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Matters of Movement

Matters of Movement

By Christina Whelan Chabot

Movement is more than exercise. Come and explore all the factors that impact our movement experience. Movement is impacted by our physical, emotional and mental health, not mention sport, culture, art, science, race and everything in between.
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E031. Cindy Willems - Fit over Fifty

Matters of Movement

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E032. Micki Havard - Pilates for Everyone
E032. Micki Havard - Pilates for Everyone
SHOW NOTES ON THEIR WAY Contact Micki: Instagram Matters of Movement Studio
42:02
April 11, 2022
E031. Cindy Willems - Fit over Fifty
E031. Cindy Willems - Fit over Fifty
Cindy is the owner/creator of My Fit Over 50, a website dedicated to the health of women going into menopause and beyond. After enjoying a great professional dance career (working all over the world including Stratford Festival), Cindy reinvented herself becoming a certified Pilates instructor, acupuncturist and holistic nutritionist. Now she uses her over 10 years of clinical experience and passion to help other women embrace the changes that happen as we age offering up an opportunity to become our best self. She believes that it’s important to keep challenging the body safely and efficiently and lives by that rule by getting her black belt in Kung Fu at the age of 50. Cindy also has a busy acupuncture and Pilates business in Toronto. The Importance of Self-Care During the podcast, Cindy speaks passionately about the importance of self-care and being the best advocate for your health. She empowers women to ask questions and have conversations about the changes that happen to their body going into peri-menopause and beyond it. She wants women to know that there are ways to help support the body as their hormones fluctuate, and often this can help make those uncomfortable symptoms of menopause easier to manage. Menopause is natural and should be the next part of a life well lived. What is peri-menopause? Cindy explains that you can actually be peri-menopausal for about 10 years. During this time your progesterone and estrogen are not in balance anymore. That brings on certain physiological symptoms like: night sweats, the inability to get a good night's sleep, and of course your period changes. It's a time to be reflective on the fact that things are shifting and changing, and that you need to be a little mindful about what that next part of the journey will look like. Self-education is a good tool! It is important to have conversations about how you are going to support yourself now that your estrogen is starting to drop, because estrogen is the fuel and the goodness that helps support your brain and your bones? When you stop producing estrogen, it is going to affect your bones. So what you may want to do is talk to your doctor about hormones that are going to help supplement the estrogen loss. What can we do to support our health going into menopause? Taking care of yourself is one of the most important things when approach peri-menopause into menopause. Your bones become your bank account, so if you deposit into your bank account before you are 20 years old, you are going to be able to withdraw from that bank account and be okay, but if you don't deposit into your bank account, then you are going to be in some trouble. We need to be more mindful now about how we move, how we approach fitness and exercise when we are in that peri-menopausal and menopausal state because depleting ourselves is not a good idea. Be mindful, mindful of your eating, mindful of your sleep, and mindful of your exercise. Cindy explains that those are the three key things to focus on. They call it the Second Spring It is a woman’s second puberty, and it can be a really exciting time. It is good to have that guidance to just let you know that it's okay. When you have those maybe not so good days that it's okay. When you just can't kill it on your workout today, it’s okay; at least you got that workout in. Right! That's good. It is just about having that little bit of education around, what your body needs now that it's changing and shifting? Contact Cindy https://myfitover50.ca/
43:32
March 01, 2022
E030. Eva Beun Lekkerkerker - The Human/Horse Physiotherapist
E030. Eva Beun Lekkerkerker - The Human/Horse Physiotherapist
Eva is a person who lives her passion with her husband, their Icelandic horses, their three dogs and one cat in a small village in the North of Netherlands. As a physiotherapist and instructor she has always been looking for some way to put feeling (during riding) into words, and to also to educate people about how their bodies work. Through the training of the Franklin Method Equestrian she has received new, very applicable insights and information. In recent years she has done various courses on sports psychology, which provides a nice total package to guide riders and horses. Physiotherapist for both Horses and Humans Eva explains that is about looking at both the biomechanics of the horse and the rider to see if the goal of the rider is fair for the horse as well, because when you look at the biomechanics of some horses, like in Belgium, they've got really massive horses and they won't be show jumpers. You have to also talk to the rider, help them understand the architecture of their horse and the horse’s capabilities. The Franklin Method With practice of the Franklin Method, equestrians become more aware of not only their own movement, but also the movement of their horse. Consequently, the connection between horse and rider becomes more clear and precise. For Eva, Eric Franklin has taught her how to use her body, and what she really likes is the way he also uses metaphors and imagery. It has become the way that she works with riders. The Art of Letting Go Christine and Eva get into more detail about the relationship between the rider and the horse. Eva shares that the pelvis is probably the biggest factor when it comes to that relationship. The pelvis is the main body part where we communicate because we sit on it, and the pelvic floor is such a big muscle. Eva readily speaks to her riders about the Art of Letting Go. “I think we are hanging on to quite a lot of things, both physically and mentally. I have moments that I'm hanging onto things, or and clinging on to things and I want to grab it and I want to hold it. Then I thought, ``Well, what does it bring? '' I only can change it when I notice, and what I don't notice, I can't change.” Establishing good Movement with your Horse It is important to have a good mind-set around movement with the horses, as it can really impact the quality of movement with your horse. Eva explains that being in the present is one of the most valuable, and needed skills while you're working with animals, especially when you're working with horses. They really mirror what we do, because it's also their nature. “When my heartbeat is high, I need to use my mental capacity to lower my heartbeat. I need to first notice that my heartbeat is high, and then I need to train myself what kind of tricks I have, or what kind of capacity I have to lower my heartbeat down. The check in is really, really important.” Teaching People how to Check-in When Eva works with her riders, she has them check in with themselves. “I just asked them: what does it feel like? Where do you feel something? I actually try to do it every time we change a gait. So when we go from walk to trot, I often ask them as well. Do a check in to notice your body. Notice what feels good. Notice what doesn't feel as flexible as you would like to have it? Give me feedback when you notice something.” Listeners can find Eva on Instagram.
44:05
February 18, 2022
E029 - Helen Thompson - The Role of Baby Massage in Development
E029 - Helen Thompson - The Role of Baby Massage in Development
Helen is originally from Perthshire in Scotland, and lives on the northwest coast of Tasmania. Helen has her nursery nursing qualification and as a qualified childcare educator Helen has spent many year looking after babies, toddlers and children. In 2010, she discovered the wonderful world of baby massage. She became an instructor and delights in helping parents enhance their confidence while forging a closer bond with their baby. Helen started hosting her First Time Mum's Chat podcast in January 2021, where she is able to connect with parents on a weekly basis. Understanding the Power of Touch There is a lot of research on baby massage, and how it helps with mothers who find it hard to touch your babies. Massage helps them learn how to communicate with their child, and it has also been researched that skin-to-skin with a baby is very important. Helen shares that it's mainly about touching and respecting your baby and giving your baby that respect. It helps with a lot of different things including: colic, constipation, and sleep. Touch has many health benefits, as well as a lot of emotional benefits. It helps promote relaxation for the mom and for the baby, as well as encourages: development, communication and bonding. The Timing of the Massage is Critical Helen shares with Kristina and the listeners the concept of quiet alert state. The quiet alert state is when your baby is just beginning to wake up. They are just waking up and they're just getting active for the day. They are communicating with you and they're engaging with you. This is a great time to actually do massage, because they are very assertive at that time and they can tell you what they like and what they don't like. Another good time is before bed, because it helps with sleep, and you can engage by talking to them, which helps them to move as well. Developing your Baby's Body Awareness and Coordination When massaging, Helen explains that it is best to start with the baby's head, and to go all the way down to the toes. You are giving them that body awareness and allowing them to see how long they are. When you go from the spine out to their arms, this allows them to see how wide they are. While you are massaging, you increase awareness by speaking to them, “I'm massaging your left leg at the moment, and I'm just going to touch your toes.” Finding Different ways to Communicate with your Children If you communicate with your child, and if they can't communicate, there are things that a parent can do. Drawing is a great way for them to express themselves; as they are drawing, you can say, “Well, why don't you draw what you're wanting to tell me?” You can also incorporate movement like jumping up and down and have them act out what they are trying to tell you. With teenagers it is a little different; with them, sometimes you just got to let them know that you are there for them.  Be supportive of them and give them the respect to regulate and process their feelings. Tummy Massages are Great for Everyone Helen shares the amazing results you get, if you just gently sort of talk to your body and tell your body what's happening. You can do this while giving yourself a tummy massage. Massage works the same way in adults as they do in babies; massage in a clockwise direction, which is the way the bowel moves. When doing this you are releasing what is trapped there, and you are pushing all the waste out. Parents that needs a little support on their parenting journey can visit Helen at her website My Baby Massage. Contact Helen Website Free Resource
48:57
February 02, 2022
E028. Kelsie Bentley - Learning to Create Space in our Lives
E028. Kelsie Bentley - Learning to Create Space in our Lives
Kelsie Bentley is a self-care and mind-set coach helping people-pleasing women reclaim their time. She got her start coaching women from behind the chair as a hairstylist, and dove deep into the work of self-care after going through her own experience with burnout. Her written work can be found on sites such as; Mama Minimalist, The Hive, and Morning Laziness, and she has been featured on several podcasts including: Healing Unscripted, We’re Not Kidding, and All Things Relax.   Kelsey has flipped the script on self-care. There are a lot of rigid self-care programs out there that have tried to prescribe to people how it should look. Kelsie is not about that at all, instead she finds ways to help people fit it into their schedules so that they are able to live successful, and purposeful lives.   A look at toxic positivity   Christina and Kelsie discuss the fact that many of us choose not to acknowledge the problems, we try to positive mind-set our way through them. Mind-set is a huge, huge thing, and it's definitely something we have to work on, but we also have to be able to feel, experience and process our feelings.   It is about taking the time to just really dive into how you feel, feel those feelings and try to work through them. This is so essential. You have to take that time and really think, “Am I allowing myself to just wallow in something, or do I need to experience this and move through it?”   How to Start Setting Healthy Boundaries   Kelsie shares that the best way to start setting boundaries is to identify if you are the type of person who tends to be of service to others all the time. This can happen when you own any kind of business; there is a certain element of being of service to others. She explains the importance of separation; a time when you can be yourself and who you are, and not have to constantly be of service.   The first step is recognizing those things that are wearing you out and that are draining your energy. Then you have to figure out how to set the boundaries. Kelsie suggests starting with those relationships, or situations that are not so close to you. These relationships are not as emotionally charged, so it makes it easier.   It's really important to be able to just recognize when you need that extra little bit of care. We spend so much time taking care of everybody else's needs.   The Spark Method   You can start setting yourself up for success by doing fewer things, and finding ways to make the things that you have to do easier. Time management is prescriptive. Time management doesn't care about your energy levels, your season of life, or your interests. You have to take a look at you, your struggles, where you're at, and where you want to go.     Creating a space for yourself   It is important to understand that other people benefit from us caring for ourselves. It is allowing yourself to unpack and take up space in your own life. It is something that is incredibly important to learn. It can be challenging, because it's a point of growth. We have to be able to allow ourselves to grow and go through the discomfort. You will be pleased with the ease that will come from it. CONTACT US Kelsie: Instagram Christina: Online Studio
