LitSciPod: The Literature and Science Podcast

LitSciPod: The Literature and Science Podcast

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By LitSciPod
Welcome to LitSciPod: The Literature and Science Podcast! We are eager to talk interdisciplinarity, the similarities and differences between humanities and STEM subjects and feature interviews with leading scholars every episode.
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Episode 4 - Tell it Like a Story
Produced by: Catherine Charlwood (@DrCharlwood) and Laura Ludtke (@lady_electric) Music composed and performed by Gareth Jones Laura and Catherine are joined by a special guest: Dr Will Abberley (@WillAbberley), Lecturer in Victorian Literature at the University of Sussex. In addition to discussing #litsci aspects of his research and teaching, Will also explores language in scientific writings, biology and the imagination, human effects on the environment, and the importance of communicating to a broad public.  At the end of the episode, you can hear Will read Grant Allen’s article ‘Strictly Incog’ from the Cornhill Magazine, Vol. 8, No. 44 (Feb 1887): 142-57. Episode resources: Books mentioned: Meredith Hooper, The Pebble in my Pocket: A History of Our Earth (Viking Children’s Books, 1996) Adelene Buckland, Novel Science: Fiction and the Invention of Nineteenth-Century Geology (University of Chicago Press, 2013)  Adelene Buckland, ‘Thomas Hardy, Provincial Geology and the Material Imagination,’ 19: Interdisciplinary Studies in the Long Nineteenth Century, (6), DOI: http://doi.org/10.16995/ntn.469.  Gideon Mantell, The Wonders of Geology, 6th ed., 1848 Thomas Hardy, A Pair of Blue Eyes (Tinsley Brothers, 1883) Michael R. Page, The Literary Imagination from Erasmus Darwin to H.G. Wells: Science, Evolution, and Ecology (Ashgate, 2012) Laura Ludtke, ‘MICHAEL R. PAGE, The Literary Imagination from Erasmus Darwin to H. G. Wells: Science, Evolution, and Ecology,’ Notes and Queries, Vol, 62, No. 3, (Sep 2015): 480–82, https://doi.org/10.1093/notesj/gjv110 Websites of interest: Narrative Science project at the London School of Economics, https://www.narrative-science.org  We hope you’ve enjoyed this episode of LitSciPod - we enjoyed making it!
48:32
June 1, 2019
Episode 3 - How Many Cultures?
Produced by: Catherine Charlwood (@DrCharlwood) and Laura Ludtke (@lady_electric) Music composed and performed by Gareth Jones Laura and Catherine are joined by a special guest: Dr Will Tattersdill (@WillTattersdill), Senior Lecturer in Popular Literature at the University of Birmingham. In addition to discussing #litsci aspects of his research and teaching, Will also explores disciplinary boundaries, science fiction, dinosaurs in science and culture (including Dinotopia!), the status of popular literature in the university, and the importance of education and outreach. At the end of the episode, you can hear Will read the end of H. G. Wells’s novel The Time Machine (1895) Episode resources: Books mentioned: Phyllis Weliver, Women Musicians in Victorian Fiction, 1860-1900: Representations of Music, Science and Gender in the Leisured Home (Routledge, 2000) Ruth Benedict, Patterns of Culture (Houghton Mifflin, 1934) Raymond Williams, Keywords: A Vocabulary of Culture and Society (Croom Helm, 1976) Stuart Hall, Representation: Cultural Representations and Signifying Practices (Sage, 1997). If you want to become more familiar with the Two Cultures debate, here are some of the articles and books Laura and Catherine mention in the episode: Thomas H. Huxley, ‘Science and Culture’ (1880) Matthew Arnold, ‘Literature and Science’ (1882) C. P. Snow, ‘The Two Cultures’ (1959) F. R. Leavis, ‘Two Cultures? The Significance of C. P. Snow’ (1962) George Levine, ed. One Culture: Essays in Science and Literature (University of Wisconsin Press, 1987) Frank Furedi, Roger Kimball, Raymond Tallis and Robert Whelan, eds., From Two Cultures To No Culture: CP Snow’s Two Cultures’ Lecture Fifty Years On (Civitas: Institute for the Study of Civil Society, 2009) We hope you’ve enjoyed this episode of LitSciPod - we enjoyed making it!
