Skip to main content
Accounting 101 with Jimmy Stewart

Accounting 101 with Jimmy Stewart

By James Stewart

Accounting 101 Podcast by James Edward Stewart, CPA/ABV, CFE
Where to listen
Apple Podcasts Logo

Apple Podcasts

Castbox Logo

Castbox

Google Podcasts Logo

Google Podcasts

Overcast Logo

Overcast

Pocket Casts Logo

Pocket Casts

PodBean Logo

PodBean

RadioPublic Logo

RadioPublic

Spotify Logo

Spotify

Stitcher Logo

Stitcher

17 - The Objectives of Financial Reporting & Concepts of Accrual Accounting
17 - The Objectives of Financial Reporting & Concepts of Accrual Accounting
I've read a lot of boring stuff so that you don't have to! Today we will summarize some of the useful information in the FASB Concepts Statements and other literature.  This information will be useful as you move along to more advanced levels of accounting.
14:30
December 23, 2019
16 - Closing the Books at the End of the Period (The Closing Process)
16 - Closing the Books at the End of the Period (The Closing Process)
Example: You own a sole proprietorship. For this period, you had revenue of $100,000, wage expense of $40,000, and computer expense of $30,000 (net income of $30,000). You also contributed $10,000 to the business this period. Step 1 – Transfer Revenue and Expense items to Income Summary                                                              Debit           Credit Revenue                                        $100,000             Income Summary                                  $100,000 Income Summary                       $40,000            Wage Expense                                           $40,000 Income Summary                       $30,000            Computer Expense                                  $30,000 Step 2 – Transfer Income Summary to Equity (capital account)                                                                   Debit           Credit Income Summary                            $30,000            Capital Account – YOUR NAME                 $30,000 Step 3 – Transfer contribution/distribution accounts to capital account                                                             Debit          Credit   Contributions – YOUR NAME     $10,000           Capital Account – YOUR NAME           $10,000       
11:43
February 02, 2019
15 - Adjusting Journal Entries (The Adjusting Process)
15 - Adjusting Journal Entries (The Adjusting Process)
 Today we will go over the adjusting process. This is where we make our adjusting journal entries to get from our unadjusted trial balance to our adjusted trial balance, which contains the figures we use on the financial statements and tax returns. We will briefly discuss prepaid expenses, unearned revenues, accrued revenues, accrued expenses, and depreciation/amortization. 
09:41
January 26, 2019
14 - An Overview of the Accounting Cycle
14 - An Overview of the Accounting Cycle
Today we will discuss the accounting cycle. This is the process taken each period to record transactions, prepare the financial statements, and to reset the temporary accounts to zero for the next period. Keep in mind that the steps you may see in your accounting textbook or elsewhere may be slightly different - I have simplified some of the steps: Step 1 – Record transactions as journal entries in the general ledger; Step 2 – Prepare an unadjusted trial balance as of the end of the period; Step 3 – Prepare adjusting journal entries and record on general ledger; Step 4 – Prepare an adjusted trial balance as of the end of the period; Step 5 – Prepare the financial statements; Step 6 – Prepare and record closing journal entries to reset temporary accounts; Step 7 – Prepare a post-closing trial balance.
06:56
January 19, 2019
13 - How to Dominate Indirect Cash Flow Statements (Fake Cash Method)
13 - How to Dominate Indirect Cash Flow Statements (Fake Cash Method)
