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Human Voices Wake Us

Human Voices Wake Us

By Human Voices Wake Us
The poem says, "Human voices wake us, and we drown." But I’ve made this podcast with the belief that human voices are what we need. And so, whether from a year or three thousand years ago, whether poetry or prose, whether fiction or diary or biography, here are the best things we have ever thought, written, or said.

Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com.
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From the Archives: Lee Harvey Oswald

Human Voices Wake Us

From the Archives: Lee Harvey Oswald

Human Voices Wake Us

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Eavan Boland: 5 Poems
A repeat of a collection of episodes from last year, of five poems by the Irish poet, Eavan Boland. All of them can be found in her New Collected Poems (https://www.amazon.com/New-Collected-Poems-Eavan-Boland/dp/0393337308/) Quarantine Irish Poetry Lines for a Thirtieth Wedding Anniversary The Pomegranate Lava Cameo Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
12:07
November 29, 2021
Happy Black Friday
Long a mainstay on my blog, this is the first time I've recorded my usual Black Friday message, on what our relationship to work, consumerism, culture, technology, and so much else is doing to us now... and what it has seemingly always meant to the majority of human populations. For those interested in the other episode mentioned here, called Working, you can listen to it here: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/working/id1535050082?i=1000538208562 (in the end, it seemed too long to add onto the end of this episode). Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
46:33
November 26, 2021
From the Archives: Lee Harvey Oswald
A repeat of an episode from 11/21/20, a reading of my poem about Lee Harvey Oswald. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
34:22
November 22, 2021
First Person: Pompeii (AD 79) & San Francisco (AD 1906)
A reading from Pliny the Younger's letter, describing the eruption of Mt. Vesuvius and the destruction of Pompeii, in the year 79; and Jack London's article describing the great earthquake of San Francisco, in 1906. I end with a reading of Laurie Sheck's poem "Pompeii," from her 2003 book, Black Series. Pliny the Younger's letter can be read here; and Jack London's article can be read here; however, I only came across both of them together thanks to Lapham's Quarterly, which featured them in their Summer, 2008 issue called Book of Nature; you can buy the issue, or subscribe to the magazine, here. As I've said before, for those not independently wealthy or ensconced in academia, I know of no better resource for the discovery of voices from history. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
24:22
November 19, 2021
How Did Picasso Do It?
Readings from a few books about Pablo Picasso, where he talks about creativity, and how the power behind his own paintings, and his huge output, remained a mystery for him as much as anyone else. The first few quotations come from the huge Taschen book about Picasso that covers his entire life; the rest come from the multi-volume biography of Picasso by John Richardson: A Life of Picasso 1: The Prodigy: 1881-1906 A Life of Picasso 2: The Cubist Rebel: 1907-1916 A Life of Picasso 3: The Triumphant Years: 1917-1932 Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
38:51
November 16, 2021
Louise Glück: 8 Poems from “The Wild Iris”
A reading of eight poems from Louise Glück's 1992 collection, The Wild Iris; followed by readings made last March, of six poems from her 1990 book, Ararat. Buy Ararat or The Wild Iris individually, or in Glück's Collected Poems 1962-2012.  from The Wild Iris Matins ("Forgive me if I say I love you") Retreating Wind The Garden Field Flowers Matins ("Not the sun merely but the earth") Vespers ("More than you love me, very possibly") September Twilight The White Lilies from Ararat Lost Love Appearances Brown Circle Child Crying Out Celestial Music First Memory Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
45:02
November 13, 2021
Episode #200: Some Thoughts on Success & Failure
A reading, with comments thrown in throughout, of an essay of mine written between 2015-2016 (I get the dates wrong in the podcast). The entirety of it can be read here as There is Only the Trying: Some Thoughts on Fame & Failure. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
51:43
November 10, 2021
From the Archives: George Orwell Down in the Mines
A repeat of an episode first posted on 11/9/2020: A reading from George Orwell’s 1937 book, The Road to Wigan Pier. This long passage comes from the handful of trips he took down into the coal mines of northern England, and the horrible conditions there. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
33:39
November 7, 2021
William Wordsworth: Immortality Ode, and 3 Other Poems
A reading of four poems by William Wordsworth: Ode: Intimations of Immortality from Recollections of Early Childhood London (1802): "Milton! thou should'st be living at this hour!" St. Paul's "It was an April morning: fresh and clear" (part 1 on "Poems on the Naming of Places" I read these here tonight to celebrate the release of a Selected Poems of William Wordsworth that I put together, and was just published. Other small books of poems (Whitman, Tennyson, and Frost) in the same series can be found here. If you'd like to support this podcast, buying a handful of these books would be the easiest way to do it--they are all around 120 pages, and all priced at $3.99. If you can recommend a similar story about how anyone discovered their passion, and would like me to read from, email me at humanvoiceswakus1@gmail.com. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
23:58
November 5, 2021
One Poet Responds to Fame
A reading of a letter written by the poet Ted Hughes, to friend and critic Al Alvarez, in November of 1971. At this time, Alvarez was publishing an intimate (and to Hughes's mind, exploitative) account of the 1963 suicide of the poet Sylvia Plath. The letter can be found in The Letters of Ted Hughes, pages 321-326.  I use this letter as a starting point to wonder why we treat celebrities, the famous, or just the infamous, the way we do; as Hughes puts it, knowledge of his and Sylvia Plath's marriage and private life can only be entertainment and anecdote, in this case for college teachers and their students; it can offer little insight into either writers' poetry. This intrusion into private lives and their grief, and the ease with which we, fifty years later, continue to lap up the gossip surrounding well-known people, should be an obvious parallel. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
42:40
November 2, 2021
The Great Myths #14: The Destruction of Da Derga's Hostel (Celtic)
In this seventh episode on Celtic mythology, I review one of the greatest surviving stories in the tradition, Togail Bruidne Dá Derga, or The Destruction of Da Derga's Hostel. Since it is also a fairly long story, I only share two small sections from the story itself: a piece from the beginning, and from the story's conclusion. You can read more about it here, or in the sources listed below. The translation I use here is by Jeffrey Gantz, in his indispensable book, Early Irish Myths & Sagas. As usual, I also make of from James MacKillop's Oxford Dictionary of Celtic Mythology, and his Myths & Legends of the Celts. For W. B. Yeats's 1888 narrative poem, The Wanderings of Oisin, check out Wikipedia. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work  presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or  other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work  presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I  will remove the episode immediately.
54:09
October 30, 2021
What Did "Collaboration" Mean in Nazi-Occupied Paris?
