Jack Dappa Blues Podcast

Jack Dappa Blues Podcast

By Jack Dappa Blues
Jack Dappa Blues Heritage Preservation Foundation is a focal point for the research, archiving and raising awareness of African American Traditional Music and the Black Experience!!

Our Podcast provides intellectual conversations, historical facts, and vital coverage of the African American experience that’s been shaped by our community as we work toward a more diverse media outlet, using broadcast journalism, film, and multimedia production to produce exciting, meaningful and historically accurate content that raises cultural and ethnic awareness of African American Traditional Music.
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Slave Hounds, Abolition and the America's
In this episode of The Jack Dappa Blues Radio Podcast, I speak to co-authors Dr. Tyler D. Parry and Dr. Chaz Yingling about their book in the works Slave Hounds, Abolition and The Americas. 40 pages of the book are currently available at https://academic.oup.com/past/article/246/1/69/5722095   They also pinned another great article we discuss in the podcast, and the link is  https://www.jacobinmag.com/2016/05/dogs-bloodhounds-slavery-police-brutality-racism/   Be sure to listen to the podcast and read the articles.  https://twitter.com/ProfTDParry   Remember you can donate to the Jack Dappa Blues Heritage Preservation Foundation here  paypal.me/LamontJack
1:08:07
March 29, 2020
David Crownson - HARRIET TUBMAN DEMON SLAYER
In this episode of Jack Dappa Blues Radio, I speak with Actor, Write Director David Crownson, who is the creator and writer of the Comic Book Harriet Tubman, Demon Slayer. David shares with us the inception of the comic, the need for a black woman heroine, the history and folklore of the storyline and the people who were positively affected by the comic series.   https://peepgamecomix.com/product/harriet-tubman-demon-slayer-1/  dcrownson@yahoo.com  https://www.facebook.com/Harriettubmandemonslayer   https://jackdappabluesstore.online/  paypal.me/LamontJack
51:09
March 23, 2020
Veronika Jackson - The Woman I Am
In this episode of Jack Dappa Blues Radio, I speak with America's Folk and Blues Singer Veronika Jackson. She shares with us her journey of making her latest album, "The Woman I Am", and states that "In these trying times, encouragement and a good message always helps." Her message of making this record is - "This CD is meant to touch people's Heart! Men and Women and Children, To be able to listen to it and be encouraged ” - Veronika Jackson. Listen to my interview with her and enjoy the selection of songs off of the album that’s part of this broadcast!  http://veronikajackson.com/ @VeronikaJackson https://jackdappabluesradio.tv/ https://jackdappabluesstore.online/ To Donate - paypal.me/LamontJack To Sponsor - lamontjackpearley@jackdappabluesradio.tv denisepearley@jackdappabluesradio.tv
1:26:18
March 20, 2020
Joseph 'Mojo' Morganfield - Blues Legacy
In this episode of Jack Dappa Blues Radio, I speak with Joseph 'Mojo' Morganfield, the youngest son of Muddy Waters.  BIO -  Joseph Morganfield, Born April 14, 1964, in Chicago Illinois. Joseph is the youngest son of the World Famous Muddy Waters. Joseph began his career following in his fathers' footsteps. As a young boy, Joseph would travel and perform with his father growing up in the Blues. His brothers are also Blues performers Big Bill Morganfield, and Larry Morganfield. He attended Westmont High School, in Westmont Illinois. He was learning guitar from his father Muddy Waters, and his fathers' guitarist Bob Margolin. However, having won a basketball scholarship while studying communications at the University of Northern Iowa. Joseph put music temporarily behind him in favor of playing college basketball. Taking up his music once again in clubs and many other festivals around Chicago and the United States. Planing to preform in Europe soon. Joseph performed on stage with Grammy Award Winners -Don Was, Jamey Johnson, and Warren Haynes at The Chicago Theater - The Last Waltz. Also with his brother Big Bill Morganfield at the Chicago Blues Fest. In 2019 Mojo Opened for Bad Company featuring Paul Rogers, he also performed on stage at the Chicago Blues Festival with his Band The Mannish Boyz. He is an Ambassador, Supporter, and Promoter inductee in the Prestigious Chicago Blues Hall of Fame. Attending many public events on behalf of his father Muddy Waters, keeping the name and the blues legacy alive. The Mannish Boyz Band - • MEMBER(S): Joseph Mojo Morganfield-Vocalist Paul Handover-Harmonica Chris Alexander-Drums Rick Kreher-Guitar Mike Flynn-Bass Song List -  I Can't Get No Grindin' Mississippi Found Me Let's Play Chess Image by www.portraitsinblues.com Booking Information: Tom Lounges Tom Lounges Entertainment Tom@tomloungesentertainment.com Beatboss@aol.com (219) 781-9131 To sponsor programming contact lamontjackpearley@jackdappabluesradio.tv To Donate paypal.me/LamontJack
50:46
March 15, 2020
The African American Folklorist - Wanda G Addison
