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Igbo Podcast

Igbo Podcast

By Igbo Podcast
"Ọjị Abịala: An Igbo Podcast" takes a revamped and innovative approach towards learning to speak the Igbo language-- guaranteed to make you at least conversant. In doing so, it aims to promote Igbo culture, literature, and a greater sense of community, especially between Ndị Igbo in Nigeria and those in the diaspora. This Igbo podcast makes language learning a lifestyle and enjoyable!! Come and join the movement and spread the word.
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Season II Finale Nwadiala
In this episode we have a special guest Dr. M. O Ene and we explore the Nwadiala concept in Igbo culture. This is a concept that provides unique privileges and recognition to people from their maternal side of the family.  In this episode we also talk about his upcoming book that goes into  depths about the significance of the Kola Nut in the Igbo culture. To get on the waiting-list to be notified when the book is available please email igbopodcast @ gmail . com.  God bless you all for the continued support and we look forward to all thats to come in the New Year. 
58:21
December 30, 2020
Somto Si Body Part III
In this episode we learner a series of phrases in Igbo that utilize words of the body part to convey different meanings. For example "aka nri" translated directly means the hand of food, but it actually means "right" or "right hand." Another example is "iri ju afọ," which directly translated means "eaten till stomach full," but in actuality, it is a phrase that means "are you satisfied." We also learn Igbo verbs in the command or imperative form and practice the verbs and phrases in a game called "Somto si," similar to the game "Simon says."  For the full transcript of this episode email igbopodcast @ gmail DOT com 
37:02
November 19, 2020
Bodily Functions
This episode focuses on learning how to talk about Bodily fluids (PG) and functions, such as crying, sweating, using the bathroom,  and more.   Looking for a transcript of the episode? Email igbopodcast @ gmail dot com to learn more about our show notes pdfs.
26:04
October 12, 2020
Body Parts Intro
This episode provides an intro to Igbo vocabulary of different parts of the body.  Looking for a transcript of the episode? Email igbopodcast @ gmail dot com to learn more about our show notes pdfs.
22:28
October 12, 2020
Homographs II
This episodes shines further light on Homographs in Igbo. Homographs are words that have the same exact spelling but are different based off tones. In Igbo there are several words like this that can be quite tricky for a learner. This episode focuses on more comprehension and pronunciation exercises   Looking for a transcript of the episode? Email @igbopodcast @ gmail dot com to learn more about our show notes pdfs.
46:34
September 28, 2020
Homographs I
This episodes focuses on Homographs in Igbo. Homographs are words that have the same exact spelling but are different based off tones. In Igbo there are several words like this that can be quite tricky for a learner.  Join us as we take learning tones to another level.  Looking for a transcript of the episode? Email @igbopodcast @ gmail dot com to learn more about our show notes pdfs. 
36:35
September 8, 2020
Tones II
This is part II on the topic of tones in Igbo.   Tones are a difficult aspect of the Igbo language for learners at any level! This episodes offers strategies with recognizing tones and an ton of practice on using them. If you're interested in getting on the wait list for our audio-visual flashcards and the worksheets/show notes for this episode email igbopodcast gmail  Like what we do? Consider supporting by donating with this link here: https://www.paypal.com/donate/?token=aRGqnrGaCBfJzWaP7tpxK7pviD67UMEXHQg0SMOfDdlHzmb_o9n0cMFvajCfw20YTJkkyW&country.x=US&locale.x=
31:56
June 16, 2020
Tones I
This is part I on the topic of tones in Igbo.   Tones are a difficult aspect of the Igbo language for learners at any level! This episodes offers strategies with recognizing tones and an ton of practice on using them. If you're interested in getting on the wait list for our audio-visual flashcards and the work sheet notes for this episode email igbopodcast  gmail  Like what we do? Consider supporting by Donating with this link here: https://www.paypal.com/donate/?token=aRGqnrGaCBfJzWaP7tpxK7pviD67UMEXHQg0SMOfDdlHzmb_o9n0cMFvajCfw20YTJkkyW&country.x=US&locale.x=
38:26
June 16, 2020
Survival, Courtesy. Manners Exercises and Recap
Please email igbopodcast@gmail.com for information on a transcript.
14:45
May 18, 2020
Survival, Courtesy, Manners and more
Please contact for information on receiving episode  transcript handouts. igbopodcast@gmail.com
33:20
May 12, 2020
Recap Survival Phrases Continued
This episode seeks to put into practice the phrases learned in the previous episode utilizing two practical scenarios. It also has a recap of the phrases and vocabulary for easy reference. Dialogue 1 A: Uncle nnọ o Uncle welcome B: Oo nne, i tetala? Well done dear, have you awaken? A: Ehen, etetala m. I rahukwara  ọfụma? Yes, I have awaken. Did you sleep well? B: Ehen, kee maka gi? Yes, what of you? A: Ee, nsogbu adighi, Ngwanu anyi ga-ahụ emecha. Yes, no problem. Alright we will see tomorrow. B: Ngwanụ Ka  ọ di Okay, goodbye. Dialogue 2 A: Hi you all Ndeewo nu B: Well Done my child, have you arrived? Welcome. Welcome Oo nwa m, i bịaroula? Nnọọ oo. Nnọ. A: Yes... are you all well/in good health? Oo Ahụ,  ọ dịkwa unu? B: Yes we are well. I trust you are well/in good health. How about school? Ehen Ahụ dị  anyị . Eji m aka na ahụ di gi, Kee maka ụlọ akwụkwọ gi. A: It is well. I want to go and rest. Ọ dị  mma oo. Achọrọ m ije zuru ike. B: Okay. Alright, we will see later Ooo ngwanụ, anyi ga-afụ, emecha . Recap General Phrases to know: Enwere m ajụjụ - I have a question. Ngwanụ - word used to denote the start of an action, can sometimes be translated as being okay/alright but its meaning can change with context. . Hapụ m aka - leave me alone Additional ways to say  "good morning," that directly translate to mean "have you awaken/ have you come out of your sleep." I teetago? I teela ? I pụtago ụra Additional Morning phrase to impress I rahakwara nke oma/ofụma?- Did you sleep well? (Note Igbo Izugbe would use "rahụkwara") Greetings Nnọọ nu -Welcome (used for multiple people) Ndewo nu- Greetings/Hello (used for multiple people) I bịaruola? - have you arrived? Also translates to mean "welcome" I garuola?- have you returned back safely (used when someone has traveled back to somewhere else) Welcome back (in different dialects)     I lọtago?     I lọtala ?     I natago ? Ways to greet/acknowledge someone who is leaving (in different dialects) I laala? I naana? I lawala/i lawago? I nabago? ( The above directly translates to "have you gone/ are you leaving. Note that it can also be used as a euphemism to express someone who has passed away, who has gone/left from the land of the living. ) See you laters Anyị  ga-ahụ (afụ) Emecha- see ya later Anyị  ga-ahụ (afụ) Echi- We will see later Emecha/ Emesia - later Ka emecha/ Ka emesia - Let it be till later
19:46
April 30, 2020
Survival Phrases continued
This episode is a continuation of the first two episodes in Season I that sought to give learners "go to phrases" for maintaining conversations in Igbo. These phrases are additional phrases to add to your  Survival Igbo tool kit. General Phrases to know: Enwere m ajụjụ - I have a question. Ngwanụ - word used to denote the start of an action, can sometimes be translated as being okay/alright but its meaning can change with context. . Hapụ m aka - leave me alone Additional ways to say  "good morning," that directly translate to mean "have you awaken/ have you come out of your sleep." I teetago? I teela ? I pụtago ụra Additional Morning phrase to impress I rahakwara nke oma/ofụma?- Did you sleep well? (Note Igbo Izugbe would use "rahụkwara") Greetings Nnọọ nu -Welcome (used for multiple people) Ndewo nu- Greetings/Hello (used for multiple people) I biaruola? - have you arrived? Also translates to mean "welcome" I garuola?- have you returned back safely (used when someone has traveled back to somewhere else) Welcome back (in different dialects) I lọtago? I lọtala ? I natago ? Ways to greet/acknowledge someone who is leaving (in different dialects) I laala? i naana? I lawala/ilawago? Inabago? ( The above directly translates to "have you gone/ are you leaving. Note that it can also be used as a euphemism to express someone who has passed away, who has gone/left from the land of the living. ) See you laters Anyi ga-ahụ (afụ) Emecha- see ya later Anyi ga-ahụ (afụ) Echi- We will see later Emecha/ Emesia - later Ka emecha/ Ka emesia - Let it be till later
36:33
April 30, 2020
Need someone to practice speaking Igbo with?
Having a peer to practice my Igbo with has provided me with the greatest improvements in learning the language. From building my confidence, to learning cool phrases, to sharpening my  audio comprehension, conversation partners are the best way to improve proficiency in speaking a language. And now we would like to bring to you two ways to access an Igbo language partner at a discounted price before the Igbo Conversation Exchange Program officially goes live. 1. Signup to practice a particular episode topic or exercises with a conversation partner for an hourly rate. This option is super flexible and requires less commitment. 2.  Trial a free week of our Conversation Exchange program and consider working with a conversation partner on a weekly basis for a specified duration of time. Interested? Contact: igbopogcast@gmail.com or DM on IG @igbopodcast.com
05:05
April 27, 2020
Prayer 101 Exercises and Create Yours!
