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Human Voices Wake Us

Human Voices Wake Us

By Human Voices Wake Us
The poem says, "Human voices wake us, and we drown." But I’ve made this podcast with the belief that human voices are what we need. And so, whether from a year or three thousand years ago, whether poetry or prose, whether fiction or diary or biography, here are the best things we have ever thought, written, or said.

Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com.
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Advice from Walt Whitman & W. B. Yeats

Human Voices Wake Us

Advice from Walt Whitman & W. B. Yeats

Human Voices Wake Us

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The Voice of Toni Morrison
Consider supporting Human Voices Wake us by clicking here: https://anchor.fm/humanvoiceswakeus/support I’ve gone through my favorite interviews with the novelist Toni Morrison and put together my favorite bits. I’ve gathered them into these segments: (:35) On love (parental, romantic, religious) (8:25) On childhood, family history, and being a parent and a writer (43:32) On race, writing in difficult political and social moments, and being more interested in good than evil (1:11:48) On writing in general, and specifically the writing of Beloved The interviews I’ve drawn from are these: Toni Morrison In Depth, on C-SPAN Toni Morrison on Charlie Rose in 1993, 1998, and 2015 Toni Morrison, interviewed by Junot Diaz Toni Morrison interview by Farah Jasmine Griffin at the 92nd Street Y Toni Morrison on NPR’s Fresh Air: in 2015, and a Retrospective Toni Morrison on BBC’s World Book Club Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com.
01:45:14
June 26, 2022
The Great Myths #18: Celtic Myth and Scholarship
Consider supporting Human Voices Wake us by clicking here: https://anchor.fm/humanvoiceswakeus/support Tonight we get back to the Celtic myths, and take a detour from the stories themselves and into what the most recent scholarship has to say about them. The book I read from is Mark Williams’s Ireland’s Immortals: A History of the Gods of Irish Myth. Previous episodes on Celtic Myth can be found here: https://wordandsilence.com/2022/03/23/the-great-myths-17-tales-of-the-elders-of-ireland-podcast/ Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
01:05:11
June 19, 2022
Advice from Seamus Heaney // James Joyce's "Araby"
Consider supporting Human Voices Wake us by clicking here. In tonight's episode, we hear from Seamus Heaney and James Joyce. In the first part, I read Heaney’s responses to general questions about writing poetry: his methods, his inspiration, his favorite time of day to write. These come from Dennis O’Driscoll’s Stepping Stones: Interviews with Seamus Heaney. In the second part (beginning at 35:15) I read James Joyce’s short story, “Araby.” The reading is prefaced by a few personal thoughts on Joyce, and includes an excerpt from Gabriel’s Yared’s score for the film The English Patient. I previously discussed Michael Ondaatje’s novel, Anthony Minghella’s movie, and Yared’s music for the film, in an early episode, Rereading the English Patient. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com.
01:03:43
June 08, 2022
Loneliness // Advice from Beethoven, Joseph Campbell, W. S. Merwin
Consider supporting Human Voices Wake us by clicking here: https://anchor.fm/humanvoiceswakeus/support Tonight, I replay two of my favorite episodes from Human Voices Wake Us: from September of 2021, I talk for a moment about loneliness and creativity. The next segment (beginning at 36:00) is from July of 2021, where we hear more about creativity and living in the world, this time from Beethoven, Joseph Campbell, W. S. Merwin, and W. D. Snodgrass. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
01:06:25
June 01, 2022
Notes from the Grid: Simple Awareness
Preorder print copies of Notes from the Grid here: https://wordandsilence.com/human-voices-wake-us/ Tonight, I read the last three essays from Notes from the Grid. After a short introduction, the eighth essay begins at 6:00, the ninth at 26:30, and the tenth at 54:40. The audio from Philip Roth near the end of tonight's episode comes from Christopher Lydon's 2006 interview with him. As always, send any comments to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
01:16:49
May 25, 2022
Notes from the Grid: The Perpetual Adolescent
Preorder print copies of Notes from the Grid here. https://wordandsilence.com/human-voices-wake-us/ For the next month or so, I will be reading a short book of essays, Notes from the Grid, that I have been writing since 2006. Tonight, I read the sixth and seventh (which begins at 20:30). Spirit Murmur, the album of string quartet music I mention in the episode, composed by Alan Hovhaness and performed by the Shanghai Quartet, can be purchased here. As always, send any comments to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com.
51:19
May 16, 2022
Notes from the Grid: All Things Can Console
Preorder print copies of Notes from the Grid here. https://wordandsilence.com/human-voices-wake-us/ For the next month or so, I will be reading a short book of essays, Notes from the Grid, that it has taken me the last sixteen years to complete. Tonight, I read the fifth and the sixth. Essay number six begins at 23:27. As always, send any comments to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com.
