The Librarian's Guide to Teaching

The Librarian's Guide to Teaching

By Amanda Piekart
This podcast is hosted by two instruction librarians that are interested in sharing their experiences teaching information literacy, discussing current trends, and having meaningful conversations about librarianship.
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Interview with Barbara Fister on Project Information Literacy in the Age of Algorithms Study

The Librarian's Guide to Teaching

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Storytelling and Instruction: What stories do you have to tell?
Show Notes: In this episode, Amanda and Jessica discuss storytelling and instruction. How can you use your experience and previous student support to provide instruction? Topics & Takeaways: Storytelling can be valuable in information literacy instruction because it is informational, memorable and a great way to reach novice learners. What are our experiences with storytelling in the classroom? What are some ways to use infographics as storytelling? What are some barriers to storytelling in the classroom? What are some “Pie in the sky” storytelling techniques you might want to try in the future? Do you think storytelling is an effective instruction technique for one shots? Small ways you can incorporate storytelling into your instruction Share your searching experience Share a time you helped a student Share a short story that introduces a topic Create case study activities Role playing activity Make your students the storytellers Resources referenced in this episode: The Teaching Professor: Storytelling: A Valuable Teaching Tool Telling Stories: The Art and Science of Storytelling as an Instructional Strategy by Karen Brakke & Jeremy Ashton Houska Harvard Business Review: What Makes Storytelling So Effective For Learning? Telling the Story: Using Narratives to Explain WHY Information Literacy Education is Important and Get Students Invested in What We Do by Heather Barrow-Stafford Teaching Information Literacy Through Short Stories by David James Brier & Vickery Kaye Lebbin Keeping Up With Digital Storytelling Infographics: The Power of Visual Storytelling by Jason Lankow, Josh Ritchie & Ross Crooks Geeky Pedagogy: A Guide for Intellectuals, Introverts, and Nerds Who Want to Be Effective Teachers by Jessamyn Neuhaus Teaching In Higher Ed Podcast: Episode 286 with Jessamyn Neuhaus NOTE: In the episode, Jessica refers to introverted teaching and attributes certain quotes to educator Flower Darby but that should have been attributed to Jessamyn Neuhaus, whose book is linked above. Here's where you can find us: Podcast: @Librarian_Guide Jessica: @LibraryGeek611 Amanda: @HistoryBuff820 Email: InfoLitTeachingPodcast@gmail.com Be sure to rate and subscribe wherever you listen to the podcast!
54:53
April 7, 2020
What's on the Horizon for Teaching and Learning? : Our Thoughts on the 2020 Educause Horizon Report
Show Notes: In this episode, Amanda and Jessica discuss their thoughts on the recently released EDUCAUSE 2020 Horizon Report and the implications for librarians in higher education. Resources discussed in this episode: 2020 EDUCAUSE Horizon Report Life Kit Podcast Free Professional Development Document for Academic Library Workers (Shoutout to librarian, Jessica Dai, for creating and sharing this editable document!) TOPcast: The Teaching Online Podcast Opening the Black Box of Adaptivity Tips for Working at Home - Tweet from @RebeccaRomney Here's where you can find us: Podcast: @Librarian_Guide Jessica: @LibraryGeek611 Amanda: @HistoryBuff820 Email: InfoLitTeachingPodcast@gmail.com Be sure to rate and subscribe wherever you listen to the podcast!
56:47
March 26, 2020
Teaching Outside of the Classroom: Designing Fun and Effective IL Programming
In this episode, Amanda and Jessica discuss their successes and failures creating instructional programming that teaches information literacy skills. They discuss tips and challenges to designing and implementing these events. Topics & Takeaways: Instructional programming refers to events and activities in libraries that teach information literacy skills in some form rather than just focusing on bringing students into the library or promoting services. Successes discussed include a Wikipedia Edit-a-Thon, LibraryLand game, tabling events and an online event LibGuide. Challenges in preparing and presenting instructional programming include: Time to plan Collaboration with other departments Lack of student attendance Marketing to students Tips for preparing and presenting instructional programming include: Know what topics and engagement methods are important to your students Be sure to assess your programming Tie your programming to the mission or goals of your department/ institution Collect meaningful data in order to demonstrate value Recognize when a program is no longer working Make sure you do tie your program back to IL skills being taught Resources referenced in the episode: Coronavirus and the Great Online-Learning Experiment Berkeley College Wikipedia Edit-a-Thon LibGuide Celebrate Berkeley College Libraries LibGuide Library Marketing and Outreach Facebook Group Shannon Farrell & Kristen Mastel - Considering Outreach Assessment: Strategies, Sample Scenarios, and a Call to Action (2016) Here's where you can find us: Podcast: @Librarian_Guide Jessica: @LibraryGeek611 Amanda: @HistoryBuff820 Email: InfoLitTeachingPodcast@gmail.com Be sure to rate and subscribe wherever you listen to the podcast!