Exercises Key words: What do they mean: Mmụọ nsọ- Holy Spirit How do you say “in Jesus name”- N'aha Jesu What is n’aha nna, na nwa, na mmụọ nsọ- "In the name of the Father, The Son, and the Holy Spirit" How would you say “Blood of Jesus”- Ọbara Jesu What does “Ka e mee uche gi” putara?- "Let your will be done"  Quiz on Names of God we will Onyenweanyi- Our Lord Onye Nzọpụta- Our Savior Dike n’agha- Might warrior Ekwueme- The one who says and does Ọkakaa- The greatest one  Onyekereụwa- The Creator  Father- Nna Savior- Nzọpụta "Mouth Watering" Names for Glorifying   1. O loro ihe loro enyi (translates directly, "The one who swallowed the thing that swallowed the elephant)      a. The all loving God.        b. The all powerful God      c. The all knowing God 2. Ama ama amacha amacha      a. The all loving God      b.The all powerful God      c.The all knowing God (correct answer) 3. Echeta obi esie ike (the in whom we base our confidence)    a. The unfailing God (correct answer)    b. The all loving God     c. The ageless God Thanks and Adoration  4 main starter phrases: Nara Ekele (ekene) maka____ Anyi na ekele gi maka ____ Daalu maka____ I meela maka____ Things to give thanks for: Ndu ahụ ike (ahụ isi ike/ahụ ishi ike) , ihe ọma i na-eme anyi. Ihe niile Nchebe- protection (Mkpuchite) Requests  3 main starter phrases  Anyi na-ariọ (ayọ) gi- We are begging/pleading with you  Biko, Nye anyi/m- Please, give us  Wepụrụ anyị- Take away from us  Things you pray for: udo - peace ahụ ike- health ịhụnanya- love. ọganịru- Progress/Success Nwa/umu- Child/children Aku n’uba- Wealth and riches Nzoputa mkpuru obi- Savior of soul Ndi na-ata ahụhụ- People suffering Enyemaka- Help Things you pray against  ọrịa-sickness Ụkọ,- lack ụkpa, ubiam -poverty Ndi iro- Enemies ihe mberede- emergency/accidents    ihe ọjọọ niile- all bad things Ihe ọbụla na-esighi n’ebe i nọ- Things that are not from you (God) God Bless
41:20
April 12, 2020
Prayer 101 Requests and Closing
In this episode we look at how to make requests in Igbo,  We introduce to phrases that can be used to requests for things we want and one phrase to request for things we do not want. From there, we go over lines that do not fall tidy into a category as well as a few lines that can be used to close a prayer.  Phrases for things we want  M na arịọ (ayọ) gi maka ___- I am pleading/asking you for ___ Anyi na arịo (ayọ) gi maka____- We are pleading/asking you for ___ Biko nye anyi (m) ___- Please, give us (me) ____ Phrase to ask God to take away things we don't want  Wepụrụ anyị (m) ____- Take away from us (me) ____ List of things you want: Mgbahara mmehie- forgiveness of sins Kpuchite anyị na ezinaụlọ anyị - protect us and our families Rịọpụtara anyi (Provide for us)- Provide for us Gwoọ ndị na-aria ọrịa (Gwoo ndi ọrịa) -heal people who are sick/ heal the sick   Ogwugwo ọrịa - healing of sickness Udo- Peace Ahụ ike- Health ịhụnanya- Love ọganịru- Progress/prosperity/success Nwa/umu- Child/children Aku n’uba- Wealth and riches Amamihe- Wisdom List of things you don't want: ọrịa, Ụkọ,- lack/scarcity ( Ex ụkọ mmiri is water scarcity) Ubiam or ukpa -poverty Ndi iro- Enemies Ihe mberede - Bad emergency bad  Ihe ọjọọ niile- All bad things Some phrases: Duo anyi- guide us Ka amara gi nonyere anyị- May your grace abide by us Napụta anyị n’aka ndị iro- Take us from the hands of our enemies Ka anyị pụọ n’udo bata n’udo- May we go out in peace and return in peace Were ọbara gi kpuchie anyị- Cover us with your blood  Closing Phrases  Na aha Jesus Christ bu Onwenweanyi - In the name of Chirst, Our Lord. Anyi na-ario (ayo) site na aha Jesus Christ,  Onwenweanyi- We ask this of you in the name of Jesus Christ, Our Lord. Anyi na ekele gi maka i nụla ekpere anyi- We thank you that you that you have heard our prayers.
40:49
March 29, 2020
Prayer 101: Thanksgiving/Adoration
So this episode is part II of our episode on creating your own prayer in igbo, which seeks to give a blueprint or guide to creating a personal prayer in Igbo. In the previous episode we went over some "must know phrases" and then a list of names used in glorifying God.  In this part of the episode, we will explore how to show Adoration and thanksgiving,.  So to explore this part of prayer we will introduce 4 phrases that can be used when beginning your sentences of thanks.  It's important to note that there are many ways to say thank you in Igbo  or to convey these means, but here are just a few phrases to get you started: 1. Nara Ekele (ekene) maka ____ inyere m/anyi- Receive thanks for ________ you have given me/us 2. Anyi na ekele gi/M na-ekele gi maka ____- We thank you for _____/ I am thanking you for ____ 3. Daalu maka ____- Thank you for _____ 4. I meela ( I meena) maka- Thank you for ____  (you have done well for ____) Onyinye: Now that we have those downs, lets just discuss some overall things we may be thankful for before we put it all into sentences Life- Ndụ Health- Ahụ Ike (ahu isi ike/ahu ishi ike) , Good things- Ihe ọma Blessing(s)- Ngọzị Family - Ezinaulọ Protection/Guard- Mkpuchite  or Nchebe Peace- Udo Joy - Ọṅụ Love- Ịhụnanya  Everything - Ihe nille Provision- Nriọpụta Friends- Ndi Enyi
38:17
March 20, 2020
Praying in Igbo 101
Have you ever wished that you could say a prayer in Igbo?  Or that you could at least, better understand when a prayer is being said in Igbo around you? Well if so, these next couple of episodes are for you, though,  even if you do not pray, these episodes are still for you as they cover a ton of great vocabulary and phrases that can be used in everyday speech in Igbo. This episode is the first of four episodes that seek to layout a blueprint for creating your very own prayer in Igbo. This episode focusses on "Must know phrases" and names used in "Glorifying God." Must know Phrase/words  in Igbo Prayers  Na aha Jesus- In the name of Jesus Akwụkwọ nsọ - Holy Bible Abụm n'ekele- Hymn or praise songs Na aha Nna, na Nwa, na Mmụọ nsọ- "In the name of the father, son, and holy spirit" Ọ  n'aha Jesus- In the name of Jesus  Ọbara Jesus- Blood of Jesus Ọ bu n’ike na obara Jesus- The power and the blood of Jesus Ụbọchị taa- Today Names God (praise/glorifying) Onye ọma- Great God Nna anyi/ Nna-Our father/ father Eze ebube-King of glory Onyenweanyị- Lord Onye Nzọpụta - Saviour Dike n’agha- Powerful warrior Odogwu n’agha- Mighty warrior Chukwu okike- Creator Ọkakaa- Great one Onye kere ụwa- The one who created the world (Creator) Ekwueme- the one who says and does O loro ihe loro enyi - Almighty/powerful (the one who swallowed the thing that swallowed the elephant) Ama ama amacha amacha- All knowing God Echeta obi esie ike- The unfailing God Mmalite n' Ọgwụgwụ- Alpha and Omega
27:24
March 19, 2020
Ajụjụ na Azịza: Lord's Prayer
The purpose of this activity is to explore another way to interact with the Our Father using questions and answers (ajuju na aziza). This is helpful too as conversation practice, because most times when we converse with other people, it’s in the form of asking and answering questions. So this will give extra practice with the question phrases we learned in Season I.  Overview of Questions: Onye bụ...(identify a person, noun comes after this phrase) Gịnị bụ… (what is, but a noun comes after this phrase) Gịnị ka… (what is, but action comes after this phrase) Ebee ka… (where is) Kedu ka… (how is..., or how are…) Gịnị ọzọ… (what again…) Kedu mgbe/ kedu oge… (when, what time…) Exercise  1. Onye bụ Chineke? Ọ bụ nna anyị. 2. Ebee ka ọ nọ? Ọ nọ n’eluigwe. 3. Gịnị ka anyị ga-agwa ya? Nna anyị nọ n’eluigwe, Ka otito dịrị aha gị, Ka ochịchị gị bịa, Ka eme uche gị n’ụwa. 4. Kedu ka esi eme uche ya n’ụwa? Ka esi eme ya n’eluigwe. 5. Gịnị ka anyị chọrọ o nye anyị? Anyị chọrọ ka o nye anyị, taataa, nri nke ụbọchi anyị. 6. Gịnị ọzọ ka anyị chọrọ? Anyị chọrọ ka ọ gbaghara anyị mmehie anyị. 7. Kedu ka ọ si agbaghara mmehie anyi? Dị ka anyị si gbaghara ndị mehiere anyị. 8. Gịnị ọzọ ka ọ ga-eme? Ọ gaghị-ekwe anyị kwenye na nranye. (Ọ gaghị-ekwe anyị danye na nranye. ) Ọ ga-azọpụta anyị na ajọ ihe. 9. Gịnị bụ nke ya? Ọchịchị bụ nke ya, na ike, na otito. 10. Kedu mgbe ha bụ nke ya? Ha bụ nke ya ebighi-ebi, ebighi-ebi. (Ebebe ebebe)