42:33
May 09, 2022
Notes from the Grid: To Criticize the Critic
Preorder print copies of Notes from the Grid here. https://wordandsilence.com/human-voices-wake-us/ For the next month or so, I will be reading a short book of essays, Notes from the Grid, that it has taken me the last sixteen years to complete. Tonight, I read the third and fourth. The second essay begins at 28:28. The excerpt I play from an interview with George Steiner comes from a 1996 episode of Desert Island Discs. As always, send any comments to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com.
37:58
May 02, 2022
Notes from the Grid: Rediscovering the Hidden Life
Preorder print copies of Notes from the Grid here: https://wordandsilence.com/human-voices-wake-us/ For the next month or so, I will be reading a short book of essays, Notes from the Grid, that it has taken me the last sixteen years to complete. Tonight, I read the first two. Listen to the introduction, or click on the link above, to see how you can become a part of bringing the book into print.  After a short introduction, the first essay begins at 6:20, and the second begins at 30:22.  As always, send any comments to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com.
38:39
April 26, 2022
Walt Whitman's Mystical Poetry
Consider supporting Human Voices Wake us by clicking here. A reading of my favorite of Walt Whitman’s "mystical" poems--that is, those poems where he found identification in every and every thing, and saw that as a kind of salvation for us all. All of the poems can be found in the two recent books I edited, The Selected Short Poems of Walt Whitman, and The Selected Long Poems of Walt Whitman. Please consider getting a copy of these books (they are only $3.99), if you enjoy what you hear in this episode. Also included in this episode is (purportedly) the only known recording of Whitman, reading four lines from his poem “America” (at 54:39). For those who want to read an article about this recording, it can be downloaded here. For those who would like to skip to his longer poems, see the list below and the timestamp for where to find them. The poems I read are: Short Poems: Selections from “Song of Myself” Assurances Earth, My Likeness Full of Life Now To a Common Prostitute Mother and Babe O Me! O Life! Sparkles from the Wheel To Thee Old Cause! A Clear Midnight From Montauk Point America L. of G.’s Purport Give Me the Splendid Silent Sun Long Poems: Crossing Brooklyn Ferry (1:08:00) Song of the Open Road (1:26:00) A Song of the Rolling Earth (1:48:53) Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
02:02:26
April 19, 2022
Walt Whitman's Death Poetry
Consider supporting Human Voices Wake us by clicking here. A reading of my favorite of Walt Whitman’s poems about death. All of them can be found in the two recent books I edited, The Selected Short Poems of Walt Whitman, and The Selected Long Poems of Walt Whitman. Please consider getting a copy of these books (they are only $3.99), if you enjoy what you hear in this episode. For those who want to skip ahead to the section longer poems, which are some of Whitman’s greatest, it begins at 39:00. The poems I read are: Short Poems: Selections from “Song of Myself” The Compost I Sit and Look Out Scented Herbage of My Breast Of Him I Love Day and Night As the Time Draws Nigh So Long! Not Youth Pertains to Me Old War-Dreams As at Thy Portals Also Death A Carol Closing Sixty-Nine As I Sit Writing Here Supplement Hours Long Poems: The Sleepers As I Ebb’d with the Ocean of Life Out of the Cradle Endlessly Rocking When Lilacs Last in the Dooryard Bloom’d Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
01:56:16
April 14, 2022
Walt Whitman's Love Poetry // Whitman & Sex
Consider supporting Human Voices Wake us by clicking here. A reading of my favorite of Walt Whitman’s love poems. All of them can be found in the two recent books I edited, The Selected Short Poems of Walt Whitman, and The Selected Long Poems of Walt Whitman. Please consider buying these books (they are only $3.99), if you enjoy what you hear in this episode. Following these poems (at 1:06:57), I have inserted a reading from a previous episode on Whitman’s love and sex life, from Paul Zweig’s book, Walt Whitman: The Making of the Poet. The poems I read are: Selections from “Song of Myself” To You Once I Pass’d through a Populous City Whoever You Are Holding Me Now in Hand Of the Terrible Doubt of Appearances Calamus #8 Calamus #9 When I Heard at the Close of the Day To a Stranger When I Peruse the Conquer’d Fame Thou Reader I Sing the Body Electric Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
01:52:34
April 10, 2022
Advice from Toni Morrison, Richard Wilbur, John Berryman, T. S. Eliot // Whitman's Earliest Critics
Consider supporting Human Voices Wake us by clicking here. Another two part episode: In the first part, quotations on creativity come from Toni Morrison, Richard Wilbur, John Berryman, and T. S. Eliot. In the second part (starting at 24:17), I read selections from Walt Whitman’s earliest reviewers. The full text of these reviews can be found in Gary Schmidgall’s Selected Poems of Walt Whitman. The two pocket books of Whitman's poetry that I mention at the end are The Selected Long Poems and The Selected Short Poems. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
57:30
April 06, 2022
