is the item, why was it selected, how does it relate to the theme, and how does it connect to a broader (re)examination of Canadian history? Find a complete list of sources on our website: http://www.sourcestory.ca/
38:48
April 21, 2022
Using Runaway Slave Ads to Unsettle the Great White North with Dr. Michele Johnson, Dr. Funke Aladejebi, & Dr. Samantha Cutrara
Using Runaway Slave Ads to Unsettle the Great White North with Dr. Michele Johnson, Dr. Funke Aladejebi, & Dr. Samantha Cutrara
How do we find the stories of enslaved people in Canada beyond the stories of the Underground Railroad? How do we unsettle the notion that slavery in Canada was benign? How do we use our imagination to place these people into our historical understanding of Canada? Join Dr. Michele Johnson and Dr. Funke Aladejebi as they show us how to read Canadian runaway slave ads and use our historical imagination to build lives for people who were not able to leave the same records we often use to learn Canadian history. This conversation is just the start of the rich conversations found in the edited collection, Unsettling the Great White North: Black Canadian History, published by University of Toronto Press (2022). Check us out on YouTube for a full list of sources! 
49:57
April 07, 2022
1980s Trans & Queer Activism and Politics with Dr. Aaron Devor & Dr. Samantha Cutrara
1980s Trans & Queer Activism and Politics with Dr. Aaron Devor & Dr. Samantha Cutrara
How have the conversations about pronouns, trans identity, and the LGBTQ2S+ community changed over time?  Join Dr. Aaron Devor, Chair in Transgender Studies (University of Victoria), talk about Leslie Feinberg (Stone Butch Blues), Rupert Raj, Reed Erickson, and how these histories come together in a 1982 issue of Metamorphosis, a newsletter for trans men, published in Canada in the 1980s. Learn more here: https://www.uvic.ca/transgenderarchives/
44:01
March 24, 2022
Canadian History at the Buxton Schoolhouse with Shannon Prince, Mariah Kaak, & Samantha Cutrara
Canadian History at the Buxton Schoolhouse with Shannon Prince, Mariah Kaak, & Samantha Cutrara
Join Buxton National Historic Site & Museum for a virtual tour around their historic schoolhouse built in 1861. Buxton/Elgin was settled as a Black community in the 1800s and understanding their schoolhouse provides us with an Afrocentric perspective on long-term community building in Canada. Buxton Museum Curator, Shannon Prince (a recent Ontario Heritage award winner!), and Assistant Curator, Mariah Kaak, join our Principal Storytelling Officer Dr. Samantha Cutrara for this conversation for Canadian history teachers.   In this video, like all our Histoire Source | Source Story videos, we ask:  What is the Source?  What is the Story?  How can using it in your classroom help us challenge Canadian history?   Check out all the resources mentioned on our webpage here: http://www.sourcestory.ca/
37:24
March 10, 2022