29:25
March 10, 2020
S2E4: Nna Anyị II
Our Father  Nna anyị nọ n’eluigwe, ka otito dịrị aha gị; ka ọchịchị gị bịa, ka emee uche gị n’ụwa ka esi eme ya n’eluigwe. Nye anyị taataa nri nke ụbọchị anyị, gbaghara anyị mmehie anyị, dịka anyị si gbaghara ndị mehiere anyị. Ekwela ka anyị kwenye na nranye, ma zọpụta anyị n’ajọ ihe. N’ihi na ọchịchị bụ nke gị, na ike, na otito, ebighi ebi, ebighi ebi. Amen. nna...nna anyị- Our father eluigwe (enuigwe)...n’eluigwe (n’enuigwe)- in heaven Otito- Praise aha (afa)...aha gị (afa gị)- your name ọchịchị...ọchịchị gị - uche...uche gị ụwa...n’ụwa taataa nri (nni/nli) ụbọchị (ụbọsị)...nke ụbọchị anyị mmehie...mmehie anyị ndị nranye...na nranye- temptation ajọ ihe...n’ajọ ihe ihi...n’ihi...n’ihi na Ike- strength/power ebighi ebi/ebebe - Forever/ Never ending Now let’s turn our attention to the remaining words in the prayer nọ...nna anyị nọ n’eluigwe- our father who art in heaven dịrị...ka otito dịrị aha gị - Let/may praise be onto your name bịa...ka ọchịchị gị bịa- Let your reign emee...ka emee uche gị n’ụwa, - Let  your will be done ka esi eme...ka esi eme ya n’eluigwe- As it is done in heaven nye anyị...nye anyị, taataa, nri nke ụbọchị anyị- give us today, the food of today (our daily bread) gbaghara anyị...gbaghara anyị mmehie anyị, dịka anyị si gbaghara ndị mehiere anyị -  Forgive us for our trepasses, as we forgive those who trespasses against us ekwela...ekwela ka anyị- Dont allow us to fall into temptation kwenye...kwenye na nranye zọpụta anyị...ma zọpụta anyị n’ajọ ihe - but  save us from evil 11, bụ...n’ihi na ọchịchị bụ nke gị, na ike, na otito- because the kingdom is your and power and glory. 
19:28
March 5, 2020
S2E3: Nna Anyị I
Nna Anyị Nna anyị nọ n’eluigwe, ka otito dịrị aha gị; ka ọchịchị gị bịa, ka emee uche gị n’ụwa ka esi eme ya n’eluigwe. Nye anyị taataa nri nke ụbọchị anyị, gbaghara anyị mmehie anyị, dịka anyị si gbaghara ndị mehiere anyị. Ekwela ka anyị kwenye na nranye, ma zọpụta anyị n’ajọ ihe. N’ihi na ọchịchị bụ nke gị, na ike, na otito, ebighi ebi, ebighi ebi. Amen. Key vocabulary breakdown part I  nna...nna anyị- Our father eluigwe (enuigwe)...n’eluigwe (n’enuigwe)- in heaven Otito- Praise aha (afa)...aha gị (afa gị)- your name ọchịchị...ọchịchị gị - your Kingdom uche...uche gị - your will ụwa...n’ụwa- in the world taataa- today nri (nni/nli) ụbọchị (ụbọsị)...nke ụbọchị anyị mmehie...mmehie anyị ndị nranye...na nranye- temptation ajọ ihe...n’ajọ ihe n’ihi na- because Ike- strength/power ebighi ebi/ebebe - Forever/ Never ending
25:16
March 5, 2020
S2E2: Kola Nut Prayer II
Ọjị, which is kola nut in the Igbo language, is a very significant part of Igbo culture in regards to greetings, offerings, covenants, communion, prayers, and more. The Kola nut can only be blessed in the Igbo language and as such, the fate of this crucial cultural phenomenon depends on those who can speak the language and who can respect and upkeep the culture. In this episode, we dissect the first half of short clip of a kola nut prayer by Obyno Daddy Muna with a new and special guest teacher, Ugochinyerennaya. 1. Olisa bi n'eluigwe; Ọjị abiala ooo, Ọjị abiala - God in Heaven. Kola Nut has arrived ooo. Kola Nut is ready (has come). 2. Ndị Igbo niile ne, nọ n'ụwa niile, ọji abịala nụ ooo, Ọjị abịala. -All Igbo people in all of the world, Kola nut has arrived ooo, Kola Nut. 3. Igbo mma mma nụ oooh. - Greetings to everybody. 4. Ndị igbo naasi na onye wetara ọjị wetara ndụ- - The Igbo people say that the one who brings kola brings life. 5. Anyị onwe anyị makwana Chinèkè, Olisa bi n'igwe bu ndụ. - We all know God in heaven is life. 6. Yaabu onye ọbuna wetara ọjị, ewetago chinèkè weta ndụ. (iweta). - Therefore anybody who brings kola has received God and received life. 7. Ọkwa ya ndị be anyị? - Isn’t that correct my people? 8. Ya (bu) na dika m si jide ọjị a, ihe m na ekpe bu na nke onye ọbuna na-achọ n' izu ụka a na abianụ ọ ga-achọta ya.... Isee. - As I am holding this kola, what I am praying for is that what anybody seeks (wants) within  this upcoming week. He/She will find it (it will be granted). Amen. 9. Nke onye ọbuna bu n'obi na abughị ihe ọjọọ, Chinèkè ga-aza ya ka anyị na ata ọjị a... iseee. - Whatever anybody has in mind that is not a bad thing, God will answer it as we eat this kola nut. 10. Ndụ mmiri, ndụ azụ..iseee. - As the water is for the fish what the fish is to water (a proverb that means let live and live, that things should work in harmony with one another.) 11. Ọ ga-adiri onye obuna mma...iseee. - It will be well with everyone 12. Nke onye na-acho, ya chota. - Whatever anyone seeks, may it be granted. 13. Ọ ga-adiri anyi ncha mma... iseee. Oji abialanu eee oji abiala. -It will be well for all of us. The kola nut has arrived. Theme Music by Jon Deux
27:33
February 21, 2020
S2E1: Kola Nut Prayer I
Ọjị, which is kola nut in the Igbo language, is a very significant part of Igbo culture in regards to greetings, offerings, covenants, communion, prayers, and more.  The Kola nut can only be blessed in the Igbo language and as such, the fate of this crucial cultural phenomenon depends on those who can speak the language and who can respect and upkeep the culture.  In this episode, we dissect the first parts of a short clip of a kola nut prayer by Obyno Daddy Muna with a new and special guest teacher, Ugochinyerennaya.  1. Olisa bi n'eluigwe; Ọjị abiala ooo, Ọjị abiala    - God in Heaven. Kola Nut has arrived ooo. Kola Nut is ready (has come). 2. Ndị Igbo niile ne, nọ n'ụwa niile, ọji abịala nụ ooo, Ọjị abịala.     -All Igbo people in all of the world, Kola nut has arrived ooo, Kola Nut. 3. Igbo mma mma nụ oooh.    - Greetings to everybody. 4. Ndị igbo naasi na onye wetara ọjị wetara ndụ-   - The Igbo people say that the one who brings kola brings life. 5. Anyị onwe anyị makwana Chinèkè, Olisa bi n'igwe bu ndụ.     - We all know God in heaven is life. 6. Yaabu onye ọbuna wetara ọjị, ewetago chinèkè weta ndụ. (iweta).      - Therefore anybody who brings kola has received God and received life. 7. Ọkwa ya ndị be anyị?      - Isn’t that correct my people? 8. Ya (bu) na dika m si jide ọjị a, ihe m na ekpe bu na nke onye ọbuna na-achọ n' izu ụka a na abianụ ọ ga-achọta ya.... Isee.     - As I am holding this kola, what I am praying for is that what anybody seeks (wants)  in this upcoming week. He/She will find it. Amen. 9. Nke onye ọbuna bu n'obi na abughị ihe ọjọọ, Chinèkè ga-aza ya ka anyị na  ata ọjị a... iseee.     -Whatever anybody has in mind that is not a bad thing, God will answer it as we eat this kola nut. 10. Ndụ mmiri, ndụ azụ..iseee.  -  As the water is for the fish what the fish is to water (a proverb that means let live and live, that things should work in harmony with one another.) 11. Ọ ga-adiri onye obuna mma...iseee. - It will be well with everyone 12. Nke onye na-acho, ya chota. - Whatever anyone seeks, may it be granted. 13. Ọ ga-adiri anyi ncha mma... iseee. Oji abialanu eee oji abiala. -It will be well for all of us. The kola nut has arrived. Theme Music by Jon Deux
23:55
February 21, 2020
Introduction: O teego!