Featured Folklorist Wanda G Addison, PhD In this episode I speak with February’s African American Folklorist of the month is Wanda G. Addison. Addison, an African American folklorist, and Professor of English sat on the board of the American Folklore Society, and through storytelling, social groups and community practices use her folklore experience for cultural sustainability and preservation of intangible cultural heritage. Coming from an English Literature background, on the road to her Ph.D., Addison took a Pro Seminar class in Folklore. One of her assignments focused on oral literature, specifically documenting the voice and story of women. This sparked a calling in her that led to a long and achieved trajectory of researching, documenting and teaching. That experience gave her the purpose and passion to make sure women’s voices who went unheard, would be heard clearly, and directly from the source. Addison’s understanding of the process of the folklorist in regards to the approach taken when allowed into the world, culture and kinfolk traditions of a people are what separates her from many. The care and poise she possesses grants her the ability to receive the story of the folk, rather than interpret it based on preconceived notions. This attribute reflects Addison’s sincere drive to document and preserve the personal narrative of African American women, specifically over 50. In my interview with Addison, she explains her mission and why the story of women in that age group needs to have representation and preservation of their voice and story. American Folklore Society  Wanda Addison Twitter - @onesungirl Sign up to receive The African American Folklorist Newspaper  Purchase Merch http://jackdappabluesstore.online/
1:12:36
March 14, 2020
Gina Coleman, IBC and the Misty Blues Music Journey
On this episode, I speak to Gina Coleman, the frontwoman of the blues band Misty Blues! She shares with us their journey to the IBC finals, her love for playing the cigar box guitar, and how blues runs in the family! Gina is a graduate of Williams College.  She began singing in 1990 on a dare by her co-workers and hasn’t turned back since.  She began performing in a duet, The Siblings.  Gina shortly started her own duet, Cole-Connection, which blossomed to a five-piece band that allowed her to showcase some of her original music.  Gina has performed in the Williamstown Theater Festival as the lead gospel singer in “A Raisin in the Sun.” She also made several appearances at NYC’s famed Bitter End.  Misty Blues was a featured group at Mass MoCa’s blues festival.  Gina and the band have had the pleasure of performing with Charles Neville from the legendary Neville Brothers at several venues in Western, MA and opening for blues staples ... Tab Benoit, John Primer, Albert Cummings, and Michel Powers.  Musical influences include Janis Joplin, Bessie Smith, Billie Holiday, and Tuck & Patti.
1:11:00
January 8, 2020
James Bunch - Hip Hop Farmers Initiative
On this episode, I speak with James Bunch (Peetie Wheatstraws Grand Nephew) and his son - n - law about Bunch's agriculture initiative "Hip Hop Farmers." James, born July 1957 in a little place called cotton plant Arkansas, grew up on a farm picking cotton and turned his agricultural experience into a successful career. Farming and agriculture is a huge staple of African American heritage, tradition and folklore, Bunch is working to reconnect our youth and adults to an industry that would generate economies, jobs, healthy foods as well as bringing generations and traditional music together. Their mission is: “Setting a new standard in outreach by utilizing 21st-century technologies and social media targeting underserved inner-city and rural communities". http://www.Twitter.com/HipHopFarmers https://www.facebook.com/HipHopFarmers Contact  (901) 315-6008 bunchology@gmail.com
42:14
January 5, 2020
Hermene Hartman - The Legacy of Chicago's N'DIGO
On this episode, I have the honor to speak with activist, publisher, teacher, entrepreneur, and Chicago historian Hermene Hartman.  She shares the beginnings of N'digo Print and walks us through to its current studio and television program! Hartman is a true historian, folklorist and she works tirelessly to platform Chicago the way it should be seen! N'DIGO STUDIO is a new talk show, independently produced. It is Chicago-centric and features interviews with notables and newbies. Hermene Hartman and Shannon Peoples are the co-hosts. N'DIGO STUDIO brings real talk with African American insights to the discussion. We will talk to the politicos, authors, and hot topics on current social issues, pop culture, and race and roundtable discussion. We will take deep dives in the art of conversation on topics that perhaps miss mainstream media. Hermene Hartman has published NDIGO a weekly newspaper for 30 years, in print for 26 and now exclusively online and in email columns. Her media career began as a TV producer with CBS, working with the late Warner Saunders. She was a college professor in the Behavioral Sciences and an administrator at City Colleges. She released a contemporary history book, NDIGO LEGACY: BLACK LUXE 110 in 1997. It is an anthology of African American Chicagoans and includes the first profile on President Barack Obama. Hartman has been a pundit, a voice, on TV news shows to include WGN TV, Fox News, WTTW-TV and The O’Riley Show. Her comments have been provocative and insightful on Chicago's personalities, issues, political races, race and controversial issues of the day. N'DIGO STUDIOS – Sizzle Reel - youtu.be/wlMF87aiAKo