Anthology: Poems by Lowell, Clare, Barbauld, Finch, Spenser // First Person: Eudora Welty & Helen Keller
Consider supporting Human Voices Wake us by clicking here. Another two part episode: in the first, I read five poems: Robert Lowell (1917-1977), “Bobby Delano” John Clare (1793-1864), “An Invite to Eternity” Anna Laetitia Barbauld (1743-1825), “A Summer Evening’s Meditation” Anne Finch, Countess of Winchilsea (1661-1720), “A Nocturnal Reverie” Edmund Spenser (1552?-1599), from The Faerie Queen, Book 3, Canto 6 In the second (starting at 42:00), I read from Eudora Welty’s One Writer’s Beginnings, and Helen Keller’s The Story of My Life. Both, in their own way, are about each writer’s earliest discovery of words. As with many First Person segments, come from the pages of Lapham’s Quarterly, one of the best collections of voices from history that I know. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
59:53
March 29, 2022
Loneliness, pt2 // Shakespeare, Sex & Sonnets
Another two part episode: The first is a brief sequel to an episode from last September, called Loneliness. (You can listen to that episode here) The second part (beginning at 19:19) is a reading from Peter Ackroyd’s biography of William Shakespeare—buy the book here. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
48:00
March 25, 2022
The Great Myths #17: Tales of the Elders of Ireland (Celtic)
A reading of selections from The Tales of the Elders of Ireland (Acallam na Senórach). The translation I read from is that of Ann Dooley and Harry Roe. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
01:10:59
March 22, 2022
"That Jane Goodall Tramp" // So Long, Lawrence Ferlinghetti
Another two-part episode: The first part is a scattershot on Jane Goodall’s appearance in Gary Larson’s The Far Side; my daughter’s reaction to hearing The Beatles’ “Revolution 9” for the first time; and thinking again about what Joan Didion taught me about jealousy, and what Leon Wieseltier’s 1996 book, Kaddish, can add to it. The second part (begins at 35:54) is a repeat from a 2/23/2021 episode, following the death of the poet Lawrence Ferlinghetti. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
50:21
March 14, 2022
First Person: Funeral Home Director // Telemarketer
Here are two readings from Gig: Americans Talk About Their Jobs. Beverly Valentine, Funeral Home Director Jason Groth, Telemarketing Group Supervisor Depending on the response, this might become a regular format for episodes going forward, putting two different episodes into one, simply for ease of listening. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
46:10
March 08, 2022
The Earliest Bookstores I Remember // Picasso's "Guernica"
Tonight’s episode is split into two parts: In the first, I take up a listener’s request to talk about my memories of bookstores; In the second, I read from two recent books about Pablo Picasso’s Guernica. The books I read from are Simon Schama's The Power of Art and John Richardson's Life of Picasso, Volume 4: The Minotaur Years. The second part of the episode begins at 45:08. Depending on the response, this might become a regular format for episodes going forward, putting two different episodes into one, simply for ease of listening. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
01:20:51
March 02, 2022
Advice from Joan Didion, Stanley Kunitz, Billy Collins & Alice Munro
A return to a series of podcasts that I haven't done since last year, where I take a quotation from another writer/artist/etc. on creativity, and just talk about it. Today's quotes come from essayist/novelist, Joan Didion, the poets Stanley Kunitz and Billy Collins, and the short story writer, Alice Munro. Preceding this is a few minutes of talking about how important it seems to be for an artist to be associated with a certain place--Dickens with London, Robert Frost with New England, etc. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
57:47
February 25, 2022
Jealousy, Part 2
A sequel of sorts to an episode from last year, called Jealousy. In this episode, I talk about more recent mutations of the kinds of jealousy I've felt towards other writers and creative people, and what to do about it.  Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
31:17
February 21, 2022
The Great Myths #16: The Story of Taliesin (Celtic)
A reading of the Welsh story about the poet and seer, Taliesin, as found in the mid-sixteenth century Hanes Taliesin. The translation I use comes from Patrick K. Ford's The Mabinogi & Other Medieval Welsh Tales. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
01:09:29
February 14, 2022
Anthology: Poems by William Blake, Elizabeth Barrett Browning, Louise Bogan, Anne Bradstreet, Henry Vaughan
A reading of five poems: Louise Bogan (1897-1970), “The Alchemist” Elizabeth Barrett Browning (1806-1861), Sonnets from the Portuguese #41 (“I thank all who have loved me in their hearts”) William Blake (1757-1827), from Milton (“I come in self-annihilation”), from Jerusalem(“Trembling I sit day and night”) Anne Bradstreet (1612-1672), “The Author to Her Book” Henry Vaughan, (1621-1695) “The Book” Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
33:08
February 07, 2022
Anthology: Poems by Eavan Boland, Gerard Manley Hopkins, Wordsworth, Milton, Philip Sidney