This is the introductory episode of Season II of this podcast series. In this audio, the founder, Ifunanya, gives a glimpse of what can be expected this season, a reminder of the format, and some encouragement towards our overall goals in this language learning journey! Enjoy =) Music:  Eriwa by Ruffcoin 
07:56
February 20, 2020
We want to Hear from you!!! (Link in Description)
Please take a moment to take this short survey. www.surveymonkey.com/r/FWZHB8F Also don't forget to follow us: Instagram: @igbopodcast Facebook: @igbopodcast Youtube: Igbo Podcast Email: Igbopodcast@gmail.com Music: Teckno
03:14
July 4, 2019
Season 1 Finale
This episode is special as it is both an audio and a visual!!! Check out the visual here on youtube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Oyb8G9IS-jU&feature=youtu.be&fbclid=IwAR1uokxUNdURaho7yDQn07qEJEqcyqveDiQQu2ImjUooGVmQlfmOcDIXTPg Igbo Dialogue Transcript Ifunanya: so with no other further ado,  Uche! Uche nno.         Uche: Ndewonu …kee kwanụ , (Greetings, How are you?)         Ifunanya: ọdịmma, ahụ dịkwa gị? (I am fine, are you in good health)?         Uche :  ehn ahụ dị m, kee maka  ụlọ akwụkwọ  (I am in good health, what about school, how is that going?)          Ifunanya: ọdịmma  ooo gịnwa kwanụ, ibidola ọrụ? ( I am fine oo , have you started work?)   ·      Uche: ehnn, kee maka ụmụnne gị ? ( yes, how about your siblings?)   ·      Ifunanya: Ha dikwa mma. (they are well)   ·      Uche: Ụmụnne olee ka I nwere? (How many siblings do you have?)   ·      Ifunanya: Anyị di ise, E nwere m  ofu nwanne m  nwaanyị na  ụmụnne nwoke atọ. ( We are 5, i have one sister and 3 brothers.)   ·      Uche: Ọ  gi tọrọ nwanne gi nwaanyị? (are you older than your sister?)   ·      Ifunanya: Mba  ọ  tọrọ m. Ma gi nwa ụmụnne olee ka inwere? (no she is older than me, how many siblings do you have?)   ·      Uche: enwere m umunne anọ  ( I have 4 sibllings)   ·      Ifunanya: Kedu aha ada unu? (what is the name of the first daughter of you all? )   ·      Uche: aha ya bu Chinonye. ( Her name is Chinonye)   ·      Ifunanya: Olee otu m ga-esi kwu, “do they speak igbo?”  (How do I say  " do they speak igbo" in igbo?" ·      Uche :  Ọ bu “Ha ma igbo asu?”   ·      Ifunanya: Ha ma igbo asu? Ekwuru m ya ọfụma?   ·      Uche: Ehn i gbaliri ( yes, you you really tried)   ·      Ifunanya: Oh okay,  afọ olee ka ọkpara unu di? (How old is the first son of you all?)        Uche: afọ iri atọ na atọ , gịnwa kwanụ? (33 years old, and what of with you?)    Ifunanya: Ọ di afọ iri abụọ na anọ . (He is 24 years old)      Uche: Cheregodi, o di ka I gwahu m na mbido, onye ebee ka I bụ? (Wait oo, its like you didn't tell me back then, where are you from?)     Ifunanya: A bu m onye Egbuoma, Ọ dị n’ime Oguta LGA, n’ime Imo steeti , ginwa kwanu, i  bu onye ebee? ( I am from Egbuoma, a town in Oguta local goverment in Imo state, what about you?)    Uche: A bu onye Mbaise ( I am from Mbaise) Music: Culture by Umu Obiligbo ft Flavour and Phyno.  Instrumentals: Endeetone
11:54
June 11, 2019
Episode 14: Ezinaụlọ Phrases To Know
In this episode, we highlight 4 phrases and verbs that are commonly used when talking about the family and related terms: Inwe (to have), Iyi (to resemble in appearance), Idi ka (to resemble in character/values/behaviors), Ito (to be older than). 4 verbs/phrases as it relates to the family: ·  Infinitive:   Inwe- to have  Iyi- to resemble  Idi ka – to be like  Ịtọ- to be older than ọ ụ ·  Conjugated: o  Inwe  E nwere m – I have  (note the “E” and not “A” b/c of vowel harmony)   M nwere – I have   I nwere- You have  O nwere- He/She/it has (note the “O” and not   Anyi nwere- We have   Unu nwere - You (pl) nwere   Ha nwere- They have Examples given ·  E nwere m nne nne-  I have a grandmother, ·  O nwere umunne ato- He/She has 3 siblings. ·  Ha nwere umu ise- They have 5 children. ·  Nna ya nwere nwunye abuo- Their father has two wives. o  Iyi  E yiri m – I resemble   M yiri – I resemble   I yiri – You resemble   O yiri – He/She/It resembles   Anyi yiri – We resemble   Unu yiri – You (pl) resemble   Ha yiri- They resemble  Examples given ·  I yiri nwanne gi – you remeble your sibling ·  O yiri nna ya – He/She resembles his/her father ·  Unu yiri onwe unu- You (pl) resemble each other o  Idi ka  A di m ka – I am like  M di ka – I am like u   Ị di ka- You are like   O di ka – You are like Anyi di ka –We are like   Unu di ka –You (pl) are like   Ha di ka – They are like ·  O di oji di ka unyi- He is black like charcoal ·  O toro ogologo di ka osisi- She is tall like a tree ·  Ifunanya di ka nna ya – Ifunanya is like her father ·  Emeka di ka nne nne ya- Emeka is like his grandmother ·  Ugochinyere di ka nna ya – Ugochinyere is like his father o  Ịtọ A tọrọ m – I am older than  M tọrọ -  I am older  I tọrọ – You are older  O tọrọ – He/She/It are older than   Anyi tọrọ – We are older than   Unu tọrọ– You (pl) are older than   Ha tọrọ  They are older than Examples: ·  Nwanne m nwoke tọrọ m – My brother is older than me ·  Nwanne m nwoke nke tọrọ m – My brother that I am older than ( My brother is younger than me)
17:01
May 21, 2019
Episode 13: Ezinaụlọ Comprehension
In this Episode we work on comprehension using some of the terms  Comprehension passage:  Nna m ochie nwere nwunye abụọ na ụmụ asaa.  Nne m na nna m nwere ụmụ ise.  Nwanne m nwanyi nwere ụmụ ato. Passage questions   Ụmụnne ole ka nna m nwere?   Umunne ole ka m nwere?   Ụmụ nwanne ole ka m nwere? Passage Answers  Ụmụnne ole ka nna m nwere  Umunne ole ka m nwere?  Ụmụ nwanne ole ka m nwere? Passage Translated  My grandfather has 2 wives and 7 children My mom and my dad have 5 children. My sister has 3 children  Passage Questions Translated How many siblings does my father have? How many siblings do I have? How many nieces/nephews do I have? Listen to audio for answers! Music: Obiako Nnwam by Ejeagha 
09:34
May 7, 2019
Episode 12: Ezinaụlọ/Related Terms Vocab Recap
This Episode Recaps some key vocabulary that we have learned about the family and related terms.  Listen and try to see what you can recall and also practice saying these words out loud with the correct pronunciation.  Nne- Mother  Nna- Father  Nwa- Child  Ụmụ- Children  Nwaanyị- Woman/ Female  Nwoke - Man/Male Other vocabulary we review  First born - Nwa mbu / nwa izizi  Last born - Nwa Ikpeazu First son- Okpara, Opara, diokpara First daughter- Ada Note: Ada can be used for any female as a term of endearment as well New Vocabulary word  Other members and related words for family  Wife - Nwunye  Husband - Di  Inlaw -  Ọgọ Mother inlaw - Ọgọ nwaanyi or Nne di  My mother inlaw - Ọgọ m nwaanyị Father inlaw- Ọgọ nwoke Relations/Relatives -Ụmụnna Kith/Kin, Relations - Ikwu na ibe Twin- Ejima  Triplets Ejima Ato  Quadruplets- Ejima anọ  Adult - Okenye Young adult male - Okorobia Young adult female-  Agbọghọ(bia) Neighbor(s) - Onye agbatobi  Friend- enyi Friend(s)- Ndi enyi Enemy- Onye irọ Enemies- Ndi irọ   Husband - Di  Inlaw -  ọgọ  Mother inlaw - ọgọ nwaanyi or Nne di  My mother inlaw - ọgọ m nwaanyi  Father inlaw Relations/Relatives (can also be step-siblings)  Umunna Kith/Kin, Relations - Ikwu na ibe Twin- Egima  Triplets Egima Atọ Quadruplets- Egima Anọ Adult - Okenye Young adult male - Okorobia Young adult female  Neighbor(s) - onye a batobi  Friend- Enyi (ndi enyi pl) Friends-  Ndi enyi Enemy- onye irọ Enemies- Ndi irọ Refer back to original episodes for more vocabulary and exercises! Music: Chief Osita Osadebe- Ife onye metalu
11:55
April 29, 2019
Episode 11: Ezinaụlọ Part II
