Conversations at the Washington Library

Conversations at the Washington Library

By Mount Vernon
Conversations at the Washington Library is the premier podcast about George Washington and his Early American world. Join host Jim Ambuske each week as he talks with scholars, digital humanists, librarians, and other guests about Washington's era and the way we tell stories about the past.
Where to listen
Apple Podcasts Logo
Breaker Logo
Castbox Logo
Google Podcasts Logo
Overcast Logo
Pocket Casts Logo
PodBean Logo
RadioPublic Logo
Spotify Logo
Stitcher Logo
TuneIn Logo
Currently playing episode

The Transatlantic Reach of Thomas Erskine and Law in the Age of Revolutions with Nicola Phillips: Explorations in Early American Law Part 1

Conversations at the Washington Library

Go to next audioGo to next audio
Go to prev audioGo to prev audio
1x
Doing Public History at Mount Vernon with Jeanette Patrick
Like many folks around the country, you might have spent the last three evenings watching Doris Kearns Goodwin’s Washington documentary series on the History Channel. Documentaries are a form of public history, which we might define loosely as making historical knowledge available and accessible for the public’s benefit. At Mount Vernon, we think about how to do this work a great deal. How can we create frameworks for public understanding of the past that balances expertise with accessibility? On today’s episode, Jeanette Patrick discusses her efforts to make the Washingtons, Mount Vernon, and their respective histories engaging for the public. Patrick is Mount Vernon’s Digital Researcher and Writer, which is another way of saying “public historian,” and she is responsible for a goodly portion of the historical content you’ll find on our websites. You’ll hear Patrick describe some of the ways that Mount Vernon decides which public history projects to pursue, and how she became a public historian in the first place. About Our Guest: Jeanette Patrick is Mount Vernon's Digital Researcher and Writer. Among her many responsibilities, she serves as Associate Editor of the Digital Encyclopedia of George Washington.  He holds an MA in Public History from James Madison University. She is a former Program Manager at the National Women's History Museum in Washington, D.C. About Our Host:  Jim Ambuske leads the Center for Digital History at the Washington Library. He received his Ph.D. in history from the University of Virginia in 2016 with a focus on Scotland and America in an Age of War and Revolution. He is a former Farmer Postdoctoral Fellow in Digital Humanities at the University of Virginia Law Library. At UVA, Ambuske co-directed the 1828 Catalogue Project and the Scottish Court of Session Project.  He is the co-author with Randall Flaherty of "Reading Law in the Early Republic: Legal Education in the Age of Jefferson," in The Founding of Thomas Jefferson's University ed. by John A. Rogasta, Peter S. Onuf, and Andrew O'Shaughnessy (Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 2019). Ambuske is currently at work on a book entitled Emigration and Empire: America and Scotland in the Revolutionary Era, as well as a chapter on Scottish loyalism during the American Revolution for a volume to be published by the University of Edinburgh Press.
35:35
February 20, 2020
Creating the New Map of Empire with Max Edelson
When the British defeated the French and their allies in the Seven Years’ War, they acquired vast new territories that expanded British America. Britain’s North America Empire grew to include New Brunswick in Canada, Florida on the southern mainland, and Caribbean Islands like Dominica, among many other places. How would the British meld these spaces – spaces that were religiously and ethnically diverse, characterized by both free and enslaved labor, and fraught with tension between indigenous peoples and white settlers – into a coherent empire? Well, first they had to map them. In the decade before the American Revolution, the British government embarked on a monumental effort to create new, high-resolution maps that would help it forge a new imperial landscape. On today’s episode, Dr. Max Edelson joins us to explain how a cadre of British military engineers, surveyors, and diplomats produced maps that sought to realize a vision of empire that never came to be. Dr. Edelson is a historian of British America at the University of Virginia, and the author of the recent book, The New Map of Empire: How Britain Imagined America Before Independence.  Edelson and host Jim Ambuske discuss a number of maps in this episode, including: Maps in The New Map of Empire: Mapscholar.org/empire Herman Moll, A new and exact map of the dominions of the King of Great Britain on ye continent of North America, containing Newfoundland, New Scotland, New England, New York, New Jersey, Pensilvania, Maryland, Virginia and Carolina (1715) The Catawba Map [Map of the several nations of Indians to the Northwest of South Carolina] [c. 1724] Samuel Holland, A map of the island of St. John in the Gulf of St. Laurence divided into counties & parishes and the lots as granted by government, (1776). About Our Guest:  S. Max Edelson studies the history of British America and the Atlantic world. His research examines space, place, and culture in colonial North America and the Caribbean. His first book, Plantation Enterprise in Colonial South Carolina (Harvard, 2006) examines the relationship between planters and environment in South Carolina as the key to understanding this repressive, prosperous society and its distinctive economic culture His second book, The New Map of Empire: How Britain Imagined America Before Independence (Harvard, 2017), describes how Britain used maps and geographic knowledge to reform its American empire in the eighteenth century.