A reading of five poems: Eavan Boland, “The Making of An Irish Goddess” Gerard Manley Hopkins, “That Nature Is a Heraclitean Fire and of the Comfort of the Resurrection” William Wordsworth, “London, 1802” John Milton, ending to Paradise Lost Philip Sidney, “Loving in truth” Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
28:13
February 04, 2022
Ted Hughes: Selected Poems
A collection of all of Ted Hughes’s poetry that I have recorded and posted here over the past year. They can all be found in his Collected Poems (smaller selections of his poetry include Selected Poems 1957-1994 and A Ted Hughes Bestiary). Rather than organizing my readings of Hughes’s poetry chronologically, I start with what seems to me his best poetry (and some of the best poetry in English, period)—that is, the poetry he published between 1970 and 1983. Only after these are his first three collections read from; the readings after that pick up his later career. A full table of contents can be downloaded here (it is too large to paste into the episode description). Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
04:33:38
January 31, 2022
T. S. Eliot's "The Waste Land"
A reading of T. S. Eliot’s 1922 poem, The Waste Land. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
29:46
January 28, 2022
Standing on Two Feet & the Evolution of Language
A reading from a handful of sections from Steven Mithen’s book The Prehistory of the Mind: A Search for the Origins of Art, Religion and Science. (That book is an identical reissue to the one first published that I read, with a slightly different title, as The Prehistory of the Mind: The Cognitive Origins of Art and Science). Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
32:07
January 24, 2022
Seamus Heaney's Origin Story
A reading of interviews with Seamus Heaney, on his discovery and growth into poetry from boyhood through university. As usual, these remarks come from Dennis O’Driscoll’s book-length collection of interviews with Heaney, Stepping Stones: Interviews with Seamus Heaney. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
36:44
January 21, 2022
Anthology: Poems by William Carlos Williams, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, Emily Brontë, Alexander Pope, Roy Fisher
A reading of five poems: The Entertainment of War, by Roy Fisher (1930-2017) Danse Russe, by William Carlos Williams (1883-1963) “The night is darkening round me,” by Emily Brontë (1818-1848) Work Without Hope, by Samuel Taylor Coleridge (1772-1834) Ode on Solitude, by Alexander Pope (1688-1744) Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
26:24
January 18, 2022
The Great Myths #15: The Pursuit of Diarmuid and Gráinne (Celtic)
A reading from great Irish love story, The Pursuit of Diarmuid and Gráinne (Tóraigheacht Dhiarmada agus Ghráinne), versions of which go back at least to the tenth century, details of which inspired the later Romance of Tristan and Isolt. The literary version read from here dates to 1651.  The text I read from is the translation by Nessa Ní Shéaghdha, was published as volume 48 in the Irish Texts Society, Main Series. The text of other translations can be found here. A summary is on Wiki here. My essay on the boar can be found here. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
56:35
January 15, 2022
First Person: Rome (AD 64) and America (1832)
A reading from Seneca’s Letters to a Stoic, from c. AD 64; and from Alexis De Tocqueville’s Democracy in America, from 1832. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
23:51
January 04, 2022
Anthology: Is Poetry Important?, & Poems by Emily Dickinson, Shakespeare, Virgil, R. S. Thomas
Rather than just reading a few poems here like usual, I take a few minutes to talk about a tweet that made waves in the “poetry community” on Twitter a few months ago. The tweet said, among other things, that “the general population has no interest in what we do,” and that a belief that poetry could be “powerful” is an illusory one. I don’t name the poet who wrote the tweet, or link to it here, because I don’t think it was meant to become so popular, and therefore mistaken as a “public pronouncement.” Nevertheless, a version of this comment or complaint about poetry is repeated everyday somewhere, and it was worth responding to before reading the following poems: “Affinity,” by R. S. Thomas #1142, by Emily Dickinson Sonnet #27, by William Shakespeare from The Aeneid, Book 6, by Virgil (translated by Allen Mandelbaum) Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
28:51
January 01, 2022
First Person: Minnesota, c. 1900
A repeat of an episode from 11/27/2020.  A reading from Studs Terkel’s book, American Dreams: Lost & Found.  Here, Andy Johnson talks about his life in rural Minnesota at the turn of the twentieth century. The interview is also included in Terkel’s best-of volume, The Studs Terkel Reader.  Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
13:52
December 28, 2021
Anthology: Poems by Amy Lowell, Thomas Hardy, John Donne, Christopher Marlowe, William Cowper
A reading of five poems:  “New Heavens for Old,” by Amy Lowell “The Darkling Thrush,” by Thomas Hardy “The Winter Evening,” by William Cowper “Death be not proud,” by John Donne “The Passionate Shepherd to His Love,”by Christopher Marlowe Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
27:33
December 25, 2021
Ted Hughes: 5 Last Poems