40:51
January 4, 2020
Dolphin's Of Hollywood - The John Dolphin Story
What does Dolomite, Lawanda Page, Scatman Crothers, Sam Cooke Pee Wee Crayton, T- Bone Walker, Johnny Lee Hooker, Bill Brown, Clyde McPhatter, Charlie White, and King Records have in common with Central Avenue? The answer is, John Dolphin and his owner-operated open 24/7 record shop rightfully named "Dolphin's of Hollywood."  Bringing Hollywood to Central Avenue, John Dolphin cut records in the back of his store, then broke the record on his radio station that broadcasted in the front window of his store. John's efforts platformed black music and artists who wouldn't have had a chance to be heard on a large level. It also broke the color barriers as his record store had Black, White and Chicano patrons who partied together in and around the record store. On this episode, I speak with Michael Dolphin, John Dolphin's son, and Jamelle Dolphin, John Dolphin's grandson and author of the book "Dolphin's of Hollywood" about the legacy and impact John Dolphin created and had on the music, record, radio and Black Business industry.  You can also read my article, "Charting The Blues" which is a 9-page feature in Living Blues Magazine, that discusses how John changed the trajectory of the radio industry and pop charts. WE ARE PUBLIC MEDIA - for donations to help us continue to produce content - paypal.me/LamontJack If you wish to sponsor content or underwriting for The African American Folklorist, contact lamontjackpearley@jackdappabluesradio.tv 
57:38
December 29, 2019
Peetie Wheatstraw Reloaded
On this episode of Jack Dappa Blues, I speak to William Bunch, AKA Peetie Wheatstraws Great Nephews about the remastered and remixed Peetie Wheatstraw album that was released on His Birthday, December 21st, 2019.  James Bunch, Peetie's great Nephew, and his son n law Ricco Doty own Peetie's publishing and are on a mission to get Peetie a well-earned grammy. They've remastered and released a five-song album, with two bonus tracks by Peetie's great great-nephews, who rerecorded Peetie's songs.  https://music.apple.com/us/album/reloaded/1480863185
28:07
December 22, 2019
The African American Folklorist Ep 2 - Elijah Cox
On this episode of The African American Folklorist, I share the story of the born free, African American Traditional Music Practitioner Elijah Cox, who was a fiddler, Buffalo soldier, and recorded in 1935 at the age of 93 for the Library of Congress Elijah Cox was also interviewed and recorded for the Born in Slavery: Slave Narratives from the Federal Writers' Project, 1936-1938, which now lives can be found of the Library Of Congress Website.  As I share the story of Elijah, I make the case that he was and utilized the tools of the folklorist.  Written, Produced and Edited by Lamont Jack Pearley -  Credits for sound design & Music Elijah Cox - Run up on The Mountain, Slavery Days, Can’t put the saddle on the ol great mule Lamont Jack Pearley - Blues Journey  & Underground Slide Excerpts from "Fife and Drum Music of the American Revolution: Military Music in America series, vol. 1," produced by the Company of Military Collectors & Historians, Washington, D.C. with George P. Carroll, Director of Music -- from about 1976. (Improved audio from my earlier upload of this same.) https://www.underthehome.org Music Performer: Sturbridge Colonial Militia Music License Original Source: Sound Clip of Gunfire Original Source: Painting Title: Battle of Bunker Hill ember 1941 (part 2 of 6) Contributor Names - Lomax, Alan, 1915-2002 (Interviewer), Sturz, Elizabeth Lyttleton (Interviewer), Johnson, George (Interviewee), Jones, Lewis Wade, 1910-1979 (Interviewer) Johnson, Charles Spurgeon, 1893-1956 (Interviewer), Work, John W. (John Wesley), 1901-1967 (Transcriber) Created / Published Mound Bayou, Mississippi, 1941 Railroad Song, Contributor Names - Work, John W. (John Wesley), 1901-1967 (Collector), Gibson, Gus (Performer) Created / Published Georgia, 1941 Negro blues and hollers, Contributor Names, Stearns, Marshall Winslow, compiler. Lomax, Alan, 1915-2002, recordist. Work, John W. (John Wesley), 1901-1967, recordist. Jones, Lewis Wade, 1910-1979, recordist. House, Son, performer. Edwards, Honeyboy, performer. Martin, Fiddlin' Joe The Boll Weevil, Contributor Names - Work, John W. (John Wesley), 1901-1967 (Collector), Ezell, Buster (Performer) Created / Published Georgia, 1941 Coon Gi'nt (Coon jive), Contributor Names - Work, John W. (John Wesley), 1901-1967 (Collector), Stripling, Sidney (Performer)Created / Published Georgia, 1941 Rock My Soul in the Bosom of Abraham, Contributor Names - Work, John W. (John Wesley), 1901-1967 (Collector), Unidentified vocal quartet (Performer), Created / Published, Fort Valley, Georgia, 1941 John the Revelator, Contributor Names - Work, John W. (John Wesley), 1901-1967 (Collector), Heavenly Gate Quartet (Performer), Created / Published Nashville, Tennessee, 1941 If I Had My Way I'd Tear the Building Down, Contributor Names - Work, John W. (John Wesley), 1901-1967 (Collector), Heavenly Gate Quartet (Performer) Created / Published Nashville, Tennessee, 1941 Remember to Subscribe to the podcast and the Newspaper! 