42:22
February 13, 2020
Sizing Up the Thigh Men of Dad History with Alexis Coe
The modern biography as we know it dates to the eighteenth century when Scottish author and lawyer James Boswell published The Life of Samuel Johnson. Boswell produced an account of the rascally Englishman, a friend of his for more than twenty years, that became a kind of template that future biographers have followed. We've all read our fair share of biographies, especially presidential biographies, to know that they follow a similar structure. This is especially true of biographies of the American Revolutionary generation. So how can we shake up this genre? And perhaps more importantly, how can we shake up biographies of George Washington, a man who seems at times opaque and beyond reproach? On today’s episode, historian Alexis Coe helps us re-imagine what a biography can be so that we can better understand George Washington and the world around him. Coe is the author of the new book, You Never Forget Your First: A Biography of George Washington, and if the title is any hint of what’s between the covers, this isn’t your father’s standard Washington biography. About Our Guest: Alexis Taines Coe is an historian. She is the author of the narrative history book, Alice+Freda Forever, and is a consultant on the movie adaptation. Her second book, You Never Forget Your First: A Biography of George Washington, was published by Viking (Penguin Random House) on February 4, 2020. Alexis is a consulting producer on the Doris Kearns Goodwin's three part George Washington series (February 2020) on the History Channel. She is the host of "No Man's Land" from The Wing/Pineapple and co-hosted "Presidents Are People Too!" from Audible. Alexis curated the ACLU'S 100 exhibition and was the assistant curator of the NYPL's centennial exhibition in Bryant Park. She has appeared on CNN, the History Channel, C-SPAN, and CBS, and lectured at Columbia, West Point, Georgetown, Sarah Lawrence, NYU, the New School, the University of San Francisco, and many others. She has given talks sponsored by Hulu, Chanel, and Madewell. About Our Host: Jim Ambuske leads the Center for Digital History at the Washington Library. He received his Ph.D. in history from the University of Virginia in 2016 with a focus on Scotland and America in an Age of War and Revolution. He is a former Farmer Postdoctoral Fellow in Digital Humanities at the University of Virginia Law Library. At UVA, Ambuske co-directed the 1828 Catalogue Project and the Scottish Court of Session Project.  He is the co-author with Randall Flaherty of "Reading Law in the Early Republic: Legal Education in the Age of Jefferson," in The Founding of Thomas Jefferson's University ed. by John A. Rogasta, Peter S. Onuf, and Andrew O'Shaughnessy (Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 2019). Ambuske is currently at work on a book entitled Emigration and Empire: America and Scotland in the Revolutionary Era, as well as a chapter on Scottish loyalism during the American Revolution for a volume to be published by the University of Edinburgh Press.
