Skip to main content
POP ART

POP ART

By Howard Casner
My guest will chose a movie from pop culture and I will chose a film from the art/classic side of cinema with some sort of connection and we will discuss both movies.
Listen on
Where to listen
Breaker Logo

Breaker

Google Podcasts Logo

Google Podcasts

Pocket Casts Logo

Pocket Casts

RadioPublic Logo

RadioPublic

Spotify Logo

Spotify

POP ART: Episode 55, The Hitman's Bodygaurd/The Gauntlet
ON THE ROAD AGAIN: “Nag, nag, nag.” How hard can it be? Your assignment is to get a witness from point A to point B? What could possibly go wrong, you ask? Sounds like it’s time for Episode 55 of Pop Art, the podcast where my guest chooses a movie from popular culture and I’ll select a film from the more art/classic/indie side of cinema with a connection to it. Today, I am happy to welcome as my guest, blogger. podcaster and film enthusiast Thomas Stoneham-Judge, who has chosen the Ryan Reynolds/Samuel L. Jackson bromance road picture, The Hitman’s Bodyguard, while I have chosen the Clint Eastwood/Sondra Locke romantic action road picture, The Gauntlet, both about people trying to get a witness to trial against almost insurmountable odds. And don’t forget to follow my podcast and comment. And in this episode we answer such questions as: What is the Wilhelm Scream; What is a Pat Hingle and would you want to be one; Why do Reynolds and Jackson work so well together; What did test audiences scream out at the climax of The Gauntlet; What song do the nuns on the bus sing; who were first cast in The Gauntlet; What happened to the screenplay to The Hitman’s Bodyguard a few weeks before shooting? And check out Thomas’ blog at ForReel Movie News & Reviews at https://www.moviesforreel.net/home/category/Blogs+by+Thomas Check out my blog at https://howardcasner.wordpress.com/ My books, More Rantings and Ravings of a Screenplay Reader, The Starving Artists and Other Stories and The Five Corporations and One True Religion can be found at https://www.amazon.com/s?k=howard+casner&ref=nb_sb_noss
52:39
June 13, 2021
POP ART: Episode 54, Ladyhawke/The Thief of Bagdad
CURSES, FOILED AGAIN: “Out of my way, you masters of one thousand fleas”. The course of true love never did run smooth. If you’re a hawk by day, your love is a wolf by night. If you are blind, your love is in a deep sleep. Curses. Sounds like it’s time for Episode 54 of Pop Art, the podcast where my guest chooses a movie from popular culture, and I’ll select a film from the more art/classic/indie side of cinema with a connection to it. This time, I am happy to welcome as my guest, blogger and film enthusiast Jeanette Ward, who has chosen Richard Donner’s medieval dark fantasy Ladyhawke, while I have chosen the Alexander Korda/Michael Powell Tales of the Arabian Nights Sabu vehicle, the classic Thief of Bagdad, both fantasy films about a thief who helps overturn a curse and reunite lovers. And in this episode we answer such questions as: What is it about fantasy films anyway? Why did Ladyhawke fail at the box office? What is a Sabu and would you want to be one? Is Leo McKern No. 1? What happened when the production of Thief of Bagdad was moved from London to Hollywood at the outbreak of the war? Who was originally cast in the Rutger Hauer role? What innovation to special effects did The Thief of Bagdad bring to movie making? Why does everyone talk to God? And what is it with Broderick’s accent? And check out Jeanette’s blog The Mundane Adventures of a Fangirl at http://jwardadventures.blogspot.com/ Check out my blog at https://howardcasner.wordpress.com/ My books, More Rantings and Ravings of a Screenplay Reader, The Starving Artists and Other Stories and The Five Corporations and One True Religion can be found at https://www.amazon.com/s?k=howard+casner&ref=nb_sb_noss
50:19
June 7, 2021
POP ART: Episode 53, Almost Famous/Murmur of the Heart
A BOY’S BEST FRIEND IS HIS MOTHER: “Your mom kind of freaked me out”. Coming of age can be the most traumatic and difficult time in a young person’s life. Of course, sometimes, this rite of passage can be eased with a little help from…your mother? Sounds like it’s time for Episode 53 of Pop Art, the podcast where my guest chooses a movie from popular culture and I’ll select a film from the more art/classic/indie side of cinema with a connection to it. And this time I am happy to welcome as my guest, film enthusiast Cameron Kanachki, who has chosen the modern coming of age rock and roll classic Almost Famous, while I have chosen the Louis Malle classic French coming of age story Murmur of the Heart, both about teens coming of age with a little help from Mommie, dearest. And in this episode we answer such questions as: How do Freud and Hegel fit in? Who was originally cast in the Billy Crudup role? Just how autobiographical are these movies? Vice is nice, but is incest best? Where does the famous Supreme Court statement about porn “I know it when I see it” come from? What is Cameron Crowe’s favorite scene? Cameron, along with moi, is often a guest on the fun LAMBCast podcast. So go to that website and find out what we talk about there: http://www.largeassmovieblogs.com/ Check out my blog at https://howardcasner.wordpress.com/ My books, More Rantings and Ravings of a Screenplay Reader, The Starving Artists and Other Stories and The Five Corporations and One True Religion can be found at https://www.amazon.com/s?k=howard+casner&ref=nb_sb_noss
41:21
May 30, 2021
POP ART: Episode 52, Indianda Jones and the Temple of Doom/Gunga Din
HIP HIP HOORAJ: “Kill for the love of Kali.” It happens over and over again. You conquer a country. Make it part of your empire. Teach them to be just like you while not giving them any real freedom or self-determination. And in response, all you expect is a little gratitude—plus the vast majority of their resources for your own exploitation. But in return, what do you get—all they do is grumble, complain and commit mass murder. Sigh. Sounds like it’s time for Episode 52 of Pop Art, the podcast where my guest will choose a movie from popular culture and I’ll select a film from the more art/classic/indie side of cinema with a connection to it. This time, I am happy to welcome as my guest, filmmaker Micky Levy. Micky has chosen the second entry in the Indian Jones franchise, Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom, while I have chosen the George Stevens, Rudyard Kipling inspired classic, Gunga Din, both inspired by the Raj in India and a rebellious cult called The Thuggees. And in this episode we answer such questions as: Why did nobody involved like Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom? Who did they want for the role of Gunga Din first? What joke was played on Spielberg during the filming of the final scenes? How did Cary Grant get cast as Cutter? What effect did Temple of Doom have on the ratings system? What did Bertolt Brecht, T.S. Eliot and George Orwell say about Gunga Din and Rudyard Kipling? What happened to the characters of Willie Scott and Short Round? Why was Kipling cut from the original version of Gunga Din? Check out Micky’s IMDB listing at https://www.imdb.com/name/nm0506551/?ref_=nv_sr_srsg_0 And her film Rails & Ties, available on various streaming platforms Check out my blog at https://howardcasner.wordpress.com/ My books, More Rantings and Ravings of a Screenplay Reader, The Starving Artists and Other Stories and The Five Corporations and One True Religion can be found at https://www.amazon.com/s?k=howard+casner&ref=nb_sb_noss
43:37
May 23, 2021
POP ART: Episode 51, Star Trek II: The Wrath of Kahn/Rio Grande
DADDY ISSUES: “Kobayashi Maru”. Fathers and sons. Husbands and wives. Wives and sons. Friends and lovers. Set against the background of the military. Sounds like it’s time for Episode 51 of Pop Art, the podcast where my guest will choose a movie from popular culture and I’ll select a film from the more art/classic/indie side of cinema with a connection to it. This time, I am happy to welcome back as my guest, screenwriter and blogger, Paul Zeidman. Paul has chosen the second entry in the Star Trek movie franchise Star Trek II: The Wrath of Kahn, while I have chosen the John Ford classic, the last in his calvary trilogy, Rio Grande. Both films about fathers not only facing battle, but also coming to terms with an estranged son. And in this episode we ponder such questions as: What is Captain Kirk’s address? Why did Ford make Rio Grande? What did Ricardo Montalban find frustrating in making The Wrath of Kahn? Why were the Sons of the Pioneers used in Rio Grande? What plotting error wasn’t realized until late in the filming of …Kahn? What is a Leo G. Carroll and would you want to be one? Why was Star Trek II more profitable than Star Trek I? What did John Wayne consider Rio Grande a parable of? Where did they get Kahn’s men for the movie? And be sure to check out Paul Zeidman’s blog MaximumZ at https://maximumz.blog/ Check out my blog at https://howardcasner.wordpress.com/ My books, More Rantings and Ravings of a Screenplay Reader, The Starving Artists and Other Stories and The Five Corporations and One True Religion can be found at https://www.amazon.com/s?k=howard+casner&ref=nb_sb_noss Meanwhile, like, follow or comment on my podcast.