Example # 1 Our Accounts Receivable balance increased by $20,000 from the end of last period to the end of this period. 1. Accounts Receivable is an asset, so it must be debited to increase its balance. 2. Create journal entry:                                                              Debit    Credit Accounts Receivable                  $20,000           Fake Cash                                            $20,000 3. A $20,000 increase in Accounts Receivable = $20,000 cash flow reduction on the statement of cash flows. Example # 2 Our Accounts Payable balance increased by $10,000 from the end of last period to the end of this period. 1. Accounts Payable is a liability, so it must be credited to increase its balance. 2. Create journal entry:                                                                Debit     Credit Fake Cash                                         $10,000         Accounts Payable                                   $10,000 3. A $10,000 increase in Accounts Payable = $10,000 cash flow increase on the statement of cash flows. Example # 3 Our Accrued Expense Payable decreased by $25,000 from the end of last period to the end of this period. 1. Accrued Expense Payable is a liability, so it must be debited to decrease its balance. 2. Create journal entry:                                                               Debit     Credit Accrued Expense Payable            $25,000             Fake Cash                                             $25,000 3. A $25,000 reduction to Accrued Expense Payable = $25,000 cash flow decrease on the statement of cash flows.    
11:02
January 12, 2019
12 - FIFO & LIFO (Cost Layering Methods)
12 - FIFO & LIFO (Cost Layering Methods)
Today we will discuss the cost layering methods that are used within the periodic and perpetual inventory systems. Assumptions for purchases: 50 units purchased on January 1 at $10 each (50 x $10 = $500) 100 units purchased on February 1 at $11 each (100 x $11 = $1,100) 150 units purchased on March 1 at $12 each (150 x $12 = $1,800) Assumptions for sales: 250 units sold to customer on April 1 for $5,000 Journal entries to record purchases under Periodic Method (entry is the same whether LIFO or FIFO is being used): January 1: Debit Purchases $500; Credit Accounts Payable $500 February 1: Debit Purchases $1,100; Credit Accounts Payable $1,100 March 1: Debit Purchases $1,800; Credit Accounts Payable $1,800 Total Debits to Purchases = $3,400 ($500 + $1,100 + $1,800) Journal entries to record purchases under the Perpetual Method (entry is the same whether FIFO or LIFO is being used): January 1: Debit Inventory $500; Credit Accounts Payable $500 February 1: Debit Inventory $1,100; Credit Accounts Payable $1,100 March 1: Debit Inventory $1,800; Credit Accounts Payable $1,800 Total Debits to Inventory = $3,400 ($500 + $1,100 + $1,800) Journal entry to record sale - Periodic Method (entry is the same whether using FIFO or LIFO): April 1: Debit Accounts Receivable $5,000; Credit Revenue $5,000 Adjusting journal entry to record Cost of Goods Sold and Inventory - Periodic Method (Using FIFO): December 31: Debit Inventory $600 (for ending inventory); Debit Cost of Goods Sold for $2,800; Credit Purchases for $3,400; Credit Inventory for $0 (for beginning inventory) Adjusting journal entry to record Cost of Goods Sold and Inventory - Periodic Method (Using LIFO): December 31: Debit Inventory $500 (for ending inventory); Debit Cost of Goods Sold for $2,900; Credit Purchases for $3,400; Credit Inventory for $0 (for beginning inventory) Journal entries to record sale - Perpetual Method (FIFO): April 1: Debit Accounts Receivable $5,000; Credit Revenue $5,000 April 1: Debit Cost of Goods Sold $2,800; Credit Inventory $2,800 Journal entries to record sale - Perpetual Method (LIFO): April 1: Debit Accounts Receivable $5,000; Credit Revenue $5,000 April 1: Debit Cost of Goods Sold $2,900; Credit Inventory $2,900
26:09
December 07, 2018
11 - Perpetual & Periodic Inventory Methods & Cost of Goods Sold
11 - Perpetual & Periodic Inventory Methods & Cost of Goods Sold
In this episode, we will cover the journal entries made when using the perpetual and periodic inventory methods, and we will also go over the formula and journal entry to record cost of goods sold under the periodic inventory method.
17:13
November 25, 2018
10 - Depreciation, Amortization, & Fixed Assets
10 - Depreciation, Amortization, & Fixed Assets