36:20
January 18, 2022
E027. Janette Yee - Supporting Athletes Postpartum
E027. Janette Yee - Supporting Athletes Postpartum
Janette Yee is a Perinatal Therapist with a background in Athletic Therapy and Massage Therapy.  She works with athletic birth parents that share her belief, “Confidence and strength in your body during pregnancy and after childbirth is a RIGHT, not a privilege.” In response to suboptimal public perinatal healthcare, Janette created the Proactive Moms Method - a simple 13-exercise prenatal/postpartum program. Using this method, birth parents learn to stay active during pregnancy and return to pain-free sports after childbirth. Janette is best known for her two ground-breaking online Caesarean recovery programs. In them, moms learn the essential skills of scar massage and exercise to optimize recovery. These courses focus on the psychology of healing, painful sex, preventing the "C-section shelf", and safe return to sport. One is designed for all moms, the other, for athletes. Janette fills her days with mandatory playtime with her kids aged 3 and 6, while training for her return to competitive running. Her 15-year rugby career was recently recognized with a team induction into the Rugby Ontario Hall of Fame. The most Hard Core Athlete is a Mother Janette shares with Christina the work that she does with rugby athletes, and some of the injuries that she has endured in her 15 years of playing rugby. She reflects on her experiences of major injuries and concludes that nothing compares to being humbled by childbirth, both physically and mentally. In Janette’s own words, “The hardest-core athlete is a mother, and the biggest injury is childbirth.” Expectations of Postpartum Healing Janette explains that most athletes push their bodies as hard as they can; that's what athleticism means. When you're pregnant, and certainly after a mother gives birth, that's just not possible. That can be a huge blow to an athlete’s identity, to their ego. Janette explains that childbirth is a season-ending injury, and during this time off, you can make a plan; what do I need to do? There's that sense of empowerment, and it helps you see the light at the end of the tunnel. Mature Athlete versus an Immature Athlete Janette uses the word immature, but not as a term of judgment. The mature athlete learns to trust their body because the brain is really stubborn. The immature athlete is going to do silly things, not trust their bodies. It is wise to draw from your past experience of major sports injuries that you have gone through, in a certain respect, you will be wiser in making choices for your body. Caesarean is a very Interesting sort of Injury The surgery itself involves three main incisions, and many people don’t appreciate that because they only see the singular external incision, but it's three incisions. Janette discusses scar tissue and the fact that it is a body's incredible super glue that holds all these incisions closed. Scar tissue is needed, especially for the first six weeks, so she instructs listeners not to bother it. The scar tissue is powerful, powerful glue that your body makes. Now that you know, pay it Forward Janette implores listeners to share information. Talk about it to anyone who will listen. You can make a difference every single day. That's how public health care is going to change. We all have a voice, and all of us can use it.  Sharing information can make a difference in somebody's quality of life. All of us have that power. Contact Us: Janette: Instagram | Website Matters of Movement Studio
46:30
January 04, 2022
E026. Renae Fieck - The Power of the Menstrual Cycle
E026. Renae Fieck - The Power of the Menstrual Cycle
Renae Fieck is a mother of three, an occupational therapist, host of Rising Mom’s Podcast, and even with such a full plate, she still has time to help women optimize their time and energy by unlocking the power of their menstrual cycles.   With her method, women are better able to balance the demands of life, create more of an impact, and get bigger results without adding more stress or needing more time.   THE STIGMA & SHAME AROUND WOMEN'S CYCLES  Christina and Renae discuss the history of stigma and shame associated with women’s menstrual cycles. Women make efforts to keep it a secret, and for many, it feels like a burden that they have to carry every month.   The idea was introduced of women finding balance by sinking up their lives with their cycle. A Woman’s Cycle impacts her Mood, Energy and Creativity Women have two main hormones that are crucial to this cycle: estrogen and progesterone. Estrogen is characterized by: higher energy, higher focus, and mental clarity. This usually occurs in the first half of the month. Progesterone, which comes at the end of the month helps make space for a baby. What it does is tell the body to retreat, and to rest. THE FOUR PHASES OF THE MENSTRUAL CYCLE Recharge Phase In this phase, women are menstruating, and it is the time that they should be slowing down and recharging. This phase sets you up for your accelerate phase.  Accelerate Phase In this phase, women feel really good. It is characterized by tons of motivation, momentum. It is a great time to take on big projects. Observation Peak Time This is when a woman is most magnetic. They will glow, appear more radiant, and are more affective at communicating during this time. The body is saying, “I'm fertile, I'm ready to make a baby.” Reflect Phase The reflect phase is when a woman can be super creative. Statements like “Let’s clean house,” or “Let’s focus in,” characterize this phase, and then they enter the recharge phase. RECOMMENDATIONS FOR MOVEMENT AND THE CYCLE At the beginning of the month, women are going to have a lot of that energy for more intense movements like running, and heavy weightlifting. At the end of the month, when progesterone is more dominant, movements are mellow: walks or yoga or things that are low impact.   WOMEN WOMEN CAN EMBRACE THEIR CYCLES Renae speaks about her dream of transforming the way corporate America is run. Her vision is that hopefully someday, massive female-run companies will allow women to take off three, or four days when they are cycling. Until then, she encourages women to learn their cycle, know their peaks and valleys, really become aware of how their bodies perform in the day. It can be drastically helpful, and subtle micro shifts align the body. It all starts with awareness. TUNING INTO YOUR CYCLE Renae explains how she has tuned into her rhythm, and how knowing her natural rhythm has created hormonal and chemical changes on a very deep body level. Even for women that are post-menopausal or, have had a hysterectomy, they can use the moon’s 28-day cycle. It is very similar to what women's menstrual cycles typically are. The moon can be used as an outward cue of where in the cycle you might be. CONTACT US Renea Fieck Instagram Matters of Movement Online Studio
40:26
December 14, 2021
E025. Abha Sharma - Taking Charge of Her Life
E025. Abha Sharma - Taking Charge of Her Life
Join Christina and her extraordinary guest Abha Sharma as they discuss her personal journey into the world of movement. Abha is a Health and Wellness Coach for Professional Working Moms. Her passion is helping working moms glow up utilizing hormone health, and living a holistic lifestyle. She is a Paediatrician, Board Certified Lactation Consultant, and the host of The Health Has No Finish Line Podcast. This weekly podcast dives into subjects concerning: body image, emotional eating, mind-set, and healthier living. Learning what you are capable of Before sharing her story, Abha empathetically speaks to parents, especially mothers about the struggle that comes with parenting, and how sometimes they neglect to see their own abilities and strengths. She reminds listeners that they are capable of doing great things, whether it is taking care of their health, or even making time for themselves. Sharing when you're on the other side of the rainbow Both of Abha’s parents emigrated from India, and she describes the pressure that comes with being a child with immigrant parents, where there s a need to work really hard, especially when it comes to your academics. Knowing that your parents or grandparents immigrated for better educational opportunities. Her mother cooked a variety of foods, with some being very carb heavy, so when she was younger, Abha dealt with fluctuating weight issues. By the time she was nine or 10 she got teased, and this continued through most of her childhood and teen years. She also wore a back brace for scoliosis, which excerbated things. “Okay, I can try this!” Steps towards Healing As she got older, Abha began to take charge of her life in a definitive way.  She began to read health magazines, ripping recipes and workout tips from them that she could utilize in her day to day. She would go to Marshalls and find indoor workout VHS and DVD’s. It became fun for her, and she felt comfortable working out this way because she didn’t have to worry about anybody judging her. She was still triggered by what she had experienced on the playground when she was younger. Even the small change can make a big difference Abha was able to maintain her healthy in Detroit during her pediatric residency. Despite the long hours, Abha was able to balance her diet by making better food choices. Instead of Lean Cuisine with all the artificial preservatives, she traded those meals in for Trader Joe's bowl that had more whole ingredients and fewer preservatives. What 10,000 steps will really get you! Abha began to learn more about the benefits of walking and she learned that 10,000 steps was a marketing strategy that originated from Japan. A study in the Journal of the American Medical Association, found that at 4400 steps per day, women had significantly lower mortality rates compared to least active women. If they did more, their mortality rates continued to drop until they reached about 7500 steps, at which point the rates levelled out. Changing the language around food Abha and her husband have made considerable efforts to change the language around food in their home. She is careful about using the words “Good food, or bad food,” around her daughter. If she is making non-restrictive changes in what she eats, she will just do it, but not explain it, especially when her daughter is around. She demonstrates balance by eating what she wants in moderation. CONTACT US Abha Sharma Instagram Matters of Movement Online Studio
51:18
November 30, 2021
E024. Chernell Bartholomew - Matters of Massage and Movement
E024. Chernell Bartholomew - Matters of Massage and Movement