48:03
May 9, 2021
POP ART: Episode 50, Revenge of the Nerds/The Freshman
NO NERDITY ALLOWED: “Al-a-ga-ZINK! Al-a-ga-ZINK! Boola Bink! WOW”. College. The place that separates the men from the boys. The alphas from the betas. The jocks from the nerds. Sounds like it’s time for Episode 50 of Pop Art, the podcast where my guest will choose a movie from popular culture and I’ll select a film from the more art/classic/indie side of cinema with a connection to it. And yes, you read that right, this is the 50thepisode; Pop Art has reached it’s first milestone. And because of that I am happy to welcome back filmmaker and fellow podcaster, Donald McKinney, III, who was the guest on my very first episode. Donald has chosen the raunchy 1980s nerds goes to college film, Revenge of the Nerds, while I have chosen the classic silent film about a nerd going to college, Harold Lloyd’s The Freshman. And in this episode we answer such questions as: What did Jeff Kanew say that got him the job to direct Revenge of the Nerds? What is a petting party? Where did the nerd laugh come from? What is a Grady Sutton and would you want to be one? Who is so tough he shaves with a blow torch? What is the connection to TMNT? Whatever happened to Ted McGinley? Meanwhile, check out The Real Short Box on most streaming platforms like Apple, as well as on Youtube at https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=the+real+short+box Donald’s website Rumblespoon Productions as http://www.rumblespoon.com/wp/index/ The web series The Blue Beetle https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_6a-L7kUfdE Check out my blog at https://howardcasner.wordpress.com/ My books, More Rantings and Ravings of a Screenplay Reader, The Starving Artists and Other Stories and The Five Corporations and One True Religion can be found at https://www.amazon.com/s?k=howard+casner&ref=nb_sb_noss Meanwhile, like, follow or comment on my podcast. I’d love to know what you think.
40:05
May 2, 2021
POP ART: Episode 49, Down With Love/Pillow Talk
BATTLE ROYALE: “If you have to ask, you’re missing it.” In this corner, the playboy, the Casanova, the Romeo, who only sees women as something to be conquered. In this corner, the modern woman, the feminist, the independent woman who won’t be played. Who will win? Let’s ring the bell and let the fight begin. Sounds like it’s time for Episode 49 of Pop Art, the podcast where my guest chooses a movie from popular culture and I’ll select a film from the more art/classic/indie side of cinema with a connection to it. For this episode, I am happy to welcome back fellow podcaster Amanda Kirkham who has chosen the post-modern take on Doris Day/Rock Hudson movies, Down With Love while I have chosen the Doris Day/Rock Hudson film it satirizes, Pillow Talk, both films that revolve around the battle of the sexes. And in this episode we discuss such issues as : What is a “sex, but no sex” film? What is odd about the pairing of David Hyde Pierce and Sarah Paulson? What does The Graduate have to do with it? Why does Down With Love end with the song Here’s to Love? What is a Thelma Ritter and would you want to be one? What is Will Jordan’s connection to Ed Sullivan? Doris Day or Renee Zellweger? And many others. Check out Amanda’s YouTube channel at https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCyUn3wNQuvokOKJsc6crLiQ/featured And her Hollywood Consumer blog at https://www.facebook.com/HollywoodConsumer/ Check out my blog at https://howardcasner.wordpress.com/ My books, More Rantings and Ravings of a Screenplay Reader, The Starving Artists and Other Stories and The Five Corporations and One True Religion can be found at https://www.amazon.com/s?k=howard+casner&ref=nb_sb_noss Meanwhile, like, follow or comment on my podcast.
47:18
April 26, 2021
POP ART: Episode 48, Something's Gotta Give/Sudden Fear
THE PLAY’S THE THING: “Love ya.” Ah, romance. It’s still the same old story. You meet a guy. He wines and dines you. He sleeps with you. He dumps you. He tries to kill you. Sounds like it’s time for Episode 48 of Pop Art, the podcast where my guest chooses a movie from popular culture and I’ll select a film from the more art/classic/indie side of cinema with a connection to it. For this podcast, I am happy to welcome as my guest, Hollywood hyphenate, writer/actor Kelly Campbell, who has chosen the Nancy Meyers directed, Diane Keaton vehicle, Something’s Gotta Give and I have chosen the classic Joan Crawford film noir Sudden Fear. Both movies with plots revolving around female playwrights and their love lives. And in this episode we answer such questions as: Are women dating younger men as believable as men dating younger women? What Does Robot Monster have to do with it? Keanu Reeves, really? Lillian Hellman, really? Who is Theresa Harris? How do Superman and Superwoman fit in? What is a women in danger/peril film and who may have created the first one? Where does the title of Something’s Gotta Give come from? What is a homme fatale? Check out Kelly’s imdb page: https://www.imdb.com/name/nm4943645/?ref_=nv_sr_srsg_5 And her series Spellagram on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCtO0Sw6uMrA1B4KqnivfHAg Her blog at https://kellythinksthis.com/ And her very funny short film: The Bachelorette Party at https://vimeo.com/254262647 Check out my blog at https://howardcasner.wordpress.com/ My books, More Rantings and Ravings of a Screenplay Reader, The Starving Artists and Other Stories and The Five Corporations and One True Religion can be found at https://www.amazon.com/s?k=howard+casner&ref=nb_sb_noss
52:11
April 11, 2021
POP ART: Episode 47, Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse/Coherence
PARALLEL PARKING: “With great ability comes great accountability”. Are we alone in the universe? Perhaps, more importantly, is our universe alone in the universe?  Sounds like it’s time for Episode 47 of Pop Art, the podcast where my guest chooses a movie from popular culture and I’ll select a film from the more art/classic/indie side of cinema with a connection to it. This time, I am happy to welcome as my guest, Hollywood hyphenate, writer/director/producer Keith Hartman who has chosen the exciting and innovative animated film Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse and I have chosen the low budget, indie film and first feature from James Ward Byrkit, Coherence. Both movies with plots containing parallel universes. And in this episode, we ask such questions as: Who steals a bagel? What happened on the final night of shooting in Coherence? What is PDNY? What scene in Rick and Morty resembles a scene in Coherence? What happens whenever you hit pause when a train goes by in Spider-Man? How much did it cost to make Coherence? Where does “leap of faith” come from and how does existentialism, post modernism and gender meets diversity fit in? Check out Keith’s IMDB page at https://www.imdb.com/name/nm1402329/?ref_=nv_sr_srsg_1 Check out his films on Amazon: https://www.amazon.com/s?k=keith+hartman&i=instant-video&ref=nb_sb_noss And his books at: https://www.amazon.com/s?k=keith+hartman&i=digital-text&ref=nb_sb_noss Check out my blog at https://howardcasner.wordpress.com/ My books, More Rantings and Ravings of a Screenplay Reader, The Starving Artists and Other Stories and The Five Corporations and One True Religion can be found at https://www.amazon.com/s?k=howard+casner&ref=nb_sb_noss
47:53
April 4, 2021
POP ART: Episode 46, Do the Right Thing/Les Miserables
THE RACE IS ON: “Wake up, Wake up, Wake up.” Black Lives Matter. Antifa. Breonna Taylor. George Floyd. January 6th. Sounds like it’s time for Episode 46 of Pop Art, the podcast where my guest chooses a movie from popular culture and I’ll select a film from the more art/classic side of cinema with a connection to it. This time, I am happy to welcome producer/director Martina Silcock who has chosen the controversial and game changing Spike Lee joint Do The Right Thing, and I have chosen the astounding first feature by French filmmaker Ladj Ly, Les Miserables, both about racial tensions that explode in a single neighborhood leading to acts of violence and a riot. And in this episode, we answer such questions as: What are the source materials for each film? Who did Spike Lee want for Sal first? What happened at Cannes and the Oscars? How does Parasite fit in? How does the Twilight Zone fit in? Are the endings satisfactory? What movie did Michelle and Barak Obama see on their first date? Check out Martina’s IDMB page at https://www.imdb.com/name/nm3697341/?ref_=nv_sr_srsg_0 Check out her films at: Lines in the Sand: https://www.amazon.com/Lines-Richardson-Michael-Gilroy-Kerensa/dp/B01N14BWH5/ The Nest Egg: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QIWcjZE-vSM&t=360s Mogul Mowgli: https://www.mogulmowgli.co.uk/ Her site: http://www.notthetennisplayer.com/ A site for underrepresented groups: https://www.lookbeyondthelist.com/ And keep a look out for Pig, starring Nicholas Cage Check out my blog at https://howardcasner.wordpress.com/ My books, More Rantings and Ravings of a Screenplay Reader, The Starving Artists and Other Stories and The Five Corporations and One True Religion can be found at https://www.amazon.com/s?k=howard+casner&ref=nb_sb_noss
47:25
March 22, 2021
POP ART: Episode 45, True Romance/Pierrot le Fou