18:36
December 8, 2019
HENRY THOMAS TEXAS BLUES LEGEND PT 3 F/DOM FLEMONS
This is part three, the last episode of the series of the Jack Dappa Blues Podcast Series in affiliation with Lonestar Blues & Heritage Festival about Henry Thomas, also known as Henry Ragtime Texas Thomas featuring our recurring guest The American Songster Dom Flemons.   On this last installment, we discuss the blues of Henry Thomas, the similarities of his songs to what W.C. Handy expressed he heard the first time he experienced the blues and the rich history of African American Traditional Music that comes out Texas.  Podcast also available on iHeart, iTunes, Apple Podcast, Radio Public, Spotify , Google Podcast and more! Henry Thomas was one of the oldest black musicians who recorded 23 cuts on Vocalion Records between the years of 1927 - 1929. his music is a great opportunity to hear what African American Traditional music sounded like near the end of the 19th century. Henry Thomas’ body of music connects the roots of black music in Africa, from the nineteenth and twentieth-century African American folksong to the essence of the blues, as well as everything in between and thereafter. Please Donate, subscribe and share!
1:06:04
December 7, 2019
Tyler D. Parry Ep2 - The History of Slave Hounds & The Blues People
This episode of Jack Dappa Blues Radio is part two of my discussion with scholar Tyler D. Parry, Assistant Professor of African American and African Diaspora Studies Program and Book Review Editor: Black Perspectives, about his co-authored journal and the upcoming book titled ' Slavehounds and Abolition".  Dr. Parry gives great detail of the role of the bloodhound before, during, and after slavery.  He delves into the origins of the purpose this hybrid animal was created,  where they were trained and how it's been utilized for centuries as a weapon against the freedoms and lives of the "Blues People" on America. Follow Dr. Parry @ProfTDParry Support our platform by purchasing our Merch Join our Facebook Group, Page, Nonprofit Page and subscribe to our newsletter. noncommercial use of Robert Johnson's 'Hellhounds on My Trail" "I’ve got to keep moving, I’ve got to keep moving, blues falling down like hail, blues falling down like hail . . . And the days keeps on ’minding me, there’s a hellhound on my trail" Artist Robert Johnson Album Robert Johnson: Cross Road Blues Writers Robert Johnson Licensed to YouTube by Kontor New Media Music, SME (on behalf of 24 Blue Music); AMRA, LatinAutor, LatinAutor - PeerMusic, CMRRA, Concord Music Publishing, and 7 Music Rights Societies       
34:13
November 29, 2019
Dr. Tyler D Parry Part One
On this episode, I speak to Dr. Tyler D. Parry, professor of African American and African Diaspora studies at UNLV, about his latest project "Jumping The Broom: A Multicultural History" based on his Zora Neale Hurston Prize award-winning paper, "Married in Slavery Time" in the Journal of Southern History.  He's also written "The Holy Land of Matrimony," in American Studies (both available on my academia.edu webpage) should provide enough content for an interviewer.  Professor Parry also is a Book Review Editor: Black Perspectives, and Editor of H-Afro-Am.  Follow Tyler @ProfTDParry
44:05
October 11, 2019
Henry Thomas Texas Blues Legend pt 2 F/Dom Flemons
This is part one of the Jack Dappa Blues Podcast Series in affiliation with Lonestar Blues & Heritage Festival about Henry Thomas, also known as Henry Ragtime Texas Thomas featuring our recurring guest The American Songster Dom Flemons. On this episode, we delve into the evolution of African American Traditions Music from the theater to records. How it became popular to record records that spoke directly to the audience listening in their homes. We also speak of how the change in consciousness of African American musicians, composers and the like, sparked by an article in the Indianapolis Freedman Newspaper, reached across the nation even inspiring Henry Thomas to make revolutionary changes in lyrics that once used derogatory lyrics to describe African Americans and the Black Experience.   A dynamic songster of the early years Having the Quill wrapped and hung around his neck, as he picks the guitar, HenryThomas' songs represent the oldest traditions of American black music ever recorded. Along with Blues and Ragtime, he played early minstrel songs, black spirituals, square dance tunes, hillbilly reels, waltzes, coon song, story songs, work calls, stomps and hollers and pop songs of the day. Henry Thomas was one of the oldest black musicians whoever recorded 23 cuts on Vocalion Records between the years of 1927 - 1929. his music is a great opportunity to hear what African American Traditional music sounded like near the end of the 19th century.