A reading of an essay of mine on cultural life and everyday life in Nazi-Occupied Paris. What did it mean to "collaborate," and what acts of collaboration were worthy of punishment or ostracism after the war? As one writer put it, “Should a woman reject a seat offered by a German in the Metro?  Should one have refused to receive civilized, non-Nazi Germans whom one had known before the war? Should one have turned one’s back on a German friend in a public place?” Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
39:27
October 27, 2021
One Poet's Origin Story
A reading from the letters of one twentieth century poet, on how he came to discover a love for poetry, the natural world, as well as folklore and mythology, and how all three became intertwined and essential to his life. The poet in question, whose name I don't reveal until the end, is Ted Hughes. The letters I read from here can be found in Letters of Ted Hughes. If you can recommend a similar story about how anyone discovered their passion, and would like me to read from, email me at humanvoiceswakus1@gmail.com. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
33:54
October 24, 2021
Advice from Walt Whitman & W. B. Yeats
A reading of excerpts from the correspondence, notebooks, and interviews, with Walt Whitman; and a handful of excerpts from letters and memoirs of W. B. Yeats. For being such different poets, there's an awful lot of overlap, and it seems significant to include them in the same episode. The passage from Whitman can be found in the appendices of Gary Schmidgall's edition of Whitman's poems; the quotations from Yeats can be found in the first volume of R. F. Foster's biography of Yeats.  Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
49:05
October 20, 2021
From the Archive: "It is so hard to die" - A Story of Depression from 1809
A replay of an episode from 10/28/2020 A reading of Stephen Ambrose's book Undaunted Courage, on the last night of Meriwether Lewis's life, in October of 1809. Unlike his more famous companion, William Clark, Lewis suffered from what we today would call depression, and this passage is one of the saddest I know. Ambrose has remarked that he wept while writing it, and it was hard to keep myself from doing the same while reading it. I should note the mistake I made when introducing the passage: this scene takes place not three days, but three years, after Lewis and Clark's return, but I haven't the heart to read this aloud again.  Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com.  I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
10:06
October 19, 2021
Beethoven on His Deathbed
A reading from Jan Swafford's Beethoven: Anguish & Triumph, narrating the last months of Beethoven's life. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
36:05
October 17, 2021
Poetry & Education in Eighth Century England
A reading of two chapters from Peter Ackroyd's book, Albion: The Origins of the English Imagination.  Chapter 5, "A Rare & Singular Bede," covers the life of the Venerable Bede, as well as education and culture in England in the eighth century. Chapter 14, "Anglo-Saxon Attitudes," is a brief look into Anglo-Saxon (aka Old English) poetry, and its continued life and reverberations in English poetry, through the present day. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
55:05
October 14, 2021
Working
A small episode talking about working, and empathy and sympathy for those who live doing work they do not love, and which they derive little meaning from.   Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
41:12
October 11, 2021
Shakespeare, Wordsworth & a Guy from Pittsburgh
A reading from Shakespeare's Hamlet and book 1 of Wordsworth's The Prelude. I also share two small sections from my poem-in-progress, 1606, about the life of Shakespeare. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
24:39
October 8, 2021
First Person: A Waitress in Chicago in the 1960s
A reading from one of my favorite books, Studs Terkel's Working: People Talk About What They Do All Day and How They Feel About What They Do. Here, Terkel interviews a waitress named Dolores Dante. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
19:18
October 1, 2021
Ted Hughes: Ten Early Poems
A reading of ten poems from Ted Hughes's first two books, The Hawk in the Rain (1957) and Lupercal (1960). They can be found in his Collected Poems. Another collection of Hughes's poetry that is mentioned in this episode is A Ted Hughes Bestiary, edited by Alice Oswald. The poems read here are: The Hawk in the Rain (1957) The Hawk in the Rain The Horses Wind Invitation to the Dance Six Young Men Lupercal (1960) Mayday in Holderness View of a Pig An Otter, pt. 1 November Uncollected Poems 1960-1967 My Uncle's Wound Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
31:38
September 30, 2021
Poem: Unfinished Michelangelo
A reading my poem "Unfinished Michelangelo." You can read the poem here. It was originally published at the Basil O'Flaherty. Learn about--and see--Michelangelo's unfinished slave sculptures here. The two books I mentioned in this episode are Howard Hibbard's biography of Michelangelo, and William Wallace's wonderfully illustrated Michelangelo: The Complete Sculpture, Painting & Architecture. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
16:37
September 28, 2021
Loneliness
Another of my autobiographical posts. Here I wonder about the deeper source of my personal mantra, that art is primarily about engendering empathy, and alleviating the loneliness of the artist and the audience experiencing it.  Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
34:55
September 27, 2021
Myths & Lies
A reading from Mircea Eliade's book The Myth of the Eternal Return, where a folklorist discovers the source of a local myth and song, and tries to convince them of the "real" story. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
14:01
September 25, 2021
Virgil's Great Poem of Nature: Starting the Georgics
A reading from the beginning of Virgil great poem of farming and nature, Georgics, in the translation by David Ferry. There will be more readings from this book to come. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
07:51
September 23, 2021
Walt Whitman: “Give Me the Splendid Silent Sun”
A reading from Walt Whitman's poem, "Give Me the Splendid Silent Sun." This comes from the earliest published version, in the 1865 collection Drum Taps.  The best place to find Whitman's poetry online (or anything about him at all) remains the Whitman Archive, and you can find every edition of Leaves of Grass here (as plain text downloads) and here (facsimiles of the original editions). While there are hundreds of editions of Whitman's poetry in print, the best editions for me are Gary Schmidgall's Walt Whitman: Selected Poems 1855-1892, which present his best poems in their earliest published form (this is the book I am reading from here); the second includes the first and last editions of Leaves of Grass, along with a huge selection of Whitman's prose. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
09:06
September 21, 2021
2 Poems for the Holocaust
A reading of two of my poems about the Holocaust, "A Ploughed Field" and "Train." These poems were published earlier this year at Jewish Journal. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
18:13
September 19, 2021
Isis in Old Age (story)
A reading of my story, "Isis in Old Age." It was originally published in Bold+Italic. The story can also be read here. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
24:32
September 17, 2021
Ted Hughes: 7 Poems from "Season Songs"
A reading of seven poems from Ted Hughes's 1976 book, Season Songs. It can be found in his Collected Poems. The poems read here are: Spring Nature Notes (parts 5 and 6) Icecrust and Snowflake Sheep (part 1) Autumn Nature Notes (parts 2, 4 and 8) The Seven Sorrows A Cranefly in September Two Horses (part 3) Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
17:36
September 15, 2021
Walt Whitman Affirms the World
A reading from a small section of "Song of Myself." This comes from the earliest published version, in the 1855 Leaves of Grass, when "Song of Myself" was free of section numbers and good deal of editing. For those looking for this section in later editions, it ends up as part of section #33. The best place to find Whitman's poetry online (or anything about him at all) remains the Whitman Archive, and you can find every edition of Leaves of Grass here (as plain text downloads) and here (facsimiles of the original editions). While there are hundreds of editions of Whitman's poetry in print, the best editions for me are Gary Schmidgall's Walt Whitman: Selected Poems 1855-1892, which present his best poems in their earliest published form (this is the book I am reading from here); the second includes the first and last editions of Leaves of Grass, along with a huge selection of Whitman's prose. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
12:04
September 13, 2021
Poems: A Travelogue Through Orkney from "Bone Antler Stone"
A reading of nine poems from the last section of my book Bone Antler Stone, on traveling through mainland Orkney. You can buy the book here, and read reviews and essays about the book here. The poems are: Pytheas in the Shetlands The Wanderer (Flight to Orkney) Walking Birsay to Swannay The Brough of Birsay (parts 1 & 2) Grain Earth House Bone Antler Stone (Orkney Museum) The Burn of Boardhouse & the Barony Mill Skara Brae The Wanderer II (Flight from Orkney) Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
44:11
September 12, 2021
The Great Myths #13: Oisin in the Otherworld
In this sixth episode on Celtic mythology, I read the famous story of the wanderings of Oisin/Oisín in the Irish Otherworld, the Tir na nÓg. As usual, I make use of from James MacKillop's Oxford Dictionary of Celtic Mythology. The two versions of the story I read from can be found in James MacKillop's Myths & Legends of the Celts and Joseph Campbell's The Hero with a Thousand Faces. For W. B. Yeats's 1888 narrative poem, The Wanderings of Oisin, check out Wikipedia. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work  presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or  other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work  presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I  will remove the episode immediately.
22:37
September 11, 2021
Ted Hughes: 3 Poems from "River"
A reading of three poems from Ted Hughes's 1983 book, River. It can be found in his Collected Poems. The poems read here are: Four March Watercolours After Moonless Midnight October Salmon Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
17:12
September 8, 2021
First Person: Vermont, 1940
A reading from an interview conducted by the Federal Writer's Project during the 1930s and 1940s. The excerpt comes from the Winter 2019 issue of Lapham's Quarterly, but a larger collection of the interviews can be found in the 2004 book, Men Against Granite.  Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
09:10
September 7, 2021
Poem: Chauvet, Lascaux, Altamira
A reading of my poem on the prehistoric painted caves of France and Spain, "Chauvet, Lascaux, Altamira," from the book Bone Antler Stone. You can buy the book here, and read reviews and essays about the book here. My favorite books on these caves are listed below. For some reason, many of them are hard to find or by now are inordinately expensive. The best general introductions to prehistoric art that are affordable include Prehistoric Art: The Symbolic Journey of Humankind, by Randall White, and Paul Bahn's Cambridge Illustrated History of Prehistoric Art. If you can find the following at your library, they are well worth a look: Lascaux: Movement, Space and Time, by Norbert Aujoulat The Cave of Altamira, edited by Pedro A. Saura Ramos Return to Chauvet, by Jean Clottes Becoming Human: Innovation in Prehistoric Material Culture, edited by Colin Renfrew and Iain Morley.  Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
22:18
September 5, 2021
The Great Myths #12: Queen Medb of Connacht
In this fifth episode on Celtic mythology, I read the famous "pillow talk" between Queen Medb and King Ailill of Connacht. Their dispute over who owns more riches, land, and animals leads to the start of the famous Táin Bó Cúailnge/Cattle Raid of Cooley. The text of the story is taken from Thomas Kinsella's translation of The Táin. I also read a passage about Medb from James MacKillop's Oxford Dictionary of Celtic Mythology. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work  presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or  other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work  presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I  will remove the episode immediately.