THE COURSE OF TRUE LOVE NEVER DID RUN SMOOTH: “Okie, dokey, doggie daddy.” We’ve all been there, done that. We meet someone. Fall in love. Pledge our lives to each other. Then, as so often happens, we kill someone or rob someone of drugs or money and have to go on the run. Who hasn’t found themselves in that situation? Sounds like it’s time for Episode 45 of Pop Art, the podcast where my guest chooses a movie from popular culture and I’ll select a film from the more art/classic side of cinema with a connection to it. This time, I am happy to welcome fellow podcaster Jarrett Galante, aka Clark F. Gable, who has chosen the Tony Scott/Quentin Tarantino neo-noir, True Romance, and I have chosen the quite different Jean Luc Godard French film classic, Pierrot le Fou, both about lovers on the run. And in this episode, we answer such questions as: What did Tarantino do to raise money to make Reservoir Dogs and how does Elvis fit in? Are Tarantino and Godard post-modern or post-post-modern? How does the movie Pineapple Express fit in? Who is Sam Fuller and would you want to be one? Where did the Sicilian story come from in True Romance? Where does Godard stand in the pantheon of directors? Where does Tarantino? What are the differences between the original screenplay and the final one in True Romance and what did Tarantino think about it? Where did the True Romance theme come from? Meanwhile check out Jarrett’s podcast The REAL Short Box at https://www.facebook.com/therealshortbox/ And Jarrett’s IDMB profile at https://www.imdb.com/name/nm1445425/?ref_=nv_sr_srsg_0 Check out my blog at https://howardcasner.wordpress.com/ My books, More Rantings and Ravings of a Screenplay Reader, The Starving Artists and Other Stories and The Five Corporations and One True Religion can be found at https://www.amazon.com/s?k=howard+casner&ref=nb_sb_noss
51:54
March 14, 2021
POP ART: Episode 44, Fast Times at Ridgemont High/The Last Picture Show
SCHOOL DAZED: “Aloha, Mr. Hand.” It was the best of times, it was the worst of times. No, actually, it was just the worst of times. The most nightmarish and traumatic years of our lives. A quagmire of debilitating despair sucking the life and soul out of us all. Or as it is more commonly called, high school. Sounds like it’s time for Episode 44 of Pop Art, the podcast where my guest chooses a movie from popular culture and I’ll select a film from the more art/classic side of cinema with a connection to it. This time, I am happy to welcome back previous guests, fellow podcasters Anna Keiser and Derek Dehanke, who have chosen the Amy Heckerling/Cameron Crowe 1980s classic Fast Times at Ridgemont High and I have chosen the Peter Bogdanovich/Larry McMurty 1970s classic The Last Picture Show, both about teens navigating the difficult years of high school. And in this episode, we answer such questions as: Who was originally asked to play Mr. Hand in Fast Times at Ridgemont High? What happened to Peter Bogdanovich’s career? What did Roger Ebert say about both films? Who was originally offered the Ben Johnson role in The Last Picture Show? What book did the person that was the basis for Mark “Rat” Ratner in Fast Times… write and what is his relation to pizza? Why is The Last Picture Show in b&w? What is Phil Spectre’s relation to Fast Times…? What two scenes did Fast Time… have to choose between to avoid an X rating? Check out Anna and Derek’s podcast, ‘80s Movie Montage, at https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/80s-movie-montage/id1498851364and other streaming platforms. Keep a look out for Anna’s short film She Had It Coming, now showing at film festivals. Check out my blog at https://howardcasner.wordpress.com/ My books, More Rantings and Ravings of a Screenplay Reader, The Starving Artists and Other Stories and The Five Corporations and One True Religion can be found at https://www.amazon.com/s?k=howard+casner&ref=nb_sb_noss
01:01:14
March 7, 2021
POP ART: Episode 43, The Truman Show/Dark City
IS IT REAL OR IS IT MEMOREX-“Good morning, and in case I don't see ya, good afternoon, good evening, and good night!”  Look to your right. What do you see? Are you sure? Look to your left? What do you see there? Look again. Are you sure? Are you really sure? Are you really, really, really sure? Sounds like it’s time for Episode 43 of Pop Art, the podcast where my guest chooses a movie from popular culture and I’ll select a film from the more art/classic side of cinema with a connection to it. This time round, I am happy to welcome back a previous guest, writer, director, producer and actor Michelle Ehlen, who has chosen the Peter Weir directed, Jim Carrey vehicle The Truman Show and I have chosen the cult favorite, sci-fi noir Dark City. And in this episode we answer such questions as: How does Charlie Chaplin fit in? What are the similarities between the two films in plot? What are the similarities in philosophy? What is the Truman Show Delusion? Why are some parts of Dark City reminiscent of The Matrix? How does the Rocky Horror Show fit in? Why did Siskel and Ebert apologize to Jim Carrey? What is Thursdayism? Rockwell or Hopper? Sartre, Schmartre? Meanwhile, check out Michelle’s IMDB page at https://www.imdb.com/name/nm1615954/?ref_=nv_sr_srsg_0 And her films on Amazon and other streaming platforms: https://www.amazon.com/s?k=michelle+ehlen&i=instant-video&crid=37LYCT29WI1S0&sprefix=michelle+ehlen%2Cinstant-video%2C209&ref=nb_sb_ss_c_3_14_ts-doa-p Check out my blog at https://howardcasner.wordpress.com/ My books, More Rantings and Ravings of a Screenplay Reader, The Starving Artists and Other Stories and The Five Corporations and One True Religion can be found at https://www.amazon.com/s?k=howard+casner&ref=nb_sb_noss
45:53
February 21, 2021
POP ART: Episode 42, L.A. Confidential/Double Indemnity
FATALE ATTRACTION “Wrapped up in tissue paper with pink ribbons on it”. Valentine’s Day is here. What better way to celebrate the holiday that with films that explore everything that makes Valentine’s great…murder, greed, corruption, adultery, and, yes, most important of all, femme fatales. Sounds like it’s time for Episode 42 of Pop Art, the podcast where my guest chooses a movie from popular culture and I’ll select a film from the more art/classic side of cinema with a connection to it. For my listeners, please like, follow or comment. This time, I am happy to welcome two fellow podcasters, Richard and Amanda Kirkham, a father/daughter team, who have chosen the Curtis Hanson neo-noir about 1950s Los Angeles, LA Confidential and I have chosen the Billy Wilder/Raymond Chandler film noir classic about 1940s Los Angeles, Double Indemnity, films that tell us that, yes, Valentine’s Day can be the most fatale day of the year. And in this episode, we answer such questions as: What building code makes a scene in Double Indemnity unrealistic? How did James Elroy describe Curtis Hanson? Why did Stanwyk, Robinson and MacMurray not want to do Double Indemnity? What does Los Angeles Plays Itself have to say about these films? Where are the Spanish style homes located that are used in both films? Why is the character in Double Indemnity called Walter Neff instead of Walter Ness? Check out Richard’s blog and podcast The Lamb at http://www.largeassmovieblogs.com/ And Amanda’s blog at https://hollywoodconsumer.wordpress.com/ Check out my blog at https://howardcasner.wordpress.com/ My books, More Rantings and Ravings of a Screenplay Reader, The Starving Artists and Other Stories and The Five Corporations and One True Religion can be found at https://www.amazon.com/s?k=howard+casner&ref=nb_sb_noss
57:23
February 14, 2021
POP ART: Epissode 41, Tootsie/Some Like It Hot
GENDER BENDER. “Nobody’s perfect.” Are you sure that person sitting across from you is male? Are you sure the person sitting next to you is female? They say clothes make the man. But do they? Or do clothes make the woman? Well, whatever the answer is, it sounds like it’s time for Episode 41 of Pop Art, the podcast where my guest chooses a movie from popular culture and I’ll select a film from the more art/classic side of cinema with a connection to it. For my listeners, please like, follow or comment. Today, I am happy to welcome writer/producer/director/novelist #DwayneAlexanderSmith, who has chosen the gender bending farce and Dustin Hoffman vehicle, Tootsie, and I have chosen the Billy Wilder/IAL Diamond classic, Jack Lemon/Tony Curtis comedy, Some Like it Hot, both about men who disguise themselves as women and try to pass. And in this episode, we answer such questions as: What is a Tootsie shot? What is the greatest last line in movie history? What held up the release of Tootsie? What does Some Like it Hot mean? Is Tootsie mansplaining? What did Cary Grant think of Tony Curtis in Some Like it Hot? Why does Bill Murray not have a credit at the beginning of the movie? What is historically inaccurate about the costumes in Some Like it Hot? Check out Dwayne’s IMDB credits and his films via https://www.imdb.com/name/nm0808051/?ref_=nv_sr_srsg_0 And his books at https://www.amazon.com/s?k=dwayne+alexander+smith&i=stripbooks&crid=2CXZXXA8I6TM4&sprefix=dwayne+alexan%2Caps%2C210&ref=nb_sb_ss_c_3_13_ts-doa-p especially Forty Acres about to be a major motion picture Check out my blog at https://howardcasner.wordpress.com/ My books, More Rantings and Ravings of a Screenplay Reader, The Starving Artists and Other Stories and The Five Corporations and One True Religion can be found at https://www.amazon.com/s?k=howard+casner&ref=nb_sb_noss
43:40
February 7, 2021
POP ART: Episode 40, Dead Calm/Knife in the Water
STRANGER DANGER. “I left the cucumbers behind” Our mothers always warned us. Always wear clean underwear. Always finish the food on your plate, there are children starving in other countries. Never pick up strangers. But do we listen to her? Of course, not. And because of that, we have to pay the penalty. Sounds like the perfect time for Episode 40 of Pop Art, the podcast where my guest chooses a movie from popular culture and I’ll select a film from the more art/classic side of cinema with a connection to it. For my listeners, please like, follow or comment. For this episode, I welcome writer/producer/director Robert Brody, who has chosen the Nicole Kidman, San Neill, Billy Zane three-handed thriller Dead Calm, and I have chosen Roman Polanski’s freshman feature, the Polish arthouse classic Knife in the Water, both about a couple who pick up a stranger and find themselves in sexual and physical conflict while on a boat at sea. And in this episode, we answer such questions as: Why do you never ask Billy Zane to go boating? Who dubbed the voice of the hitchhiker in Knife in the Water and why? What are the technical accuracies and inaccuracies of both movies? How and why did they change the ending to Dead Calm? What is significant about Knife in the Water and the Oscars? Why didn’t Polanski remake Knife in the Water in Hollywood? And be sure and stay tuned to the end where Robert very generously gives me a wonderful recommendation for my coverage service. Thank you, Robert.