A reading of five poems from Ted Hughes’s last book, Birthday Letters (1998). This is the book where Hughes finally addressed his relationship to Sylvia Plath in verse, nearly forty years after her suicide; in my introduction to the poems, I also talk about the strange phenomenon both of audiences demanding such a confession over a private matter, and the weight that Hughes said was lifted from him, when he finally published the book. All of the poems can be found in his Collected Poems. The poems are: A Pink Wool Knitted Dress You Hated Spain Drawing The Rabbit Catcher Life after Death Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
32:46
December 22, 2021
Anthology: Poems by Edgar Lee Masters, Tennyson, Mary Robinson, Henry Wotton, and Walter Raleigh
A reading of five poems from five different poets. They are: “Minerva Jones,” by Edgar Lee Masters (from his Spoonriver Anthology) “Ulysses,” by Alfred Tennyson “A London Summer Morning,” by Mary Robinson “A Hymn to My God in a Night of my Late Sickness,” by Henry Wotton “The Lie,” by Walter Raleigh Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
30:02
December 18, 2021
Ted Hughes: A Handful of Late Poems
A reading of a handful of poems from Ted Hughes, published between 1986 and 1997. They can be found in his Collected Poems.  They are: Flowers & Insects (1986) Two Tortoiseshell Butterflies Sunstruck Foxglove Uncollected (1987-1989) Devon Riviera Wolfwatching (1989) For the Duration Take What You Want But Pay For It Uncollected (1992-1987) Mother Tongue Tales from Ovid (1997) Tereus Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
44:57
December 14, 2021
1606: A Poem about Shakespeare
A reading from my poem about Shakespeare, 1606. Born out of a podcast episode from earlier this year, it seemed appropriate to set aside an entire episode, moths later, to share what the poem has become. If you enjoy what you hear, please consider sharing it with others; and as it is still a work in progress, email me with any reactions or suggestions for improvement: humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
48:13
December 11, 2021
Ted Hughes: A Handful of Short Poems from the 1970s
A reading of eleven short poems from a handful of books that Ted Hughes published during the 1970s. As I explain in the introduction, the period was one of creative flux for Hughes, and the collections that these poems come from are not always successful as books; however, there are magnificent poems to be found within them, and they are easily read outside the context of the books they were first embedded in. They can all be found in his Collected Poems. The poems are: Prometheus on His Crag (1973) #7 Gaudette (1977) I skin the skin Uncollected (1977-1978) New Foal Orts (1978) #1 #44 Cave Birds (1978) The Executioner A Green Mother Bride and Groom Lie Hidden for Three Days Adam & the Sacred Nine And the Phoenix has come Earthnumb (1979) Life is Trying to Be Life A God Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
39:21
December 07, 2021
First Person: London, c. 1615
A reading from chapter six of Peter Ackroyd’s history of early seventeenth-century England, Civil War (or Rebellion, as the book has been retitled in its America, apparently not to upset anybody buying it by accident and hoping to read about a different Civil War). Ackroyd uses two texts to paint a brief picture of London at the time: Thomas Dekker’s The Seven Deadly Sins of London (1607), and Ben Jonson’s play Bartholomew Fair(1614). Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
19:14
December 05, 2021
Ted Hughes: 6 Poems from Wodwo
A reading of six poems from Ted Hughes's 1967 book, Wodwo, and one uncollected poem from the same time period. They can be found in his Collected Poems.  Wodwo (1967) A Wind Flashes the Grass Reveille from "Out" The Warriors of the North Heptonstall You Drive in a Circle from "Scapegoats and Rabies" (uncollected) Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
23:25
December 02, 2021
Eavan Boland: 5 Poems
A repeat of a collection of episodes from last year, of five poems by the Irish poet, Eavan Boland. All of them can be found in her New Collected Poems (https://www.amazon.com/New-Collected-Poems-Eavan-Boland/dp/0393337308/) Quarantine Irish Poetry Lines for a Thirtieth Wedding Anniversary The Pomegranate Lava Cameo Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
12:07
November 29, 2021
From the Archives: Lee Harvey Oswald
A repeat of an episode from 11/21/20, a reading of my poem about Lee Harvey Oswald. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
34:22
November 22, 2021
First Person: Pompeii (AD 79) & San Francisco (AD 1906)
A reading from Pliny the Younger's letter, describing the eruption of Mt. Vesuvius and the destruction of Pompeii, in the year 79; and Jack London's article describing the great earthquake of San Francisco, in 1906. I end with a reading of Laurie Sheck's poem "Pompeii," from her 2003 book, Black Series. Pliny the Younger's letter can be read here; and Jack London's article can be read here; however, I only came across both of them together thanks to Lapham's Quarterly, which featured them in their Summer, 2008 issue called Book of Nature; you can buy the issue, or subscribe to the magazine, here. As I've said before, for those not independently wealthy or ensconced in academia, I know of no better resource for the discovery of voices from history. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
24:22
November 19, 2021
How Did Picasso Do It?