21:08
September 4, 2021
First Person: Visiting a Poor Poet in Paris, 1895
A reading of Harry Kessler's diary from July 10, 1895, visiting the French poet Paul Veraline. From the English translation by Laird Easton, published as Journey to the Abyss: The Diaries of Count Harry Kessler, 1880-1918. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
13:16
September 2, 2021
Ted Hughes: A Bunch of Crow Poems
A reading of nine Crow poems by Ted Hughes. The contents of Hughes's Crow collections, first published in 1970, vary widely; these poems are taken from his Collected Poems: King of Carrion Crow and the Birds Crow's First Lesson Crow Tyrannosaurus A Childish Prank Crowego Song Against the White Owl Crow's Courtship Crow's Song About God  Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
19:24
August 31, 2021
2 Poems: "Newgrange" and "Star Carr"
A reading of my poems "Star Carr" and "Newgrange" from the book Bone Antler Stone.  You can buy the book here, and read reviews and essays about the book here. Read about Star Carr and Newgrange on Wikipedia.  Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
08:49
August 29, 2021
The Great Myths #11: How Cuchulainn Got His Name
In this fourth episode on Celtic mythology, I read the story of how the great Irish hero, Cúchulainn, got his name.  The text of the story is taken from Thomas Kinsella's translation of The Táin. I also read a passage about Cúchulainn from James MacKillop's Oxford Dictionary of Celtic Mythology. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work  presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or  other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work  presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I  will remove the episode immediately.
23:04
August 27, 2021
First Person: Paris, 1785
A reading from Louis-Sébastien Mercier's twelve-volume Le Tableau de Paris. The translation is from Helen Simpson's 1933 selection, The Waiting City: Paris 1782-1788. The excerpt comes from the Winter 2019 issue of Lapham's Quarterly. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
12:00
August 26, 2021
Ted Hughes: 2 War Poems
A reading of two war poems by Ted Hughes: "Six Young Men," from his first book, Hawk in the Rain, and an uncollected poem, "My Uncle's Wound." Both can be found in his Collected Poems. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
08:56
August 25, 2021
Cauldron & Drink (poem)
A reading of my poem "Cauldron & Drink," from the book Bone Antler Stone. This poem originally appeared in the Irish poetry journal Crannog. You can buy the book here, and read reviews and essays about the book here. Read about the Gundestrup Cauldron from c.200 BCE-AD 300 Denmark, and the Vix Grave from c.500 BCE France.  Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
07:14
August 23, 2021
Seamus Heaney: Selected Poems
A collection of all the poems by Seamus Heaney I have read here over the past few months, spanning his entire career. Each of his collections of poetry can of course be purchased on their own, but nearly everything I read here can be found either in his career-spanning 100 Poems, or in the two volumes of his selected poetry: Selected Poems 1966-1987 and Selected Poems 1988-2013.  Death of a Naturalist (1966) Follower Poem Personal Helicon Door Into the Dark (1969) Dream The Forge Bogland Wintering Out (1972) The Tollund Man Limbo First Calf North (1975) Belderg Funeral Rites Bog Queen The Grauballe Man Punishment Strange Fruit Kinship Field Work (1979) The Strand at Lough Beg from "Field Work" Station Island (1984) The Railway Children VII from Station Island VIII from Station Island The Scribes The Haw Lantern (1987) III from Clearances The Mud Vision Seeing Things (1991) Seeing Things 1.1.87 #2, #8 from Lightenings #15 from Settings #25, #27, #31, #32 from Crossings #40, #42, #45, #46 from Squarings The Spirit Level (1996) The Strand Postscript District & Circle (2006) A Shiver #1 from "District & Circle" A Hagging Match Human Chain (2010) Uncoupled Miracle from "Colum Cille Cecinit" from Hermit Songs from In the Attic from Heaney's translation of Beowulf Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
02:23:59
August 21, 2021
Seamus Heaney: A Handful of Late Poems
A reading of a handful of poems from the second half of Seamus Heaney's career. Aside from his book Seeing Things, his poetry doesn't seem nearly as powerful to me as his earlier work, and so it seemed best to sum up my favorite poems from his later life here.  The poems are:  Station Island (1984) The Railway Children Part VII from "Station Island" from The Spirit Level (1996) The Strand Postscript from District and Circle (2006) A Shiver Part 1 of "District and Circle" A Hagging Match from Human Chain (2010) from "Colum Cille Cecinit" from "Hermit Songs" And a final section from his translation of Beowulf You can buy the individual volumes, or find nearly all of these poems in the career-spanning 100 Poems. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
48:20
August 19, 2021
Seamus Heaney: 3 Poems on Old Age & Memory
A reading of 3 poems from Seamus Heaney's last collection from 2010, Human Chain. The poems are: Uncoupled Miracle an excerpt from In the Attic Human Chain can be purchased here. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
07:27
August 16, 2021
Week of the Bomb #4
The last in a series of four episodes on the atomic bomb, from its development to the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, drawn from the words of those who were there. The full text of the quotations used here can be found in the blog versions of these podcasts. The books used to make these episodes are: The Making of the Atomic Bomb, by Richard Rhodes Dark Sun: The Making of the Hydrogen Bomb, by Richard Rhodes American Prometheus: The Triumph & Tragedy of J. Robert Oppenheimer, by Kai Bird and Martin J. Sherwin J. Robert Oppenheimer: Shatterer of Worlds, by Peter Goodchild. The book that comes to different conclusions than me, and which I hope to devote an entire episode to in the future, is A. C. Grayling's Among the Dead Cities: The History and Moral Legacy of the WWII Bombing of Civilians in Germany and Japan John Else's documentary, The Day After Trinity, can be watched here. John Bradley's anthology of poets writing about the bomb is Atomic Ghosts: Poets Respond to the Atomic Age. My essay, "Blindness, War & History," first published in the Concho River Review in 2014, can be read here. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
38:57
August 15, 2021
Week of the Bomb #3
The third in a series of four episodes on the atomic bomb, from its development to the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, drawn from the words of those who were there. The full text of the quotations used here can be found in the blog versions of these podcasts. The books used to make these episodes are: The Making of the Atomic Bomb, by Richard Rhodes Dark Sun: The Making of the Hydrogen Bomb, by Richard Rhodes American Prometheus: The Triumph & Tragedy of J. Robert Oppenheimer, by Kai Bird and Martin J. Sherwin J. Robert Oppenheimer: Shatterer of Worlds, by Peter Goodchild. John Else's documentary, The Day After Trinity, can be watched here. John Bradley's anthology of poets writing about the bomb is Atomic Ghosts: Poets Respond to the Atomic Age. My essay, "Blindness, War & History," first published in the Concho River Review in 2014, can be read here. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
45:05
August 14, 2021
Week of the Bomb #2
The second in a series of four episodes on the atomic bomb, from its development to the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, drawn from the words of those who were there. The full text of the quotations used here can be found in the blog versions of these podcasts. The books used to make these episodes are: The Making of the Atomic Bomb, by Richard Rhodes Dark Sun: The Making of the Hydrogen Bomb, by Richard Rhodes American Prometheus: The Triumph & Tragedy of J. Robert Oppenheimer, by Kai Bird and Martin J. Sherwin J. Robert Oppenheimer: Shatterer of Worlds, by Peter Goodchild. John Else's documentary, The Day After Trinity, can be watched here. John Bradley's anthology of poets writing about the bomb is Atomic Ghosts: Poets Respond to the Atomic Age. My essay, "Blindness, War & History," first published in the Concho River Review in 2014, can be read here. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
46:25
August 13, 2021
Week of the Bomb #1
The first in a series of four episodes on the atomic bomb, from its development to the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, drawn from the words of those who were there. The full text of the quotations used here can be found in the blog versions of these podcasts. The books used to make these episodes are: The Making of the Atomic Bomb, by Richard Rhodes Dark Sun: The Making of the Hydrogen Bomb, by Richard Rhodes American Prometheus: The Triumph & Tragedy of J. Robert Oppenheimer, by Kai Bird and Martin J. Sherwin J. Robert Oppenheimer: Shatterer of Worlds, by Peter Goodchild. John Else's documentary, The Day After Trinity, can be watched here. John Bradley's anthology of poets writing about the bomb is Atomic Ghosts: Poets Respond to the Atomic Age. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
30:04
August 9, 2021
Seamus Heaney: A Poem in Memory of His Mother
A reading of Seamus Heaney's poem dedicated to the memory of his mother, the third in a series of sonnets called "Clearances," from his 1987 book, The Haw Lantern. As a part of A Poem for Ireland project, this poem was voted by listeners of the RTE as the favorite Irish poem of the twentieth century. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
04:30
August 6, 2021
2 Poems: "Song to the Smith" & "A Song to Stone"
A reading of my poems "Song of the Smith" and "A Song to Stone," from the book Bone Antler Stone. You can buy the book here, and read reviews and essays about the book here. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
07:03
August 4, 2021
James Garbarino on Violent Young Men
A reading from James Garbarino's 1999 book on violent young men, Lost Boys: Why Our Sons Turn Violent & How We Can Save Them. Garbarino has written many other books on the topic, and this one especially can both continue to speak to us today, as well as seem like a time capsule before the internet went crazy, before smartphones, and before social media.  For these reasons & others, this episode is a good companion to only the third episode of Human Voices Wake Us, where I read from Mary Pipher's 1994 book on teenage girls, Reviving Ophelia: Saving the Selves of Adolescent Girls. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
32:15
August 3, 2021
The Poet Speaks: How to Tell a Story, with Joyce, Hardy, etc.
