Grace Audio

Grace Audio

By Miles Smith
Selections from the rites and music of Grace Episcopal Church in Cismont, Virginia. Visit our website at www.gracekeswick.org (photo by Harlow Chandler).
Seventh Sunday of Easter (Ascension Sunday)
Music Notes from Music Director and Organist, Michael Latkso: “The prelude is an abridged version of a work by American organist and composer McNeil Robinson (1943-2015) whom I was privileged to meet and hear while living in NYC. He had a distinguished career, serving as church musician at some of the most prominent and publicly visibly religious institutions in NYC including St. Mary the Virgin, Park Avenue Christian Church, and Park Avenue Synagogue where he served five decades having been appointed at the recommendation of Leonard Bernstein. He served on the faculty of the Manhattan School of Music and the Mannes College of Music. His beautifully meditative “Chorale Prelude on Llanfair” was composed in 1995; it is based on the tune used for the hymn “Hail the day that sees him rise” (number 214 in Hymnal 1982), originally written as “Hymn for Ascension Day” by Charles Wesley from Hymns and Sacred Poems, 1739. The tune, claimed to have been written by several different composers, is Welsh and was written between 1817-1837. If you would like to listen to the composer play the entire version himself then you can listen here: https://soundcloud.com/pipe_organ/mcneil-robinson-plays-chorale-prelude-on-llanfair-1943-to-2015. A video recording of the entire version by another organist: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GhhNKnSEAoU The postlude is a festive toccata by Swiss composer Rudolf Moser (1892-1960), someone Grace parishioners are not likely to know. Moser studied with the great German composer of the late-Romantic period Max Reger who wrote some of the most difficult music ever composed for the organ. Moser’s style was much more economical that Reger’s but he mimicked Reger in merging late romantic and baroque music. The tune for this brief virtuosic work featuring full organ appears twice in Hymnal 1982, at numbers 400 (“All creatures of our God and King”) and 618 (“Ye watchers and ye holy ones”) and comes from a Roman Catholic book of church “songs” first published in Cologne, Germany in 1623.” Officiant and Homilist: Fr. Miles Smith The liturgical excerpts are from the 1979 Book of Common Prayer.
31:59
May 24, 2020
Memorial Day Program
Officiant and Speaker: Jeb Baker. And featuring soloist Keith Perry singing “Eternal Father, strong to save” (The Navy Hymn). Eternal Father, strong to save, whose arm hath bound the restless wave, who bidd’st the mighty ocean deep its own appointed limits keep: O hear us when we cry to thee for those in peril on the sea. O Christ, whose voice the waters heard and hushed their raging at thy word, who walkedst on the foaming deep, and calm amid its rage didst sleep: O hear us when we cry to thee for those in peril on the sea. Most Holy Spirit, who didst brood upon the chaos dark and rude, and bid its angry tumult cease, and give, for wild confusion, peace; O hear us when we cry to thee for those in peril on the sea. O Trinity of love and power, thy children shield in danger’s hour; from rock and tempest, fire and foe, protect them wheresoe’er they go; thus evermore shall rise to thee glad hymns of praise from land and sea. William Whiting (1825-1878) The liturgical excerpt is from the 1979 Book of Common Prayer.
09:07
May 24, 2020
Sixth Sunday of Easter
The opening music is an arrangement of the hymn “I Come with Joy” originally written by Brian Wrenn and composed and performed by Stephen Petrunak. I come with joy to meet my Lord, forgiven, loved, and free, in awe and wonder to recall his life laid down for me. I come with Christians far and near to find, as all are fed, the new community of love in Christ’s communion bread. As Christ breaks bread and bids us share, each proud division ends. That love that made us makes us one, and strangers now are friends. And thus with joy we meet our Lord. His presence, always near, is in such friendship better known: we see, and praise him here. Together met, together bound, we’ll go our different ways, and as his people in the world, we’ll live and speak his praise. The closing music is an organ performance of “People of God”, also known as “Earth and All Stars”, written by Patricia Clark and performed by Nicholas White of the St. Paul’s School, Concord, New Hampshire. People of God, gather together, come, let us sing on this glorious day. Shouting abroad praise to the Maker, come and with body and soul let us pray. Come, let us join in the heavenly dance, praising in joyous celebration. Hearing God’s word, heeding the message, come and rejoice as we answer the call. With one accord, made in God’s image, come in community, welcoming all. Bearing your gifts, enter God’s presence; come, let us share in the heavenly feast. Mending all rifts, healing divisions, come and from sorrows and hurts be released. Women and men, harmony blending, come, swell the chorus in loving accord. Raising again thanks never ending, come to the God who is Wisdom and Word. Officiant and Homilist: Fr. Miles Smith The liturgical excerpts are from the 1979 Book of Common Prayer.