49:39
January 31, 2021
POP ART: Episode 39, Superbad/American Graffiti
SCHOOL DAZE: “Where were you in ‘62” We’ve all been there. And it was a nightmare of monumental proportions. A time of nihilistic and existential dread. A period of fear and trembling and sickness unto death. Or as it is better known: finishing high school and leaving for college. Sounds like the perfect time for Episode 40 of Pop Art, the podcast where my guest chooses a movie from popular culture, and I’ll select a film from the more art/classic side of cinema with a connection to it. For my listeners, please like, follow or comment. Today, I am happy to welcome actor/voice over artist Charley Rossman, who has chosen the farcical coming of age Michael Cera/Jonah Hill movie, Superbad, (Charley plays the Security Guard at Good Shopper), and I have chosen George Lucas’s instant classic, American Graffiti, both about characters having to make some life changing decisions in their last year before college. Ah, good times, good times. And in this episode we answer such questions as: How are women treated in films like this? What had to happen in order for Christopher Mintz-Plasse to do his sex scene? Why was American Graffiti almost released to television? Is the ending to Superbad believable? Why didn’t Elvis Presley have any of his songs used in American Graffiti? What line from Superbad became a popular ringtone? In the meantime, check out Charley Rossman’s IMDB page at https://www.imdb.com/name/nm0744451/?ref_=nv_sr_srsg_0 And two of his recent films: This Way Up https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rbxD31BawNg&feature=youtu.be Ex-Mas exmasfilm.com https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rbxD31BawNg&feature=youtu.be
42:45
January 24, 2021
POP ART: Episode 38, Go/71 Fragments of a Chronicle of Chance
FANCY MEETING YOU HERE: “Wait. You want us to sell Amway?” How much does chance play in our lives and what happens to us? How much does it play when it comes to our interaction with strangers? Or when we or others are the victims of seemingly sudden and random acts of violence? Sounds like the perfect time for Episode 38 of Pop Art, the podcast where my guest chooses a movie from popular culture, and I’ll select a film from the more art/classic side of cinema with a connection to it. For my listeners, please like, follow or comment. Today, I am happy to welcome back film enthusiast and podcaster of Cinemarecall, The Vern, who has chosen the dark comic riff on Pulp Fiction, the cult classic Go, where I have chosen Michael Haneke’s Austrian art house classic 71 Fragments of a Chronicle of Chance, two films about three disparate groups of people whose paths cross due to shocking acts of violence during the holidays. So, Merry Xmas, I guess. And in this episode we answer such questions as: What was Melissa McCarthy and Sebastian Stan’s first film? What did the grocery store where Go was filmed do to cause the filmmakers consternation? What does Killer Condom have to do with it? How is Family Guy like a Haneke film? In what show did Scott Wolf and Jay Mohr reunite? Meanwhile look up The Vern’s podcast CinemaRecall at Cinemarecall.net.
44:08
January 17, 2021
POP ART: Episode 37, Annihilation/Stalker
WATCH THE SKIES. “It's not destroying. It's making something new.” When we’re visited from another world, how will it happen? Will it be with a bang or a whimper? Will it be a war of the worlds, a day the earth stood still, a close encounter? Or will it be a subtler arrival with a philosophical bent? Sounds like the perfect time for Episode 37 of Pop Art, the podcast where my guest chooses a movie from popular culture, and I’ll select a film from the more art/classic side of cinema with a connection to it. Today, I am happy to welcome director, writer, producer, Gustavo A. Garzon, who has chosen the female driven sci-fi epic Annihilation, whereupon I have chosen the Andrei Tarkovsky philosophical sci-fi art house classic Stalker, both about alien arrivals that resulted in the creation of a mysterious location the government has cut off from the general public. And in this episode we answer such questions as: What do these movies mean, or do they mean anything? Why did Annihilation flop? Why was Stalker filmed three different times? How does Annihilation support post-modernism and how does it address the ideas of female leads in film and the new era of genre meets diversity? How did Stalker contribute to the death of the director, the director’s wife and the lead actor? Be sure to check out Garzon’s IMDB page and his many films and videos at https://www.imdb.com/name/nm3126261/?ref_=nv_sr_srsg_0
48:14
January 10, 2021
POP ART: Episode 36, Captain American: The Winter Soldier/Manhattan Melodrama
BFFs: “On your left.” Does this sound familiar? You have a best friend growing up. You’re inseparable. You’d give your life for them. But as you get older, you find yourselves going your separate ways. While you go the straight and narrow and fight for law and order, your former friend joins the forces of evil to take down all that is worthwhile. It’s happened to all of us. Sounds like the perfect time for Episode 36 of Pop Art, the podcast where my guest chooses a movie from popular culture and I’ll select a film from the more art/classic side of cinema with a connection to it. Today, I am happy to welcome film enthusiast and podcaster, Kevin Myth, who has chosen the Marvel blockbuster Captain America: The Winter Soldier and I have chosen the favorite film of John Dillinger, the pre-code Manhattan Melodrama, both films about best friends who grew up to find themselves fighting each other on opposite sides of the law. And in this episode we answer such questions as: Who is the modern day Clark Gable? What is the difference between the Marvel and DC universes? Who played Clark Gable as a child? How relevant is Captain America: Winter Soldier to today’s world? What does John Dillinger have to do with it? Why did Robert Redford do the movie? What is significant about Nick Fury’s gravestone in Captain America? And check out Kevin’s podcast: The Real Short Box, http://www.rumblespoon.com/wp/index/
47:31
December 27, 2020
POP ART: Episode 35, Kiss Kiss Bang Bang/The Thin Man
THE HOLIDAYS CAN BE MURDER. “Don't quit your gay job.” Don’t you hate when this happens? You gather for the holidays. Christmas carols are in the air. Trees are lit with fairy lights. You’re ready to exchange gifts. And then, wouldn’t you know it? Someone gets murdered and you have to figure out who did it. Yes, sounds like the perfect time for Episode 35 of Pop Art, the podcast where my guest chooses a movie from popular culture and I’ll select a film from the more art/classic side of cinema with a connection to it. For my listeners, please like, follow or comment. Today, I am happy to welcome back a previous guest, film enthusiast and podcaster, and lover of Christmas movies, Jay Cluitt, who has agreed to join me to talk about a couple of holiday films. Jay has chosen Shane Black’s directorial debut, the dark comedy Kiss, Kiss, Bang, Bang, while I have chosen the classic detective film based on the Dashiell Hammett novel, The Thin Man, both about murder at Christmas time. And in this episode we ask such questions as: Why was Kiss, Kiss, Bang, Bang not a box office hit? What was so difficult about filming the climactic scene in The Thin Man and how do oysters come into it? What is the source material for Kiss Kiss Bang Bang? Who is Skippy? Who played the bear in the commercial in Kiss Kiss Bang Bang? How does Mia Farrow fit in? What is it about Kiss Kiss Bang Bang and women? Meanwhile, check out Jay’s podcast Deep Blue Sea (about Renny Harlin’s film) on Apple, Spotify, Podomatic and many other streaming services. And his blog Life v. Film at https://lifevsfilm.com/
43:29
December 20, 2020
POP ART: Episode 34, Big Trouble in Little China/That Man From Rio
NOW YOU SEE ‘EM, NOW YOU DON’T-“This is Jack Burton in the Pork Chop Express.” What would you do if someone was kidnapped, abducted right in front of you? What if you loved this person? What if this person was your fiancé? What if it was your truck? That’s right. It sounds like the perfect time for Episode 34 of Pop Art, the podcast where my guest chooses a movie from popular culture and I’ll select a film from the more art/classic side of cinema with a connection to it. For this episode, I am happy to welcome movie hyphenate, actor, director, writer, producer, stuntman and podcaster, Darin Munnell, who has chosen John Carpenter’s martial arts cult comedy classic, Big Trouble in Little China, and I have chosen French director, Philippe de Broca’s whimsical thriller/comedy spoof That Man From Rio, both about characters who see their fiancés, and a truck, abducted right before their eyes and go on an adventure to get them back. And in this episode we answer such questions as: Why did John Carpenter say he’ll never work for the studios again? How did That Man in Rio possibly influence Raiders of the Lost Arc? Who else auditioned for Sulu in Star Trek? How does James Bond fit in? Is there a structural problem with Big Trouble in Little China? And does it work anyway? And check out Darin’s other projects: Lone Wolf McCray, a TV series https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCt5IfMB9GUBk74eIR5I-MgA Pineapple Insurance,  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7FrRJpLoVBI The Real Short Box, http://www.rumblespoon.com/wp/index/
50:60
December 15, 2020
POP ART: Episode 33, Planes, Trains and Automobiles/Ballad of a Soldier