The latest episode of The Poet Speaks, where I talk about storytelling with examples from James Joyce, Thomas Hardy, John Hawkes, Geoffrey Hill, and William Trevor.  James Joyce's 1906 letter to his brother can be found here. Thomas Hardy's short story, "On the Western Circuit," can be found here. The two volumes of William Trevor's short stories can be found here and here.  The short story collection of mine that I mention during the episode is called The Lonely Young & the Lonely Old.  Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
29:51
August 1, 2021
"The Sun Sets Into the Sea" (poem)
A reading of my poem "The Sun Sets Into the Sea," from the book Bone Antler Stone. You can buy the book here, and read reviews and essays about the book here.  Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
11:56
July 30, 2021
Seamus Heaney: On "Seeing Things"
A reading and commentary from interviews Seamus Heaney gave on the writing of his 1991 book Seeing Things, taken from Dennis O'Driscoll's Stepping Stones: Interviews with Seamus Heaney. Seeing Things can be purchased here. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
40:59
July 25, 2021
Seamus Heaney: 13 Poems from "Seeing Things"
A 13 poems from Seamus Heaney's 1991 collection, Seeing Things. The poems are: 11 poems from the sequence called "Squarings": #2, #8, #15, #25, #27, #31, #32, #40, #42, #45, #46 Seeing Things 1.1.87 Seeing Things can be purchased here. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
19:19
July 19, 2021
Seamus Heaney: 2 Poems from "Seeing Things"
A reading of two poems from Seamus Heaney's 1991 collection, Seeing Things. The poems are the title poem, "Seeing Things," and "1.1.87"; both address the memory and death of Heaney's father.  Seeing Things can be purchased here. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
06:03
July 18, 2021
Seamus Heaney: 5 More Poems from "Squarings"
A reading of five more poems from the sequence "Squarings," from Seamus Heaney's 1991 collection, Seeing Things. The poems in the sequence have only numbers for titles, and these are #32, #40, #42, 45, and #46. Seeing Things can be purchased here. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
05:57
July 16, 2021
Seamus Heaney: 3 More Poems from "Squarings"
A reading of three poems from the sequence "Squarings," from Seamus Heaney's 1991 collection, Seeing Things. The poems in the sequence have only numbers for titles, and these are #25, #27 and #31. Seeing Things can be purchased here. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
04:04
July 15, 2021
Seamus Heaney: Three Poems from "Squarings"
A reading of three poems from the sequence "Squarings," from Seamus Heaney's 1991 collection, Seeing Things. The poems in the sequence have only numbers for titles, and these are #2, #8 and #15. Seeing Things can be purchased here. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
05:56
July 15, 2021
The Great Myths #10: The Book of Invasions (Celtic)
In this third episode on Celtic mythology, I read a summary of the Lebor Gabála Érenn, otherwise known as the Book of Invasions, or The Book of the Taking of Ireland. I also discuss why, with some of this mythological and folkloric material, reading a summary and not the original is preferable.   The summary I read comes from James MacKillop's Oxford Dictionary of Celtic Mythology. The 5-volume English translation of the entire Lebor Gabála Érenn (published by the Irish Texts Society) can be purchased in hardcover here; however, each volume is now available for download as .pdfs, here.  Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
44:01
July 8, 2021
Artlessness
Artlessness is a thing.  Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com.  I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
20:38
July 6, 2021
The Poet Speaks: Beethoven, Joseph Campbell, W. S. Merwin, W. D. Snodgrass
The Poet Speaks will be a series of episodes where I share my favorite comments on creativity from other artists, poets, and writers. The quotations from this episode come from: Joseph Campbell (interviewed by Michael Toms), Beethoven (from Jan Swafford's biography), and the Paris Review interviews with W. S. Merwin and W. D. Snodgrass. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
30:50
July 4, 2021
Seamus Heaney: Two Poems for His Murdered Cousin
Since there aren't many poems in Seamus Heaney's 1979 collection Field Work that I wanted to share here, I've done something a bit different this time: The first poem I share is "The Strand at Lough Beg," from Field Work, and the second is part 8 from Heaney's sequence Station Island, from 1984. "The Strand at Lough Beg" is dedicated to Heaney's second cousin, Colum McCartney, who was murdered in 1975 by Protestant sectarians; the poem from Station Island allows that same cousin to scold Heaney for making his death, almost, into an aesthetic experience. It seemed worthwhile to put these poems together here. Finally, a section from the title sequence of Field Work is read. Field Work can be purchased here, and Station Island here. A good selection from the first half of his career can be found in Selected Poems 1966-1987. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
18:22
June 28, 2021
The Poet Speaks: Flannery O'Connor, Jacques Barzun, Jean Guéhenno
The Poet Speaks will be a series of episodes where I share my favorite comments on creativity from other artists, poets, and writers.  The quotations from this episode come from: Jacques Barzun, From Dawn to Decadence, 1500 to the Present: 500 Years of Western Cultural Life Jean Guéhenno, The Diary of the Dark Years: 1940-1944 Flannery O'Connor, The Habit of Being Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
39:39
June 27, 2021
Seamus Heaney: 7 Poems from "North," & Interviews with Heaney
A reading of seven poems from Seamus Heaney's fourth collection, North (1975): Belderg Funeral Rites Bog Queen The Grauballe Man Punishment Strange Fruit Kinship Following the poems is a reading from interviews Heaney gave on the writing of North, taken from Dennis O'Driscoll's Stepping Stones: Interviews with Seamus Heaney. This time around, the interviews are prefaced by a more historical introduction to the bog bodies that figure in the poems from North. The books mentioned and read from in this section are P. V. Glob's The Bog People: Iron Age Man Preserved, Wijnand Van Der Sanden's Through Nature to Eternity: The Bog Bodies of Northwest Europe, Timothy Taylor's The Buried Soul: How Humans Invented Death, Miranda Aldhouse-Green's Bog Bodies Uncovered: Solving Europe's Ancient Mystery. The first five of Heaney's collections can be purchased here, and a good selection from the first half of his career can be found in Selected Poems 1966-1987. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
01:11:51
June 22, 2021
Seamus Heaney: On "North"
A reading and commentary from interviews Seamus Heaney gave on the writing of his fourth book, North, taken from Dennis O'Driscoll's Stepping Stones: Interviews with Seamus Heaney. The Heaney interviews are prefaced by a more historical introduction to the bog bodies that figure in his poems from North. The books mentioned and read from in this section are P. V. Glob's The Bog People: Iron Age Man Preserved, Wijnand Van Der Sanden's Through Nature to Eternity: The Bog Bodies of Northwest Europe, Timothy Taylor's The Buried Soul: How Humans Invented Death, Miranda Aldhouse-Green's Bog Bodies Uncovered: Solving Europe's Ancient Mystery. The first five of Heaney's collections can be purchased here, and a good selection from the first half of his career can be found in Selected Poems 1966-1987. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
51:43
June 22, 2021
Seamus Heaney: "Kinship"
A reading of the poem "Kinship," from Seamus Heaney's fourth collection, North (1975). The first five of Heaney's collections can be purchased here, and a good selection from the first half of his career can be found in Selected Poems 1966-1987. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
06:35
June 20, 2021
Seamus Heaney: "Strange Fruit"
A reading of the poem "Strange Fruit," from Seamus Heaney's fourth collection, North (1975). The first five of Heaney's collections can be purchased here, and a good selection from the first half of his career can be found in Selected Poems 1966-1987. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
02:17
June 19, 2021
Seamus Heaney": "Punishment"
A reading of the poem "Punishment," from Seamus Heaney's fourth collection, North (1975). The first five of Heaney's collections can be purchased here, and a good selection from the first half of his career can be found in Selected Poems 1966-1987. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
02:55
June 18, 2021
Seamus Heaney: "The Grauballe Man"
A reading of the poem "The Grauballe Man," from Seamus Heaney's fourth collection, North (1975). The first five of Heaney's collections can be purchased here, and a good selection from the first half of his career can be found in Selected Poems 1966-1987. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
03:08
June 17, 2021
Seamus Heaney: "Bog Queen"
A reading of the poem "Bog Queen," from Seamus Heaney's fourth collection, North (1975). The first five of Heaney's collections can be purchased here, and a good selection from the first half of his career can be found in Selected Poems 1966-1987. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
03:33
June 16, 2021
Seamus Heaney: "Funeral Rites"
A reading of the poem "Funeral Rites," from Seamus Heaney's fourth collection, North (1975). The first five of Heaney's collections can be purchased here, and a good selection from the first half of his career can be found in Selected Poems 1966-1987. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
04:27
June 15, 2021
Seamus Heaney: "Belderg"
A reading of the poem "Belderg," from Seamus Heaney's fourth collection, North (1975). The first five of Heaney's collections can be purchased here, and a good selection from the first half of his career can be found in Selected Poems 1966-1987. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
03:28
June 15, 2021
Seamus Heaney: 3 Poems from "Wintering Out," & Interviews with Heaney