Review of  6 key words in Igbo: Nne- Mother  Nna- Father  Nwa- Child  Ụmụ- Children  Nwaanyị Nwoke (Other common words for children: ụmụaka, nwata, and nwatakiri) Review of Vocabulary that denotes the Position of a child  First born - Nwa mbu / nwa izi  Last born - Nwa Ikpeazu First son- Okpara, Opara, diokpara First daughter- Ada Note: Ada can be used for any female as a term of endearment as well New Vocabulary  Other members and related words for family  Wife - Nwunye  Husband - Di  Inlaw -  Ọgọ Mother inlaw - Ọgọ nwaanyị or Nne di  My mother inlaw - Ọgọ m nwaanyị Father inlaw- Ọgọ nwoke Relations/Relatives (can also be step-siblings) -Ụmụnna Kith/Kin, Relations - Ikwu na ibe Twin- Ejima  Triplets Ejima Ato  Quadruplets- Ejima Ise  Related Terms Adult - Okenye Young adult male - Okorobia Young adult female-  Agbọghọ(bia) Neighbor(s) - Onye agbata obi  Friend- Enyi Friends- Ndi enyi Enemy- Onye iro   Enemies- Ndi iro Music: Nwa by Ifé
21:51
April 8, 2019
Episode 10: Ezinaụlọ
Ezinaụlọ  means family in Igbo.  Using 6 key words, as explained by @nwaadaigbo, one can derive at many other vocabulary words used to describe different family members.  Those words are: Nne- Mother  Nna- Father  Nwa- Child  Ụmụ- Children  Nwaanyị  (Other common words for children: ụmụaka, nwata, and nwatakiri)  Examples of this formula in use Nwa nwoke- (male+ child) = Son  Nwanne nwoke- (child of my mom that is male)= Brother  Nwanne nwaanyị - (child of my mom that is female)= Sister  Umunne- (children of my mom)= my siblings  Other Vocabulary we learn: Grandfather- Nna Ochie/ Nna nna Grandmother Nne Ochie/ Nne nne There are words used in Igbo used to specifically highlight the position of a child in the family. See Vocabulary below: First born - Nwa mbu / nwa izi  Last born - Nwa Ikpeazu First son- Okpara, Opara, diokpara First daughter- Ada Note: Ada can be used for any female as a term of endearment as well  Exercise: using the key words/ formula figure out what these words in english will be in english (LISTEN to the audio before looking below) Grandchild - Nwa nwa (the child of my chlid) Grandchildren-  Ụmụ ụmụ (the children of my children) Nephew/Niece (w/o gender) Nwa nwanne (the child of my sibling) Stay tuned for part 2 and 3 of Ezinaulo as we talk more about the family.  Music: Flavour Ada Ada (karaoke version)
29:12
April 2, 2019
Episode 9: Ịnọ
In this episode we explore,  "Ịnọ" the "to be" verb which means being at a place for both living and non living items. (Note there are examples where ịdị can also be the "to be" verb used to describe "to be at a place" for inanimate objects. This concept is not explored in this episode however.) We then explore common vocabulary words for names of places in Igbo.  Exercise 1: Try listening and coming up with the sentences before reading below. I am home - A nọ m n’ụlọ  She is at school- Ọ  nọ n’ụlọ akwụkwọ  We are at work Anyị  nọ n’ọrụ (ụlọ ọrụ) You (singular) are at church - Ị nọ n’ụka (ụlọ ụka ) They are here  Ha nọ  ebe a Where are you? Ebee ka ị nọ?/ Ị nọ  ebee? I am on the road” A nọ m n’ụzọ  “I am coming”  M na-abịa ( A na m abịa)  Victor: Perfect, so just to recap the vocabulary we just learned. To say  Home -  Ụlọ  School- Ụlọ akwụkwọ  Work- Ụlọ ọlụ (ọrụ) Church- Ụlọ Ụka (Ụka) Here- Ebe a (this location) Ụzọ - Road (can also be used in many less literal ways)  Exercise 2  She is upstairs (above) - Ọ  nọ n’elu He is downstairs (below) Ọ  nọ n’ala It is in front  Ọ  nọ n’ịhụ Stay in the front (at the head) Nọ n’ịhụ They are outside Ha nọ n’   It is at the side of you Ọ  nọ n’akụkụ  We are behind you- Anyi nọ na-azụ Recap the vocabulary  Up (used to indicate Upstairs) Elu (Enu) Down (used to indicate downstairs) Ala In front/at the head- N’ịhụ Outside - N'Ezi The side- N'Akụkụ Behind- Azụ Exercise 3: Ịbụ vs Ịdị vs Ịnọ Translate the english sentence into the correct igbo phrase using the correct "to be" verb.  Where are you?  Ebee ka ị nọ? I am tall- A dị m ogologo I am a wealthy person- A bụ  m  ọgaranya Stay one place- Nọ ofu ebe Other phrases  Sit -nọdụ  Sit down - nọdu ala  Stay!-Nọ Stay still (be easy)- Nọ nwayọ Music: Zoro ft Flavour - Ogene (Instrumental) Produced by KexyKlef x Majorbangz
29:12
February 24, 2019
Episode 8: Ịbụ vs Ịdị
In english, everything simply just is. The to be verb can be used when stating, I am a girl,  He is 32 years old, or They are at the house. Also notice that in english the "to be" verb also changes or is conjugated based off the pronoun, ie: "is, are, am."  The way Igbo people conceptualize the "to be" verb is different however. In this episode we explain that the "Ịbụ" "to be" verb in Igbo is used more when expressing a category of an object or its literally "being" while "Ịdị" is more so used to qualify that being or to speak towards an attribute. There is another form of the "to be" verb in the igbo language used to explain "to be at a place," (explored in the next upcoming episode).  Note luckily in Igbo the "to be" verb remains the same "bụ" or "dị" or " nọ" irregardless of the pronoun uses. Listen to this episode to explore more and also practice with exercises.  Music- Akula: Owu Onye Ara by The Funkees
21:35
February 18, 2019
Episode 7.1 Advanced Number
This episode gives a bit more practice on formulating numbers and then introduces numbers such as 100, 1000,  and 1,000,000 100- narị 1000- puku 1,000, 000- nde Review previous episode for overview of numbers.  Music: Ijele by Flavour ft Zoro
11:50
February 1, 2019
Episode 7: Ọnụọgụgụ
Ọnụọgụgụ  means Numbers in Igbo.   In this lesson, we go over Igbo number 1-10 and then using this knowledge formulate other numbers from 1-99.  Igbo Numbers in Igbo Izugbe (Central Igbo)  1:   otu (ofu- very common to hear)  2:  abụọ 3:  atọ 4:  anọ 5:   ise 6:   isii 7:   asaa 8:   asatọ 9:   itoolu (itenani) (eteghiete) 10:  iri Note: in Parentheses are other common ways to hear the Igbo number being called. In this audio we also cover how numbers are pronounced in the Anambra dialect where there are smaller variations in spelling and thus pronunciation ::Exercise 1- Udaume of the numbers:: Listen to the pronunciation of each number and identify which vowel group you are hearing. this will be a great way to reinforce some of those vowel sounds and your ability to recognize them!  Remember (refer episode 5) -  heavy vowels (udaaro) ‘e’, ‘i’, ‘o’,’u’  - light vowels (udamfe) ‘a’, ị ọ ụ Listen to audio and try to answer before viewing 1:     otu : Heavy vowels 2:    abụọ 3:    atọ: Light vowels 4:    anọ: Light Vowels  5:     ise: Heavy vowels 6:     isii: Heavy vowels  Numbers 1-99  Once you know Igbo numbers from 1-10 you can figure out any other number with addition or using “and” in igbo which is (in this case)“na.” So for example 11 is 10+1 or iri na otu 11- iri na otu 12- iri na abụọ 13- iri na atọ 14- iri na anọ 15- iri na ise  16- iri na isii Note: in pronunciation, there is vowel swallowing that occurs in normal speech between the “na” and the word that follows.  Multiplication is needed when counting by 10s so example 20 is 10*2 or 10 two times  10 iri  20 iri abụọ 30 iri atọ 40 iri anọ 50 iri ise  60 iri isii  ::Exercise 2- Question game:: Listen to the numbers given by Onyinye in English and try and figure out how to say the number in Igbo.  Common Phrase to know using numbers to come across meaning  - Things with pronouns       · Ha abụọ- them two       · Unu abụọ - you two (the two of you)      · Anyi anọ- the 4 of us - Other Phrases · Ugboro – Times  o Ex Ugboro olee ka m kpọrọ gi?- how many times did I call you  o Ugboro ise – 5 times  · Ofu ihe – same thing  o Ex: Ha bu ofu ihe.  Exercise 3: Numbers in Names of Places  · Mbaise   · Mbanọ · Ochasiatọ · Mbaitoolu  Note: mba here can mean “town,” “community,” “nation” “the people of a place, ” typically used when describing a place that is not your own. 