31:15
May 17, 2020
Fifth Sunday of Easter
The opening music is the 7th century hymn “Christ is made the sure foundation” translated by John Mason Neale in the 19th century and performed by the Southwestern Seminary Oratorio Chorus and Festival Brass. Christ is made the sure foundation, Christ the head and cornerstone, chosen of the Lord, and precious, binding all the Church in one; holy Zion’s help for ever, and her confidence alone. All that dedicated city, dearly loved of God on high, in exultant jubilation pours perpetual melody; God the One in Three adoring in glad hymns eternally. To this temple, where we call thee, come, O Lord of Hosts, today; with thy wonted loving-kindness hear thy servants as they pray, and thy fullest benediction shed within its walls alway. Here vouchsafe to all thy servants what they ask of thee to gain; what they gain from thee, for ever with the blesséd to retain, and hereafter in thy glory evermore with thee to reign. Praise and honor to the Father, Praise and honor to the Son, Praise and honor to the Spirit, Ever Three and ever One, One in might, and One in glory, While unending ages run. The closing music is a toccata on “Christ the Lord is Risen Today” played by Diane Bish at the Methuen Memorial Music Hall in Methuen, Massachusetts. Officiant and Homilist: Fr. Miles Smith The liturgical excerpts are from the 1979 Book of Common Prayer.
32:26
May 10, 2020
Fourth Sunday of Easter
The opening music is an arrangement by Virgil Thomson of the Isaac Watts’ hymn “My Shepherd Will Supply My Need” performed by the Bowdoin College Chamber Choir in Brunswick Maine. “My Shepherd will supply my need, Jehovah is his Name; in pastures fresh he makes me feed beside the living stream. He brings my wandering spirit back when I forsake his ways, and leads me, for his mercy’s sake, in paths of truth and grace. When I walk through the shades of death, thy presence is my stay; one word of thy supporting breath drives all my fears away. Thy hand, in sight of all my foes, doth still my table spread; my cup with blessings overflows, thy oil anoints my head. The sure provisions of my God attend me all my days; oh, may thy house be mine abode and all my work be praise. There would I find a settled rest, while others go and come; no more a stranger or a guest, but like a child at home.” The link to online worship opportunities within the Diocese of Virginia is: http://www.thediocese.net/news-and-events/covid-19-resources/worship-online/ The closing music is performed by the Ars Nova Vocal Group. It is “The King of Love My Shepherd Is” written by Henry Williams Baker—another beautiful piece of music based on Psalm 23. “The King of love my shepherd is, whose goodness faileth never; I nothing lack if I am his, and he is mine for ever. Where streams of living water flow, my ransomed soul he leadeth, and where the verdant pastures grow, with food celestial feedeth. Perverse and foolish oft I strayed, but yet in love he sought me, and on his shoulder gently laid, and home, rejoicing, brought me. In death’s dark vale I fear no ill with thee, dear Lord, beside me; thy rod and staff my comfort still, thy cross before to guide me. Thou spread’st a table in my sight; thy unction grace bestoweth; and oh, what transport of delight from thy pure chalice floweth! And so through all the length of days thy goodness faileth never: Good Shepherd, may I sing thy praise within thy house for ever.” Officiant and Homilist: Fr. Miles Smith The liturgical excerpts are from the 1979 Book of Common Prayer.