A reading of three poems from Seamus Heaney's third collection, Wintering Out (1972): The Tollund Man Limbo First Calf Following the poems is a reading from interviews Heaney gave on the writing of Wintering Out, taken from Dennis O'Driscoll's Stepping Stones: Interviews with Seamus Heaney. The first five of Heaney's collections can be purchased here, and a good selection from the first half of his career can be found in Selected Poems 1966-1987. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
53:26
June 12, 2021
Seamus Heaney: On "Wintering Out"
A reading and commentary from interviews Seamus Heaney gave on the writing of his third book, Wintering Out, taken from Dennis O'Driscoll's Stepping Stones: Interviews with Seamus Heaney. The first five of Heaney's collections can be purchased here, and a good selection from the first half of his career can be found in Selected Poems 1966-1987. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
44:28
June 11, 2021
Seamus Heaney: "First Calf"
A reading of the poem "First Calf," from Seamus Heaney's third collection, Wintering Out (1969). The first five of Heaney's collections can be purchased here, and a good selection from the first half of his career can be found in Selected Poems 1966-1987. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
02:08
June 5, 2021
Seamus Heaney: "Limbo"
A reading of the poem "Limbo," from Seamus Heaney's third collection, Wintering Out (1969). The first five of Heaney's collections can be purchased here, and a good selection from the first half of his career can be found in Selected Poems 1966-1987. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
02:15
June 4, 2021
Seamus Heaney: "The Tollund Man"
A reading of the poem "The Tollund Man," from Seamus Heaney's third collection, Wintering Out (1969). The first five of Heaney's collections can be purchased here, and a good selection from the first half of his career can be found in Selected Poems 1966-1987. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
07:17
June 4, 2021
Seamus Heaney: 3 Poems from "Door into the Dark" & Interviews with Heaney
A reading of three poems from Seamus Heaney's second collection, Door into the Dark (1969): Dream The Forge Bogland Following the poems is a reading from interviews Heaney gave on the writing of Door into the Dark, taken from Dennis O'Driscoll's Stepping Stones: Interviews with Seamus Heaney. The first five of Heaney's collections can be purchased here, and a good selection from the first half of his career can be found in Selected Poems 1966-1987. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
49:06
May 30, 2021
Seamus Heaney on "Door into the Dark"
A reading and commentary from interviews Seamus Heaney gave on the writing of his second book, Door into the Dark, taken from Dennis O'Driscoll's Stepping Stones: Interviews with Seamus Heaney. The first five of Heaney's collections can be purchased here, and a good selection from the first half of his career can be found in Selected Poems 1966-1987. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
43:36
May 30, 2021
Seamus Heaney: "Bogland"
A reading of the poem "Bogland," from Seamus Heaney's second collection, Door Into the Dark (1969). The first five of Heaney's collections can be purchased here, and a good selection from the first half of his career can be found in Selected Poems 1966-1987. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
03:42
May 28, 2021
Seamus Heaney: 2 Poems from "Door into the Dark"
A reading of two poems from Seamus Heaney's second collection, Door Into the Dark (1969): Dream The Forge The first five of Heaney's collections can be purchased here, and a good selection from the first half of his career can be found in Selected Poems 1966-1987. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
03:35
May 26, 2021
Seamus Heaney on "Death of a Naturalist"
A reading and commentary from interviews Seamus Heaney gave on the writing of his first book, Death of a Naturalist, taken from Dennis O'Driscoll's Stepping Stones: Interviews with Seamus Heaney. The first five of Heaney's collections can be purchased here, and a good selection from the first half of his career can be found in Selected Poems 1966-1987. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
41:55
May 23, 2021
Seamus Heaney: 3 Poems from "Death of a Naturalist" & Interviews with Heaney
A reading of three poems from Seamus Heaney's first collection, Death of a Naturalist (1966):  Follower  Poem  Personal Helicon  Following the poems is a reading from interviews Heaney gave on the writing of Death of a Naturalist, taken from Dennis O'Driscoll's Stepping Stones: Interviews with Seamus Heaney. The first five of Heaney's collections can be purchased here, and a good selection from the first half of his career can be found in Selected Poems 1966-1987. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
50:50
May 16, 2021
Seamus Heaney: “Personal Helicon”
A reading of Seamus Heaney's poem "Personal Helicon," from his first collection, Death of a Naturalist (1966). The first five of Heaney's collections can be purchased here, and a good selection from the first half of his career can be found in Selected Poems 1966-1987. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
04:26
May 13, 2021
Seamus Heaney: A Love Poem
A reading of Seamus Heaney's poem for his wife Marie, "Poem," from his first collection, Death of a Naturalist (1966). The first five of Heaney's collections can be purchased here, and a good selection from the first half of his career can be found in Selected Poems 1966-1987. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
02:10
May 12, 2021
Seamus Heaney: “Follower”
A reading of Seamus Heaney's poem about his father, "Follower," from his first collection, Death of a Naturalist (1966). The first five of Heaney's collections can be purchased here, and a good selection from the first half of his career can be found in Selected Poems 1966-1987. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
05:00
May 12, 2021
John Keats: "The poet has no identity"
A reading of part of John Keats's letter of October 27, 1818, where he talks about the poet and the poetic character. The full text of the letter is here, and the actual letter can be viewed here.  Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
27:33
May 6, 2021
Hart Crane to His Father
A reading of a letter Hart Crane sent to his father in January of 1924. I don't know of a better attempt by a poet to explain his vocation to someone who will never understand it, than this.  The letter is found on O My Land, My Friends: The Selected Letters of Hart Crane, edited by Langdon Hammer & Brom Weber. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
16:14
May 4, 2021
Robinson Jeffers: Selected Poems
Here is a collection of all of the recordings I've made of the poetry of Robinson Jeffers from November of 2020 until this month. It's merely my list of favorite thirty seven of his poems, which was culled from a larger selection of more than a hundred poems I've loved over the years.  His collected poetry spans three huge volumes, and nearly every individual collection included a narrative poem alongside the shorter lyrics. While Jeffers seemed to have believed that his reputation would rest on the longer poems, none of them (at least for me) come near matching the power that he is able to achieve in his shorter poems. At his best, I can't think of an American poet since Whitman to match his voice, and can think of no other American poet to write who has written so beautifully and so sadly about nature, and humanity's place in it. Because Jeffers's "inhumanist" philosophy is so dour and cynical, it's easy to dismiss his poetry and relegate him to the status of a crank, or as merely a regional, "Californian," or "ecological" poet. But to pigeon-hole a poet like him does a disservice to us all.    Buy The Selected Poetry of Robinson Jeffers. The texts used in the readings, and the titles and dates gives for each collection, follow The Collected Poetry of Robinson Jeffers. Tamar (1920-1923) The Excesses of God Age in Prospect To the Rock that Will Be a Cornerstone of the House Point Joe Roan Stallion (1924-1925) Birds Boats in a Fog Joy The Women at Point Sur (1925-1926) Post Mortem Pelicans excerpt from Credo Cawdor (1926-1928) Tor House Dear Judas (1928-1929) Hooded Night excerpt from Ossian's Grave Antrim Inscription for a Gravestone Subjected Earth Second Best Thurso's Landing (1930-1931) New Mexican Mountain Give Your Heart to the Hawks (1931-1933) Still the Mind Smiles Such Counsels You Gave to Me (1935-1938) Nova Contemplation of the Sword Shiva The Double Axe (1942-1947) Original Sin Hungerfield (1948-1953) Animals Time of Disturbance The Beauty of Things The World's Wonders The Old Stone-Mason excerpt from Hungerfield De Rerum Virtute The Deer Lay Down Their Bones Last Poems (1953-1962) Explosion Vulture "The polar ice-caps are melting" "As the eye fails" "It nearly cancels my fear of death" "I am seventy-four years old" Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
01:37:25
April 30, 2021
Robinson Jeffers: 6 Poems from "Dear Judas"
A reading of three poems from Robinson Jeffers’s book Dear Judas. The poems are: Hooded Night an excerpt from Ossian's Grave Antrim Inscription for a Gravestone Subjected Earth Second Best Buy The Selected Poetry of Robinson Jeffers. The entirety of Dear Judas can be found in volume two of The Collected Poetry of Robinson Jeffers. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
12:41
April 29, 2021
Robinson Jeffers: "Tor House"
A reading of Robinson Jeffers's poem, "Tor House," from the collection Cawdor (1926-1928). Buy The Selected Poetry of Robinson Jeffers. The entirety of “Cawdor” can be found in The Collected Poems of Robinson Jeffers. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
04:23
April 25, 2021
The Poet Speaks: Da Vinci, Aiken, Meredith
The Poet Speaks will be a series of episodes where I share my favorite comments on creativity from other artists, poets, and writers. The quotations from this episode come from Serge Bramly's Leonardo: The Artist & the Man, and the Paris Review interviews with Conrad Aiken and William Meredith. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
36:31
April 25, 2021
Robinson Jeffers: 3 Poems from "The Women at Point Sur"