37:36
February 1, 2019
Episode 6.1: Ajụjụ in Action
In this Episode, we put our question words into action by role playing two scenarios. This is a good exercise to help with comprehension as well as working on pronunciation and command of the Igbo question words. Uchenna :So Ifunanya, here’s the scenario: let’s say, we’re siblings living in the same house. I have some juicy gossip to tell you, and I knock on your door. Our conversation may sound like this: I knock and you may say: “Onye no n’uzo?” which means “Who is at the door?” and I may reply “O bu m, Uchenna” which means “It is me, Uchenna.” You may then ask “Gini ka i choro?” What do you want?” And I may say “Achoro m ikwuru gi okwu” “I want to talk to you.” Now let’s act it out. Exercise 1 Role play: Uchenna: *kwai kwai kwai* Ifunanya: Onye nọ n’ụzọ? Uchenna: Ọ bu m, Uchenna. Ifunanya: Gini ka i chọrọ? Uchenna: Achoro m ikwuru gi okwu. Uchenna: Now let’s switch roles. Ifunanya: *kwai kwai kwai* Uchenna: Onye nọ n'ụzọ? Ifunanya: Ọ bu m, Ifunanya. Uchenna: Gini ka i chọrọ? Ifunanya: Achoro m ikwuru gi okwu. Uchenna: Well done. I na-agbali. You’re putting in a great effort. Now let’s say we’re friends who have not seen each other in a while. I visit your home unexpectedly and you are surprised to see me. After I knock and tell you who I am, you may excitedly ask “Kedu mgbe i batara?”...”When did you get in?” And I may reply “Abatara m unyaahu”...”I came in yesterday.” And you may say “Ebee ka i si bata?”...”From where did you come?” And I may reply “Esi m Nigeria”...”I came from Nigeria.” And you may say “Maka gini ka i biara?”...”Why did you come?” And I may reply “Abiara m maka ezumike”...”I came for a vacation.” You may then say “Kedu otu i di? Biko bata nwere mmanya, nke olee ka i choro?”...”How are you? Please come in and take a drink. Which one do you want?” And I may say “Adi m mma, daalu. Achoro m mmiri”...”I’m fine, thank you. I want water.” Now let’s act it out. Role play: Uchenna: *kwai kwai kwai* Ifunanya: Onye nọ n'ụzọ? Uchenna: O bu m, Uchenna. Ifunanya: Ewooooo, kedu mgbe i batara? Uchenna: Abatara m ụnyaahụ  Ifunanya: Ebee ka i si bata? Uchenna: Esi m Nigeria. Ifunanya: Maka gini ka i bịara? Uchenna: Abịara m maka ezumike. Ifunanya: Kedu otu i di? Biko bata were mmanya, nke olee ka i chọrọ? Uchenna: Adi m mma, daalu. Achọrọ m mmiri Uchenna: Now let’s switch roles again. Ifunanya: *kwai kwai kwai* Uchenna: Onye nọ n'ụzọ? Ifunanya: O bu m, Ifunanya. Uchenna: Ewooooo, kedu mgbe i batara? Ifunanya: Abatara m ụnyaahụ. Uchenna: Ebee ka i si bata? Ifunanya: Esi m Nigeria. Uchenna: Maka gini ka i bịara? Ifunanya: Abịara m maka ezumike” Uchenna: Kedu otu i di? Biko bata were mmanya, nke olee ka i chọrọ? Ifunanya: Adi m mma, daalu. Achọrọ m mmiri Recap Question Words  Question Words Who?...Onye? What?...Gini? When?...Mgbe olee? Where?...Ebee? Ebe olee? Why?...Maka gini? How?...Otu olee? Or Olee Otu Which?...Nke olee? (Note: "Otu olee" can be used when just simply asking "how?" While "Ole otu" is the start of a sentence beginning with "how" and followed by other words.  Kedu in combination with these words are phrases that start a question. Here is what I mean: Kedu + onye...? means “who is…?” Kedu + mgbe...? means “when is...?” Kedu + ebe...? means “where is...?” Kedu + otu...? means “how is/are….?” Kedu + nke...? means “which one...?” Kedu in front of any other noun…? can mean “what is....?” Music: Onye bu nwanne m by Onyeka
13:14
January 19, 2019
Episode 6: Ajụjụ
Ifunanya: Uche nnọ , kee maka izu  ngwụcha  gi? I na-eweta onwe gi?   Uchenna: Ndeewo Ifunanya; izu m gara ofuma. Gi nwa kwanu? Kedu ka i mere? .... Uchenna: Daalu maka ajụjụ  gi. Thank you for your question. In today’s lesson we will talk about how to ask questions,  ịjụ ajụjụ, in Igbo. To start off, let’s go back to basics. You can even think back to when you were in grade school. What were you taught are the “question words in English”? Ifunanya: Sure; they were “who,” “what,” “when,” “where,” “ why,” and “how.”  ... Note questions can also be made from statements based off of tone/voice inflections. Example: You have a question: I nwere ajụjụ.  Do you have a question: I nwere ajụjụ? (change in tone) Exercise 1: Review of Survival Kit Question Phrases What did you say? ---> Gini ka i kwuru? Or Isi gini? How do I say ____ in igbo?--->  Olee otu m ga-esi kwuo ____ n’Igbo? What is ____ in igbo?---> Gini bu ____ n’Igbo.  Question Words Who?...Onye? What?...Gini?  When?...Mgbe olee?  Where?...Ebee? Ebe olee? Why?...Maka gini? How?...Otu olee? Or Olee Otu Which?...Nke olee? (Note: "Otu olee" can be used when just simply asking "how?" While "Ole otu" is the start of a sentence beginning with "how" and followed by other words.   Kedu in combination with these words are phrases that start a question. Here is what I mean: Kedu + onye...? means “who is…?” Kedu + mgbe...? means “when is...?” Kedu + ebe...? means “where is...?” Kedu + otu...? means “how is/are….?” Kedu + nke...? means “which one...?” Kedu in front of any other noun…? can mean “what is....?” (Note: There are many variations of ways that questions can be formed beyond what is discussed here. What will be important is to just pick a place to start and phrases that are easiest for you to integrate into speech and then from there work on learning the other variations) Exercise 2 Listen to the question, identify which question word is being used, the meaning of the phrase, and then attempt to respond. Gini bu aha gi? --->What is your name?              -Kedu aha (afa) gi?     2. Onye ka i bu? --->Who are you?              -Kedu onye i bu?    3. Ebee ka i nọ? ---> Where are you?              -Kedu ebee i nọ?    4. Olee mgbe i nwere oge?---> When do you have time?             -Kedu mgbe i nwere oge?    5. Nke olee masiri gi karia, jollofu Nigeria ka o bu jollofu Ghana? Which do you like better, Nigerian jollof or Ghanaian jollof?            - Kedu nke masiri gi karia, jollofu Nigeria ka o bu jollofu Ghana?     6. Olee otu i di? How are you?               -Kedu otu i di?