Readings from a few books about Pablo Picasso, where he talks about creativity, and how the power behind his own paintings, and his huge output, remained a mystery for him as much as anyone else. The first few quotations come from the huge Taschen book about Picasso that covers his entire life; the rest come from the multi-volume biography of Picasso by John Richardson: A Life of Picasso 1: The Prodigy: 1881-1906 A Life of Picasso 2: The Cubist Rebel: 1907-1916 A Life of Picasso 3: The Triumphant Years: 1917-1932 Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
38:51
November 16, 2021
Louise Glück: 8 Poems from “The Wild Iris”
A reading of eight poems from Louise Glück's 1992 collection, The Wild Iris; followed by readings made last March, of six poems from her 1990 book, Ararat. Buy Ararat or The Wild Iris individually, or in Glück's Collected Poems 1962-2012.  from The Wild Iris Matins ("Forgive me if I say I love you") Retreating Wind The Garden Field Flowers Matins ("Not the sun merely but the earth") Vespers ("More than you love me, very possibly") September Twilight The White Lilies from Ararat Lost Love Appearances Brown Circle Child Crying Out Celestial Music First Memory Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
45:02
November 13, 2021
Episode #200: Some Thoughts on Success & Failure
A reading, with comments thrown in throughout, of an essay of mine written between 2015-2016 (I get the dates wrong in the podcast). The entirety of it can be read here as There is Only the Trying: Some Thoughts on Fame & Failure. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
51:43
November 10, 2021
From the Archives: George Orwell Down in the Mines
A repeat of an episode first posted on 11/9/2020: A reading from George Orwell’s 1937 book, The Road to Wigan Pier. This long passage comes from the handful of trips he took down into the coal mines of northern England, and the horrible conditions there. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
33:39
November 07, 2021
William Wordsworth: Immortality Ode, and 3 Other Poems
A reading of four poems by William Wordsworth: Ode: Intimations of Immortality from Recollections of Early Childhood London (1802): "Milton! thou should'st be living at this hour!" St. Paul's "It was an April morning: fresh and clear" (part 1 on "Poems on the Naming of Places" I read these here tonight to celebrate the release of a Selected Poems of William Wordsworth that I put together, and was just published. Other small books of poems (Whitman, Tennyson, and Frost) in the same series can be found here. If you'd like to support this podcast, buying a handful of these books would be the easiest way to do it--they are all around 120 pages, and all priced at $3.99. If you can recommend a similar story about how anyone discovered their passion, and would like me to read from, email me at humanvoiceswakus1@gmail.com. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
23:58
November 05, 2021
One Poet Responds to Fame
A reading of a letter written by the poet Ted Hughes, to friend and critic Al Alvarez, in November of 1971. At this time, Alvarez was publishing an intimate (and to Hughes's mind, exploitative) account of the 1963 suicide of the poet Sylvia Plath. The letter can be found in The Letters of Ted Hughes, pages 321-326.  I use this letter as a starting point to wonder why we treat celebrities, the famous, or just the infamous, the way we do; as Hughes puts it, knowledge of his and Sylvia Plath's marriage and private life can only be entertainment and anecdote, in this case for college teachers and their students; it can offer little insight into either writers' poetry. This intrusion into private lives and their grief, and the ease with which we, fifty years later, continue to lap up the gossip surrounding well-known people, should be an obvious parallel. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
42:40
November 02, 2021
The Great Myths #14: The Destruction of Da Derga's Hostel (Celtic)
In this seventh episode on Celtic mythology, I review one of the greatest surviving stories in the tradition, Togail Bruidne Dá Derga, or The Destruction of Da Derga's Hostel. Since it is also a fairly long story, I only share two small sections from the story itself: a piece from the beginning, and from the story's conclusion. You can read more about it here, or in the sources listed below. The translation I use here is by Jeffrey Gantz, in his indispensable book, Early Irish Myths & Sagas. As usual, I also make of from James MacKillop's Oxford Dictionary of Celtic Mythology, and his Myths & Legends of the Celts. For W. B. Yeats's 1888 narrative poem, The Wanderings of Oisin, check out Wikipedia. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work  presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or  other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work  presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I  will remove the episode immediately.