A reading of three poems from Robinson Jeffers’s book "The Women at Point Sur.” The poems are: Post Mortem Pelicans an excerpt from Credo Buy The Selected Poetry of Robinson Jeffers The entirety of “The Women at Point Sur” can be found in The Collected Poems of Robinson Jeffers Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
05:59
April 23, 2021
Four Columbine Poems
Here are four poems I wrote about Columbine. There are many others, but these are the only ones I can bear to read aloud.  The two books I mention in the introduction are Dave Cullen's Columbine, and Sue Klebold's A Mother's Reckoning. Also, any writing or interviews you can find online with Andrew Solomon are worth getting into as well, especially his book, Far From the Tree: Parents, Children & the Search for Identity. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
21:45
April 20, 2021
Ted Hughes: 7 Poems from "Remains of Elmet"
A reading of seven poems from Ted Hughes's 1979 collection, Remains of Elmet, which can be found in his Collected Poems. The seven poems are:  The Trance of Light Hill-Stone was Content Remains of Elmet The Ancient Briton Lay under His Rock Heptonstall Widdop Cock-Crows Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
12:57
April 18, 2021
The Poet Speaks: Shakespeare, Fitzgerald, Lowell, Larkin, Paz
The Poet Speaks will be a series of episodes where I share my favorite comments on writing and creativity from other artists, poets, and writers. The quotations from this episode come from James Shapiro's 1606: William Shakespeare and the Year of Lear, and the Paris Review interviews with Robert Fitzgerald, Philip Larkin, Octavio Paz, and Robert Lowell. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
31:44
April 18, 2021
Jealousy
Jealousy. Along the lines of a previous long episode, "Stubbornness," I wonder aloud about the jealousy that creative people feel towards each other, especially my own, and I wonder where it comes from, and what use it can be.  Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
01:00:34
April 15, 2021
Episode #100: A Belated Manifesto
Six months into this podcast, I come to episode #100. For those who are interested, here's a rundown of what I imagined I was doing when I got started, and how surprised I am to still be going. Thanks to all those who are listening! Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
35:29
April 9, 2021
The Greath Myths #9: The Many Metamorphoses of the Pig Keepers (Celtic)
In this second episode on Celtic mythology, I read the story "The Quarrel of the Two Pig-keepers and how the Bulls were Begotten," from Thomas Kinsella's translation and selection from the great Irish epic, The Tain. The other books referred to in this episode are by James MacKillop: the Oxford Dictionary of Celtic Mythology and Myths & Legends of the Celts.  Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
26:08
April 6, 2021
Walt Whitman's Life #6: The Books He Read & the Scraps He Saved
This is the fourth in what will be a long series of readings from biographies of Walt Whitman. For the next month or so, the book I will be reading from is Paul Zweig's Walt Whitman: The Making of the Poet, which focuses on the years preceding the publication of Leaves of Grass, and and the decade or so after, which Zweig and many others identify has the period in which he wrote his best poetry. The best place to find Whitman's poetry online (or anything about him at all) remains the Whitman Archive, and you can find every edition of Leaves of Grass here (as plain text downloads) and here (facsimiles of the original editions). While there are hundreds of editions of Whitman's poetry in print, the best editions for me are Gary Schmidgall's Walt Whitman: Selected Poems 1855-1892, which present his best poems in their earliest published form; the second includes the first and last editions of Leaves of Grass, along with a huge selection of Whitman's prose. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
51:22
April 2, 2021
Walt Whitman: "When Lilacs Last in the Dooryard Bloom'd"
A reading of Walt Whitman's poem "When Lilacs Last in the Dooryard Bloom'd." The reading is from the earliest published version of the poem, in his book of Civil War poetry, Drum Taps. The full text of that version is here; the final revision of the poem is here. The best place to find Whitman's poetry online (or anything about him at all) remains the Whitman Archive, and you can find every edition of Leaves of Grass here (as plain text downloads) and here (facsimiles of the original editions). While there are hundreds of editions of Whitman's poetry in print, the best editions for me are Gary Schmidgall's Walt Whitman: Selected Poems 1855-1892, which present his best poems in their earliest published form (this is the book I am reading from here); the second includes the first and last editions of Leaves of Grass, along with a huge selection of Whitman's prose. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
27:40
March 31, 2021
Walt Whitman's Life #5: Building Houses & Writing Poems
This is the fourth in what will be a long series of readings from biographies of Walt Whitman. For the next month or so, the book I will be reading from is Paul Zweig's Walt Whitman: The Making of the Poet, which focuses on the years preceding the publication of Leaves of Grass, and and the decade or so after, which Zweig and many others identify has the period in which he wrote his best poetry. The best place to find Whitman's poetry online (or anything about him at all) remains the Whitman Archive, and you can find every edition of Leaves of Grass here (as plain text downloads) and here (facsimiles of the original editions). While there are hundreds of editions of Whitman's poetry in print, the best editions for me are Gary Schmidgall's Walt Whitman: Selected Poems 1855-1892, which present his best poems in their earliest published form; the second includes the first and last editions of Leaves of Grass, along with a huge selection of Whitman's prose. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
46:00
March 29, 2021
Walt Whitman: "I Sing the Body Electric"
A reading of Walt Whitman's poem "I Sing the Body Electric." The reading is from the earliest published version of the poem, in the 1855 edition of Leaves of Grass, where the poems was untitled. The full text of that version is here; the final revision of the poem is here. The best place to find Whitman's poetry online (or anything about him at all) remains the Whitman Archive, and you can find every edition of Leaves of Grass here (as plain text downloads) and here (facsimiles of the original editions). While there are hundreds of editions of Whitman's poetry in print, the best editions for me are Gary Schmidgall's Walt Whitman: Selected Poems 1855-1892, which present his best poems in their earliest published form (this is the book I am reading from here); the second includes the first and last editions of Leaves of Grass, along with a huge selection of Whitman's prose. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
20:59
March 27, 2021
H. D.: "Envy"
A reading of H. D.'s poem "Envy" which can be found in her Collected Poems 1912-1944. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
04:29
March 25, 2021
H. D.: "Eros"
A reading of H. D.'s poem "Eros" which can be found in her Collected Poems 1912-1944. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
04:50
March 24, 2021
Walt Whitman's Life #4: Whitman in 1849
This is the fourth in what will be a long series of readings from biographies of Walt Whitman. For the next month or so, the book I will be reading from is Paul Zweig's Walt Whitman: The Making of the Poet, which focuses on the years preceding the publication of Leaves of Grass, and and the decade or so after, which Zweig and many others identify has the period in which he wrote his best poetry. The best place to find Whitman's poetry online (or anything about him at all) remains the Whitman Archive, and you can find every edition of Leaves of Grass here (as plain text downloads) and here (facsimiles of the original editions). While there are hundreds of editions of Whitman's poetry in print, the best editions for me are Gary Schmidgall's Walt Whitman: Selected Poems 1855-1892, which present his best poems in their earliest published form; the second includes the first and last editions of Leaves of Grass, along with a huge selection of Whitman's prose. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
36:05
March 24, 2021
Stubbornness
Stubbornness. An experiment in what might become a podcast diary/autobiography, and starting off with a poem I wrote when I was 18 (sorry, I say in the episode I was 17), and wondering where my stubbornness, confidence, and early thoughts on art and creativity came from. It may not work at all. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
53:39
March 22, 2021
H. D.: Two Love Poems, "Eros" & "Envy"
A reading of two love poems by H. D., "Eros" and "Envy," which are included in her Collected Poems 1912-1944. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
13:10
March 19, 2021
Walt Whitman's Life #3: Whitman & Sex
This  is the third in what will be a long series of readings from  biographies of Walt Whitman. For the next month or so, the book I will be reading from is Paul Zweig's Walt Whitman: The Making of the Poet, which focuses on the years preceding the publication of Leaves of Grass, and and the decade or so after, which Zweig and many others identify has the period in which he wrote his best poetry. The best place to find Whitman's poetry online (or anything about him at all) remains the Whitman Archive, and you can find every edition of Leaves of Grass here (as plain text downloads) and here (facsimiles of the original editions). While there are hundreds of editions of Whitman's poetry in print, the best editions for me are Gary Schmidgall's Walt Whitman: Selected Poems 1855-1892, which present his best poems in their earliest published form; the second includes the first and last editions of Leaves of Grass, along with a huge selection of Whitman's prose. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode  constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders  who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me  at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode  immediately.