“Those aren’t pillows”. We’ve all been there. We have to be somewhere. We only have a certain amount of time to get there. And when we try…we hit nothing but obstacle after obstacle after obstacle. That’s right. It sounds like the perfect time for Episode 33 of Pop Art, the podcast where my guest chooses a movie from popular culture and I’ll select a film from the more art/classic side of cinema with a connection to it. For this episode, I am happy to welcome back a previous guest, film enthusiast and blogger movierob, who has chosen teen scene John Hughes’ first adult movie, the Steve Martin/John Candy farce, Planes, Trains and Automobiles, and I have chosen the classic Russian antiwar film, Ballad of a Soldier, both films about characters trying to get someplace by a certain time, and find it, well, just a tad difficult. And in this episode, we answer such questions as: Why did Planes, Trains and Automobiles get an R rating? What did Ballad of a Soldier signify when it came to Russian films? What was the original ending of Planes, Trains…? Who is “one righteous dude”? How successful was Ballad of a Soldier? What does Planes, Trains… say about class in the US? What was the director of Ballad… able to get away with more than other Russian filmmakers? And be sure to check out movierob’s blog at https://movierob.wordpress.com/
39:38
December 6, 2020
POP ART: Episode 32-The Lngest Yard/The Lonesliness of the Long Distance Runner
“Stick this is your trophy case.” It’s November, and to paraphrase Alfred Lord Tennyson, in fall a young man’s fancy turns to thoughts of…sports, or, since one of our films is British, sport. And since we are still in quarantine, what better idea that to combine sports with prison. Sounds like the perfect time for Episode 32 of Pop Art, the podcast where my guest chooses a movie from popular culture and I’ll select a film from the more art/classic side of cinema with a connection to it. For this episode, I am happy to welcome back a previous guest, film enthusiast, creator of the Film a Day blog, and host of the LAMBCast podcast Richard Kirkham, who has chosen the Robert Aldrich directed Burt Reynolds vehicle, The Longest Yard, and I have chosen the angry young man Tony Richardson drama, The Loneliness of the Long Distance Runner, both about sports and prisons. And in this episode we answer such questions as: What was the alternative ending for The Longest Yard? Which people associated with the movies are part of long film dynasties? What did Aldrich think of Reynolds and what did Reynolds think of Aldrich? How does James Bond and Alfred Hitchcock fit in? What is the difference between James and Edward Fox? Who started the crazy old ladies films? What is an angry young man and what do they want? Meanwhile, check out Richard’s Film a Day blog at http://kirkhamclass.blogspot.com/ And the LAMBCast at http://www.largeassmovieblogs.com/
51:24
November 22, 2020
POP ART: Episode 31-Mad Max: Fury Road/A Boy and His Dog
“I live, I die. I LIVE AGAIN!” Do you sometimes think we’re on the edge of an apocalypse? That tomorrow you might wake up to a barren and dog eat dog wasteland of mass destruction? And I’m not talking America after the election. Sounds like it’s time for Episode 31 of Pop Art, the podcast where my guest chooses a movie from popular culture and I’ll select a film from the more art/classic side of cinema with a connection to it. For this episode, I am happy to welcome back a previous guest, the host of the Cathode Ray Mission, Adam Ferenz, who has chosen George Miller’s blockbuster reimagining of the George Miller cult classic franchise Mad Max, Mad Max: Fury Road, and I have chosen L.Q. Jones cult classic adaptation of enfant terribles sci-fi author Harlan Ellison’s cult classic A Boy and His Dog, two apocalyptic films about some very strange strangers in some very strange lands. And in this episode, we answer such questions as: How does the Brady Bunch and Green Acres fit in? What did Miller steal from Ellison that led to Mad Max: Fury Road? How did Tom Hardy break his nose? How many hours of footage was there for Mad Max and how long did it take to view it? What was the controversy over the last line in A Boy and His Dog? And check out Adam Ferenz’s Cathode Ray Mission podcast at https://www.blogtalkradio.com/deviantlegion/2019/09/14/adam-ferenzs-cathode-ray-mission
47:54
November 15, 2020
POP ART: Episode 30-Bridesmaids/Monsoon Wedding
“It’s coming out of me like lava”. Is there some event you’ve been missing out on since the quarantine kicked in? Are you having those wedding bell blues? Are you not going to the chapel? Are you not getting married in the morning? Sounds like it’s time for Episode 30 of Pop Art, the podcast where my guest chooses a movie from popular culture and I’ll select a film from the more art/classic side of cinema with a connection to it. For my listeners, please like, follow or comment. I’m especially looking for more reviews on iTunes and I’d love to know what you think. For this episode, I am happy to welcome two guests, actors, producers and radio hosts, Jasper Cole and Ralph Cole, Jr., who have chosen the hit marital farce that gave us the national treasure known as Melissa McCarthy, Bridesmaids, and I have chosen the art house hit from Indian filmmaker Mira Nair, Monsoon Wedding. And in this episode we ask such questions as: Does the bathroom scene hurt the film, make the film, or both? Which movie made 30 times its cost? What is the legacy of Bridesmaids? Where did the idea for Monsoon Wedding come from? Where does Miss Marple fit in? Fill in the blank: weddings are a __________? Why did Jon Hamm not get his credit? And listen to Jasper and Ralph on their radio show at https://www.blogtalkradio.com/oneononejcole Look for Jasper Cole in the film Kambucha Cure and as producer, Never and Again, due out in 2021 And Ralph Core, Jr. in The Undertaker’s Wife and Boy Culture
50:56
November 8, 2020
POP ART: Episode 29, Jurassic Park/Frankenstein/Bride of Frankenstein/Son of Frankenstein
“It’s alive! It’s alive!” Do you think there may be just a bit too much ego out there? That there are people who think they can do no wrong? That morality doesn’t apply to them? And I’m not talking about politicians and lawyers…or film directors. Just in time for Episode 29 of Pop Art, the podcast where my guest chooses a movie from popular culture and I’ll select a film from the more art/classic side of cinema with a connection to it. This time, my guest, animater, blogger and film enthusiast Curt Headly, has chosen the Steven Spielberg blockbuster with game changing special effects, Jurassic Park, while I have chosen the timeless horror classics, a set of three, Frankenstein, Bride of Frankenstein and Son of Frankenstein, all films about scientists trying to play god. And in this episode we answer such questions as: Are these simply genre films or is there more to them that first meets the eye? How does the Age of Enlightenment and Modernism fit in? Which is the most popular dinosaur? What does North by Northwest have to do with it? What was so unsettling about the special effects in Jurassic Park? Where does Nazism fit in? What is a golem and would you want to be one?
52:00
November 1, 2020
POP ART: Episode 28, Halloween III: Season of the Witch/The 5000 Fingers of Dr. T
“I want my lavender spats.” What is about kids? Those annoying little rug rats and curtain climbers that cause you nothing but misery, pain and despair? Wouldn’t it be great if you could do something about them? But you can’t, can you? Because they’re kids. Can’t live with them, can’t kill them…or can you? Just in time for Episode 28 of Pop Art, the podcast where my guest chooses a movie from popular culture and I’ll select a film from the more art/classic side of cinema with a connection to it. For this episode, I am happy to welcome back a returning guest who earlier joined me on Pop Art to discuss The Omen and Village of the Damned, Damien Riley. As someone especially interested in horror, I was thrilled to have him return for the Halloween episode. Damien has chosen perhaps the underrated non-Halloween Halloween movie, Halloween III, Season of the Witch, while I have chosen the overlooked and also perhaps underrated Dr. Seuss fantasy/musical The 5000 Fingers of Dr. T, both with diabolical plots aimed at children. And in this episode, we answer such questions as: why did neither film succeed or meet expectations? What did Dr. Seuss have to say about The 5000 Fingers of Dr. T? Who is or were married while working on these two films? Who dubbed Timmy Rettig’s voice? Who was the voice of the curfew announcer in Halloween III? What is a Hans Conried and would you want to be one? And did the Simpsons do it? And be sure to check out Damien’s blog: rileyonfilm.com
43:06
October 27, 2020
POP ART: Episode 27, Snatch/The Twelve Chairs
“Hope for the best, expect the worst.” Running short of cash? Need some extra income? Would some rare and precious jewels help out? But what if everybody else and their cousin are after them as well? Just in time for Episode 27 of Pop Art, the podcast where my guest chooses a movie from popular culture and I’ll select a film from the more art/classic side of cinema with a connection to it. This time, my guest is writer/director/producer Drew Hall (Convergence, now on Amazon), who has chosen Guy Ritchie’s British crime farce Snatch, while I have chosen the Mel Brooks film nobody has seen or heard of, The Twelve Chairs, both with a disparate group of characters trying to locate some jewels. And in this episode we answer such questions as: Which movie is a vending machine snack and which is a well prepared steak? What is the primary difference between Ritchie and Tarantino? Why did Woody Allen and Mel Brooks’ careers go in different directions? Why did Gene Wilder not do The Twelve Chairs? What is a Dennis Farina and would you want to be one? How well does Ritchie’s style hold up today? What is the source material for Spaceballs?