23:46
January 19, 2019
Episode 5.1: Udaume II
   In this episode, we jump right into exercises to help better solidify Udaume, vowels in Igbo. And then, we further explore how vowel harmony dictates which pronouns to use in certain instances.  Exercise I Listen to the audio before reading the answers below. Objective of this exercise is to listen to the vocabulary words and see if you can, correctly identify the vowel group you are hearing in a word ie Udaarụ (Heavy vowels) vs Udaarụ (Light vowels) whether the word · Ude - lotion (Heavy vowels) · Nkịta - dog (Light) · Igbo (Heavy Vowels) · Nwaanyị- woman (Light Vowels) · Nwoke- man  (Heavy Vowels) · Akwụkwọ (Light Vowels) · Oroma- orange (Exception: contains both) · Kpọ- call (Light Vowels) Subject Pronouns Recap  English - Igbo I  M/ Mu You (sing)  Ị /I He/She/It  Ọ /O We  Anyi  You (pl) Ụnụ They  Ha When learning subject pronouns, a few of the pronouns had dependent variations to them. These were when saying you (singular) which can be either and he/she/it which can be . In this episode, we now learn that this difference is based off of keeping vowel harmony between the pronoun and the preceding verb.  Example given: Biara- past tense of the verb “to come- ịbịa” so it can be used to say “came” With this verb, we see that the vowels that make it up are Udamfe (light vowels). This thus means that the pronoun that should be used to say  You came - Ị bịara so the Ị  NOT I  Or  He came - Ọ bịara so the  Ọ NOT O Note: with the first person subject pronoun vowel harmony also comes into place with the use of a/e ___(verb) m. This will be explained in another episode however.  Exercise 3: (12:06)  Reason through which pronoun would be used for the various verbs  · ___  (you) jere         - Answer: I jere  · ____ (you) gara        - Answer: Ị gara  · _____ (He) riri       -O riri (He/she/it ate) · ____  (It) tara       - Ọ tara (He/she/it chewed) · _____ (you) gbara        -I gbara  · _____ (she) Biara      - Ọ bịara  Other notes: Omenka means Artist  Ome- doer Nka- art (artist is a "doer of art") Music: Ife Onye Metula- Chief Osita Steven Osadebe 
21:44
January 12, 2019
Episode 5: Udaume I
Initial Dialogue  I: Maazi Omenka nno, kee kwanu?  O: Adi m mma, Obi di m mma ino ebe a, soro nyere aka ikwuzi asụsụ Igbo.  I : Daalu rinne maka i nonyere anyi ebe a. Review of Diagraphs from previous episode  Exercise 1: Try to Identify the correct digraph just by listening first before looking below. Also test yourself on the meaning before looking at the answer.   Igbo • Ígwè– metal also often used to refer to a bike  Kpo- call • Nwaanyi – woman  Chinyere – name God gives  ghere – fry  akwukwo- paper/book (and many other things in context)  Semi vowels- should not be confused with udampki.  The first letter is the tone bearing sound Nkem Nna Nne Mma (Nma) “nn” and “nk”  Udaume- Vowels  Uda- means sound  Ume- means breathe  There are two categories of vowels in Igbo:  Udaarụ – The heavy vowels  (aru- means heavy) =  I E U O  Udamfe- The light vowels  (mfe- light/easy) =Ị A Ụ Ọ  Vowel Harmony in Igbo dictates that in a word typically only vowels from a particular set is are used to formulate that word.  This typically holds true with the exception of:  Compound words  Borrowed Words  Natural and/or Dialects  Follow along from here as each vowel sound is recited: 23:57:  Udaarụ (Heavy Vowels) E example eze (king)   U example ukwe (song)  O example ogologo (long/tall)  26:10 Udamfe (Light Vowels)  Udamfe  • A example akpa (bag)  • Ụ example  • Ọ think of saying “awwww”  • Ị Check out Udaume II for more.  Music: Ife Onye Metula- Chief Osita Steven Osadebe
30:45
January 11, 2019
Episode 4.1 Pronouns Recap and Extra Exercise
Subject pronouns  English- Igbo  I- M/Mụ  You (singular)- I /Ị  He/She/It-  O/Ọ We-Anyi  You (plural)- Ụnụ  They- Ha  Object Pronouns  Me -M  You (singular)- Gi  Him/Her/It- Ya  Us- Anyi  You (plural)- Ụnụ  Them - Ha  Extra Practice  Lets take the sentence "I am going to school" and work through the subject pronouns.  I am going to school = M na-aga ụlọ akwụkwọ  You are going to school= ị na-aga ụlọ akwụkwọ  He/She/It are going to school = ọ na-aga ụlọ akwụkwọ  We are going to school= anyi na-aga ụlọ akwụkwọ  You (pl) are going to school = ụnụ na-aga ụlọ akwụkwọ  They are going to school = ha na-aga ụlọ akwụkwọ  As mentioned when using an object pronoun the only things that change are that:   "ị/i" turns into "gi" and  "him/her/it" is "ya."  Now to practice the object pronouns that change let's try saying:  I saw you M fụrụ gi= I saw it M fụrụ ya  Note: Igbo pronouns do not have gender as seen with he/she and even “it” which are all said as either “O/Ọ” when a subject and him/her/it said as “ya” when an object.  Also The difference presented of "I or Ị" for "you" and "O or Ọ" are a result of vowel harmony and will be better explained in the next episode on vowels. For now just focus on being able to better identify and use the correct pronoun to formulate your sentences and as you advance, you can add on the extra layer of making sure you are following the correct vowel harmony rules.  Music: Music: Na Kwa Echeki by Dr Sir Warrior and Oriental Brothers
06:41
December 22, 2018
Episode 4: Nnọchi Aha(Pronouns)
Introductory Exchange Ifunanya: Nno- welcome  Victor: Kee ka izu gị si aga? - How is your week going? (week is izu in igbo)  Ifunanya: Izu m gara ọfụma. Ebidoro m semester ọhụrụ - My week went well, I started a new semester. (“new”-ọhụrụ many dialectal variations) Ifunanya: Kee maka izu gi?- what about your week?  Victor: Mee nke mee nke a, ekweghi nwata zuuru ike (igbo proverb: do this do that, wont allow the child to rest.”  Pronouns are known as Nnọchi Aha in Igbo, which translates to “to be in the place of a name” At the very basic sentence structure level, Igbo follows a similar pattern with English in that sentences are also constructed in the “subject verb object” format. When addressing pronouns, we thus will look at the pronouns used as the subject of a sentence and as an object of the sentence.   Take this sentence:  Chijioke plays ball. “Chijioke” is the subject here, “plays” the verb, and “ball” the object.  Victor: Gwa m onye na gba bọọlụ?- Tell me who plays ball?  Ifunanya: Ọ na- gba bọọlụ- He plays ball.  Chijioke reads a book -Ọ na-agụ akwụkwọ  Chijioke rides a bike -Ọ na-agba igwe- He rides it. Ọ na-agba ya Pronouns in their categories broken down: Subject pronouns English- Igbo I =M/Mụ You (singular)=I /Ị He/She/It =O/Ọ We=Anyi You (plural) =Ụnụ They =Ha When you need to use an object pronoun, most of them stay the same as the above list except for with “you and now, him/her/it” see the difference in the list below where  "you" becomes “gi”  "him/her/it" becomes “ya.” Also for what will now be “me” is most properly just “M” but sometimes heard and said as “Mụ” especially for emphasis. See list below. Object pronouns Me -M You (singular)- Gi Him/Her/It- Ya Us- Anyi You (plural)- Ụnụ Them - Ha Examples after categories listing Subject: He is going- Ọ na-aga They draw well- Ha na-ese nke ọma (Ha na-ese ọfụma ) She is the boss- Ọ bụ onye isi Object  Chijioke has it - O ji ya They called you- Ha kpọrọ gi  Chijioke is talking to her - Ọ na-ekwu ya okwu ** *(this one is more complex the verb and complement here is ikwu okwu to be covered later* Note: Igbo pronouns do not have gender as seen with he/she and even “it” which are all said as either “O/Ọ” when a subject and him/her/it said as “ya” when an object.  The difference displaced of I or Ị for you and O or Ọ are a result of vowel harmony and will be better explained in the next episode on vowels. For now, just focus on being able to better identify and use the correct pronoun to formulate your sentences and as you advance you can add on the extra layer of making sure you are following the correct vowel harmony. Exercise 1 Using the verb “imere - to do” formulate different sentences using the different pronouns given 1. Subject “they”and object “it” “They did it” = Ha mere ya 2. Subject “you (singular”) and object “me” and verb “called”— You called me = i kpọrọ m 3. Subject “you” and verb “going” and object school. You are going to school = ị na-aga ụlọ akwụkwọ Exercise 2  Music: Na Kwa Echeki by Dr Sir Warrior and Oriental Brothers
30:40
December 22, 2018
Episode 3.1: Udamkpi Recap
This is a recap of Udamkpi, double consonant letters in Igbo. It is intended for learners who may want some additional help practicing these digraphs and working on putting them into action with some vocabulary words.  Ch chara - ripe  Gw egwu - music  Gg Igbo  Kp: Akpa - bag  Kw: Sounds like the “qu” in queen  Kwusi - stop Nw Nwoke- man/male Ny inyere- to give  Sh: Nshiko - crab  We also spoke about the consonant Ṅ. It is NOT an Udamkpi but just a difficult consonant for learners and so reviewed in this episode as well.  Ṅ ịṅụ- to drink aṅụrị ---- to rejoice/happiness  the sound made between the two words Ṅ - saying "longing" then try saying it only with the "ng"  Learning Tools Gb- say "tug boat" fast, the sound made between the two words Kp- say "stuck pot" fast,  Music: Ejeagha by Obiako Nnwam
06:02
December 14, 2018
Episode 3: Udamkpi (Double Consonants)