45:55
March 18, 2021
Louise Glück: “Brown Circle”
A reading of Louise Glück's poem “Brown Circle,” from her 1990 collection, Ararat. Buy Ararat, or Glück's Collected Poems 1962-2012. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
02:13
March 17, 2021
H. D.: "Wine Bowl"
A reading of H. D.’s poem “Wine Bowl,” from her 1931 collection, Red Roses for Bronze. Buy her Collected Poems 1912-1944. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
04:04
March 16, 2021
Walt Whitman: "The Sleepers"
A reading of Walt Whitman's poem "The Sleepers." The reading is from the earliest published version of the poem, in the 1855 edition of Leaves of Grass, where the poems was untitled. The full text of that version is here; the final revision of the poem is here. The best place to find Whitman's poetry online (or anything about him at all) remains the Whitman Archive, and you can find every edition of Leaves of Grass here (as plain text downloads) and here (facsimiles of the original editions). While there are hundreds of editions of Whitman's poetry in print, the best editions for me are Gary Schmidgall's Walt Whitman: Selected Poems 1855-1892, which present his best poems in their earliest published form (this is the book I am reading from here); the second includes the first and last editions of Leaves of Grass, along with a huge selection of Whitman's prose. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
22:54
March 13, 2021
Louise Glück: Six Poems from “Ararat”
A reading of six poems from Louise Glück's 1990 collection, Ararat. The poems are: Lost Love Appearances Brown Circle Child Crying Out Celestial Music First Memory Buy Ararat, or Glück's Collected Poems 1962-2012. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
20:32
March 12, 2021
Walt Whitman's Life #2: Early Politics, the Opera & Theater
This is the second in what will be a long series of readings from biographies of Walt Whitman. For the next month or so, the book I will be reading from is Paul Zweig's Walt Whitman: The Making of the Poet, which focuses on the years preceding the publication of Leaves of Grass, and and the decade or so after, which Zweig and many others identify has the period in which he wrote his best poetry. The best place to find Whitman's poetry online (or anything about him at all) remains the Whitman Archive, and you can find every edition of Leaves of Grass here (as plain text downloads) and here (facsimiles of the original editions). While there are hundreds of editions of Whitman's poetry in print, the best editions for me are Gary Schmidgall's Walt Whitman: Selected Poems 1855-1892, which present his best poems in their earliest published form; the second includes the first and last editions of Leaves of Grass, along with a huge selection of Whitman's prose. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
30:36
March 10, 2021
The Great Myths #8: The Dream of Óengus (Celtic)
In beginning a new series of Great Myths, now delving into Celtic mythology, I read the short but representative story, "The Dream of Óengus" (Aisling Óenguso). I also discuss how many aspects of the story serve as a nice introduction to the larger stories I will talk about and read from in future episodes. The translation of "The Dream of Óengus" that I use comes from Jeffrey Gantz's wonderful book, Early Irish Myths & Sagas. For anyone entering into these stories, I will also never stop recommending James MacKillop's Oxford Dictionary of Celtic Mythology. It is one of the great reference books. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
25:26
March 9, 2021
Walt Whitman: "As I Ebb'd with the Ocean of Life"
A reading of Walt Whitman's poem "As I Ebb'd with the Ocean of Life." The reading is from the earliest published version of the poem, in the 1860 edition of Leaves of Grass, where it is titled "Leaves of Grass #1." The full text of that version is here; the final revision of the poem is here. The best place to find Whitman's poetry online (or anything about him at all) remains the Whitman Archive, and you can find every edition of Leaves of Grass here (as plain text downloads) and here (facsimiles of the original editions). While there are hundreds of editions of Whitman's poetry in print, the best editions for me are Gary Schmidgall's Walt Whitman: Selected Poems 1855-1892, which present his best poems in their earliest published form (this is the book I am reading from here); the second includes the first and last editions of Leaves of Grass, along with a huge selection of Whitman's prose. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
08:21
March 8, 2021
H. D.: "Lethe"
A reading of H. D.’s poem “Lethe,” from her 1924 collection, “Heliodora.” Buy her Collected Poems 1912-1944. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later  episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode  constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
02:30
March 5, 2021
Walt Whitman's Life #1: Whitman's Long Foreground
This is the first in what will be a long series of readings from biographies of Walt Whitman. For the next month or so, the book I will be reading from is Paul Zweig's Walt Whitman: The Making of the Poet, which focuses on the years preceding the publication of Leaves of Grass, and and the decade or so after, which Zweig and many others identify has the period in which he wrote his best poetry.  The best place to find Whitman's poetry online (or anything about him at all) remains the Whitman Archive, and you can find every edition of Leaves of Grass here (as plain text downloads) and here (facsimiles of the original editions). While there are hundreds of editions of Whitman's poetry in print, I   prefer the two editions published by the Library of America: the first includes the 1855 and 1892 versions of Leaves of Grass, and the second includes the same, along with a huge selection of Whitman's prose. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com.  I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
54:18
March 5, 2021
George Orwell on War
A reading of three essays by George Orwell on the Allied bombings of German cities in World War Two, and the aftermath of the atomic bombs being dropped on Japan.  I am reading from the exhaustive (more than 1,300 pages) collection of hundreds of Orwell's essays, reviews and articles to be found in the Everyman's Library edition of George Orwell's Essays. For those who would just like to see find the text of what I've read from, their online counterparts are linked to below: As I Please #25, from May 19, 1944 As I Please #33, from July 14, 1944 You and the Atom Bomb, from October 19, 1945 An online collection of all of his As I Please articles can be found here. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
28:50
March 2, 2021
The Great Myths #4-7: Ancient Egypt
A collection of four episodes on the mythology of Ancient Egypt. For a full list of readings used, visit the page for each individual episode, in the links below: Episode #4 (beginning at 00:36) is an introduction and reading of only a handful of the ancient Egyptian Pyramid texts. Episode #5 (beginning at 46:00) is an overview of the story of the Egyptian god Osiris, with readings from the most complete Egyptian and Greek sources Episode #6 (beginning at 1:27:15) is an overview of the Egyptian Book of the Dead, and a reading from Chapter 125. Episode #7 (beginning at 1:56:45) is a reading of Herodotus's account of Egyptian embalming/mummification practices, followed by a summing up of Egyptian myth episodes. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
02:34:25
February 28, 2021
The Great Myths #7: Herodotus on Egypt
A reading of Herodotus's account of Egyptian embalming/mummification practices, followed by a summing up of Egyptian myth episodes. The translation of Herodotus used is the Landmark Herodotus; the essays I read from can be found in The Oxford Encyclopedia of Ancient Egypt, and the entries on "Mythological Texts" and "Mythology"; the grumpy Egypt-hater's remarks can be found in the introduction to his volume in the Mythology of All Races. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later  episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode  constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
38:12
February 26, 2021
Robinson Jeffers: Three Poems from "Roan Stallion"
A reading of three of Robinson Jeffers’s poems from “Roan Stallion.” The poems are: "Birds" "Boats in a Fog" "Joy" Buy The Selected Poetry of Robinson Jeffers The entirety of “Roan Stallion” can be found in volume one of The Collected Poems of Robinson Jeffers Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
05:30
February 26, 2021
Walt Whitman: "Out of the Cradle Endlessly Rocking"
A reading of Walt Whitman's poem "Out of the Cradle Endlessly Rocking." The full text of the poem is here. The best place to find Whitman's poetry online (or anything about him at all) remains the Whitman Archive, and you can find every edition of Leaves of Grass here (as plain text downloads) and here (facsimiles of the original editions). While there are hundreds of editions of Whitman's poetry in print, I  prefer the two editions published by the Library of America: the first includes the 1855 and 1892 versions of Leaves of Grass, and the second (and the book I'm reading from here) includes the same, along with a huge selection of Whitman's prose. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later  episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that  the small amount of work presented in each episode  constitutes fair use.  Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders  who would prefer to not  have their work presented here can also email  me at  humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode  immediately.