54:09
October 30, 2021
What Did "Collaboration" Mean in Nazi-Occupied Paris?
A reading of an essay of mine on cultural life and everyday life in Nazi-Occupied Paris. What did it mean to "collaborate," and what acts of collaboration were worthy of punishment or ostracism after the war? As one writer put it, “Should a woman reject a seat offered by a German in the Metro?  Should one have refused to receive civilized, non-Nazi Germans whom one had known before the war? Should one have turned one’s back on a German friend in a public place?” Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
39:27
October 27, 2021
One Poet's Origin Story
A reading from the letters of one twentieth century poet, on how he came to discover a love for poetry, the natural world, as well as folklore and mythology, and how all three became intertwined and essential to his life. The poet in question, whose name I don't reveal until the end, is Ted Hughes. The letters I read from here can be found in Letters of Ted Hughes. If you can recommend a similar story about how anyone discovered their passion, and would like me to read from, email me at humanvoiceswakus1@gmail.com. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
33:54
October 24, 2021
Advice from Walt Whitman & W. B. Yeats
A reading of excerpts from the correspondence, notebooks, and interviews, with Walt Whitman; and a handful of excerpts from letters and memoirs of W. B. Yeats. For being such different poets, there's an awful lot of overlap, and it seems significant to include them in the same episode. The passage from Whitman can be found in the appendices of Gary Schmidgall's edition of Whitman's poems; the quotations from Yeats can be found in the first volume of R. F. Foster's biography of Yeats.  Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
49:05
October 20, 2021
From the Archive: "It is so hard to die" - A Story of Depression from 1809
A replay of an episode from 10/28/2020 A reading of Stephen Ambrose's book Undaunted Courage, on the last night of Meriwether Lewis's life, in October of 1809. Unlike his more famous companion, William Clark, Lewis suffered from what we today would call depression, and this passage is one of the saddest I know. Ambrose has remarked that he wept while writing it, and it was hard to keep myself from doing the same while reading it. I should note the mistake I made when introducing the passage: this scene takes place not three days, but three years, after Lewis and Clark's return, but I haven't the heart to read this aloud again.  Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com.  I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
10:06
October 19, 2021
Beethoven on His Deathbed
A reading from Jan Swafford's Beethoven: Anguish & Triumph, narrating the last months of Beethoven's life. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
36:05
October 17, 2021
Poetry & Education in Eighth Century England
A reading of two chapters from Peter Ackroyd's book, Albion: The Origins of the English Imagination.  Chapter 5, "A Rare & Singular Bede," covers the life of the Venerable Bede, as well as education and culture in England in the eighth century. Chapter 14, "Anglo-Saxon Attitudes," is a brief look into Anglo-Saxon (aka Old English) poetry, and its continued life and reverberations in English poetry, through the present day. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
55:05
October 14, 2021
Working
A small episode talking about working, and empathy and sympathy for those who live doing work they do not love, and which they derive little meaning from.   Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
41:12
October 11, 2021
Shakespeare, Wordsworth & a Guy from Pittsburgh
A reading from Shakespeare's Hamlet and book 1 of Wordsworth's The Prelude. I also share two small sections from my poem-in-progress, 1606, about the life of Shakespeare. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
24:39
October 08, 2021
First Person: A Waitress in Chicago in the 1960s
A reading from one of my favorite books, Studs Terkel's Working: People Talk About What They Do All Day and How They Feel About What They Do. Here, Terkel interviews a waitress named Dolores Dante. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
19:18
October 01, 2021
Ted Hughes: Ten Early Poems
A reading of ten poems from Ted Hughes's first two books, The Hawk in the Rain (1957) and Lupercal (1960). They can be found in his Collected Poems. Another collection of Hughes's poetry that is mentioned in this episode is A Ted Hughes Bestiary, edited by Alice Oswald. The poems read here are: The Hawk in the Rain (1957) The Hawk in the Rain The Horses Wind Invitation to the Dance Six Young Men Lupercal (1960) Mayday in Holderness View of a Pig An Otter, pt. 1 November Uncollected Poems 1960-1967 My Uncle's Wound Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
31:38
September 30, 2021
Poem: Unfinished Michelangelo
A reading my poem "Unfinished Michelangelo." You can read the poem here. It was originally published at the Basil O'Flaherty. Learn about--and see--Michelangelo's unfinished slave sculptures here. The two books I mentioned in this episode are Howard Hibbard's biography of Michelangelo, and William Wallace's wonderfully illustrated Michelangelo: The Complete Sculpture, Painting & Architecture. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