Join Christina and Chernell as they talk about the ins and outs of massage therapy. The common reason people end up at the massage therapist is chronic pain in back and neck especially when they sit for prolonged periods of time. The problems caused by this are disc herniations and compression of the nerves, which causes muscle imbalances, tightness. The body doesn’t get stimulated enough which can lead to weakness and pain. They discuss office culture and what companies can do to positively impact employee wellness. Massage therapists can help work on tight muscles, but also give homecare to help extend the practice beyond the table. Movement and Massage They are one in the same. Massage is movement of the tissues. The circulation, fluid, oxygen and nutrients get moved around also. When you get up to stand your muscles are contracting and fluids are moving through the body. For example, if you want to give your lungs a little mini massage, you can take a deep breath and expand your lungs and open up your chest. Both active and sedentary people benefit from massage. More active people can use massage to help with tight muscles, increase flexibility and prevent injury. Sedentary people benefit by relieving aches and pains and improving circulation and swelling. Types of Massage Therapy There are many types of massage and include:  Swedish, aromatherapy that introduces oils and scents which is highly effective for anything going on mind body, shiatsu, which is more deeply pointed pressure on trigger points. Hot stone, Fascial Release, this is when you release the fascia and help break down scar tissue. Then there is Thai massage that involves more stretching. What is an RMT? Registered Massage Therapist is a person trained in massage and who is governed by a regulatory body. RMTs have standards, a scope of practice, and require a health history to determine contraindicates to treatment. Massage and Emotions Massage is an excellent way to release and move energy like grief and stress through the body.. We have to take into consideration, whether you will let it build up to the point where it starts to start conditions, pain and disease, or you find a way to release and let it out. There is a connection in your body to the emotions that you are experiencing. Emotions are like chemical reactions. Whether you are acutely aware of it or not, emotions will cause a reaction in your body. Stress, cortisol, your nervous system, and your hormones are all intertwined. Massage and Mental Health Mental health challenges can be obstacles to getting up to move. Massage can be a catalyst to moving. If you can't get up to move, or you don't know how to start or where to start, sometimes a massage, just getting the blood pumping and muscles moving is a great place to start. Massage can start the circulation, blood flow and will start to relax the nervous system, which is going to allow improved digestion and gut health.  There is research to show that when the muscles are contracting they function like their own endocrine system and they trigger the release of myokines which are like antidepressants. The Importance of Touch sdlIsolation is detrimental. Human beings are meant to live in community with one another working together. As adults, we forget that even as we age, we still need that physical touching connection, we need that to survive and thrive. Contact Chernell Instagram Web Contact Christina Studio
38:59
November 19, 2021
E023. Arin Kaur - The Here and Now of Breathing
E023. Arin Kaur - The Here and Now of Breathing
Show notes to come Reach out to Arin:  Instagram
37:23
November 03, 2021
E022. Martin Reid - Real Men Do Pilates and Community Building
E022. Martin Reid - Real Men Do Pilates and Community Building
Join Christina and her special guest Martin Reid as they chat about how men are beginning to embrace Pilates as a way to get into shape, build strength and improve flexibility. Introduction to the Reid Method Martin takes some time to explain his signature Reid Method, and how his style of teaching differentiates him from other Pilate’s teachers. Interestingly, everyone has their own style, and even if two Pilate’s teachers took the same course, and graduated at the same time, they would still have different ways of teaching their classes. Martin’s social work background allows him to communicate empathetically, and authentically with his clients. As he has evolved in the industry, he has learned how to marry techniques picked up from different schools of thought and implement them into his work. He feels that he is always learning, whether it is on the relationship side of the business, or the biomechanical side; this is what makes his work so impactful; there is always room for growth. Pilates is for everyone Although Pilates has traditionally been associated with women’s fitness, Martin is excited that more and more men are realizing the power of Pilates. Men tend to get caught up in being weekend warriors, playing sports, and for some, it is hard to put their ego’s aside to do something that does not involve weights, or other workouts that they have been doing for the last 40 years. What they soon discover is that while doing Pilates, they learn exactly what their bodies are capable of. They are touching their toes for the first time. They are finding mobility that they never had before, and they are getting stronger. Martin feels strongly about the benefit of Pilates for men; it helps their bodies recover from the yearly wear and tear. During the discussion, he shares stories about fathers coming to classes with their children, which he finds simply amazing. He see’s it as a great way for these dads to bond with their kids. Real Men do Pilates What is a real man? What does being a real man even mean? This is something that Martin and his colleagues have been unpacking for years. His goal has been to topple the stigma that Pilates is just for women. Martin highlights the fact that athletes like: LeBron James, Chris Carter, and the late Kobe Bryant all have done Pilates because they wanted to be ahead of the curve. Now, even more pro athletes and former pro athletes are trying Pilates, many stating that they wished they had started doing it much earlier. He shares that sentiment, noting that when he got injured, maybe if he had tried Pilates, he would have healed better, and maybe his performance would have been better. The Core Conversations Podcast Concept Like many other fitness experts, when the pandemic hit, Martin had to pivot and find a way to not only stay relevant, but to establish a unique niche in the disrupted industry. One day while talking with his wife, an idea came to him; at 10:00 am everyday, he would do an Instagram Live, and invite industry professionals to come on, and just talk about what they are doing. He has now interviewed about 400 guests since the podcast began last year. The Power of Effective Communication Communication is the cornerstone of Martin’s work, and although he admits that he does not have perfect communication skills, his training has taught him how to be empathetic. REACH OUT Martin: Instagram Website Christina:  Online Studio
46:47
November 03, 2021
E021. Nikki Walsh - A Personal Trainer without Limitations
E021. Nikki Walsh - A Personal Trainer without Limitations
Welcome back for season two! Join Christina and Nikki as they chat about the importance of exercise for wheelchair users, and the benefits it has for the mind, body, and soul. Nikki Walsh is a Certified Personal Trainer and owner of Waikiki Nikki Fitness. She studied at Penn State University and was certified through the National Academy of Sports Medicine. Nikki started her career as a personal trainer, and then tragically, she was involved in a car accident, which paralyzed her from her chest down. About a year after her injury, she was on vacation, and went to a gym with her sister. She describes it as the weirdest feeling, because she was a personal trainer and had lived in the gym before the accident; now it just felt different being in her body, in a situation that should have been normal for her. It was a wake up call, and she decided at that moment that she would return to doing what she loved; she was going to help people who had similar challenges get moving again. She works with wheelchair users to help them increase their strength, assist in their weight loss, and create healthier habits for a healthy lifestyle. Nikki trains her clients online, and is currently working on expanding her business and becoming certified in Nutrition. The importance of exercise for wheelchair users Nikki explains that movement is so important, because when you are in a wheelchair, your metabolism changes, so you have that weight gain that comes with lack of movement, especially if you are eating the same way. If you have that extra weight and you are not strong, transfers (getting in and out of bed, getting into the shower) are difficult. Your joints are not as strong, and if you have not strengthened your back, shoulders, or core, it can lead to injuries. She discusses the importance of working out even when you don’t feel like it, how working out releases endorphins that are released, which in turn make you happier. How personal training has changed for Nikki She explains how her workouts have changed significantly, and in learning how to train her body, she has become more equipped at helping her clients train. The concepts she focuses on getting across to her clients is: practicing good eating habits, focusing on breathing when exercising, engaging their muscles during your workout, and practicing proper form. No one wants a personal trainer who is boring, so Nikki jokes about how she keeps it light by being goofy, and corny. The importance of Nutrition Nikki’s work with her nutritionist, Fatima from Paralysis Nutritionist, educated her on the fact that the paralysis body needs to eat a certain way. They don’t need the same amount of protein because their muscles don’t need to be rebuilt like someone who is not in a wheelchair. Too much protein can cause constipation, and eating too much can overload the kidneys. She realized that getting her nutrition certification would allow her to take her clients to the next level, by empowering them with proper, researched nutrition advice. The importance of Mind-set In reflection, for Nikki it goes back to the decision she made in the hospital bed after her accident; are you going to push through, she asked herself, or are you going to fall back? She works with her clients on their mind-set by addressing their feeling, and thoughts, as well as encouraging them with her own story. She summed it up in one of her most recent social media posts, a quote by R.M. Drake. CONTACT US Nikki Facebook Instagram Christina Online Studio
44:36
October 05, 2021
EP20. Making Pilates Accessible for Larger Bodies
EP20. Making Pilates Accessible for Larger Bodies
Join Christina and Allison as they chat about opening a studio and how to make the Pilates environment inclusive of larger bodies. Alison shares her experience living in and doing and teaching Pilates. She began teaching out of a need to learn how to move better for herself, because she was struggling in group classes. As a new teacher, she experienced bias for being in a larger body and she frequently would get once overs when she met new clients. Later she began doing equipment maintenance at one of the studios and became proficient in machine safety and the ins and outs of the Pilates equipment. Allison is an advocate for fair and equitable pay for Pilates teachers, after having experienced unfair treatment herself. She describes how some teacher’s pay structures are set-up and how such structures penalize the teachers who teach at unpopular times. Opening a Pilates Studio After having subpar experiences working at other studios Allison, has decided to open her own space. The thought of opening a studio and working for herself gave her comfort. There are weight limits on the equipment and this impacts people’s movement experience. She is making special considerations to ensure that her space is comfortable for all people. This includes knowing weight limits for all the furniture in the studio as well as making sure that this furniture can make someone’s life easier when it comes to removing shoes etc.... Other considerations she included were natural light, main floor access or elevator, a restroom. Teacher Training All teacher training programs seem to ignore larger sized bodies and how to teach effectively.  Despite Pilates allowing Allison to connect so deeply with her, she saw a gap in her learning. She quickly saw the issues when she had larger bodies on the reformer and they didn’t fit. So she had to change spring weights to accommodate her clients. She began doing the research to run a workshop called Making Pilates Accessible for Larger Bodies and she took a sociocultural perspective. Allison shares about the challenges of running a workshop and the growing pains. She did eventually run it and will be doing it again when her studio is up and running, with friends in larger bodies so that she can show different things. Allison shares how some cueing is ineffective for larger bodies. Negative space is the idea that the low back will be lifted away from the floor, so eliminating that all together. Change the motivation, so eliminate the idea of the ‘summer body’, which is not accessible for everyone. Fat bodies are not a monolith, which means that all fat bodies are different and should be treated as such. Larger breasted women and smaller breasted women have different needs. Many people are not proportional. REACH OUT TO ALLISON IG: www.instagram.com/allison_skewes REACH OUT TO CHRISTINA www.instagram.com/mattersofmovement www.facebook.com/mattersofmovement christina@mattersofmovement.com www.mattersofmovement.com ONLINE STUDIO www.mattersofmovement.com/membership
01:01:56
June 08, 2021
EP19. Body Politics, Leadership, Trauma and Social Change in the Movement Sphere
EP19. Body Politics, Leadership, Trauma and Social Change in the Movement Sphere