13:49
February 25, 2021
So Long, Lawrence Ferlinghetti
A reading of a few poems from Lawrence Ferlinghetti's A Coney Island of the Mind, and some reflections on Ferlinghetti himself. He died yesterday at the age of 101, and you can read his obituary here. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com.  I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
15:02
February 24, 2021
Robinson Jeffers: "Joy"
A reading of Robinson Jeffers’s poem “Joy,” from his collection “Roan Stallion.” Buy The Selected Poetry of Robinson Jeffers The entirety of “Roan Stallion” can be found in volume one of The Collected Poems of Robinson Jeffers Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
01:56
February 23, 2021
Robinson Jeffers: "Boats in a Fog"
A reading of Robinson Jeffers’s poem “Boats in a Fog,” from his collection “Roan Stallion.” Buy The Selected Poetry of Robinson Jeffers The entirety of “Roan Stallion” can be found in volume one of The Collected Poems of Robinson Jeffers Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
02:44
February 22, 2021
Robinson Jeffers: "Birds"
A reading of Robinson Jeffers’s poem “Birds,” from his collection “Roan Stallion.” Buy The Selected Poetry of Robinson Jeffers The entirety of “Roan Stallion” can be found in volume one of The Collected Poems of Robinson Jeffers Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
02:38
February 21, 2021
The Great Myths #6: The Egyptian Book of the Dead
A brief introduction to the Egyptian Book of the Dead, with a reading of the longest chapter in the book, Chapter 125.  Both the introduction to the Book of the Dead and the text of Chapter 125 comes from Miriam Lichtheim: Ancient Egyptian Literature, vol. 2: The New Kingdom  Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later  episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com.  I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email meeat humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
30:27
February 19, 2021
Walt Whitman: "Crossing Brooklyn Ferry"
A reading of Walt Whitman's poem "Crossing Brooklyn Ferry." The full text of the poem is here. The best place to find Whitman's poetry online (or anything about him at all) remains the Whitman Archive, and you can find every edition of Leaves of Grass here (as plain text downloads) and here (facsimiles of the original editions).  While there are hundreds of editions of Whitman's poetry in print, I prefer the two editions published by the Library of America: the first includes the 1855 and 1892 versions of Leaves of Grass, and the second (and the book I'm reading from here) includes the same, along with a huge selection of Whitman's prose. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later  episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com.  I assume that  the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use.  Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not  have their work presented here can also email me at  humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
18:60
February 18, 2021
Robinson Jeffers: 4 Poems from "Tamar & Other Poems"
A reading of four poems from Robinson Jeffers’s 1924 book, “Tamar & Other Poems.” The poems are:  "The Excesses of God"  "Age in Prospect"  "The Rock that will be the Cornerstone of the House"  "Point Joe"  Buy The Selected Poetry of Robinson Jeffers The entirety of “Tamar & Other Poems” can be found in volume one of The Collected Poems of Robinson Jeffers Any comments, or suggestions for readings  I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to  humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. 
08:32
February 17, 2021
Robinson Jeffers: “Point Joe”
A reading of Robinson Jeffers’s poem “Point Joe,” from his 1924 book, “Tamar & Other Poems.” Buy "The Selected Poetry of Robinson Jeffers" here: https://www.amazon.com/Selected-Poetry-Robinson-Jeffers/dp/0804741085/ The entirety of “Tamar & Other Poems” can be found in volume one of The Collected Poems of Robinson Jeffers: https://www.sup.org/books/series/?series=The%20Collected%20Poetry%20of%20Robinson%20Jeffers Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
03:16
February 15, 2021
Robinson Jeffers: “To the Rock that will be the Cornerstone of the House”
A reading of Robinson Jeffers’s poem “To the Rock that will be the Cornerstone of the House,” from his 1924 book, “Tamar & Other Poems.” Buy "The Selected Poetry of Robinson Jeffers" here: https://www.amazon.com/Selected-Poetry-Robinson-Jeffers/dp/0804741085/ The entirety of “Tamar & Other Poems” can be found in volume one of The Collected Poems of Robinson Jeffers: https://www.sup.org/books/series/?series=The%20Collected%20Poetry%20of%20Robinson%20Jeffers Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
03:06
February 15, 2021
George Orwell on Poverty
A reading from early on in George Orwell’s “Down & Out in Paris & London.” Buy the book here: https://www.amazon.com/Down-Paris-London-George-Orwell/dp/015626224X Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
10:06
February 13, 2021
Robinson Jeffers: “Age in Prospect”
A reading of Robinson Jeffers’s poem “Age in Prospect,” from his 1924 book, “Tamar & Other Poems.” Buy "The Selected Poetry of Robinson Jeffers" here: https://www.amazon.com/Selected-Poetry-Robinson-Jeffers/dp/0804741085/ The entirety of “Tamar & Other Poems” can be found in volume one of The Collected Poems of Robinson Jeffers: https://www.sup.org/books/series/?series=The%20Collected%20Poetry%20of%20Robinson%20Jeffers Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
02:42
February 11, 2021
Robinson Jeffers: “The Excesses of God”
A reading of Robinson Jeffers’s poem “The Excesses of God,” from his 1924 book, “Tamar & Other Poems.” Buy "The Selected Poetry of Robinson Jeffers" here: https://www.amazon.com/Selected-Poetry-Robinson-Jeffers/dp/0804741085/ The entirety of “Tamar & Other Poems” can be found in volume one of The Collected Poems of Robinson Jeffers: https://www.sup.org/books/series/?series=The%20Collected%20Poetry%20of%20Robinson%20Jeffers Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
00:57
February 11, 2021
The Great Myths #5: Osiris
An overview of the story of the Egyptian god Osiris, with readings from the most complete Egyptian and Greek sources. The books read from in this episode are: for Plutarch's account: Isis & Osiris (electronic text of the 1936 Loeb Classical Library edition of Plutarch's Moralia) for the "Great Hymn to Osiris": Miriam Lichtheim, Ancient Egyptian Literature, vol. 2: The New Kingdom  --- Salima Ikram & Aidan Dodson, The Mummy in Ancient Egypt: Equipping the Dead for Eternity Douglas Brewer, Ancient Egypt: Foundations of a Civilization Richard Wilkinson, The Complete Gods and Goddesses of Ancient Egypt  Erik Hornung, Conceptions of God in Ancient Egypt: The One & the Many Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later  episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode   constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders   who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email  me  at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode   immediately.
42:09
February 8, 2021
H. D.: “Adonis”
A reading of H. D.’s poem "Adonis" from her early collection, “The God.” Buy her Collected Poems 1912-1944.  Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later  episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com.   I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode  constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
02:32
February 3, 2021