28:27
May 3, 2020
Third Sunday of Easter
Featuring Fr. Miles Smith "Welcome happy morning!" played by Nicholas Haigh, the Associate Organist at St. Thomas Church, Fifth Avenue, and recommended by our Organist, Michael Latsko. The "spiritual communion" prayer is attributed St. Alphonsus de Liguori (1696-1787). Liturgical excerpts are from the 1979 Book of Common Prayer. 
27:57
April 26, 2020
Second Sunday of Easter
Featuring Fr. Miles Smith.  The liturgical excerpts are from the 1979 Book of Common Prayer. 
22:53
April 19, 2020
Easter Day 2020
Featuring Michael Latsko playing an opening hymn “Jesus Christ is risen today”, an Easter hymn first written in Latin in the 14th century and a closing Easter Carol “This joyful Easteride” (Dutch arrangement by Charles Wood). And also featuring Renee Poulan-Wagner singing an Air for Soprano, #38, from Handel’s “Messiah”: “How beautiful are the feet of them that preach the gospel of peace, and bring glad tidings of good things.” (Romans 10:15) Officiant and Homilist: Fr. Miles Smith Reader and Additional Singer: Harry Gamble The liturgical excerpts are from the 1979 Book of Common Prayer.
19:48
April 12, 2020
The Great Vigil of Easter Eve 2020
Featuring Keith Perry singing “The Exsultet” which is traditionally sung on the Eve of Easter Day at the Great Vigil of Easter when the Paschal Candle is first lit for the season of Easter, symbolizing the Light of God in the darkness and the Resurrection of Christ in the midst of death. The Great Vigil and this ancient song were first introduced to Episcopalians in the 1979 Book of Common Prayer. The version that Keith is singing is a variation on the one below: “Rejoice now, heavenly hosts and choirs of angels, and let your trumpets shout Salvation for the victory of our mighty King. Rejoice and sing now, all the round earth, bright with a glorious splendor, for darkness has been vanquished by our eternal King. Rejoice and be glad now, Mother Church, and let your holy courts, in radiant light, resound with the praises of your people. All you who stand near this marvelous and holy flame, pray with me to God the Almighty for the grace to sing the worthy praise of this great light; through Jesus Christ his Son our Lord, who lives and reigns with him, in the unity of the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever. Amen. The Lord be with you. And also with you. Let us give thanks to the Lord our God. It is right to give him thanks and praise. It is truly right and good, always and everywhere, with our whole heart and mind and voice, to praise you, the invisible, almighty, and eternal God, and your only-begotten Son, Jesus Christ our Lord; for he is the true Paschal Lamb, who at the feast of the Passover paid for us the debt of Adam's sin, and by his blood delivered your faithful people. This is the night, when you brought our fathers, the children of Israel, out of bondage in Egypt, and led them through the Red Sea on dry land. This is the night, when all who believe in Christ are delivered from the gloom of sin, and are restored to grace and holiness of life. This is the night, when Christ broke the bonds of death and hell, and rose victorious from the grave. How wonderful and beyond our knowing, O God, is your mercy and loving-kindness to us, that to redeem a slave, you gave a Son. How holy is this night, when wickedness is put to flight, and sin is washed away. It restores innocence to the fallen, and joy to those who mourn. It casts out pride and hatred, and brings peace and concord. How blessed is this night, when earth and heaven are joined and man is reconciled to God. Holy Father, accept our evening sacrifice, the offering of this candle in your honor. May it shine continually to drive away all darkness. May Christ, the Morning Star who knows no setting, find it ever burning--he who gives his light to all creation, and who lives and reigns for ever and ever. Amen.” And also featuring Michael Latsko playing "Sortie on ‘Alleluia! The Strife Is O'er’"--a creation of his own based on the hymn, incorporating fragments composed by Wilbur Held, Charles Callahan, Janet Linker, Gerre Hancock, and Geoffrey Shaw. Officiant and Homilist: Fr. Miles Smith Additional singers: Harry Gamble and Renee Poulan-Wagner The liturgical excerpts are from the 1979 Book of Common Prayer.