Join Christina and Robin for an amazing discussion.  Body politics Robin described how being in a racialized body comes with the baggage of trauma inherited or accumulated over time and how it impacts how she feels in spaces, in life and interactions with other people. Being in Yoga studios and hearing spiritual bypassing rhetoric like “good vibes only” and instead of being uplifted and strengthened by it, it was starting to drain Robin. She felt more fragmented and without ease. A comment from Christina, when you can’t show up as your whole self due to fear or oppression, you manufacture a version of yourself that is acceptable. You can see how a person can become fragmented. We can’t separate people from politics. It is how systems of oppression maintained their power by categorizing bodies in certain ways and judging bodies in certain ways. How society sees my body is out of my control. We need to understand that white people,  brown people, black people, indigenous people, queer people, disabled people all have unique experiences. Access to resources and access to belonging differ greatly and that is political. Actively empower and equip more folks in marginalized bodies to be in leadership roles. It is important to decenter whiteness so more people can see themselves in their leaders. Robin worked at many different studios and had not had any POC teachers. She started to embark on a journey to open her own studio but doubted herself along the way and kept wanting to turn to established white ‘experts’ but found she was doing this because there was no one who looked like her to model this for her. She didn’t think it was ok for her to occupy those roles. Why are there no people in these roles? When you look at the Fitness Industrial Complex it is inaccessibly priced, there are no images of people of colour in marketing which acts as gatekeeping and in a way a barrier to access. It signals that POC don’t belong there. Centering Trauma One of the uniting threads for human beings is trauma. If you haven’t experienced a lot of trauma, that is a sign of your privilege. If we make space for the most vulnerable, then everybody wins. Trauma lives in your body and when you move your body, we had better be prepared to support a person who has been triggered by something in our class. It is negligent to be unaware of trauma. Have to be able to hold space for triggered emotions. Give people back to their power and learn to listen to your body. Social Change People see movement professional than than any other professional. We have the microphone. We get to tell them what to pay attention to and what to feel. Our sphere of influence is large and rich. You can do hard things, now go do hard things that contribute to collective liberation. Set up your response or sequence of actions for when you mess up in this area. Building a Studio for All It is not easy. Being a POC Robin still struggled to get a diverse crowd in her classes. The work has to come from the inside. When you invite a friend over, you ask about allergies, you make the house presentable. Trying to diversify in a hurry, people may not have done everything they should do. Get a roundtable with people who have different experiences. The research has to be done first. It is a slow process and the learning does not stop. REACH OUT TO ROBIN www.instagram.com/royolaroyola www.instagram.com/goodbodyfeel www.goodbodyfeel.com REACH OUT TO CHRISTINA www.instagram.com/mattersofmovement www.facebook.com/mattersofmovement christina@mattersofmovement.com www.mattersofmovement.com ONLINE STUDIO www.mattersofmovement.com/membership
52:17
May 25, 2021
EP18. A Canadian Military Career - Love, Movement and Mental Health
EP18. A Canadian Military Career - Love, Movement and Mental Health
Debbie started her young life as an athlete and reached national level in fast pitch baseball and volleyball. Debbie went on to serve 28 years in the military and since become a civilian officer. During her service she received a commendation and coin for service over and above her expected duties by a Chief Commander. She also received 1988 athlete of the year by PM Brian Mulroney. Debbie shares about her deployments to Egypt, Bosnia and Haiti and what it was like to prepare for and experience these deployments. We dive into the physical, emotional and spiritual preparations at that time and how they differ for the military personnel today. Spending months at a time in war-torn countries on peace keeping missions inevitably leads to seeing and doing things that could be defined as difficult. In Bosnia, there was a great deal of ethnic cleansing that took place, which laid heavily on Debbie’s heart. Debbie shares about how she has developed mental health challenges as a result of her work in the military. She suffers from generalized anxiety and complex PTSD. With the support of her therapist and loving wife, she is getting the support that she needs to get by. Being an athlete in her younger years prepared Debbie for the physical demands of being in the military, which included doing physical training on a daily basis. As the troupe prepared to go overseas, the physical expectations were significantly increased, where the soldiers were expected to be able to run for 13kms with full equipment. Debbie has had several injuries from her days as an athlete and in the military that has resulted in her needing hip replacement surgery. We learn about her recovery and the challenges she has faced transitioning out of a physical career, into a sedentary lifestyle. She still turns to movement, but in a way that is very different than before. She visits physiotherapists, chiropractors and massage therapists frequently to be able to maintain her physical health. She mourns the loss of the movement, but has found other ways to give meaning to her life as is a proud member of the Order of the Eastern Star where she contributes to fundraising in her community. Debbie has been looking to contribute to the ‘Serving with Pride’ organization, which aims to make a difference for the LGTBQ2S+ community who serve in the military and police. REACH OUT TO DEBBIE https://www.facebook.com/debbie.wiken REACH OUT TO CHRISTINA www.instagram.com/mattersofmovement www.facebook.com/mattersofmovement christina@mattersofmovement.com www.mattersofmovement.com ONLINE STUDIO www.mattersofmovement.com/membership
47:21
May 11, 2021
EP17. Teaching Athletes with Disordered Eating about Embodiment
EP17. Teaching Athletes with Disordered Eating about Embodiment
Sarah works as a mental performance consultant with athletes at all levels. The majority of her practice is on body image and disordered eating. Athletes can face quite a lot of barriers to seeking help for their mental health. . HOW DISORDERED EATING MANIFESTS IN SPORT We talk about the normalization of disordered eating in athletes. With many athletes it can look like a preoccupation with food that causes stress and impacts social relationships. It is not just a question of body size. STRATEGIES TO IMPROVE DISORDERED It is mostly an individual approach. One of the first things that Sarah does is have the individual connect to their body as there is often a disconnection between the body’s cues and how the athlete responds to them. This can happen because of the ‘push harder’ culture in the world of sport. HOW RESTRICTED EATING IS LINKED TO PSYCHOLOGY & HORMONES Restricted eating can lead to overcompensation (bingeing and overeating), it can be physiologically and emotionally difficult. Hormones will signal to the body that it wants food. For example, you might have a piece of cake and eat way more than you need to because your body is so dissociated from what it really needs. If we were in tune with our bodies and what it needs, we would eat far less. TRAUMA, RELATIONSHIPS AND FOOD In terms of trauma, people who have had experience with difficult situations can often feel out of control and food and exercise can be the place where they can control. When it comes to the intimate relationships between the athlete and coach, it can get quite complicated when it comes to body image and food recommendations. Considerations need to be taken with family, coach, friendships. TRANSITIONING OUT OF SPORT Developing a wide variety of interests outside of sport can help prevent a narrowed sense of self when and can also translate into a smoother transition outside of sport. Sarah enlightens us to the difficulty athletes have with that transition and how they can get into trouble if it isn’t done well. EMBODIMENT OF MOVEMENT AND EATING The sensation of feeling your body in movement and before, during and after eating are crucial to being able to self-monitor and be able to listen to the cues in their bodies. Athletes can often become disembodied due to the nature of sports training and during disordered eating causes a similar. REACH OUT TO SARAH Twitter @saragairdner IG @sarahgairdner www.sarahgairdner.com REACH OUT TO CHRISTINA www.instagram.com/mattersofmovement www.facebook.com/mattersofmovement christina@mattersofmovement.com www.mattersofmovement.com ONLINE STUDIO www.mattersofmovement.com/membership
53:36
April 27, 2021
EP16. Thriving in the Aftermath of Mental Illness
EP16. Thriving in the Aftermath of Mental Illness
Trigger warning: Self-harm Join Jeanette and Christina as they talk about Jeanette and the amazing work she is doing. Jeanette has had her own experience with mental illness and has now turned her experience into an amazing program to help other black women and women of colour thrive on the other side of mental illness and health challenges. We discuss why a program like this is needed, and much of it lies in the lack of resources, love and support for black women who are the pillars of strength for their families and communities. Often it is the strongest that appear to be well and ok and who in turn need the additional help and support. We discuss how movement plays a role in recovery from mental illness and how movement played a crucial role in Jeanette’s life while suffering from mental illness. Often it was the only thing that kept her afloat. In the end, a holistic approach to wellness was the answer for her. Knowing that movement was a source of strength for her, is comforting, but it was not the whole picture, community, meditation and a variety of other tools were key to helping her get to the other side. https://www.facebook.com/InnerJCoachingConsulting https://www.instagram.com/jeanetteoduro/ Reach out to Christina www.instagram.com/mattersofmovement www.facebook.com/mattersofmovement christina@mattersofmovement.com Online Studio www.mattersofmovement.com/membership
50:59
April 13, 2021
EP15. A Biomechanical Perspective to Cueing Movement
EP15. A Biomechanical Perspective to Cueing Movement
Join Christina and Malinda in a deep dive into the biomechanics of cueing and how the vertical jump has become an excellent tool to assess performance in varsity athletes. Malinda is a PhD Candidate studying biomechanics at the Faculty of Kinesiology and Physical Education at the University of Toronto. Her research primarily focuses on studying vertical jumps in athletic populations to 1) better understand the movement mechanics as they relate to performance and 2) support practitioners in their training design and program implementation praxis. While an undergraduate student at UofT, Malinda competed for the women’s varsity field hockey team. She has served as an Assistant Coach with the Varsity Field Hockey team at UofT since 2012 What exactly is biomechanics? We discuss what biomechanics means in the world of movement. It is essentially the physics of movement. She is really interested in vertical jump and the aspects of movement that get the athlete at their highest jump and how taking a holistic approach to the athlete is really key to understanding outcomes. The difference between internal and external cues We look at how certain cues impact performance in the vertical jump and how the effectiveness of cues will differ for each person Evaluating vertical jump assessments and how we can effectively use them to evaluate athletic performance and assist with the reduction of injuries. This includes evaluating the process all the way from data collection and analysis procedures to inform practitioners about these strengths and limitations of these assessment tools, to best inform their training and injury prevention praxis. Misinformation spread through social media Much of what we do in our research is to teach others to be critical thinkers. We want fellow researchers and practitioners to be mindful of the misinformation that is sometimes pervasive in the strength and conditioning discipline, particularly because of access to social media platforms. Research opportunity with Sports Information Research Centre (SIRC) We will work in collaboration with Field Hockey Canada and Field Hockey Ontario to identify benchmark characteristics related to athletic performance between the various age cohorts involved in the female development pathway towards the national team. Malinda: m.hapuarachchi@mail.utoronto.ca IG: www.instagram.com/mattersofmovement FB: www.facebook.com/mattersofmovement Online Studio: www.mattersofmovement.com/membership
01:02:25
March 30, 2021
EP14. Movement Beyond the Scale
EP14. Movement Beyond the Scale
Join Christina and Lori as they discuss movement, women’s empowerment and what it means to look beyond the scale. Lori Mork is an expert in the field of health and wellness, mindset, women’s empowerment, and body positivity. She is a fierce and dynamic author, speaker, former fitness champion, reformed dieting junkie, and kick ass coach to thousands of women worldwide. Children and movement: Do what is fun and that makes you happy. We have seen COVID-19 completely change the landscape of children’s movement experiences. In some cases, the movement practices they were doing before just aren’t fun anymore. It is also important to allow the kids flexibility to let them find what brings them joy. Moving our bodies for the purpose of weight loss. Aside from having an understanding of beginning and end weight, the scale can often play games with women’s psyche’s as they feel chained to it while looking for validation. Body composition plays a big role in a woman’s weight. Lori shares about her experience with the scale. Empowering women. There is so much happening in the world right and Lori has positioned herself as the empowering and real voice of reason for all the women out there. www.lorimork.com FB Lori Mork wellness IG lori.mork Learn more about the Matters of Movement Wellness and Movement Membership: www.mattersofmovement.ca christina@mattersofmovement.com IG @mattersofmovement FB @mattersofmovement