16:37
September 28, 2021
Loneliness
Another of my autobiographical posts. Here I wonder about the deeper source of my personal mantra, that art is primarily about engendering empathy, and alleviating the loneliness of the artist and the audience experiencing it.  Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
34:55
September 27, 2021
Myths & Lies
A reading from Mircea Eliade's book The Myth of the Eternal Return, where a folklorist discovers the source of a local myth and song, and tries to convince them of the "real" story. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
14:01
September 25, 2021
Virgil's Great Poem of Nature: Starting the Georgics
A reading from the beginning of Virgil great poem of farming and nature, Georgics, in the translation by David Ferry. There will be more readings from this book to come. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
07:51
September 23, 2021
Walt Whitman: “Give Me the Splendid Silent Sun”
A reading from Walt Whitman's poem, "Give Me the Splendid Silent Sun." This comes from the earliest published version, in the 1865 collection Drum Taps.  The best place to find Whitman's poetry online (or anything about him at all) remains the Whitman Archive, and you can find every edition of Leaves of Grass here (as plain text downloads) and here (facsimiles of the original editions). While there are hundreds of editions of Whitman's poetry in print, the best editions for me are Gary Schmidgall's Walt Whitman: Selected Poems 1855-1892, which present his best poems in their earliest published form (this is the book I am reading from here); the second includes the first and last editions of Leaves of Grass, along with a huge selection of Whitman's prose. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
09:06
September 21, 2021
2 Poems for the Holocaust
A reading of two of my poems about the Holocaust, "A Ploughed Field" and "Train." These poems were published earlier this year at Jewish Journal. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
18:13
September 19, 2021
Isis in Old Age (story)
A reading of my story, "Isis in Old Age." It was originally published in Bold+Italic. The story can also be read here. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
24:32
September 17, 2021
Ted Hughes: 7 Poems from "Season Songs"
A reading of seven poems from Ted Hughes's 1976 book, Season Songs. It can be found in his Collected Poems. The poems read here are: Spring Nature Notes (parts 5 and 6) Icecrust and Snowflake Sheep (part 1) Autumn Nature Notes (parts 2, 4 and 8) The Seven Sorrows A Cranefly in September Two Horses (part 3) Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
17:36
September 15, 2021
Walt Whitman Affirms the World
A reading from a small section of "Song of Myself." This comes from the earliest published version, in the 1855 Leaves of Grass, when "Song of Myself" was free of section numbers and good deal of editing. For those looking for this section in later editions, it ends up as part of section #33. The best place to find Whitman's poetry online (or anything about him at all) remains the Whitman Archive, and you can find every edition of Leaves of Grass here (as plain text downloads) and here (facsimiles of the original editions). While there are hundreds of editions of Whitman's poetry in print, the best editions for me are Gary Schmidgall's Walt Whitman: Selected Poems 1855-1892, which present his best poems in their earliest published form (this is the book I am reading from here); the second includes the first and last editions of Leaves of Grass, along with a huge selection of Whitman's prose. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
12:04
September 13, 2021
Poems: A Travelogue Through Orkney from "Bone Antler Stone"
A reading of nine poems from the last section of my book Bone Antler Stone, on traveling through mainland Orkney. You can buy the book here, and read reviews and essays about the book here. The poems are: Pytheas in the Shetlands The Wanderer (Flight to Orkney) Walking Birsay to Swannay The Brough of Birsay (parts 1 & 2) Grain Earth House Bone Antler Stone (Orkney Museum) The Burn of Boardhouse & the Barony Mill Skara Brae The Wanderer II (Flight from Orkney) Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
44:11
September 12, 2021
The Great Myths #13: Oisin in the Otherworld
In this sixth episode on Celtic mythology, I read the famous story of the wanderings of Oisin/Oisín in the Irish Otherworld, the Tir na nÓg. As usual, I make use of from James MacKillop's Oxford Dictionary of Celtic Mythology. The two versions of the story I read from can be found in James MacKillop's Myths & Legends of the Celts and Joseph Campbell's The Hero with a Thousand Faces. For W. B. Yeats's 1888 narrative poem, The Wanderings of Oisin, check out Wikipedia. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work  presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or  other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work  presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I  will remove the episode immediately.
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September 11, 2021