The Molecular Ecologist Podcast

The Molecular Ecologist Podcast

By The Molecular Ecologist
A podcast about ecology, evolution, and everything in between. Contributors to the Molecular Ecologist blog discuss the science they've been reading and writing about.
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Color me viral edition
The Molecular Ecologist Podcast is a conversation about ecology, evolution, and everything in between, with contributors to The Molecular Ecologist discussing the science and science-adjacent issues they've been reading and writing about. In this episode,  Patrícia Chrzanová Pečnerová discusses resources for using color to make scientific figures clear and appealing; Stacy Krueger-Hadfield tells us about the complex considerations surrounding tracking and controlling species invasions in the Antarctic; Melissa Walker gives us a tour of the truly weird biology of viruses big enough to measure in millimeters Katie Grogan recaps her series of posts on the costs — in terms of time, money, and emotional impact — of applying for tenure-track faculty jobs; and we also mention Laetitia Wilkins's contribution on the costs of not (yet) landing one of those jobs. You can find the podcast hosted on Anchor.fm, or on Apple Podcasts, Pocket Casts, and Spotify — or you can add the RSS feed directly to your podcast-management app of choice. Whatever service you use, consider taking a moment to rate or even review the podcast, which will help us build an audience.
57:01
May 21, 2020
A #NewPI chat about teaching, both before and after COVID
On this episode, we're taking our #NewPI Chat conversations among early-career faculty to the podcast format. In this chat, Rob Denton, Stacy Krueger-Hadfield, and Jeremy Yoder discuss teaching: the transition from postdoc life to managing classrooms and curricula, juggling instruction time and research — and how all of this has changed while our campuses are locked down to help contain the COVID-19 pandemic. To send us questions about life as new PIs, or suggest topics or guests for future chats, you can leave us a voice message from the podcast's Anchor.fm page, hit us up on Twitter or Facebook, or email Jeremy. You can find the podcast on Apple Podcasts, Pocket Casts, and Spotify — or you can add the RSS feed URL directly to your podcast-management app of choice. Whatever service you use, consider taking a moment to rate or even review the podcast, which will help us build an audience. The music in this episode is Leroy Anderson's "The Waltzing Cat," performed on piano by Markus Staab and available under a Creative Commons license via Musopen.
40:04
April 28, 2020
#StudentScicomm, diversity within an algae bloom, the origins of a vital mutualism, and population genetics in continuous space
The Molecular Ecologist Podcast made it to a second episode! Thanks for listening to our first one, and for all the positive comments. In addition to our "home" hosting service, Anchor.fm, you can now subscribe to the podcast on Apple Podcasts, Pocket Casts, and Spotify — or you can add the RSS feed URL directly to your podcast-management app of choice. Whatever service you use, consider taking a moment to rate or even review the podcast, which will help us build an audience. On this episode, Stacy Krueger-Hadfield and Sabrina Heiser talk about Stacy's #StudentScicomm initiative, using science blogging as an assignment in graduate-level professional development and science courses. Kelle Freel describes the results of a community genetics survey of diversity within an algae bloom that travels the North Atlantic every year, by Bolaños et al. (doi: 10.1038/s41396-020-0636-0) R. Shawn Abrams previews an upcoming post about new research supporting the hypothesis that symbiosis with nitrogen-fixing bacteria had a single origin in the common ancestor of the clade that includes legumes, roses, and oaks. Jeremy Yoder recaps a new simulation study that shows how populations distributed continuously across space (which is to say, most natural populations) confound and complicate population genetic analyses, by Battey et al. (doi: 10.1534/genetics.120.303143) The music in this episode is Leroy Anderson's "The Syncopated Clock," performed on piano by Markus Staab and available under a Creative Commons license via Musopen.
45:12
April 13, 2020
Whale gut microbes, inbred ibexes, African Americans in evolutionary biology, and cryptic crow species
In the inaugural episode of the Molecular Ecologist Podcast, a panel of contributors to The Molecular Ecologist recap the science they've been reading and writing about over the past month. On this episode: Kelle Freel talks about a nifty study of the microbes that help whales digest plankton, by Carolyn A. Miller et al. (doi: 10.1038/s41396-019-0549-y) Patrícia Pečnerová describes how endangered Alpine Ibex populations have lost genetic diversity but are still purging deleterious mutations, as described in a paper by Christine Grossen et al. (doi: 10.1038/s41467-020-14803-1) R Shawn Abrams recaps his post about the history of African Americans studying evolution, and what it will take to broaden the diversity of the field, citing a recent paper by Joseph Graves (doi: 10.1186/s12052-019-0110-5) Jeremy Yoder discusses a study that finds substantial hybridization between the endemic Northwest crow and the much more widespread American crow, by David Slager et al. (doi: 10.1111/mec.15377) You can find more from The Molecular Ecologist at molecularecologist.com, follow updates on Twitter at @molecologist, or find us on Facebook at The Molecular Ecologist. The music in this episode is Leroy Anderson's "The Syncopated Clock," performed on piano by Markus Staab and available under a Creative Commons license via Musopen.
39:27
March 16, 2020