31:51
March 17, 2021
EP13. Bringing the Empowerment of Dance into the Digital Space
EP13. Bringing the Empowerment of Dance into the Digital Space
Join Christina and Janet as they chat about dance, empowerment and bringing a movement business online during the pandemic. Janet shares how she started dance as a shy little girl and went on to become a professional dancer, working in Toronto, New York, Los Angeles and London, England. After about ten years she started craving stability and decided to get married and start a family but found herself missing something. So, she had the courage to come back into the studio and that is just when everything came rushing back, in terms of feeling alive, feeling great in her body and her skin and she knew in that moment that she wanted to share this feeling with as many women as she can. The role dance has played during the pandemic. Janet moved her dance teaching to the online space. She didn't let fear get in the way., mainly because she knew that people needed this right now. We need to move, we need to feel inspired, there needs to be a light in this sort of darkness that's happening. She decided that she wanted to be that person that that's going to show up for everyone. She’s had proven results with so many women that have just stepped out of their comfort zone and who are now so confident and empowered in their life, and continuing to dance with me to this day. Her concern was about how to make an in-person experience, the same as online. She found that by doing mindset work, she was able to go further and deeper with her clients. Many of us have the inner critic that tells us all kinds of stories and Janet works with women to see beyond those words. She also makes it a safe space so that women feel free to make mistakes and move away from perfectionistic tendencies. Go make mistakes, feel silly, feel crazy, because we're so conditioned to not be that way. Dance allows you that freedom. Dance combats stress and burnout Janet feels that the reason why we're burned out, stressed and overwhelmed is because we are living in the past or the future. We’re thinking about all the things that have to happen tomorrow. We're thinking about all the fears and the doubts and everything from the past. Dance is so powerful because it just brings you back to the present and that's where our true confidence and power lies. Process of building an online business. It has been very rewarding but also very challenging. You've got to really believe in your service and that you can provide a transformation. You have to show up to do the work. Be transparent with others so you can show them that you’ve been there and that you understand. It’s ok to own what you do even if so many others are doing it too because, there is only one of you. Building a business takes time and you’ve got to be patient with yourself. You have to trust and know and have faith and hope that you are making an impact. The more you do things that are a success, the more confidence you build in it, and the more risk you're going to take for the next one. When it comes to creating a product, you need to go to your community and ask what are you struggling with? How can I help? And then create it. Building confidence Ask the women in my course to envision their greatest selves. Doing that work really opens up the imagination and gives them something to visually see for themselves, which then helps their brain to wake up to that sort of energy. It takes awareness and you showing up doing some work. I love seeing women just become confident and empowered and feeling good and who they are and in their skin. Just going for it is so magical because if they can feel that way then there is a ripple effect to other parts of their lives. IG: www.instagram.com/workitjanet FB: www.facebook.com/janet.l.castillo.90 Website: http://janetco.live/
50:36
March 02, 2021
EP12. Raising our Kids on the Language of Food and Movement
EP12. Raising our Kids on the Language of Food and Movement
Raising our kids on the language of food and movement Parents are influenced by the how they were raised, especially around the restrictive diet and exercise culture back when we were children. Many of viewed exercise as a means of changing how we look. We have seen a shift away from that, especially when it comes to their children. But, diet culture is still around and is so pervasive that the way we talk about our bodies, just comes out over and over and over again. Jay focuses on language swaps and mindset shifts around food and exercise to uncouple them. One of the effective ways she has done this is to use language we use for our own bodies/diets, as parents, with our children. Communication and play around food Children around the age of 5 start developing a tendency to prefer slimmer body types for women and muscular body types for men. Jay talks about using curiosity to explore ideas around food. Asking questions like “how do you feel after eating _____” and this teaches children to start paying closer attention to their own personal cues for hunger, how food makes them feel and they get to decide how much to eat. Using play, can help parents gain an understanding of how kids feel about food and remove stress about actually having to eat it. When parents are concerned about too little activity and too much food, getting them to move and eat a certain way by telling them what to do is not generally going to work. She promotes the division of responsibility around food. The parents decide when, what and where and the kids decide how much. Stress, food and bringing joy to the table We’ve been experiencing greater than normal amounts of stress and children may turn to food for comfort, which is totally normal and ok, but if that their only coping mechanism, then a shift may be needed. Much of the time, feeding our children can feel stressful and frankly a negative experience. Considering how much our children eat a day, that can be a lot negative experiences. Jay recommends avoiding talk about food and taking the time to enjoy our food when we eat. Good and bad foods Placing moral restrictions on food can be an issue and Jay wants to work toward food neutrality, where kids can have the same excitement or energetic pull around strawberries as their birthday cake. Teaching kids intuitively how to build a complete snack, might look like consistently pairing a cookie with apples and peanut butter, without ever having to teach them about proteins and carbs. Doing things differently Many of us were raised to sit at the dinner table until everything was eaten and how its ok to look beyond these strategies to feed our children. It’s ok to allow them to develop an intuitive eating approach. As long as they are eating at other meals, they are likely not going to go hungry or go without a balanced diet. Ensuring that there is at least one thing on the plate that they would eat, it a good way of meeting the kids half way without catering to them. Overall, Jay just really loves to change and shift the language around food and movement to make things more joyful. Making food less about fuel and molding our bodies, but as a source of fun, family, friendship, celebration and connection. Jay Baum, RD www.pommetta.com https://facebook.com/pomettanutrition https:///www.instagram.com/feeding.kids_intuitive.eating/ Christina Whelan Chabot IG: www.instagram.com/mattersofmovement FB: www.facebook.com/mattersofmovement christina@mattersofmovement.ca
46:14
February 15, 2021
EP11. Sharpening Strategic Leadership During COVID with a Yoga Mindset
EP11. Sharpening Strategic Leadership During COVID with a Yoga Mindset
Join Kris and .Christina as they talk about how yoga can play a big role in changing the landscape of leadership Strategic Leadership Before COVID, strategic leadership was a lot of planning, a lot of digging in deep into performance indicators, and finding ways to solve all the world's problems. Now, we have all learned how to consecutively, in healthcare at least, learn how to build and fly the plane at the same time. So strategic leadership means being able to pivot on a dime, adjust your plan, and really rise to the occasion. Kris feels that the health care systems is been rocked in raw, challenging and difficult ways. But we've also seen incredible resiliency. Stress, the Pandemic and Yoga A lot of people are functioning from a state of fight or flight and they're in this chronic crisis overload. What I can do is bring people down to calming breath work. Meditation has an enormous impact on how we do work. If we are in a creative mindset, we're more open, and we're able to strategize a bit more creatively and focus on what's going to work for the patients In health care, wellness has taken a front seat, especially given the stressful conditions people are under. At my workplace, we have many meditations every morning, it's voluntary but there are yoga classes available virtually throughout the day. Some of the challenges with yoga were financial or flexibility barriers. When we bring yoga into a home environment, people are a bit more inclined to try something new in the comfort space. There is research that says that about 5% of our population in Canada does yoga and I'm hoping we’ll see an increase. We learn about how Kris began her Yoga practice and how she became a Yoga teacher in the midst of COVID. She had two traumatic losses in her life and felt that it was time for her to look beyond her negative self talk and share her gifts and talents. Yoga has been a place of solace for her and a time for her to develop her philanthropic journey. We discuss the marathon of COVID and how we are going to keep up this momentum. Finding our internal resiliency that we can channel and bring forward can give us hope and allow us to create and for a lot of people it is giving back in different ways to our community. So I think we are seeing kindness on an epic level. There's a kindness revolution. Toxic workplace cultures and leveraging yoga? When people are engaged in high meaning work, where they are making a difference. They may have a degree of tolerance for behavior that otherwise may not make a lot of sense on the outside. There are a lot of factors that can create or cultivate a toxic workplace. Getting support from other co-workers or a third party is important. Learn to trust your gut instincts. You know what is right and wrong. There is always a solution. It is possible to create a culture where people do become more comfortable speaking up, but it's power in numbers. Seeking leadership roles When looking to become a leader it is important to decide how you want to lead, are you leading from a place of power-with your team or are you leading from a place of power-over. There are ways to cultivate a leadership style that is both fair and tough, that empowers your team to fully commit to their role. Yoga can play an important role in allowing a leader to lead creatively and from the heart. www.krisbannermanyoga.com FB @krisbannermanyoga IG @krisbannerman
46:11
February 02, 2021
EP10. The Role of Movement and Pow Wows in Healing from Complex PTSD
EP10. The Role of Movement and Pow Wows in Healing from Complex PTSD