55:05
February 6, 2020
Finding Ona Judge's Voice with Sheila Arnold
In May 1796, Ona Judge, Martha Washington’s enslaved maidservant, freed herself by walking out of the Washington’s Philadelphia home. She had learned that Martha intended to give her away as a wedding present to Elizabeth Parke Custis, her eldest granddaughter. Judge quietly slipped out of the house one evening, boarded a ship, and fled to New Hampshire. She lived there for the rest of her life. Despite their best efforts, the Washingtons were never able to recapture her. On today’s episode, Ona Judge tells her own story. Library Research Fellow Sheila Arnold joins Jim Ambuske in character as Ona Judge to give voice to her life. Arnold is a historic character interpreter who performs as many historical figures, including Ona Judge and Madame CJ Walker, an African American entrepreneur and businesswoman who was one of the wealthiest self-made women in early 20th century America. During the first half of today’s show, Ambuske interviews Arnold as Ona Judge, as she might have been in the last years of her life. He then talks to Arnold herself about historic character interpretation and the powerful ways that performing as a formerly enslaved person can build bridges between communities. About Our Guest: Sheila Arnold currently resides in Hampton, VA. She is a Professional Storyteller, Character Interpreter and Teaching Artist. Through her company, History’s Alive!, Sheila has provided storytelling programs, historic character presentations, Christian monologues, dramatic/creative writing workshops, professional development for educators and inspirational/motivational speeches at schools, churches, libraries, professional organizations and museums, in 41 states since 2003. About Our Host: Jim Ambuske leads the Center for Digital History at the Washington Library. He received his Ph.D. in history from the University of Virginia in 2016 with a focus on Scotland and America in an Age of War and Revolution. He is a former Farmer Postdoctoral Fellow in Digital Humanities at the University of Virginia Law Library. At UVA, Ambuske co-directed the 1828 Catalogue Project and the Scottish Court of Session Project.  He is the co-author with Randall Flaherty of "Reading Law in the Early Republic: Legal Education in the Age of Jefferson," in The Founding of Thomas Jefferson's University ed. by John A. Rogasta, Peter S. Onuf, and Andrew O'Shaughnessy (Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 2019). Ambuske is currently at work on a book entitled Emigration and Empire: America and Scotland in the Revolutionary Era, as well as a chapter on Scottish loyalism during the American Revolution for a volume to be published by the University of Edinburgh Press.
1:00:14
January 30, 2020
Plotting against General Washington with Mark Edward Lender
In late 1777, George Washington’s disappointing performance as commander-in-chief of the Continental Army was a source of growing concern among some army officers and members of Congress. While he had won important victories at Princeton and Trenton months earlier, he had lost New York City, and Philadelphia, and suffered defeats at Brandywine and Germantown. Patriots intended to win the war, not lose it. And to win it, some came to believe that Washington ought to be removed from power, or at least his authority weakened.  On today’s episode, Dr. Mark Edward Lender joins Jim Ambuske to discuss what some have called a cabal or a conspiracy to replace Washington as head of American forces. The reality is much more complicated, and surprising. Lender is the author of the new book, Cabal! The Plot Against General Washington! Lender is a military historian who has written extensively about the Revolutionary War era. This episode begins with a conversation about one of Lender's first books, “A Respectable Army”: The Military Origins of the Republic, 1763-1789, co-authored with James Kirby Martin. Lender and Martin published the book at a time when historians started to rethink how to write military history from the bottom up. After chatting about "A Respectable Army," Lender and Ambuske discuss the plot against George Washington. About Our Guest:  Mark Edward Lender has a Ph.D. in American History from Rutgers University. He is Professor Emeritus of History at Kean University, from which he retired as Vice President for Academic Affairs in 2011. He is the author or co-author of eleven books and many articles and reviews, and his writings have won awards for history, writing, and research. He was a finalist for The George Washington Prize, from Mount Vernon and Washington College, with Garry Wheeler Stone, for Fatal Sunday: George Washington, the Monmouth Campaign, and the Politics of Battle, 2017. About Our Host: Jim Ambuske leads the Center for Digital History at the Washington Library. He received his Ph.D. in history from the University of Virginia in 2016 with a focus on Scotland and America in an Age of War and Revolution. He is a former Farmer Postdoctoral Fellow in Digital Humanities at the University of Virginia Law Library. At UVA, Ambuske co-directed the 1828 Catalogue Project and the Scottish Court of Session Project.  He is the co-author with Randall Flaherty of "Reading Law in the Early Republic: Legal Education in the Age of Jefferson," in The Founding of Thomas Jefferson's University ed. by John A. Rogasta, Peter S. Onuf, and Andrew O'Shaughnessy (Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 2019). Ambuske is currently at work on a book entitled Emigration and Empire: America and Scotland in the Revolutionary Era, as well as a chapter on Scottish loyalism during the American Revolution for a volume to be published by the University of Edinburgh Press.