43:44
October 18, 2020
POP ART: Episode 26-Back to the Future/La Jetee
“Roads? Where we’re going we don’t need roads.” Is there something about this time period that just isn’t working for you? Wouldn’t you love to travel in time and do something to fix things? Like the apocalypse? Or maybe to stop your parents from making an absolute mess of everything? Sounds like the perfect time for Episode 26 of Pop Art, the podcast where my guest chooses a movie from popular culture and I’ll select a film from the more art/classic side of cinema with a connection to it. This time, my guest, writing coach, trainer and narratologist Dimitri Vorontsov chose the immensely popular time travel movie from filmmaker Robert Zemeckis, Back to the Future, and I chose the experimental, art film La Jetee from avant garde French filmmaker Chris Marker, both about going back in time to events earlier in their or their parent’s youth. And in this episode we answer such questions as: Which scene from BTTF is the funniest when seen in a Russian movie theater? Which one made Dimitri cry? What is the main difference between La Jetee and Twelve Monkeys? What is the inciting incident in BTTF and does it break all the rules of modern day film structure? What does Greek tragedy, Christianity and film noir have to do with these films? What is it with French intellectual cinema? Is BTTF racially insensitive? How does Donald Trump fit in and are we living through Back to the Future II? And check out Dimitri’s new screenwriting contest and websites: https://superstarscreenwriters.com/?fbclid=IwAR32Uul-DVYSsjy6l94Nl5B6dd6d1kP7nRAim7jtCy6JtBhOhkGLueh6IE0, https://www.facebook.com/groups/SuperstarScreenwriters/
45:34
October 11, 2020
POP ART: Episode 25, The Running Man/The Most Dangerous Game
“I don’t do requests.” Is there someone in your life you wish wasn’t? Maybe a group of people? Or maybe you’re just plain bored? I have a solution—how about taking up…hunting? Sounds like the perfect time for Episode 25 of Pop Art, the podcast where my guest chooses a movie from popular culture and I’ll select a film from the more art/classic side of cinema with a connection to it. This time my guest, writer and film critic, influencer and book reviewer, Hermione Flavia chose the perhaps bit too relevant Arnold Schwarzenegger dystopian action film The Running Man and I chose the pre-code adventure classic, The Most Dangerous Game, both films about men hunting men for sport. And in this episode we answer such questions as: What are the major differences between the films and their source material? Who is the first recorded black person to play a white character in film? Who are the saving graces of each film? What was Richard Dawson’s condition for doing The Running Man? How relevant is The Running Man to the world today? And where does The Family Feud and Scooby Do come in? What is pre-code? And what is it about those fashions? And have a look at Hermione’s blog at wildfiremotionpictures.com.
46:29
October 5, 2020
POP ART: Episode 24, Hell or High Water/Bonnie and Clyde
“They’re young, they’re in love and they kill people.” Running low on cash? Need some extra pocket money? Or have you realized that banks are just an evil institution that deserve no quarter? The perfect time for Episode 24 of Pop Art, the podcast where my guest chooses a movie from popular culture and I’ll select a film from the more art/classic side of cinema with a connection to it. This time, my guest, film enthusiast, writer and blogger Kira Comerford, chose the modern day western Hell or High Water and I chose the game changing Warren Beatty/Faye Dunaway classic, Bonnie and Clyde, both films about bank robbers. And in this episode we discuss such issues as: How do you make characters who do bad things interesting or likeable to the audience; what is a Dale Dickey and would you want to be one; what is the double meaning in the title Hell or High Water; what major change did they make to Clyde Barrow’s character and why then did C.W. Moss’s character make no sense; why is Bonnie and Clyde one of the most important movies ever made; what do the three crosses signify; and many more.
45:30
September 27, 2020
POP ART: Episode 23, The Goonies/The Bridge (1959)
“Do the shuffle Truffle.” Feeling attacked? That the world is closing in on you and your friends? Feeling the need to come together and fight back and protect what’s yours? The perfect time for Episode 23 of Pop Art, the podcast where my guest chooses a movie from popular culture and I’ll select a film from the more art/classic side of cinema with a connection to it. For my listeners, please like, follow or comment. I’m especially looking for more reviews on iTunes and I’d love to know what you think. This time, my guest is Hollywood hyphenate, writer, director, producer, podcaster Donald McKinney, III, who is appearing for the second time on the show. Donald joined me on the premier episode of the podcast where we discussed Raiders of the Lost Ark and The Treasure of the Sierra Madre. This time round, Donald chose everyone’s favorite coming of age treasure hunt story, The Goonies, and I chose the dark German anti-war film The Bridge, both films about a group of teen friends who band together to save their home. And in this episode we ask such questions as: How did Josh Brolin ruin an important shot in The Goonies? Who dubs Dennis Quaid and Kris Kristofferson in German films? What is an Anne Ramsey and would you want to be one? What happened when Richard Donner went to Hawaii? What does Oedipus Rex have to do with it? Is it Captain Blood or The Sea Hawk? What happened to Casablanca when it premiered in Germany? And listen to Donald’s podcast The REAL Short Box at https://www.facebook.com/therealshortbox/, https://www.stitcher.com/podcast/the-real-short-box and other streaming platforms.
42:37
September 13, 2020
POP ART: Episode 22, The Blues Brothers/Silence (1971)
“We’re on a mission from God.” Feel like there’s something you should be doing that you aren’t? Are you ignoring some calling, perhaps? Maybe that there is some sort of goal, or even a mission, that you should be on? The perfect time for Episode 22 of Pop Art, the podcast where my guest chooses a movie from popular culture and I’ll select a film from the more art/classic side of cinema with a connection to it. For my listeners, please like, follow or comment. I’m especially looking for more reviews on iTunes and I’d love to know what you think. This time around, my guests, fellow podcasters Anna Keizer and Derek Dehanke, have chosen the Dan Ackroyd/John Belushi musical extravaganza The Blues Brothers, while I chose the austere 1971 Japanese masterpiece by Masahiro ShinodaSilence, both with stories about characters on a mission from God. And here we answer such questions as: Are Nazis funny? Who or what is a Mako and would you want to be one? Is there cultural appropriation here? Why didn’t the Blues Brothers do better at the box office than it did? Why did it go over budget? Which is the better film—Shinoda’s or Scorcese’s? Listen to Anna and Derek’s podcast 80’s Movie Montage on popular streaming sites. And look out for Anna’s supernatural dark comedy short She Had it Coming.
49:49
September 6, 2020
POP ART: Episode 21, Constantine/The Wailing
“What if I told you that God and the devil made a wager, a kind of standing bet for the souls of all mankind?” Have you been thinking that maybe there’s just a bit too much evil in the world? Not sure what is getting into people these days? What is possessing people to act the way they do? The perfect time for Episode 20 of Pop Art, the podcast where my guest chooses a movie from popular culture and I’ll select a film from the more art/classic side of cinema with a connection to it. For this episode, my guest, screenwriter Jordan Trippeer, chose the Keanu Reeves apocalyptic comic book vehicle Constantine, while I chose the new wave South Korean horror thriller The Wailing, both with stories about characters confronting demons and great evil. And here we answer such questions as: Myth Constantine? Why was there no sequel to Constantine? Just what is it about South Korean films? Which film has the less forgiving worldview? How does Kill Bill, Vol. I fit in? What the hell is the Book of Revelations? And many others.