49:34
March 13, 2020
What does it take to "Thrive as a Library Professional"? Interview with Susanne Markgren and Linda Miles
Show Notes for Website: In this episode, Amanda and Jessica talk to Susanne Markgren and Linda Miles, authors of the book “How to Thrive as a Library Professional”. They discuss what it means to thrive, the various topics covered in the book and hone in on specific strategies for networking and habit creation. Topics & Takeaways: The chapter topics are Career Vision, Habits, Relationships Building, Organizational Culture, Telling our Stories for Self-Promotion, Mindfulness/Self-Compassion, Creating a Reflective Practice. Success can be defined differently by each person and changes as a person moves through their career. Reflection is an important part of thriving because it requires us to think out all of the aspects of our career, including habits, relationships and our daily work. Habits Mindfulness Resources referenced in the episode: How to Thrive as a Library Professional: Achieving Success and Satisfaction by Susanne Markgren and Linda Miles David Allen - Getting Things Done method Bullet Journaling
31:51
February 27, 2020
Interview with Barbara Fister on Project Information Literacy in the Age of Algorithms Study
Show Notes: On this episode of The Librarian's Guide to Teaching, Amanda and Jessica talk with Barbara Fister, Scholar-in-Residence at Project Information Literacy and co-researcher on PIL's latest study, "Information Literacy in the Age of Algorithms: Student Experiences with News and Information, and the Need for Change." They discuss the report’s findings, potential barriers to implementing algorithm education and ways that librarians can be a part of the change in higher education. Guest Bio: Barbara Fister is a Scholar-in-Residence at Project Information Literacy and co-researcher on PIL's latest study, "Information Literacy in the Age of Algorithms: Student Experiences with News and Information, and the Need for Change." For three decades Barbara coordinated the library instruction program at Gustavus Adolphus College=, a liberal arts college in Minnesota. In addition to collaborative teaching with faculty across the curriculum she has developed courses on research methods, book culture, first term seminars, and (most recently) launched a new course on Clickbait, Bias, and Propaganda in Information Networks. Resources related to this episode’s theme and mentioned in the show include: Algorithm Report Abstract & Links Full Report: Information Literacy in the Age of Algorithms: Student Experiences with News and Information, and the Need for Change Algo Report Additional Readings Tweet of the week  https://twitter.com/Jessifer/status/1222177875719327744 
36:33
February 5, 2020
Making Time for Professional Development
Show Notes: On this episode of The Librarian's Guide to Teaching, Amanda and Jessica talk with Bonnie Lafazan, Library Director of the Berkeley College Woodbridge Campus and current member of the ACRL Professional Development Committee and the ACRL Conference 2020 Committee. They chat about the importance of the various levels of professional development, strategies to building a culture of development and how we make time for writing and reading. Topics & Takeaways: Professional development is an important part of keeping up to date on what’s going on in librarianship as well as stretching ourselves as life-long learners. We balance our professional development time between work and personal time based on what works for our lives. Amanda shares some strategies for fitting it in on a tight schedule. For those interested in encouraging professional development at their institution, a variety of strategies are discussed including bringing information back from your local library organizations, giving a variety of opportunities to team members and getting input from staff members on what they want to develop. Resources related to this episode’s theme and mentioned in the show include: ACRL Library Marketing Outreach & Interest Group (including a link to the active Facebook group) ACRL Roles & Strengths of Teaching Librarians American Libraries Magazine College & Research Libraries News Circulating Ideas - Podcasts of Interest (Free PD from podcasts!) Scholarships: ACRL 2021 Scholarships ALA Education Scholarship Lists Routledge Being a Librarian: Professional Development FreeBook ALA Staff Development Links & Bibliography Here's where you can find us: Podcast: @Librarian_Guide Jessica: @LibraryGeek611 Amanda: @HistoryBuff820 Email: InfoLitTeachingPodcast@gmail.com Be sure to rate and subscribe wherever you listen to the podcast!