Zongwe Binesikwe (Zee) bravely shares her struggles with getting diagnosed with complex PTSD and the symptoms that she copes with. She educates us on how it can differ from regular PTSD and how it can manifest as a really harsh inner critic with toxic self-shame that can lead to having difficulty with self-love. She shares her concern that many indigenous people have complex PTSD and have been misdiagnosed and aren't receiving the right treatment. She acknowledges that it takes a lot of work, but that everyone is worth the work and that it doesn’t have to be solved overnight. She has found healing in movement and intentionally slowing down. Pow wows and connecting to nature has played an important role in Zee’s healing. Pow wows, are used to come together and for healing. They can happen in the spring, or summer or fall feast. Zee is a jingle dress dancer. Music is Zee’s medicine and she believes it goes back to her oral traditions, which is why she enjoys speaking on podcasts and on the radio. The jingle dress traditionally is made with 365 little jingles for every day of the year and are made out of tobacco tin lids, bent into jingles. Hearing the jingles, connects to the spiritual realm. Dancing allows you to connected to Mother Earth with your feet on the ground. You’re connecting with your ancestors, higher self, creator, everyone around you and all of your relations that came before you and all those coming after you. It can be so overwhelming, healing, energizing and a place to grieve. The drum is the heartbeat of Mother Earth and a connection to the spiritual realm. So, all together, it is physical, spiritual, emotional and truly magical. During COVID, it has been hard to have access to ceremony and many are struggling because we are looking for ceremony. Many people have been doing virtual pow wows throughout the year. But, internet isn’t accessible to all, so radio has been a main source of communication.. We discuss the role of regalia, which is the clothing worn in ceremony at the pow wows. We want to be clear that they are not costumes. Wearing them is part of ceremony, but creating that that piece of regalia is also ceremony. It takes a lot of time and energy and each piece is unique. Zee’s colors are green, pink and blue, which are significant to her spirit. Then she would have something to do with the Thunderbird or the bear clan. When the regalia is not being used, they get feasted. She offers tobacco, she puts out food for her ancestors and for that piece of regalia because it has its own spirit. The whole ceremony of it helps bring Zee back into her body and connect with spirit, which has been essential to healing from her complex PTSD. We dive into bare feet on ground because it reminds Zee that Mother Earth is here to support her. Mother Earth goes through cycles and seasons and she knows everything and she's not worried about all the stuff that we're worried about. She knows that everything is going to work out. Walking as a form of meditation has also played a huge role in Zee’s healing. Meditation doesn’t have to be when you are seated, it could be when you're doing the dishes, it could be when you're baking bread, gardening. As long as you are connecting to yourself. So walking for Zee doesn't take a lot of energy like. She will intentionally look around at the animals and the sun and the sky, and then try to feel like the wind and smell the odours. During our talk, Zee was wearing a beautiful piece of regalia, created by Diana Lidemark with Healing Journey Beadwork. A photo can be found on IG @mattersofmovement FB @zongwebinesikwe IG @zongwebinesikwe Twitter: @zongwebinesikwe Website: www.zongwebinesikwe.com
46:57
January 19, 2021
EP9. Shifting Language around Movement in Childhood Disabilities
EP9. Shifting Language around Movement in Childhood Disabilities
Join Fiona and Christina in discussing movement in children in disabilities Fiona first shares how her work became a lifelong passion. CHALLENGES CHILDREN FACE WITH CHRONIC ILLNESS The ignorance and lack of understanding or misunderstanding are barriers. The biggest impact for children from a developmental perspective is their exposure to peers. Not going to school, or having a lot of disruption or not being able to play in the same way as their peers. PHYSICAL ACTIVITY RESEARCH IN CHILDREN AND BENEFITS In 2002 there was no information on physical activity for children with disabilities. There was a fear discourse, the notion that children were too fragile, sick, weak, susceptible, vulnerable. A population that's faced a lot of paternalism and overprotection. Our research has really started to shift the narrative, away from these kids being too weak and vulnerable, and injury prone. There's a range of gross motor and fine motor skills and enhancements. There's functional improvements in activities of daily living, and participation and inclusion, through physical activity. From the psycho social side, it enhances perceptions of social inclusion, wellness, friendship, quality, quality of life, mental health, intra personal issues, like self efficacy and self confidence. There's a range of benefits and additive benefits that kids with disabilities do get through physical activity. It's safe and normal and good and advisable. BARRIERS TO MOVEMENT There are many barriers that can include: physical activity barriers in the school system are really really common. Parents just don't know about the benefits. Some parental overprotection with fears to allow their child to engage, they might not have the economic resources to find their child and opportunity. Internal psychological barriers. Children with disabilities are never seeing themselves represented, that critical social modeling and role modeling. BULLYING Bullying and exclusion and stigma are such formidable barriers for children with disabilities. We do have deeply ingrained normative ideas of what bodies look like and how they move. Disabled bodies might move in ways that we consider not normal, that can also invite bullying and exclusion. It can damage self efficacy and cause children to shift their interest. Bodies move in many different ways and there are many ways to be physically successful at a skill. There are many ways to move, to play and to move your body with freedom. All of that's okay. THE IMPORTANT ROLE OF QUANTITATIVE RESEARCH IN CHILDHOOD DISABILITIES 10 years ago, there was more of a hierarchy in research design, with a lot more emphasis and prestige, placed on quantitative research. Qualitative research has been so much more embraced by the community, and regarded to have the same degree of social scientific merit. Qualitative research diminishes the hierarchy between the researcher and the participant and works to empower patient’s voices and experiences. CONCEPT OF TIME WITH CHILDREN WITH LIFE SHORTENING ILLNESSES For children with life shortening illnesses, or life threatening illnesses it's complicated. Most people with cystic fibrosis can expect to live into their mid 40s. Time is an ideological construct, like we won't question it, unless it's taken. We take it for granted unless it's threatened. Children, teenagers, young adults living with life shortening conditions, do really grapple with this concept of time and how to use it in the best way. LinkedIn: Dr. Fiona Moola Holland Bloorview: https://www.hollandbloorview.ca/people/fiona-moola
47:19
January 05, 2021
EP8. Dance, Stress and Postpartum Depression
EP8. Dance, Stress and Postpartum Depression
Join Christina and Lisa as they talk about the value of dance during COVID and stressful times. Lisa’s days with dance and music started very early when her Argentinian mother would blast music every morning and her uncle taught her how to dance when she was three or four years old. She did a stint on Broadway and then became a backup dancer. So performance and being on stage was the permission for her to completely express herself. It was my outlet. The beauty of music is that it allows you to adopt a persona for those three to five minutes that the song plays. It's like you escape into your own world. It's like acting in some ways. DANCE AND CONFIDENCE Dance teaches confidence, the more you practice it. It teaches you how to take up space powerfully. Whether you are standing there, speaking and communicating your body language and emotions or the way you actually physically move your body. I think what dance allows you to just try different ways of taking up space and being able to move your body and get lost in the present moment. I think that's the beauty of movement and it doesn't even necessarily have to be dance, for some, it’s running. It gives you a platform to experiment and see what feels good for you. Once I became a mom, I had to rediscover myself in movement. because my body was not feeling the same way. Becoming a mom. LISA REDISCOVERY THROUGH DANCE When she was home with her infants she would listen to reggaeton music in the background. She was never into exercise, but if you throw on some music, she could dance for two hours not realizing the time going by. It was a way for me to do something that lifts my spirits. She recalls her first break-up in University and how she turned to dance to cope. She danced for the full four years in university and did classes as a way to stay active and to keep herself happy. It was also a way to socialize So, after that experience it’s become the thing she goes to. COVID was a disaster for her as a mom. She was drinking a lot and so she just started dancing. She went live at 10 o'clock every morning and would dance for 10-15 minutes. That's all she needed to get a boost of energy. She’d get the kids involved and so it was memory building activity together. DANCE AS A FORM OF MEDITATION Lisa shares how she uses dance as a form of meditation because it is a way for her to stay in the present moment. One of the powerful things that meditation can give you is it teaches you to focus being present in the moment and getting rid of all the noise and chatter that happens in your mind, that we don't say out loud. Lisa feels this way when she dances. There's literally nothing else that she thinks of. Walking meditations can play a similar role. DANCE AND COPING WITH MOTHERHODD Lisa shares that one of the biggest struggles with motherhood, was not anticipating her identity crisis. Part of it came from the pressures of wanting to be a good mom. She didn't know who she was anymore. The only thing that I had that I knew was dance. It was something that made her feel good, even if it was 10 minutes. Dance gave her an outlet to rediscover herself, her body and to learn to love herself again. We discuss postpartum depression and the work that has been done to normalize it and reduce the stigma attached to it. LISA’s INSTAGRAM She felt that if she didn’t laugh, she’s going to cry. Motherhood felt very challenging, so the creative and comedic work she did was a relief from the pressure of it all. Lisa turned to social media as a way to meet other moms. Creating content was her way to feel like she had access to the real world. Http://www.lisainthecity.ca Http://www.Instagram.com/lisainthecity Tik Tok @lisainthecity
43:37
December 15, 2020
EP7. Rediscovering Intuition and Feminine Energy through Movement
EP7. Rediscovering Intuition and Feminine Energy through Movement
Join Christina and Deanna as we explore her book feminine warrior, feminine and masculine energies, energy healing, intuition and how they tie into movement. ENERGIES (FEM AND MASC) Every living being has masculine and feminine energy. It has nothing to do with gender. It is what creates the friction and the creation parts of the earth including human beings. Masculine shows up in our life as drive and goals, purpose and clarity, getting things done. Feminine is in the moments of presence, the stop and smell the roses, deep breaths, presence with where you are or who you are with, enjoying the food you are tasting, being with what is. Flow with life. In order to feel balanced, we need both to be at a balanced level. Most of us have been taught to suppress our feminine because it has been seen as silly. It’s been seen that following your intuition or trusting your innate wisdom isn’t valid. BALANCING THE ENERGIES Deanna wants to empower women through the lens of releasing external societal pressure and balancing their feminine & masculine energy centres. When you balance your masculine and feminine, it isn’t about not working. It’s about doing what you want to do and having it light you up. Masculine and feminine energy in movement. Masculine energy is present in consciousness and would be there during meditation or even in some individuals it can look like sitting and resting, zoned out without any yearning to be in movement.Or be in movement such as a hard-core Yoga class and power through it like a warrior. Feminine energy in dancing and flow and movement. Dancing around the house while you are baking and cleaning. It’s also the act of calling a friend up and making plans for the weekend. It is a multifaceted multi-layered aspect of beauty and connection and bliss. INTUITION Intuition is the most sacred language of our soul, sharing wisdom, guidance and always supporting us to our highest evolution, and the greatest good for all. Intuition is your gut feeling, inkling or knowing. The sensation that you just know. Even though we have suppressed our feminine, we can still feel it but we often ignore it. It is constantly speaking to you. When you want to start tapping into it, you need to be more quiet and listen to your body. Your ego can take over. The intuition is a whisper of wisdom. ENERGY HEALING We are all energy and energetic molecules and in dynamic movement as our energy is constantly moving. In every moment we are changing our bodies, our thoughts, what we are, what our physical make up is and beliefs. Energy healing, using the energy of universal life to allow energy to flow through and bring balance and harmony to our energy molecules in our physical and mental and emotional selves. BODY IMAGE It is not up to anyone else to gauge our value based on our intelligence, appearance, income levels. When we start getting this, we are teaching the next generation that we don’t have to rely on anyone else to determine our value. ENERGY IN MOVEMENT Feminine energy movement can look like spirals and is cyclical. Want to do movements that feel expansive. Like shaking your hips side to side with the aim of getting fluid. We are shaking up stagnant energy in our spine and fascial tissue and muscle and ligaments. Breaking it up and it allows us to feel good with a sense of vitality and excitement and flexibility. Deanna has a special movement experience to offer as a gift. It is a 90 minute class, with 30 minutes of belly fit, 30 minutes of barre, and 30 minutes of Yoga. Link is here: bit.ly/goddessmovement Quantum Physics reference: Breathing the Habit of Being Yourself by Dr. Joe Dispenza www.deannadeacon.com FB|IG @deannadeaconcoaching https://www.youtube.