44:44
August 30, 2020
POP ART: Episode 20, Jaws/White Hunter, Black Heart
“We’re gonna need a bigger boat.” Feeling a bit bored? Need some outside activity? Maybe you should take up hunting? If so, who would you want helping you? John Wilson or Quint? Sounds like the time for Episode 19 of Pop Art, the podcast where my guest chooses a movie from popular culture and I’ll select a film from the more art/classic side of cinema with a connection to it. This time, my guest, writer and filmmaker Steve Wise (the award winning Sur’vi, soon to be seen on Amazon), has chosen the Steven Spielberg game changing summer blockbuster Jaws, while I have chosen the Clint Eastwood movie nobody has seen or heard of, White Hunter Black Heart, both with stories about characters obsessed with hunting down wild beasts. And in this episode, we’ll answer such questions as: Why is the shark named Bruce? What did the IRS have to do with the casting? Who was supposed to originally play Quint? Why doesn’t Hooper die in the film? Why is Clint Eastwood so good in WH, BH? Who plays Humphrey Bogart and Katherine Hepburn? Has Clintwood ever lost a fight in his movies? And may more. And don’t forget to check out Steve’s website at https://stephenjwise.com/?fbclid=IwAR0zlhdz9uw02JPLQ9zdwQPr7fszNUZd5usKsGtakWBluEbjMTP-5Nkb7x8and company page at http://realitycheckent.com/?fbclid=IwAR1QeY1zK8OnPdOVs82DOe5BU1uiONNHXmrOCvcU--AtlUttMIhFaw8-sAE
49:01
August 23, 2020
POP ART: Episode 19, Finding Nemo/The Searchers
“That’ll be the day.” Concerned about your kids these days? Wondering about their safety? Just how far would you go to keep them safe? Who would you rather come after you if you are abducted? Ethan Edwards or Marlin? The perfect time for Episode 18 of Pop Art, the podcast where my guest chooses a movie from popular culture and I’ll select a film from the more art/classic side of cinema with a connection to it. This time, my guest, blogger and film reviewer Drew of Drew’s Movie Reviews, has chosen the Pixar/Disney animated classic and ironic fish out of water film Finding Nemo, while I have chosen the John Ford/John Wayne classic western The Searchers, both with adults who are looking for abducted children. And here we answer such questions as: Why were Albert Brooks and Ellen DeGeneres cast in the movie? What makes Pixar movies so special? What makes The Searchers a great movie…or is it one? How does the Batcave come into all this? Why was the shark named Bruce? Should Andy Serkis get an Oscar? How many Hitchcock references can you name? And what is John Wayne’s real name? And check out Drew's Movie Reviews at drewreviewmovies.wordpress.com, 
45:20
August 16, 2020
POP ART: Episode 18, The Karate Kid/Let the Righ One In
“Wax on, wax off. Wax on, Wax off.” Feeling the world is ganging up on you? Feeling targeted in some way? Even bullied by those around you? Who would you rather have on your side? Mr. Miyagi or Eli? The perfect time for Episode 18 of Pop Art, the podcast where my guest chooses a movie from popular culture and I select a film from the more art/classic side of cinema with a connection to it. This time, my guest, film enthusiast and podcaster, Todd Liebenow (of The Forgotten Film and Walt Sent Me Podcasts) chose the Ralph Macchio/Pat Morita iconic coming of age martial arts classic, The Karate Kid, and I chose Swedish filmmaker Tomas Alfredson’s moody, atmospheric new take on vampire films, Let The Right One In, both about bullying. And here we answer such questions as: How can you combine getting free labor while training someone for martial arts; who was the original choice for Mr. Miyagi; where the heck are the adults, for God’s sake; what does Let the Right One In bring to the vampire genre; what happens when you don’t invite a vampire in and they come in; and how are the issues of bullying dealt with and resolved in each movie, if they are indeed.
42:40
August 9, 2020
POP ART: Episode 17, Face/Off/Mulholland Drive
“Lies, deceit, mixed messages... this is turning into a real marriage”. Not quite feeling yourself these days?  Do you suspect you might not be who you think you are? Maybe that you might even be…someone else? Just in time for Episode 17 of Pop Art, the podcast where my guest chooses a movie from popular culture and I select a film from the more art/classic side of cinema with a connection to it. This time, my guest, filmmaker and screenwriter AJ Bermudez, chose Hong Kong filmmaker John Woo’s over the top action thriller Face/Off while I have chosen David Lynch’s surrealistic neo-noir Mulholland Drive, both with characters who are not exactly themselves for most of the story. And here we answer such questions as: What happened to John Woo in America? What the hell is going on in Mulholland Drive? Is John Travolta better at playing Nicholas Cage, or Cage better at playing Travolta? What are the best scenes in each movie? What do I and David Lynch have in common and what do the French have to do with it? What is the weakest scene in Face/Off? Who or what is Harve Presnell and would you want to be one?
45:45
August 2, 2020
POP ART: Episode 16, Galaxy Quest/Seven Samurai
“Never give up. Never Surrender.” Feeling a bit overwhelmed? That the world is ganging up against you? Need some outside help? Time for Episode 16 of Pop Art, a podcast where my guest chooses a movie from popular culture and I choose a film from the more art/classic side of cinema to go with it. For this episode my guest, filmmaker Anna Remus, has chosen the cult classic space opera, voted the 7th best Star Trek film of all time, Galaxy Quest, and I have chosen Akira Kurosawa’s great samurai epic Seven Samurai, both films in which a band of intrepid heroes join forces to defend a small defenseless group threatened by a vicious enemy. And here we answer such questions as to which characters correspond to other characters in both films? Why didn’t Galaxy Quest do better at the box office? What did Toshiro Mifune do that was so revolutionary in Seven Samurai? Who almost had the lead in Galaxy Quest and who is our favorite Galaxy Questian? What does Kevin Spacey have to do with it? And listen to other episodes of the podcast and don’t forget to Like, Comment and Follow.
49:41
July 26, 2020
POP ART: Episode 15, Get Out/Upstream Color
“By the way, I would have voted for Obama a third term, if I could.” Are you feeling a bit paranoid these days? Wondering if your mind’s your own? Time for Episode 14 of Pop Art, the podcast where my guest chooses a movie from popular culture and I choose a film from the more art/classic side of cinema. This time my guest, Anastasia Washington, stand up comedienne and co-host of the Cereal Killer podcast, chose the Jordan Peele game changing horror film, Get Out, and I chose writer/director Shane Caruth’s experimental, WTF sci-fi film, Upstream Color, both films about mind control. And we talk about such subjects as: Why is Get Out perhaps the most important movie of the 2010s? What is genre meets diversity? Pigs, pigs, pigs? Which ending for Get Out is the best? What happens when you write, direct, star in, edit, compose music, co-photograph and self-distribute a movie? What can be achieved on a nothing budget? So keep thinking good thoughts, if they are indeed your thoughts. Also, like, comment and follow
42:12
July 12, 2020
POP ART: Episode 14, Dumb and Dumber/Too Late For Tears
“Wanna hear the most annoying sound in the world?” Running a bit short of money these days? What would you do if, out of nowhere, you suddenly found a large amount of money in your possession? Find out what others have done in Episode 14 of my podcast Pop Art where my guest chooses a movie from popular culture and I choose a film from the more classic/art side of cinema. This time my guest, Hollywood hyphenate actor/writer/director/producer Alan Ritchson (his latest project Cicada 3301 will be released…well, when this quarantine thingy lets up) chose the Farrelly brothers first film, the outrageous farce Dumb and Dumber, and I chose the film noir cult classic Too Late For Tears, both about people who find themselves suddenly in possession of a great deal of filthy lucre. And in this episode we answer such questions as Why did Jeff Daniels only get $50,000 to do the movie while Jim Carrey got $7 million? What is the appeal of Jim Carrey? How does Clint Eastwood fit in and what does it have to do with toilets? What is the appeal of film noir? How were women seen in the 1940s and 1950s? What is a Dan Duryea and would you want to be one? And don’t forget to LIKE, COMMENT and FOLLOW.
40:02
July 5, 2020
POP ART: Episode 13, American Psycho/Repulsion
“I have to return some videotapes.” Is the quarantine turning you a bit…crazy? Perfect time to list to the latest episode of Pop Art, my podcast where the guest chooses a movie from pop culture and I select a film from the art/classic side of cinema with a connection to it. This time, my guests Tessa Markle and Carolina Alvarez of Femme Regard Productions have chosen the adaptation of bad boy Bret Easton Ellis’s book American Psycho and I have chosen bad boy Roman Polanski’s atmospheric black and white horror film Repulsion, both concerning characters who, let us say, are going off the deep end a bit. And here we answer such questions as: Which is the more feminist film? Does the ending of American Psycho work? What does Gloria Steinem have to do with any of it? What is important about the female orgasm in Repulsion? Don’t forget to LIKE, COMMENT or FOLLOW.
44:60
June 28, 2020
POP ART: Episode 12, Die Hard/District B13
"Come out to the coast, we'll get together, have a few laughs..." Have things reached a point where the world desperately needs a hero to save us? Find out with the twelfth episode of Pop Art, the podcast where my guest chooses a movie from popular culture and I, in turn, will choose a film from the art/classic side of cinema. This time, my guest, screenwriter and producer Ann Kimbrough, has chosen everyone’s favorite Christmas movie, Die Hard, and I, in turn, have chosen the French parkour/martial arts classic District B13, in which the lives of a group of people rest in the hands of some unexpected heroes. And here we discuss such topics as: Is Die Hard a Christmas movie? What part did Cybil Shephard’s pregnancy have to do with everything? To parkour or not parkour? What is the lasting influence of Die Hard? How does the movie Taken fit in? Is this the end of French cinema as we know it? What can screenwriters learn from these movies?