31:48
January 27, 2020
Online Information Literacy Instruction Gets Critical
Show Notes:  NOTE: It's not your speakers! We had some technical difficulties recording this episode and we are sorry for the choppy audio! In this episode, Amanda and Jessica discuss online instruction, including the concepts of critical digital pedagogy and open pedagogy which were suggested by a listener on Twitter! They discuss incorporating these concepts into the online environment whether in a credit-bearing course, embedded instruction or one-shots.  Topics and Takeaways:  • Critical digital pedagogy asks many of the same questions about teaching as critical pedagogy but extends the discussion into the online environment and includes questions around the use of technology itself.  • However, online instruction has only been practiced for 20-30 years whereas humans have been teaching and studying pedagogy for thousands of years. How do we bring what we’ve learned into the online realm in a more holistic way rather than being limited by the technology? We need to re-envision online pedagogy!  • Open pedagogy is focused on themes of collaborative learning and inter-connected with open educational resources, open access and other forms of open education.  • How do we adapt our one-shot instruction to “work” in this environment? What are the criteria for successful online one-shots?  • Discussion boards are so limiting in their ability for actual discussion, engagement and assessment. And if we don’t like doing them as students or grading them as teachers, how can we expect our students to feel empowered to do them? We need a new method of creating discussion in our online classrooms.  Links to resources discussed in this episode (or related to the topics): There are SO many great resources on these topics - this is by no means a complete or widely reaching list!  • Critical Library Pedagogy o Book: Critical Library Pedagogy Handbook by Nicole Pagowsky& Kelly McElroy (2016) o Book: Critical Library Pedagogy in Practice by Jess Haigh & Elizabeth Brookbank (2020 - The editors just finished accepting proposals in July 2019) o Eamon C. Tewell (2018)  The Practice and Promise of Critical Information Literacy: Academic Librarians’ Involvement in Critical Library Instruction, College & Research Libraries o Monthly Twitter Chat: #CritLib o Kenny Garcia (2019) Keeping Up With Critical Librarianship, ACRL (Great reference list!) • Critical Digital Pedagogy o Podcast: The Teaching in Higher Ed Podcast: Critical Instructional Design With Sean Michael Morris o Podcast: The Teaching in Higher Ed Podcast: Small Teaching Online With Flower Darby o Sean Michael Morris: Critical Pedagogy in the Age of Learning Management o Critical Digital Pedagogy (Open Book)  • Open Pedagogy o Open Pedagogy Notebook  o Podcast: The Teaching in Higher Ed Podcast: Critical Open Pedagogy With Rajiv Jhangiani • Kevin Seeber blog post on faculty collaboration • Meredith Farkas blog series: Thoughts at Mid-Career Part 1 – Letting Go, Questioning, and Pathfinding Thank you to the Twitter users we quoted this episode: • @melodylynn457 Here's where you can find us: https://librariansguidetoteaching.weebly.com/
48:26
January 15, 2020
Who will teach information literacy in the future?
Show Notes: In this episode, Amanda and Jessica discuss both the practical and theoretical ideas behind the future of information literacy. Will librarians always teach information literacy? Will it ever be fully adopted into higher ed curriculum and only taught by faculty? Topics Discussed & Takeaways: So many potential answers to these questions are institution specific depending on culture, relationships and contexts. Faculty have a lot of discipline-specific content to cover which is where their expertise lies and since librarians are the research/information experts, this should remain our responsibility. Due to institutional contexts, one-shots can’t always be replaced with a full credit course and if only taught early in their college careers, students would not receive discipline specific instruction. Librarians remain up to date on the technology of research which takes that off of the faculty. And many faculty don’t have to do research on their own so they may not want to learn all of that to teach students. Many posit that we are in a “third wave” of information literacy. Since information is our discipline area, librarians remain up to date with these changes, its impact on society and how to best approach these changes pedagogically (i.e. - ACRL Framework changes). Links to resources discussed in this episode (or related to the topic): “Information Literacy’s Third Wave” by Barbara Fister published on Inside Higher Ed (February 14, 2019) “Defining and teaching information literacy” by Elizabeth Dolinger in College & Research Libraries News, Vol 80, No. 1, 2019 “Philosophical Shift: Teach the Faculty to Teach Information Literacy”, White Paper written by Risë L. Smith and Karl E. Mundt Library “Competencies in the Major - University of Albany” Check, Please! Digital Information Evaluation Course, by Mike Caulfield Thank you to the Twitter users we quoted this episode: @LibraryBon Here's where you can find us: Podcast: @Librarian_Guide Jessica: @LibraryGeek611 Amanda: @HistoryBuff820 Email: InfoLitTeachingPodcast@gmail.com Be sure to rate and subscribe wherever you listen to the podcast!