22:47
April 11, 2020
Holy Saturday 2020
Officiant and Homilist: Fr. Miles Smith The liturgical excerpts are from the 1979 Book of Common Prayer.
09:22
April 11, 2020
Good Friday 2020
Featuring Keith Perry singing “The Crucifixion”--one of a cycle of ten songs from The Hermit Songs composed by Samuel Barber and first performed by Leontyne Price, soprano, with the composer at the piano, at the Library of Congress, Washington D.C., on October 30, 1953.  They are settings of anonymous Irish texts of the eighth to thirteenth centuries written by monks and scholars, often on the margins of manuscripts they were copying or illuminating--perhaps not always meant to be seen by their Father Superiors.  They are small poems, thoughts or observations, some very short, and speak in straightforward, droll and often surprisingly modern terms of the simple life these men led, close to nature, to animals and to God. “At the cry of the first bird They began to crucify Thee, O Swan! Never shall lament cease because of that. It was like the parting of day from night. Ah, sore was the suffering borne By the body of Mary’s son, But sorer still to Him was the grief Which for His sake Came upon His Mother.” And also featuring Michael Latsko playing “Prelude and Fugue” by German composer and organist Johann Christian Heinrich Rinck who lived 1700-1846. Reader: Harry Gamble. Officiant and Homilist: Fr. Miles Smith The liturgical excerpts are from the 1979 Book of Common Prayer.
36:34
April 10, 2020
Maundy Thursday 2020
Featuring Michael Latsko playing a Bach chorale prelude (Alle menschen mussen sterben, BWV 643) taken from Bach's Orgelbuchlein, a collection of 46 chorale preludes, most of which were written 1708-1717 while Bach was organist to the Duke of Weimar. The translation is "Hark! a voice saith, all men are mortal." Also with Keith Perry singing "Ubi caritas" (Where charity is)--a hymn of the Western Church often sung on Maundy Thursday. The melody is Gregorian chant composed sometime between the fourth and tenth centuries while the text may have been written earlier. The text says that God is present wherever charity – care for others – and love is expressed. It resonates with both Jesus’ Great Commandment (Luke 10:27) and his New Commandment (John 13:34). Ubi caritas et amor, Deus ibi est. Congregavit nos in unum Christi amor. Exsultemus, et in ipso jucundemur. Timeamus, et amemus Deum vivum. Et ex corde diligamus nos sincero. Ubi caritas et amor, Deus ibi est. Simul ergo cum in unum congregamur: Ne nos mente dividamur, caveamus. Cessent iurgia maligna, cessent lites. Et in medio nostri sit Christus Deus. Ubi caritas et amor, Deus ibi est. Simul quoque cum beatis videamus, Glorianter vultum tuum, Christe Deus: Gaudium quod est immensum, atque probum, Saecula per infinita saeculorum. Amen. Where charity and love are, there God is. The love of Christ has gathered us into one. Let us exult, and in Him be joyful. Let us fear and let us love the living God. And from a sincere heart let us love each other. Where charity and love are, there God is. Therefore, whensoever we are gathered as one: Lest we in mind be divided, let us beware. Let cease malicious quarrels, let strife give way. And in the midst of us be Christ our God. Where charity and love are, there God is. Together also with the blessed may we see, Gloriously, Thy countenance, O Christ our God: A joy which is immense, and also approved: Through infinite ages of ages. Amen. Reader: Harry Gamble. Officiant and Homilist: Fr. Miles Smith The liturgical excerpts are from the 1979 Book of Common Prayer. 
23:58
April 9, 2020
Palm-Passion Sunday 2020
Featuring Michael Latsko, organist Reader: Harry Gamble. Officiant and Homilist: Fr. Miles Smith The liturgical excerpts are from the 1979 Book of Common Prayer.
15:51
April 4, 2020
March 29, 2020
The is the Sunday Audio for the 5th Sunday of Lent. 
26:38
March 28, 2020
March 22, 2020
This is the first Sunday Audio from Grace Episcopal Church for the 4th Sunday of Lent. 
26:41
March 28, 2020