This episode focuses on what is known as Udamkpi in Igbo, as digraphs by linguist, and more colloquially as "double consonants." There are nine digraphs in Igbo language. Digraphs are two letters written together to represent single sounds. Igbo digraphs are made up of consonants and are regarded as single letters: ch, gb, gh, gw, kp, kw, nw, ny, sh  In the Igbo alphabet there are 36 Igbo letters total, 19 consonants, 9 Digraphs (double consonants) and 8 vowels. Overview of Alphabets : A B CH D E F G GB GH GW H I Ị J K KP KW L M N NW NY Ṅ O Ọ P R S SH T U Ụ V W Y Z (ran through quickly in this episode, for more on the entire alphabet check out youtube and other online resources)  Digraphs and Examples  Ch: Chara (ripe), icho (to want) ,  Gb: Gbara (to run) ezigbo (good) igbo  Gh: ghoro (to chose) a ghotaghi (I dont understand)  Gw: Sounds like gwara (told) egwu (music) ogwu (medicine/drug) Kp: Sounds like akpa- bag.  Mkpuru- seed apku- fermented casava  Kw: Kwuo (speak) Kwusi (stop)  Nw: Nwaanyi (woman) Nwoke (man)  Ny inyere- to give , Anya (eyes) Onye ( depends on where it is in a sentence can me who, or can mean person)  Sh Nshiko (crab) isha (crayfish)  Ṅ ** nnuo (drink) inu (drink) anuli (happiness/rejoice)  **Note: Ṅ a digraph but difficult to pronounce for learners and gone over in this episode**  Pronunciation Tools   Gb- say "tug boat" quickly and that sound that is made between the words   Kp- say " stuck pot" quickly and that sound that is made between the two words   Ṅ- Try saying Longing or Long then try saying it dropping the other letters except the "n and g."  Exercise 1: (Try listening to identify the sound you are hearing in the words before looking at these answers)  Onye (context dependent who or person)   Kwusi (stop)   Nwata (child)   Okpukpu - (bone)   Enyo- (mirror)   ikpo - (to call)   Ishi (crab)   Ngwa  Ekpere (Prayer) (note this is very different from Ebere which means Mercy or Pitty)  Music: Ejeagha by Obiako Nnwam
33:34
December 14, 2018
Episode 2.1- Exercises And Recap
This audio puts into action the phrases learned in Episode 2 and then recaps all of the phrases, depending on your goals, I would suggest going through the exercise without looking through the visual at first to test your knowledge then refer back. Good morning: • i saala chi? • i bọọla chi? Thank you · Daalu** · I meela (you have done well)** · Deeme · Ndewo Response to thank you · ooo ( a sound that is made) No problem · Nsogbu adighi · Nsogbu adiro Hello/Salutation · Ndewo · Daalu · Kedu (abbreviation for “how are you, also used similarly as a hello) He/she is greeting you • Ọ na ekele gi Greet him/her (again) • Kele ya (ọzọ ) Survival Kit Phrases/ Introduction What is your name? • Gini bu aha (afa) gi? • Kedu aha (afa) gi? My name is ______. • Aha (afa) m bu ______. How old are you? • Afọ ole ka i di? I am ____ years old. • A dim afọ _____. __ years old. • Afọ ____. Where are you from? • Onye ebee ka i bu? • I bu onye ebee? • Gini bu aha obodo gi? (obodo - place/town) I am from? • A bu m onye ______. • Onye ______. Music: Agbalụ aka na azọ anị by Chief Stephen Osita Osadebe
15:35
December 7, 2018
Episode 2: Beginner phrases cont., Introduction, & More
This episode builds upon the previous episode with more phrases that can easily be integrated in everyday life. It also explores basic phrases a learner may hear and use to introduce him/herself to another Igbo speaker. Afamefuna (Afamefula)- Igbo name that means "my name will never be lost"  Review of Greetings  Welcome:  Nnọọ  Good morning:   i saala chi?   i bọọla chi?   ụtụtụ oma (the above two are more authentic Igbo expressions for this)  New phrases  Thank you:  Daalu**  I meela (you have done well)** · Deeme  Ndeewo  Response to thank you  ooo ( a sound that is made)  No problem  Nsogbu adighi  Nsogbu adiro  Hello/Salutation  Ndewo  Daalu  Kedu (abbreviation for “how are you, also used similarly as a hello)  (Note: Ndewo and Daalu can be used as either hello or thank you depending on the context, if you're a beginner it may be easier to just internalize "Daalu" for "thank you" and "Ndewo" for "hello" and with time and more immersion it will all become clearer.)  He/she is greeting you  • Ọ na ekele gi Greet him/her (again)  • Kele ya (ọzọ )  Kelechi- Igbo name meaning  Thank God Ekelechi (Ekene)- Igbo name meaning  Thank God (Note: ikele is the verb to thank; kele is imperative form; ekele is a noun which means thank and/or greet)  Survival Kit Phrases/ Introduction  What is your name?  Gini bu aha (afa) gi?   Kedu aha (afa) gi?  My name is ______. •  Aha (afa) m bu ______.  How old are you?  Afọ ole ka i di?  I am ____ years old.  A dim afọ _____. __ years old.  Afọ ____.  Where are you from?   Onye ebee ka i bu?  I bu onye ebee?  Gini bu aha obodo gi? (obodo - place/town)  I am from?  A bu m onye ______.  Onye ______.  Music: Agbalụ aka na azọ anị by Chief Stephen Osita Osadebe
33:24
December 7, 2018
Episode 1.1 Recap
This sub-audio is a recap of the phrases and vocabulary of Episode 1 only. It is designed, especially for beginners, who need a bit more resources to help commit these phrases into memory as well as work on pronunciation.  Welcome:   Nnọọ Good morning: i saala chi? i bọọla chi? ụtụtụ oma (the above two are more authentic Igbo expressions for this) Goodnight Ka chi fo Ka chi bọọ Are you well/in good health? • Ahụ adikwa gi? (can also be ahu di gi?)(the "kwa adds emphasis) Yes, I am well/in good health Ehen, Ahụ dị m No I am not well/in good health Mba, Ahụ adighi m How are you? Kedu? Kedu ka i mere? Kee ka i mere? Olee otu i di? (There are many other variations that will be introduced in other episodes but these are four ways for starters) Survival Kit Phrases: I don’t understand : Aghotaghi m. (Aghotahu m. Aghotaa m.) Did I say that right (well)?: Ekwuru m ya ọfụma? Say it again please : Kwuo ya ọzọ biko Speak slowly(softly): Kwuo ya nwayọ And you?: Ginwa kwanu? What of _____ ?: Kee maka _____? *** Note to say "and you" "ginwa kwanu" is often used but may not always be appropriate to say to one's elder. Rather you can say "gi kwanu" instead to an elder. *** Music: Ezigbo Mmadu Adiro Fechaa by Osadebe
02:54
December 1, 2018
Episode 1: Learn Igbo in 30 mins
In this episode, listeners will learn a few basic Igbo Greetings as well as phrases for their Beginner Igbo Language Survival Kits--- that is phrases that can get the listener to start speaking Igbo in their daily lives as well as beginning to navigate through different real life scenarios using the Igbo language.  Greetings Slang: Pinọ pinọ kee way; Udo (meaning Peace)  Welcome: • Nnọọ  Good morning: i saala chi?  i bọọla chi?  ụtụtụ oma (the above two are more authentic Igbo expressions for this)  Goodnight    Ka chi fo   Ka chi bọọ  Are you well/in good health?  • Ahụ adikwa gi? (can also be ahu di gi?)(the "kwa adds emphasis)  Yes, I am well/in good health   Ehen, Ahụ dị m  No I am not well/in good health  Mba, Ahụ adighi m  How are you?  Kedu?  Kedu ka i mere?  Kee ka i mere?  Olee otu i di?  (There are many other variations that will be introduced in other episodes but these are four ways for starters)  Survival Kit Phrases:   I don’t understand :  Aghotaghi m. (Aghotahu m. Aghotaa m.)   Did I say that right (well)?:  Ekwuru m ya ọfụma?   Say it again please :  Kwuo ya ọzọ biko  Speak slowly(softly):  Kwuo ya nwayọ  And you?:  Ginwa kwanu?  What of _____ ?:  Kee maka _____?  *** Note to say "and you" "ginwa kwanu" is often used but may not always be appropriate to say to one's elder. Rather you can say "gi kwanu" instead to an elder. *** Music: Ezigbo Mmadu Adiro Fechaa by Osadebe
26:30
November 13, 2018
Introduction: Nnọọ
This is the Introductory Episode to "Ọjị Abịala: An Igbo Podcast" which seeks to help individuals improve their Igbo speaking, comprehension, and more. The series is pioneered by a fellow Igbo learner who, in making great strides with her Igbo, wants to help others do the same. Each episode focuses on specific topics or themes and features a guest Igbo teacher/linguist. In this episode the founder, Ifunanya, gives an overview of how episodes will be conducted and also how the listeners can best begin their Igbo language journeys. Overall Tips for Success 1. Learning a new language is learning how to think a thought differently, welcome this! 2. Practice Regularly, episodes should be listened to and worked on repeatedly depending on ones level, to really get the most out of them. 3. Be Brave and Patient, in order to improve speech you have to have the courage to speak in the language and the willingness to make inevitable mistakes. 4. Make SMART goals meaning Specific, Measurable, Achievable, Realistic, and Time-bound goal. Tips for effectively learning with the podcast: 1. Listen in stages: For the first listen just be okay listening all the way through. Don’t feel you have to memorize or learn everything all at once. This will allow you to listen again to the episode with more specific objectives. 2. Visuals: each episode has a description that has the key words and phrases written out, use this to supplement your auditory learning during one or more of your stages of listening. 3. Exercises: Actively participate in the exercises of each episode, practice saying things out loud and testing your comprehension. 4. Recap Audio- these are short sub-clips of all the words and phrases from the previous episode. This is helpful for a learner who really wants to hone in on pronunciation and comprehension. Use this along with full episodes to help solidify what you’ve learned. Music: Eriwa by Ruffcoin
15:30
November 13, 2018