59:42
September 23, 2019
Michael L Jones Share Kentucky's Musical History
On this episode of the Jack Dappa Blues Podcast, I speak to Kentucky Music Historian Michael L Jones about The Jugband Jubilee Festival and his exhibit of Kentucky Music history. We also discuss the rise of jug band music, the inception of Kentucky. Michael shares how Kentucky is a riverboat location which culminated in the creation of music legends.  Michael shares rarely heard facts about Kentucky history. Michael is an author and journalist who's research and writing reclaims the African American Traditions and music started popularized in Kentucky and traveled the world. Links of Michael's work. Celebrating the Sounds of Kentucky: https://fraziermuseum.org/exhibits/kentucky-music Interview with Michael L Jones: https://www.wdrb.com/wdrb-in-the-morning/keith-kaiser-out-and-about/keith-tries-his-hand-at-jug-band-music/video_3daca768-b0c5-58c0-8f3f-fbfa9d3f4a36.html?utm_medium=social&utm_source=facebook&utm_campaign=user-share National Jug Band Jubilee: http://www.jugbandjubilee.com/ Wall Street Journal article about the Jubilee: http://www.jugbandjubilee.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/08/08022018074353-0001.pdf Louisville Jug Music: https://www.amazon.com/Louisville-Jug-Music-McDonald-National-ebook/dp/B00XRSH6HC/ref=sr_1_1?keywords=louisville+jug+music&qid=1568752043&s=gateway&sr=8-1 article about me winning history award: https://www.courier-journal.com/story/news/local/south/2015/03/02/louisville-jug-music-book-earns-author-award/24271195/ Here is an article I wrote for the Oxford-American on the black roots of "Happy Birthday to You," which also comes from Louisville: https://www.oxfordamerican.org/magazine/item/1348-a-peculiar-composition Subscribe, Follow and Like 
1:01:19
September 18, 2019
Henry Thomas Texas Blues Legend pt1 W/ Dom Flemons
This is part one of the Jack Dappa Blues Podcast Series in affiliation with Lonestar Blues & Heritage Festival about Henry Thomas, also known as Henry Ragtime Texas Thomas featuring our recurring guest The American Songster Dom Flemons. On this episode we delve into the unique and wide musical range of Henry Thomas whos songs represent the oldest of the African American Traditional music. He also played a traditional African American instrument called the "Quill". The history and role of the A&R. Early recording industry methods, and the fact that Henry, as well as other early African American Songsters,  played songs of the plantation.  Henry Thomas was one of the oldest black musicians whoever recorded 23 cuts on Vocalion Records between the years of 1927 - 1929. his music is a great opportunity to hear what African American Traditional music sounded like near the end of the 19th century. And in this era, they are just introducing the world to folk music through records/Vinyl.
48:32
September 12, 2019
Jorge Arévalo Mateus, Exec Director Of Association For Cultural Equity
on this archive episode, I speak with Jorge Arèvalo Mateus about the Association For Cultural Equity, The Folklorist convention and the work of ethnomusicologists and folklorists!  Jorge Arevalo Mateus, Ph.D. Executive Director The Association for Cultural Equity (ACE) was founded by Alan Lomax to explore and preserve the world's expressive traditions with humanistic commitment and scientific engagement. ACE was registered as a charitable organization in the State of New York in 1983, and is housed at New York City's Hunter College. http://www.culturalequity.org/
20:11
July 20, 2019
Billy Jones Bluez - The Politics, Segregation and Business of The Blues
If you enjoyed and learned something from my recent article in Blues Festival Guide Magazine titled “Beyond The Green Book,” and Enjoyed the Robert Johnson Documentary on Netflix, then you’re in for a treat! Billy Jones Bluez, who I referenced in my article, in this rebroadcast of my WFDU Radio Program, gives his first hand account of blues people, traveling while black, his upbringing in a juke joint, the services his grandfather provided while running the bar, and his very own journey as a bluesman from Arkansas. He gives great detail of the boarding rooms his family rented out to Black folk, and the real focal point of any venue or bar. He also debunks the myth of Robert Johnson and many other stereotypes bluesman encounter. He also, in the middle of our conversation, pulls out his guitar and begins playing some real blues! With all of that, Billy shares the conditions of today’s blues scene, industry, political climate and how it’s different for black blues practitioners in comparison to white musicians who play the blues. We find that in today’s world, and music industry, there is still segregation.  Billy Jones Bluez This blues bandleader, who sings and plays guitar and calls his music "bluez," began releasing his own compact discs in 2001. When Billy Jones substituted a "z" for an "s," he was not trying to make the name of his beloved genre closer to the way a drunken bar patron might pronounce it at the end of the night. Rather, "bluez" is all about being independent from the big-time music business, a stance more often taken by indie rockers. While in reality even the biggest blues labels are nothing but small independents, these firms still represent too big a clique for Jones, who prefers issuing material on his own Cyborg-Blue imprint. Read More Remember to Subscribe, Rate, Share and become a supporting member!! WE ARE PUBLIC MEDIA!