Today we tackle depreciation and amortization, and we discuss fixed assets. Facts for following examples: Asset cost of $85,000, salvage value of $10,000, and a useful life of 5 years. Note: "Depr" represents depreciation expense, "A/D" represents accumulated depreciation, and "B/V" represents book value at the end of the year. I tried to align the columns as best as I could, but they appear differently on different platforms. Assuming the asset was put into service January 1 of year 1 and utilizing the straight line method: Year Factor Depr A/D B/V 1 0.2 15,000 15,000 70,000 2 0.2 15,000 30,000 55,000 3 0.2 15,000 45,000 40,000 4 0.2 15,000 60,000 25,000 5 0.2 15,000 75,000 10,000 Assuming the asset was put into service October 1 of year 1 and utilizing the straight line method: Year Factor Depr A/D B/V 1 0.2 3,250 3,750 81,250 2 0.2 15,000 18,750 66,250 3 0.2 15,000 33,750 51,250 4 0.2 15,000 48,750 36,250 5 0.2 15,000 63,750 21,250 6 0.2 11,250 75,000 10,000 Assuming the asset was put into service January 1 of year 1 and utilizing the double declining (don't!) balance method: Year Factor Depr A/D B/V 1 0.4 34,000 34,000 51,000 2 0.4 20,400 54,400 30,600 3 0.4 12,240 66,640 18,360 4 0.4 7,344 73,984 11,016 5 0.4 1,016 75,000 10,000 Assuming the asset was put into service January 1 of year 1 and utilizing the sum of the years' digits method: Year Factor Depr A/D B/V 1 5/15 25,000 25,000 60,000 2 4/15 20,000 45,000 40,000 3 3/15 15,000 60,000 25,000 4 2/15 10,000 70,000 15,000 5 1/15 5,000 75,000 10,000
28:00
November 10, 2018
9 - Unearned Revenue (Deferred Revenue)
9 - Unearned Revenue (Deferred Revenue)
In this episode, we discuss unearned revenue.
07:59
November 04, 2018
8 - Prepaid Expenses (Prepaid Assets)
8 - Prepaid Expenses (Prepaid Assets)
Today we will discuss prepaid assets, and do some examples with journal entries.
07:17
October 28, 2018
7 - Accounts Payable - Purchases, Payments, Discounts, & Agings
7 - Accounts Payable - Purchases, Payments, Discounts, & Agings
In this episode, we will discuss accounts payable and journal entries related to accounts payable.
13:48
October 22, 2018
6 - Accounts Receivable - Sales, Collections, Discounts, Agings, & Write-Offs
6 - Accounts Receivable - Sales, Collections, Discounts, Agings, & Write-Offs
In this episode, we will describe accounts receivable, and we will go over journal entries related to accounts receivable.
13:45
October 21, 2018
5 - Contra Accounts - Understanding Them & Examples
5 - Contra Accounts - Understanding Them & Examples
Today we will explain contra accounts, and we will also do some examples to demonstrate how the debits and credits work.
16:21
October 13, 2018
4 - An Introduction to Financial Statements
4 - An Introduction to Financial Statements
In this episode, we will briefly discuss the four main financial statements in accounting: the balance sheet, income statement, statement of owner's equity, and statement of cash flows.
23:01
October 06, 2018
3 - General Ledgers & Trial Balances
3 - General Ledgers & Trial Balances
In this episode, we discuss the flow of accounting from how our journal entries are recorded in the general ledger, summarized in the trial balance, and then presented on the financial statements and tax returns.
12:06
September 29, 2018
2 - A|LE-R|E & Journal Entries
2 - A|LE-R|E & Journal Entries
In this episode, we discuss how each type of account in ALE-RE is affected by journal entries, and we learn the debit/credit language of accounting using A|LE-R|E. The lines separate the types of accounts with normal debit balances from those with normal credit balances. This is the most important episode to listen to if you are just learning accounting. Example Journal Entry: Dr. Cr. Utilities Expense 150 Accounts Payable 150
17:01
September 10, 2018
1 - Assets, Liabilities, Equity, Revenue, & Expenses (ALE-RE)
1 - Assets, Liabilities, Equity, Revenue, & Expenses (ALE-RE)
In this episode, we briefly discuss each type of account in accounting: Assets, Liabilities, Equity, Revenue, and Expenses.
06:57
September 10, 2018
0 - Introduction
0 - Introduction
Hi Everyone, Welcome to Accounting 101 with Jimmy Stewart. I hope to explain accounting to you the way I wish someone had explained it to me when I first started out. This isn't meant to be your only source of learning accounting, but this is meant to advance your knowledge in accounting by reinforcing the fundamentals that you absolutely must know to understand accounting. I am a forensic accountant from New York State, and I have learned a lot of tricks over the years that I know will help a lot of other people out as well. Stick with me and I promise I will help you understand accounting in a way that will let you master it. I hope you all enjoy. Please be patient with me as I figure out what I'm doing. James Edward Stewart, CPA/ABV, CFE The Fundamentals and Principles of Accounting: https://www.amazon.com/Fundamentals-Principles-Accounting-Edward-Stewart-ebook/dp/B0151VR3AC
02:46
September 10, 2018