50:13
December 01, 2020
EP6. Core Health and Quality of Life
EP6. Core Health and Quality of Life
Join Christina and Sam, chat about core health and how this impacts our quality of life in the short and long term. WHAT IS THE TRUE CORE Definitely is more than the abs and back. It is composed of the core four, which is the diaphragm (your breathing muscle), pelvic floor (foundation), transverse abdominals (deepest abdominal muscles) and multifidus (deepest back muscles). If your pelvic floor isn’t working well, this impacts the whole core. Idea to have synergy of all COMPONENTS OF CORE TRAINING Understand what the core is. Alignment is key. Without proper alignment, each component can’t work at it’s best. Want to avoid breathing into the chest, or holding the belly, or gripping the pelvic floor (if leaking). This call causes a disruption in the core. Breathing is the most important factor. Encourage women to slow down and breathe can be a big challenge. This society is based on instant gratification which can prevent us from building our foundation. THE SIGNS OF CORE DYSFUNCTION Signs are pelvic organ prolapse, which is when the pelvic organs start to fall in and out of your vagina or anus. Leaking urine, back pain and hip pain. Diastasis Recti, which is the separation of the abdominal muscles, creating a weakening of the core breathing system. CONSEQUENCES OF IGNORING LEAKING AND CORE DYSFUNCTION IN THE LONG TERM 50% of women by age 50 will have some degree of pelvic organ prolapse. They aren’t even aware of it. It is possible to reverse prolapse without surgery. Don’t want to be ignoring the symptoms. It is not normal to leak anytime. We have to think about the consequences of ignoring these symptoms, like not being able to run after your kids, or take part in a class, or having to wear adult diapers. When you get to menopause, things don’t get better. Muscle atrophies and hormones take a nosedive. You lose muscle faster than you can create it. Your pelvic floor is like all the other muscles in your body, if you don’t use it, you lose it. Many women will delay taking care of things until something drastic takes place. Samantha talks to her clients about the bare minimum requirements and that even if they get out for a ten minute walk everyday, that has to be it. Incontinence is the second leading cause of being placed in a nursing home. There are no excuses for ignoring your symptoms. BARRIERS TO GETTING HELP There are so many barriers to getting help, especially when you have advertisements normalizing it with young women wearing. Light bladder leakage - actually called incontinence, so not a real term. One of the reasons why they don’t get help is because they don’t want to embarrass their doctors. The doctors aren’t asking either. There is also a disconnect between doctors and pelvic physiotherapists because there is a misconception that it doesn’t work. Surgical bladder lifts fail 50% of the time in the first 5 years. The big reason is that there is no education, post-op or rehab or pre-hab. It is a bandaid. It is not getting to the root cause of the problem. DIASTASIS RECTI This is the separation of the connective tissue called the linea alba. Alignment has to be taken into consideration the way you stand, avoid exercises that result in abdominal coning. The need to close the gap has gone and now the aim is to have tone across the connective tissue. You can have a three finger wide diastasis but bounce a quarter off of the linea alba, there are no concerns about it, but if there is a narrower gap and can touch your organs. If you have a dysfunctional diastasis, you may see doming with an ab curl. It is about managing intra abdominal pressure. There is pressure day to day and the aim is to get alignment. If you have weak connective tissue, you can have chronic back pain.
46:31
November 17, 2020
EP5. Stress and Trauma in the Body
EP5. Stress and Trauma in the Body
SOMATIC BODYWORK Following the birth of her first child, Riikka realized that all of the physiology, biology, anatomy, biomechanics that she learned about the body wasn’t going to fully help her heal from the birth of her first child. She was going to have to look deeper at her emotional well-being before going any further. It was the somatic, emotional and trauma work that opened her eyes. We talk about how grief can be held in the body and how it can manifest as physical pain. HOW STRESS AFFECTS OUR BODIES Riikka likes to look at daily living and stress. If daily movements that uphold our standard of living are painful, what is that doing to our psyche? When we are experiencing pain on a regular basis, it makes us less likely to make an effort. For stress, it is important to know what it is, and how it can look in the body. We dive into the nervous system and its role in stress. TRAUMA IN THE BODY Dr. Gabor Mate calls trauma an unhealed wound. Scar tissue is the armour around it, which is it’s protection. It is fascinating how differently we all respond to trauma. People in group exercise classes respond differently. The field is not trained well enough to handle all the people dealing with trauma. She shares a story about a client who had experienced trauma and couldn’t feel squats. Turns out she was sexually abused and was in that position while it was taking place. If a client tells you they can’t feel a body part, there is probably something else behind it. We need to be able to prescribe personalized programs and tune into each individual’s story. BECOMING ATTUNED TO OUR BODIES Being able to understand and hear our body’s language is so important. Knowing in your gut that we are making the right decisions can be trained and allow us to hear how our body is responding to the experiences we are exposing it to (food, people, movement…). THE TRUE MEANING OF MOVEMENT IS MEDICINE A simple practical example is the hip replacement. The person is barely walking and is stiff and robotic. If you can create movement in the socket years earlier, what would it be like later in life. Another example is in pelvic prolapse and incontinence, not only do you train the integrity of the body but you are also shifting your identity. Who am I wearing a diaper, who am I when I can’t enjoy sex. Movement is emotional medicine and is beneficial to all layers of our health. BIRTHING A MOTHER Birthing a mother is understanding that mothers are as raw as a newborn. The support, care, comfort, and tenderness a baby needs is also what the mother needs. And, as the baby grows, the mother grows. Allowing herself to feel her own birth as a mother has taught her so much compassion. She doesn’t have to have her shit together everyday. Bring the tenderness to the mother who is facing something new every day as they deal with an ever changing environment. POSTPARTUM AND BIRTH STORIES We don’t often think of postpartum beyond the first year but we are always postpartum. And, whether the birth story was a positive or negative experience, the imprint will stay with the mother forever. We need to give support to women who are birthing themselves for the rest of their lives. Right after a birth, there is a lot of help, but beyond that, there has to be mental and body work support given. Riikka sees women who are 60 years postpartum who still have their birth story imprinted in their bodies. MOVE BETTER FEEL BETTER Riikka feels like we all deserve to feel good. Connecting into the part of us that feels good is the life force within us. If we are clouded by pain or stress, it can disconnect us from our life. It is essential to connect to goodness every single day. It is not realistic to feel good all day,
50:19
November 03, 2020
EP4. Discovering Movement after a Hysterectomy
EP4. Discovering Movement after a Hysterectomy
NUTRITION Krystal and Christina explore the importance of eating well and listening to our bodies to find out how foods are affecting us. Many of us walk through life without really ever making the connection between how we feel and what we’ve been consuming. Learning to fuel your body correctly will provide you with the energy you need to meet the demands of your day. Krystal was motivated to learn more about nutrition because of her own journey to becoming a healthier. She had to introduce vegetables and determine what she liked and didn’t. Her body had to adjust in a big way after going through a lot of discomfort but she craves vegetables now, whereas before she craved the breads and carbs. Your body will crave the food you feed it, if you feed it the junk, it will crave the junk, if you feed it the good stuff, it will crave the good stuff. Fueling your body for movement. Everyone is different. She exercises on an empty stomach and has whole food proteins like eggs and sausages, as opposed to protein bars or protein powders after. She recommends using proteins as a supplement only, not as a regular food source. She is a big proponent of eating real and whole foods. Protein supplements can have an adverse effect on the kidneys. Short cuts, although convenient, aren’t always the best strategy Krystal shares some of the strategies she uses to make sure that her eating and movement is consistent. MINDSET Krystal shares what mindset means to her. It is the positive outlook and the avoidance of the negative stream of thought that can really impact us. If you have a positive mindset, see your experiences in a positive light. Mindset around movement is huge. If you go into any form of activity thinking it is a chore or a must do or get to do. I am blessed that my body will move. Gratitude to be able to focus on your health. I can do this, so I can’t. For those feeling like they don’t have the time to move, Krystal recommends taking stock of the ways that you spend your day. How much time do you spend scrolling through IG or FB or of the of the other activities you do on a daily basis? How much of that time could be spent on moving your body? Ask yourself, is my health more important than scrolling through IG or this episode of television The more you commit to movement, the more addictive it can get. Try adding a bit of activity for a week. Little by little, it can increase. ADENOMYOSIS At the age of 36, Krystal was experiencing severe cramping and heavy bleeding following the birth of her six children and was diagnosed with adenomyosis, which is similar to endometriosis, but the growth of the tissue is inside the uterus. After a lot of doctors visits and many attempts at treating the condition with alternative methods Krystal, with the support of her husband, chose to go the route of the hysterectomy. We talk about the difficulty that come with making a decision like this. This decision has completely improved her quality of life, she felt like a human and we explore her movement exploration in the aftermath. What it is like to move following a big surgery like this. Having to deal with stairs, bloating. Discovering what movements she is confident doing. Her movements today have to be slower and more mindful.. She has to avoid planks, modify her squats. She is doing a whole lot of listening to her body. She is exploring more exercise. TAKING CONTROL OF YOUR HEALTH Krystal injured herself a few years ago and she got to the point where she couldn’t get out of bed. Her injuries involved the SI joint and bursitis. She spent so much money on getting help. They mentioned arthritis. After hitting a wall with medical doctors, she started looking at treatments for inflammation and realized her nutrition knowledge was part of the puzzle to getti...