50:35
May 11, 2019
Tony Thomas - The 'Real' Origins of the Banjo
The Banjo is a very popular instrument, and it's popularity is currently growing rapidly. However, there's a convoluted and misconstrued history of this instrument. On today's episode of Jack Dappa Blues Podcast, I speak with Tony Thomas,  African American Banjo Scholar, about the history, origins and commercial explosion of the Banjo. Along with Sule Greg Wilson and Cece Conway, Tony Thomas organized the 2005 Black Banjo Gathering that launched the contemporary Black Banjo revival.   In 2013, “Why African Americans Put the Banjo Down,” Thomas’s contribution to Duke University Press’s Hidden in the Mix: The African American Presence in Country Music became the first scholarly essay on the banjo by an African America to be published.  In 2018 his chapter, "Gus Cannon--'The Colored Champion Banjo Pugilist of the World' and the Big World of the Banjo," appeared in Banjo Roots and Branches, published by Duke University Press, the first scholarly anthology on the banjo.  Tony Thomas’s “The Banjo and African American Musical Culture", published online in 2014 by African American National Biography, a joint project of the W. E. B. Du Bois Institute for African and African American Research at Harvard University and Oxford University Press. It follows Thomas’s earlier contributions to African American National Biography on African American fiddler Joe Thompson and on the legend of the 19th century banjo figure Picayune Butler.  Thomas was one of the advisors to the Marc Fields PBS Film Give Me the Banjo in which he appears. He was also an adviser to and appears in Jim Carrier’s film The Librarian and the Banjo. Tony Thomas has presented many times at the Banjo Collectors Gathering, the central banjo history event, and at banjo camps, and at other old-time music, folk, and blues events the United States and Europe.  He has also performed as a vocalist, banjoist, and guitarist as a solo artist for many years and with New York’s Ebony Hillbillies. Tony Thomas was born in New York City in 1947, lives in West Palm Beach, Florida, and holds a Master of Fine Arts in Creative Writing degree from Florida International University.   Here are links to his writing and presentations -  Why Black Banjo: The Black Banjo List Serve  Tony Thomas presentation to the Banjo Collectors Gathering 2015  US Slave: About the Banjo Remember to Like, subscribe, share and DONATE! FACEBOOK GROUP PAGE FACEBOOK LIKE PAGE JACK DAPPA BLUES HERITAGE PRESERVATION FOUNDATION PAGE BLACK SPIRITUALS, SLAVE SECULARS & FIELD HOLLERS PAGE 
1:07:07
April 28, 2019
Dom Flemons - Understanding Blackface, Minstrelsy and Early Black Entertainment
On this episode of Jack Dappa Blues I speak with the American Songster Dom Flemons about how Blackface, Minstrelsy and African American Traditional Music morphed into America's top entertainment industry. In our discussion the true context of what became a stain on the image of Black folk is unpacked.  Dom Flemons is known as “The American Songster” since his repertoire of music covers nearly 100 years of American folklore, ballads, and tunes. Flemons is a music scholar, historian, record collector and a multi-instrumentalist. He was recently nominated for a Grammy from his current album "The Black Cowboy" with Smithsonian Folkways. The tile for this program may be offensive, but it's from a Minstrel written and composed by Ernest Hogan, the first African-American entertainer to produce and star in a Broadway show  @Jackpearley Jack Dappa Blues FB Group Jack Dappa Blues FB Page Jack Dappa Blues Heritage Preservation Foundation Black Spirituals, Field Hollers and Slave Seculars
1:00:37
April 2, 2019
The African American Folklorist ep1 - Charlotte Forten Grimke pt 1
The African American Folklorist Podcast Series - Charlotte Forten Grimke - The First series of the African American Folklorist will be covering the works, journals, and lineage of Charlotte Forten Grimke. Documented as the first person to record Black Spirituals on her excursion to Sea Island in 1864, Charlotte, a teacher, anti-slavery activist, and poet comes from four generations of successful, free abolitionists African Americans. The series will raise awareness and discuss the people and experiences she's had during a turbulent time in America for Black people that shaped her views and propelled her to achieve many feats. Not taking away from her story, we delve into the achievements and mindset of her elder relatives that not only molded Charlotte but formulated the way free blacks and abolitionists attacked slavery with ferocity. From funding abolitionist publications to being major participants in the Underground Railroad system, The Forten family and their in-laws were trailblazers in the contributions to African American history, liberation and freedom. From what can be considered the home base of abolition, Philadelphia. This is the description of the pilot episode. This episode, Episode one, focus on the beginning of Charlotte's legacy, and the places and experiences that lead her grandfather, James Forten, to begin work and plant a seed that would harvest in Charlotte and the rest of the Forten family, and extended family. Follow us @JackDappaBlues     Jack Dappa Blues FB Group     Jack Dappa Blues Heritage Preservation Foundation Page     Black Spirituals, Field Hollers and Slave Seculars
43:08
March 10, 2019
Chris Thomas King - The True Origins of The Blues
As Black History Month comes to an end, after the Grammy's are long gone and post his open letter about the miseducation and representation of the Blues category nomination process, I sit down in Time Square New York to speak with Chris Thomas King.  On this special 2 hour episode, CTK shares the misconception of the birthplace of the Blues, the proof of this misconception, history of Louisiana and the Creole culture, as well as addressing his open letter and the book titled “The Original Blues: The Emergence of the Blues in African American Vaudeville” by Lynn Abbott & Doug Seroff.  He explains why his album "Hotel Voodoo" is definitely a Blues Album. if you haven't read the article, click here Be sure to subscribe, rate, like and share! Follow us on Twitter @JackDappaBlues Join our FB Group, Instagram There are also opportunities to sponsor content, WE ARE PUBLIC MEDIA!