35:18
December 23, 2019
Overcoming Classroom Management Challenges
Show Notes: In this episode, Amanda and Jessica discuss some of the most common classroom management challenges faced by instruction librarians and chat about strategies to overcome them. Topics Discussed & Takeaways: Instruction librarians may not have degrees in education but that doesn’t mean they can’t succeed in classroom management. Five areas of classroom management challenges: Getting and keeping students engaged Getting students to participate Engaging distracted students & keeping everyone on task Dealing with difficult students Handling technical difficulties and interruptions Links to resources discussed in this episode (or related to the topic): “When You Get Nothing But Crickets” from The Cult of Pedagogy (August 18, 2019) “Forty ways to survive IL instruction overload; or, how to avoid teacher burnout” by Giovanna Badia in College & Undergraduate Libraries, 2017 “The One-Shot Library Instruction Survival Guide”, Second Edition Heidi E. Buchanan and Beth A. McDonough “Classroom Management: Dealing with Difficult Students” from Brookhaven College Thank you to the Twitter users we quoted this episode: @Overthrowinged @WoodsieGirl Here's where you can find us: Podcast: @Librarian_Guide Jessica: @LibraryGeek611 Amanda: @HistoryBuff820 Email: InfoLitTeachingPodcast@gmail.com Be sure to rate and subscribe wherever you listen to the podcast!
42:25
November 27, 2019
Engaging Students in the Classroom through Critical Librarianship
In this episode, Amanda and Jessica interview Romel Espinel and discuss his approaches to critical librarianship in the classroom. We discuss teaching styles, student centered practices and practical examples of how to implement these strategies in the classroom.  Show Notes:  Here's where you can find us -- Podcast: @Librarian_Guide Jessica: @LibraryGeek611 Amanda: @HistoryBuff820 Email: InfoLitTeachingPodcast@gmail.com We are also now available on itunes! Be sure to find us there and subscribe to our podcast!
42:09
November 7, 2019
Can libraries be "normal"?
Show Notes: On this episode of The Librarian's Guide to Teaching, Amanda and Jessica respond to a recent article published about academic libraries and what students really want. They also share a tweet of the week.  The Atlantic Article: https://www.theatlantic.com/education/archive/2019/10/college-students-dont-want-fancy-libraries/599455/ Duke Study referenced in Atlantic Article: https://library.duke.edu/about/depts/assessment-user-experience/student-survey Ebony Magnus, Jackie Belanger and Maggie Faber; Towards a Critical Assessment Practice: http://www.inthelibrarywiththeleadpipe.org/2018/towards-critical-assessment-practice/ ***Note: The article is discussed with a bit of snark at times but we focus on positive takeaways around library assessment, institutional culture and meeting the needs of students. Here's where you can find us -- Podcast: @Librarian_Guide Jessica: @LibraryGeek611 Amanda: @HistoryBuff820 Email: InfoLitTeachingPodcast@gmail.com
25:58
October 30, 2019
Assessment: are we asking the right questions?
In this episode, Jessica and Amanda interview ACRL-NJ Chapter President, Cara Berg and they talk about their experiences with assessment, the challenges they encounter and how they are using the data they collect. They also share this week's work triumphs and work fails.  Show Notes:  ACRL project outcomes. Retrieved from https://acrl.projectoutcome.org/ Bull, A., Head, A., & MacMillian, M. (2019). Asking the right questions: Bridging gaps between information literacy assessment approaches. Against the Grain, 31(4) Retrieved from https://against-the-grain.com/2019/10/v314-asking-the-right-questions-bridging-gaps-between-information-literacy-assessment-approaches/
43:02
October 21, 2019
Impostors in the Classroom?
In the first episode of The Librarians Guide to Teaching, Hosts, Jessica Kiebler and Amanda Piekart introduce themselves, explain why they started this podcast and discussed Impostor Syndrome in the classroom. Below are links to resources discussed in this first episode.  The Imposter Cure by Jessamy Hibberd: https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/48138995-the-imposter-cure?ac=1&from_search=true “Jumping into the Deep: Imposter Syndrome, Defining Success, and the New Librarian”: https://journal.lib.uoguelph.ca/index.php/perj/article/view/3979/3994 Clance, P.R., and Imes, S.A. (1978). The impostor phenomenon in high achieving women: Dynamics and Therapeutic interventions. Psychotherapy: Theory Research and Practice, 15, 241-247. https://www.paulineroseclance.com/impostor_phenomenon.html ACRL eLearning Course: http://www.ala.org/acrl/onlinelearning/impostersyndrome "Driven" Podcast - The 1st 3 episodes are a failure series: https://thedrivenpodcast.com/ This episodes theme music: Srivastav, A. (2013). Merry Go Round [Audio file]. Retrieved from https://soundcloud.com/909-music/arnav-srivastav-merry-go  Amanda Twitter handle: @historybuff820 Jessica Twitter handle: @librarygeek611 Podcast website: https://librariansguidetoteaching.weebly.com/ 
29:36
October 1, 2019