42:17
June 21, 2020
POP ART: Episode 11, Adaptation/Sunset Blvd.
“Audiences don't know somebody sits down and writes a picture; they think the actors make it up as they go along.” The quarantine is giving you a lot of time to write and work on your art. But are you? Sounds like the perfect time for the next episode of Pop Art, the podcast where the guest chooses a movie from pop culture and I, in turn, choose a film from the more art/classic side of cinema that has a connection to it. My guest, filmmaker Josh Kim, chose the whimsical, idiosyncratic movie Adaptation written by Charlie and Donald Kaufman, while I chose the film noir Billy Wilder classic Sunset Blvd. (the movie that shows the real tinsel behind the fake tinsel of Hollywood), both about screenwriters in crisis. And we cover such topics as: What does it say about screenwriters? Which is the better film? Why did Charlie Kaufman think his career was over? What was the original opening for Sunset Blvd. and how did they achieve the shot used now? Who else was considered for the various roles? Who or what is an H.B. Warner? And what is the connection to Rebel Without a Cause? Finally, remember, it’s the pictures that got small. Next up: Die Hard/District B13.
42:43
June 14, 2020
POP ART: Episode 10, Aliens/Attack the Block
Are we alone in the universe? If not, will they come with a bang or a whimper? Sounds like time for Episode 10 of POP ART. The concept of POP ART is for my guest to choose a movie from popular culture and I, in turn, will choose a film from the more art/classic side of cinema. For  Episode 10  my guest, screenwriter, film student and facebook host Mark Gunnion, has chosen the James Cameron horror/sci-fi blockbuster Aliens, while I have chosen the urban horror/sci-fi independent film Attack the Block, both about people fighting off deadly aliens.  And here we talk about: What is the major plot flaw of Aliens? Which movie has the better screenplay? Is Aliens all about mansplaining? Where did Alien 3 go wrong? And how does Dr. Who fit in?  Is it game over, man, game over?
42:15
June 6, 2020
POP ART: Episode 9, The Omen/Village of the Damned
The quarantine got you spending a bit too much time with the kids? Are you getting the feeling that maybe they’re really, well…evil, underneath it all? The perfect time to listen to Episode 9 of Pop Art, the podcast where the guest chooses a movie from pop culture and I, in turn, choose a film from the more art/classic side of cinema that has a connection to it. This time my guest, Damien Riley (appropriately named), of Riley on Film, chose the eschatological horror thriller The Omen, while I chose the more low key sci-fi thriller Village of the Damned, both about evil children. And in this episode, we discuss such topics as: Why were these films so unexpectedly successful? How do they rate by today’s standards? What does The Late Great Planet Earth have to do with it? What are the scariest moments in the film? Do the eyes have it? And how does Dr. Who fit in? And whatever you do, whenever your kids are around, think about a brick wall.
39:51
May 29, 2020
POP ART: Episode 8, Star Wars/The Hidden Fortress
This quarantine getting you down? Need some adventure in your life? The perfect time to listen to Episode 8 of my podcast Pop Art. In Pop Art, my guest chooses a movie from pop culture and I choose a film from the more art/classic side of cinema. For this episode, my guest Paul Zeidman, screenwriter, script consultant, blogger and podcaster, chose George Lucas’s game changing epic space opera Star Wars, and I chose Akira Kurosawa’s great epic samurai film The Hidden Fortress, one of Lucas’s biggest influences for his film. In this episode we cover such topics as: Is Star Wars a good film or is it an important film? How did it change Hollywood? Where does it rank in the franchise? Who is Akira Kurosawa and why are they saying such things about him? What is the state of movie making today? So give it a listen. “You’ll laugh, you’ll cry, you’ll kiss three bucks good-bye.”
46:28
May 23, 2020
POP ART: Episode 7, Singin' in the Rain/Irma Vep
Been seeing a lot of films during the quarantine? Then what better time to listen to a podcast about movies that are about making movies? In Pop Art, my guest chooses a movie from pop culture and I choose a film from the art/classic side of cinema and in Episode 7, my guest, Adam Ferenz, host of the Cathode Ray Mission, chose the musical classic of infinite grace Singin’ in the Rain, while I, in turn, chose a classic of Olivier Assayas’ oeuvre, Irma Vep. And here we discuss such issues as how did Singin’ in the Rain move from pop culture to art status? Who steals the movie? What do these films have to say about the making of movies in their own culture? Who or what is a Madge Blake? And how does Batman fit in? Enjoy. And don’t forget to LIKE, COMMENT and FOLLOW.
38:39
May 15, 2020
POP ART: Episode 6, Robocop/THX 1138
Afraid the world is heading toward dystopia? Worried the future may be…too futuristic? The perfect time to listen to Episode 6 of my Podcast Pop Art on Robocop/THX 1138. The premise of Pop Art is for my guest to choose a movie from pop culture and I in turn will choose a film from the art/classic side of cinema. This time my guest, film enthusiast, blogger and podcaster The Vern, of Cinema Recall, chose Paul Verhoeven’s early Hollywood directorial effort Robocop and I, in turn, chose George Lucas’s feature debut THX 1138, both dystopian tales with roboticized police forces. Here we discuss such topics as the ups and downs of Paul Verhoeven’s career; how relevant are both films to today’s world; who or what is an Ian Wolfe; what is with that white room; and other important and existential issues. Next up: Singin’ in the Rain/Day for Night.
43:11
May 10, 2020
POP ART: Episode 5, Best in Show/Series 7: The Contenders
Up for a little competition? The quarantine got you playing games? In Pop Art, my guest chooses a movie from pop culture and I chose a film from the more art/classic side of cinema. For this episode, my guest, filmmaker Michelle Ehlen, chose the brilliant, hysterical Christopher Guest ensemble comedy Best in Show and I chose the dark, trenchant, violent satire of reality shows Series 7: The Contenders, both mockumentaries about competitions. And in this show we deal with such issues as: Who gives the best performance in Best of Show and what does Joe Garagiola have to do with it? How long was the script for Best in Show? What does a pregnant woman want to eat after shooting someone in cold blood? How does Star Trek fit in? Don’t forget to comment, like and follow. Next up Robocop and THX 1138.
45:51
May 3, 2020
POP ART: Episode 4, The Great Escape/A Man Escaped
Feeling a bit trapped? Longing to escape? So are the characters in the latest installment of my podcast series POP ART. So what better time to sit down and indulge? For this episode, my guest movierob selected the epic John Sturges WWII prison escape film The Great Escape. I in turn chose the more austere, minimalist Robert Bresson WWII prison escape film, A Man Escaped, both based on true stories. And in this episode we cover such topics as: Did the Simpsons do it? Why was Steve McQueen not chosen most popular actor on the set of The Great Escape? What liberties did the writers take for The Great Escape? Why is anti-cinema at times more emotional than cinema? And what does A Man Escaped have to do with The Incredible Hulk? So come along with us as we explore man in captivity.
39:43
April 27, 2020
POP ART: Episode 3, Monty Python and the Holy Grail/The Seventh Seal
What better time to discuss two films that take place during a plague? For this episode of Pop Art, my guest Jay Cluitt chose the brilliant comedy Monty Python and the Holy Grail and I, in turn, chose the great Ingmar Bergman’s art house hit The Seventh Seal. And in this episode we answer such questions as: Who is the best Monty Pythoner; which movie has the best insult scenes; how does an acting troupe survive in a plague; where have all the existentialists gone; and what is the connection between Bergman and Twister?
47:03
April 27, 2020
POP ART: Episode 2, Goldfinger/The Spy Who Came in From the Cold
For this episode of Pop Art, my guest Richard Kirkham chose the James Bond blockbuster Goldfinger and I, in turn, chose the brooding, dark adaptation of John Le Carre's spy novel The Spy Who Came In From the Cold. John Le Carre called Bond an "international gangster" and in this episode we answer such questions as: how did the screenwriter resolve a major hole in the original Ian Fleming story; what line from Goldfinger was removed for censorship purposes; can someone actually die from being painted gold; what is an Oskar Werner and would you want to be one; who makes the best spy, Bond,James Bond, or Alec Leamus?
42:06
April 27, 2020
POP ART: Episode 1, Raiders of the Lost Ark/Treasure of the Sierra Madre
The concept of Pop Art is for my guest to chose a movie from pop culture and I will chose a film from the art/classic side that has a connection to it. This time, my guest Donald McKinney chose the blockbuster epic Raiders of the Lost Art and I chose the John Huston/Humphrey Bogart classic The Treasure of the Sierra Madre. Join us as we talk about both films and discuss such issues as: Does Indian Jones effect the outcome of the story at all? Who or what is a Denholm Elliott? How did Fred Dobbs die in Treasure...? What major star plays the kid selling lottery tickets? 
34:41
April 27, 2020