1:58:08
February 28, 2019
Elizabeth Lynn Kilrain - Dancing the Blues in San Diego!
on this episode of Jack Dappa Blues Heritage Podcast, I speak with Elizabeth Lynn Kilrain about her journey with Blues Dancing and her organization Blue Note SD who's mantra is: "Dancing the Blues in San Diego!" The mission of her organization is exploring, celebrating, and growing the blues dance community through musical immersion, classes, social dancing, and competition.  We discuss how the music, culture, lifestyle and vernacular of the Blues People resonate with the feel of the Blues Dance. https://bluenotesd.com https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC_VS8hyyZK1V9xWjiC2hGnQ
37:10
December 28, 2018
We The Blues People- Gentrification of the Blues
On this episode, Marquise Knox and I discuss the issues that prompted Chris Thomas King to write his open letter addressing the gentrification of the Blues based on him being removed from the Grammy nomination list for best Blues Album. As we address this issue, we refer and share quotes from other Black Blues Musicians, (Chick Willis and Corey Harris) that have addressed similar, if not the same concerns in the past. Links to articles http://www.offbeat.com/news/bluesman-chris-thomas-king-says-hes-banned-grammys/?fbclid=IwAR1Nj3Pb_BfUJJh4FT5oCnLEkk9ofxQ0FXYt0id4tR8Hx50QL_JWmALhiXc#.W9si2bA6YVZ.facebook http://www.soul-patrol.com/soul/chickwillis.htm?fbclid=IwAR1uxt-i50dmDHVurIG6NdjxWeW_5plJ2NddpIePqXfdzACDYhUCQOlB5w0 https://bluesisblackmusic.blogspot.com/2015/05/can-white-people-play-blues.html?fbclid=IwAR3h-pm-8vyaubssPVzgr1PBdtiL-OFSeG8kWETcwCzipTcv83Jm4PKvHSs We The Blues People with Hosts Lamont Jack Dappa Blues Pearley Marquise Knox Remember to enjoy, share, leave a comment and click the sponsor button! And Like our Facebook Page https://www.facebook.com/wethebluespeople/
58:33
December 18, 2018
Jimmy Duck Holmes - Bentonia Blues
On this episode of jack Dappa Blues Podcast I have the honor of speaking with one of the last remaining threads to original Blues....and owner of the longest running Juke Joint in America, Bentonia Bluesman Jimmy Duck Holmes, as he breaks down the real Blue. Jimmy is the last living link to the "Bentonia School" of blues. Other artists who played in this style include Skip James, Jack Owens, Henry Stuckey and Cornelius Bright. Jimmy "Duck" Holmes has lived a life steeped in blues. Today he is the last living practitioner of the celebrated style of Bentonia blues made famous by Skip James and Jack Owens. In addition, Holmes operates what is arguably the oldest juke joint left in Mississippi and is the organizer of one of the longest-running festivals in the state - the Bentonia Blues Festival. The 44th Annual festival is scheduled for June 18, 2016. https://bluefrontrecords.myshopify.com
42:26
December 13, 2018
Big Bill Morganfield - Living the Legacy
On this episode, I have the honor to talk Blues with living Legend, son of a Legend Big Bill Morganfield about his New album Bloodstains on the Wall, His new record Label Black Shucks Records and his process of music making.
59:31
December 13, 2018
Dr. Steve Perry - Education for Black & Brown Children
On this powerful episode of Jack Dappa Blues, I speak with Dr. Steve Perry as we discuss the Blues of the educational system for Back and Brown children! Dr. Perry gives us many examples of why we should be serious when making the decision of where our children attends school, what we should be looking for in schools, and why His Charter school and those affiliated are the best choices to break the Blues we and our children face in the educational system
1:03:46
December 11, 2018
Jontavious Willis - Regional Styles of Blues
On this episode I will be talking with Blues Sensation Jontavious Willis. This young man is the rebirth of real Roots Blues, and we will be discussing the regional styles of Blues such as Piedmont, Delta and the like...along with hearing some great Original Blues records that will allow you to feel the music we're discussing.