51:06
May 3, 2019
Episode 2 – The T in STEM
Produced by: Catherine Charlwood (@DrCharlwood) and Laura Ludtke (@lady_electric) Music composed and performed by: Gareth Jones About this episode: In this episode, Laura and Cathy dive into the STEM vs. the humanities debate, discussing how funding in post-secondary institutions widens the divide between the humanities and STEm subjects. This week's interview features Alex Goody, Professor of Twentieth-Century Literature in the Department of English Literature at Oxford Brookes University.  After the interview, you can hear Alex read Mina Loy’s poem, ‘Human Cylinders.’ Bio for Alex Goody:  After completing her PhD on 'Mina Loy’s Modernist Aesthetic’ at the University of Leeds, Dr Goody taught at Falmouth University before joining Oxford Brookes. Her research interests and teaching spans the field of modernist studies, encompasses technology and literature, considers the work of the modernist poets and novelists Mina Loy, Djuna Barnes, and Gertrude Stein, as well as New York Dada, jewish writing, modernist drama, and radio. We highly recommend you read Technology, Literature and Culture, (Polity Press, 2011). Episode resources: If you want to become more familiar with the Humanities vs STEM debate, here are some of the articles and books Laura and Catherine mention in the episode:  Schmidt, ‘The Humanities are in Crisis’. Rustin, ‘Why study English? We’re poorer in every sense without it’. ‘Patterns and trends in UK Higher Education’.   Olejarz, ‘Liberal Arts in the Data Age'. Wadhwa, 'Why liberal arts and the humanities are as important as engineering’. Anders, ‘That 'Useless' Liberal Arts Degree Has Become Tech's Hottest Ticket’. Bate, The Public Value of the Humanities (Bloomsbury, 2011) Collini, What Are Universities For? (Penguin 2012) Small, The Value of the Humanities (Oxford University Press 2013)  Klein, The Shock Doctrine: The Rise of Disaster Capitalism (Random House Canada, 2007 'Universities likely to cut number of staff due to Brexit uncertainty'. Resources mentioned in the interview with Alex Goody: Hales: Unthought: The Power Of The Cognitive Nonconscious; Kittler, Gramophone, Film, Typewriter; Elkin, Flâneuse: Women Walk the City; Ahmed, Living a Feminist Life Mina Loy: Navigating the Avant-Garde.  Loy materials on the Beinecke Rare Books Library website. You can read Mina Loy, ‘Human Cylinders’ here and Seamus Heaney’s ‘The Railway Children’’   here.
55:42
March 24, 2019
Episode 1 - What Even is Literature and Science?
Episode One: What even is Literature and Science? Produced by: Catherine Charlwood (@DrCharlwood) and Laura Ludtke (@lady_electric) Music composed and performed by Gareth Jones In the first episode of LitSciPod, hosts Laura and Catherine set out to define the field of Literature and Science, which is concerned with investigating and challenging the disciplinary boundaries between the study and practice of literature and that of science. They also tackle one of the most important issues in Literature and Science: how the classroom and the education reinforce these boundaries, often referred to colloquially as the “Two Cultures,’ after the title of C. P. Snow’s (in)famous Rede Lecture in 1959. Laura and Catherine are joined by a special guest: Dr Rachel Crossland (@DrRCrossland, a Senior Lecturer at the University of Chichester, whose book, Modernist Physics: Waves, Particles, and Relativities in the Writings of Virginia Woolf and D. H. Lawrence, was published in 2018 by the Oxford University Press. In addition to discussing the obstacles to the study of Literature and Science at university in the UK, Rachel also explores the personal connections that underpin the #litsci aspects of her research and teaching. At the end of the episode, you can hear Rachel read Rebecca Elson’s poem, ‘Explaining Relativity.’ For further reading, Laura and Catherine recommend: Crossland, Rachel. Modernist Physics: Waves, Particles, and Relativities in the Writings of Virginia Woolf and D. H. Lawrence. Oxford University Press. 2018. Elson, Rebecca. A Responsibility to Awe. Carcanet Press. 2001. Hayles, N. Katherine. The Cosmic Web: Scientific Field Models and Literary Strategies in the Twentieth Century. Cornell University Press. 1984. Sleigh, Charlotte. Literature and Science. Palgrave Macmillan. 2011. Whitworth, Michael. Einstein’s Wake: Relativity, Metaphor, and Modernist Literature. Oxford University Press. 2001. About the hosts: Laura’s research investigates the connections between technology, gender, politics, and aesthetics in the city in late-Victorian, Edwardian, and Modernist literature. Her current project, Reading London’s Lightscapes, 1880–1950, considers literary and cultural responses to the electrification of London at the end of the nineteenth and beginning of the twentieth centuries. Laura has worked as an educator at handful of museums and nature centres across Canada as well as at undergraduate and graduate level in Canada and the UK. Catherine’s research interests lie in poetic form, how experimental/cognitive psychology can be read productively alongside literature and all things memory-related. She’s writing a book on memory in the poetry of Thomas Hardy and Robert Frost, and has also published on memory in Kazuo Ishiguro’s fiction. More recently, Catherine’s been looking at how literary and scientific knowledge proliferated alike in the nineteenth century, and is researching mutual improvement and literary societies in nineteenth-century Wales. A former schoolteacher, she has a particular interest in questions concerning education. We would love to hear what you think about our first episode, so if you have feedback, please email us at litscipod@gmail.com
31:58
February 22, 2019
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