49:10
October 18, 2020
EP3. Advocating for Pain-Free Aging
EP3. Advocating for Pain-Free Aging
In this episode April and Christina talk about her positivity agent status. April’s superpower is to support and make people feel amazing about themselves. She sees that many people get inundated in the negative and by helping others see the positive and nourish them with some love, this helps her stay focused. It also fills her to fill other people’s cups. She wants to share the gift that she has discovered. April also shares about how she decided at 54 that it was time to start moving and how this has completely transformed her physical, emotional and spiritual health. She began her journey into movement and wellness after sitting at her table feeling like she was aching everywhere and in that moment the words, you have to get moving flashed in front of her eyes. She brought Ryan De Winter on board and initially signed up for three months and thought she would be done after those three months. She stayed another three and another three after that. Looking back she realized how silly it was to think she would be done after three months. We talk a little about the emotional and mental transformation that she experienced. Her emotional and mental transformation has been miraculous. Confidence has gone up, her reaction is now a response. Her spiritual health has been impacted in a way that has allowed her to see that it is now time to serve others and to share what she has experienced. We owe it to ourselves with our physical and emotional health. We never arrive, as it's a work in progress. Sharing is how we bond with people. We discuss a recent news article about how people over fourty years of age are giving up on their health. April wants to show people it was possible to get healthy. In fact, she claims that 70 is the new 30! People need to know that they are not put on this earth to live to their 40s. Improvements in health and wellness can be made at any age, so no one, no matter what their age should be giving up on health. We dive into how the body compensates for pain. Poor fitted shoes can cause problems all the way up the chain to the hip and it can be a bit like a garbage can lid. You press on the pedal and the lid flips up. What can happen next is that we end up carrying more weight on the other side, which will cause pain and over-use on the other side of the body. Being in constant pain puts a stress on our emotional well-being. Will end up being reactive and less able to handle the stressors in life. It’s a dangerous walk when we don’t listen to what the body is telling us as we set ourselves up for injury. Many people have a hard time connecting with the messages the body gives and as women, we haven’t been trained or encouraged to put ourselves first. You can’t pour from an empty cup. The best thing a female will ever learn is NO! Creating healthy boundaries with consistency is one way to make sure you get the care you need in this life. We talk about the big challenge that April overcame by running up and climbing on top of a big boulder in her backyard. She posted about it on social media and it was such an exciting moment for many reasons. Mainly because of the work that went into accomplishing this feat. She had to overcome big fears to do this, but it is thanks to her trainers belief in her that she was able to do it. April wants you to know it is not that you can’t do something, it is that you haven’t. This is something that nobody should deny themselves, the ability and excitement of doing something you haven’t done. I still can’t do push-ups to this day, but I don’t deny myself the hope and excitement that I could one day. People who are looking to start moving, never deny yourself the potential and hope. We talk about what Move Better Feel Better means to April and for her is the connection between movement and how we feel and how we approach the day.
43:23
October 03, 2020
EP2. Opening the Doors to Diversity
EP2. Opening the Doors to Diversity
Join Alexa and Christina as they talk about movement, diversity and body positivity. Why Pilates is so important to Alexa. When she came to Pilates after have been in the Yoga and wellness space for so long, she felt like she got a re-education. Even after learning the mechanics through her personal training. And even after dedicating herself to Yoga where you really learn about your body. After going to Pilates, she realized there were places in her body that she didn’t know existed and they woke up. Who should be doing Pilates and how to start a practice. Everybody should be doing Pilates. She feels strongly the Pilates is an excellent tool for making other exercise modalities better. Other things do not necessarily make Pilates better. For example, Pilates makes her Yoga practice better, but not the other way around. Pilates has a way of targeting muscles and getting them working. So you don’t have to spend so long trying to activate them. There are certain exercises where if you aren’t using the right muscles, you won’t be able to do the exercise. Get to a Pilates studio as you get the full benefit of the practice if you have access to the some of the equipment. It might not be in everybody’s budget, but many studios will offer group classes that are comparable in price to a Yoga class. How Pilates can become less exclusive. The people running a studio have to want to have to have non-white people come in. Other people want to do this practice and if they opened their doors, they would be there. Studios that make an effort to offer services to people in other languages will bring those people in. What kind of language is important to avoid or alternatively what language is important to use to ensure that we are creating an inclusive environment. Anyone with a Pilates studio has to be intolerant of language that prejudice or stereotyping involved. I have worked at studios where teachers will say things about a client who looks a specific way and stereotypes it to that client when many other clients do the same things. If a studio is located in an area with many non-native speakers, it would be good to learn a few sentences to greet those people when they walk in the door. You may not say it perfectly, but the effort goes a long way. We get a peak into how Alexa put together her office chair video series. People kept requesting exercise for the office. She explored and played with the office chair. It was inspired by many different things including her own physical therapy, exploration and work on the Pilates equipment. All the things she does herself and that would be effective and not super weird to do in an office. We talk about how workplaces are bringing in more digital trainers We talk about a great post Alexa put up about aiming for health and not a specific dress size. This post was inspired by Alexa’s experience as a child surrounded by family who were very focused on dress size. She could never quite meet the expectations. Her mother sadly passed away at the young age of 46 from cancer, despite how small she was. This started Alexa’s health journey. She is a firm believer that you will get to the size you are meant to be by eating the most nutritious food and a healthy movement pattern. Alexa wants to encourage people to find a movement practice, it’s good for your mental health and physical health.  it will make you feel better or for the time that you are here, live better IG: @lowimpactfit TikTok: @alexapilates and @lowimpactfit Website: www.lowimpactfit.com
47:04
October 02, 2020
EP1. Introducing Matters of Movement, The Podcast
EP1. Introducing Matters of Movement, The Podcast
Welcome to the very first episode of the Matters of Movement podcast. In this introductory episode, I am going to share about how I got here and what you can expect to learn and hear during your time with me and my special guests. So, how did you get into Pilates?  After my undergrad, I completed a Masters in the Exercise Sciences department with a focus on the impact exercise had on down regulating the autonomic nervous system. When I had completed that, my hopes were to get work into exercise research, but life didn’t lead me where I had originally hoped. I ended up working in research in the area of gambling. An experience that brought me all over the country collecting information about safer gambling practices. It was so fun and at the time, the perfect fit. At the same time, in an effort to continue doing the health and wellness work that I so loved to do, I trained to become a Pilates instructor, which took me on a four year journey back and forth to Vancouver and across two Pilates studios here in Toronto. And I never looked back.  Why did you start Matters of Movement? Just before the birth of my third, Matters of Movement was born, a Pilates-based movement practice. Obviously, I didn’t get much teaching in the first year, but I built my website and did all the things. Although I have been teaching Pilates for 13 years I have been teaching officially as Matters of Movement since January 2019 and business was just picking up at my new location in 2020 when COVID happened.  How did this podcast come about?  I have learned that the foundation of this podcast was in its early gestation when we were at the University of Toronto doing our undergrad. During our time in this program, we were exposed to all facets of movement learning, whether it involved learning how to teach movement, society’s impact on sport and movement, the psychology of sport and movement, biomechanics, physiology, motor learning, anatomy, philosophy, sports medicine, sports research and media. I am so grateful today for the exposure we had at that time to all things related to movement. Today, 16 years later, I am still fascinated by both what impacts movement, but also what movement impacts in our lives. In the early stages of my business, I decided to participate in some business training and it was probably one of the best things I have ever done. It really let me open my mind up to all the possibilities. I never imagined doing a podcast, but here we are.  What do you hope to accomplish during the podcast? This podcast is going to act as a tool for my and my listeners continued learning about movement.  In the podcast, I want to tackle every aspect of life that can impact movement, so that would mean science, physical, spiritual and mental health, the arts, race, accessibility, societal pressures, and well everything in between. The options are basically endless, which is perfect for a podcast like this. Given everything going on with black lives matter and the anti-racist movement, how are you going to make sure that your work represents the BIPOC community? My plan is to make sure that this podcast has guests that represent the BIPOC community well. This includes ensuring that I invite people to come and share their stories in a raw and open and honest way so that we may all continue to learn in a way that will help us support the BIPOC in the best way possible.  IG/FB: @mattersofmovement www.mattersofmovement.com christina@mattersofmovement.com
09:40
October 02, 2020