59:57
December 11, 2018
Mary Hurt-Wright - Mississippi John's Granddaughter
On this part one episode of a two part series, I have the honor to speak to the great grand daughter of Mississippi John Hurt, Mary Hurt Wright, who shares with us her upbringing in Mississippi with her parents and grandfather which opened her eyes to the importance of not only her Grandfather's legacy, but the legacy she's building by preserving his.
1:03:46
December 11, 2018
Peetie Wheatstraws Great Nephews
on this episode I speak to the great nephew of the legendary Blues Pioneer Peetie Wheatstraw. They share how they are acquiring Peetie's long musical catalog. They also share how they found out they were related to Peetie, and the family history!
48:41
December 11, 2018
Bobby Rush - Blues Legend
on this episode of Jack Dappa Blues Podcast I have the honor to speak with the living Legend Bobby Rush!! 50 years strong in the Blues Music business, and has a new album out!!
1:03:46
December 11, 2018
Valerie June - Working Woman Blues
On this episode of Jack Dappa Blues Podcast, Valerie June shares her beginnings, where her voice comes from, her humble home and church experiences and the meaning of her sound, art and culture that's made her into the sensation and traditional music practitioner she is today. A major part of her story is her work ethic, passed down by her parents and the sacrifices they made to run their business and take care of their family. She also shares that she has the honor of having Mavis Staples cover her song.
53:35
December 8, 2018
Blues Dance NY - Odysseus Bailer
On this episode, I speak to Actor, Historian and Blues Dance NY Instructor/Dj Odysseus Bailer on the importance of Blues Dance to the tradition of the Blues People, and the great program and community of Blues Dance NY, which is dedicated to fostering community and encouraging life-long learning through a shared passion for blues dancing. Odysseus also shares his journey with Blues dancing and music, as it pertains to the African American experience.
31:39
December 7, 2018
On The Porch at Augusta Heritage's Blues n Swing Week
On this episode, I sit and speak with Piedmont Blūz Ben and Valerie Turner, Dena Ross Jennings, Jim Bunch, and Steve and Melissa Waggy, all musicians and attendees of Augusta Heritage Blues and Swing week in West Virginia. We engage in a deep conversation about Society, Stereo Types, Traditions and Traditional Musics, Perception and everything that makes the expression of cultures extremely relevant
48:25
October 5, 2018
Joel Bailes at Blues & Swing Week
On this episode of The Jack Dappa Blues Podcast, I speak with Joel Bailes, historian, musician, and husband of a Blues Harp Woman at Augusta’s Blues & Swing Week, which provides participants with the opportunity to work with some of the finest performers and educators in the Blues and Swing worlds. Joel shares with us his musical journey, family story and why African American Traditional Music is important to him. He also speaks about how culture is extremely important to America.
41:00
August 19, 2018
We The Blues People F/ Marquis Knox
“We The Blues People” is a biweekly broadcast produced and hosted by Jack Dappa Blues Public Media, in partnership with Knox Entertainment located in St. Louis, which is a live feed broadcast that discusses events and laws from the past which results continue to leave a strains on African American politics, economy and family of today. The program is hosted by Lamont Jack Pearley and Marquis Knox. "The path the slave took to 'citizenship' is what I want to look at. And I make my analogy through the slave citizen's music -- through the music that is most closely associated with him: blues and a later, but parallel development, jazz... [If] the Negro represents, or is symbolic of, something in and about the nature of American culture, this certainly should be revealed by his characteristic music." -- Amiri Baraka in the Introduction to Blues People
1:13:35
August 12, 2018
The Black Spirituals are the Expressions of Freedom
On this episode, I speak with Reverend, Dr. Derrick McQueen, New Testament Scholar and Black Spirituals Historian about the history of the Black Spirituals, it's importance and it's truly the songs and expressions of revolution. http://www.derrickmcqueen.com/
51:35
August 12, 2018
Dom Flemons - Black Cowboy
On this episode, Dom goes into detail of how a visit with family some 10 years ago landed him at a gift shop around the Petrified Forest, where he came across a book called “The Negro Cowboys”. Probably no coincidence, Dom shares with us what transpired from this book purchase, and how the journey of producing The Black Cowboys album brings him full circle of his own family’s lineage.
30:48
April 24, 2018
NAMA Harlem's Rich History
NAMA Harlem, also known as The New Amsterdam Musical Association is a staple of the Harlem community as it is with the History of African American Music, Entertainment and Heritage. On this episode, Arthur Brown, Vice President of the legendary organization walks us through the story of NAMA Harlem’s Rich History, and gives insights of its significance in African American History, Traditional Music and Culture.
27:20
April 24, 2018