56:58
January 23, 2020
Accounting for Women in the Business of Slavery with Alexi Garrett
When George Washington died in December 1799, it changed Martha Washington’s legal status. Just as she did when she was widowed for the first time in 1757, Martha once again became an independent person in the eyes of the law. She was no longer in the shadow of her husband’s legal identity. So what did this mean for Martha and other unmarried or widowed elite white women who ran businesses powered by slavery in early Virginia? How did they negotiate contracts, oversee enslaved labor, and manage their estates, all while navigating society’s expectations for women of their status? On today’s episode, Alexi Garrett joins us to discuss three such women – Martha Washington, Catharine Flood McCall, and Annie Henry Christian – who by choice or by fate oversaw major business operations in the early republic. About Our Guest: Alexi Garrett is a Ph.D. candidate in the Corcoran Department of History at the University of Virginia. Her dissertation examines how feme sole businesswomen managed their slave-manned enterprises in revolutionary and early national Virginia. About Our Host: Jim Ambuske leads the Center for Digital History at the Washington Library. He received his Ph.D. in history from the University of Virginia in 2016 with a focus on Scotland and America in an Age of War and Revolution. He is a former Farmer Postdoctoral Fellow in Digital Humanities at the University of Virginia Law Library. At UVA, Ambuske co-directed the 1828 Catalogue Project and the Scottish Court of Session Project.  He is the co-author with Randall Flaherty of "Reading Law in the Early Republic: Legal Education in the Age of Jefferson," in The Founding of Thomas Jefferson's University ed. by John A. Rogasta, Peter S. Onuf, and Andrew O'Shaughnessy (Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 2019). Ambuske is currently at work on a book entitled Emigration and Empire: America and Scotland in the Revolutionary Era, as well as a chapter on Scottish loyalism during the American Revolution for a volume to be published by the University of Edinburgh Press.
51:55
January 16, 2020
(Recast) Republican Laws and Monarchical Education with Mark Boonshoft
This episode originally aired in June 2019.  Once the United States achieved its independence, how did white Americans expect to educate the new republic's youth? How did questions about education become a flash point in the battle between Federalists and Republicans over the meaning of the American Revolution and the nation's soul? On today's episode, Dr. Mark Boonshoft of Norwich University joins Jim Ambuske to discuss how ideas about education were part of a larger argument about who should rule, and who should rule at home as Americans struggled to form a more perfect union. About our Guest:  Mark Boonshoft received his BA in history from SUNY-Buffalo and his MA and PhD in history from the Ohio State University. Before coming to Norwich, he was a post-doctoral research fellow at the New York Public Library, where he worked on the Polonsky Foundation-funded Early American Manuscripts Project. A social and political historian of early America, Boonshoft has published articles, reviews, and essays in the Journal of the Early Republic, New York History, the Journal of American History, and the edited volume The American Revolution Reborn. He is currently revising his dissertation into a book, tentatively titled Monarchical Education and the Making of the American Republic. In addition to his scholarly work, Boonshoft is a contributor at The Junto: A Group Blog on Early American History and the affiliated podcast, The Juntocast. At Norwich, Boonshoft teaches the American history survey to 1877, as well as classes on colonial North American history, the American Revolution, and the early republic period. About Our Host: Jim Ambuske leads the Center for Digital History at the Washington Library. He received his Ph.D. in history from the University of Virginia in 2016 with a focus on Scotland and America in an Age of War and Revolution. He is a former Farmer Postdoctoral Fellow in Digital Humanities at the University of Virginia Law Library. At UVA, Ambuske co-directed the 1828 Catalogue Project and the Scottish Court of Session Project.  He is the co-author with Randall Flaherty of "Reading Law in the Early Republic: Legal Education in the Age of Jefferson," in The Founding of Thomas Jefferson's University ed. by John A. Rogasta, Peter S. Onuf, and Andrew O'Shaughnessy (Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 2019). Ambuske is currently at work on a book entitled Emigration and Empire: America and Scotland in the Revolutionary Era, as well as a chapter on Scottish loyalism during the American Revolution for a volume to be published by the University of Edinburgh Press.
31:49
January 9, 2020
Harnessing the Power of Washington's Genealogy with Karin Wulf
Early Americans like George Washington obsessed over genealogy. Much was at stake. One's place on the family tree could mean the difference between inheriting a plantation like Mount Vernon and its enslaved community, or working a patch of hardscrabble. Genealogy was very much a matter of custom, culture, and law, which explains in part why Washington composed a long-ignored document tracing his own lineage. It was as much a reflection of his family's past as it was a road map to his future power, wealth, and authority. On today's episode, Dr. Karin Wulf helps us understand the powerful force that genealogy played in early American life. Wulf is a Professor of History at the College of William & Mary where she is also the director of the Omohundro Institute of Early American History and Culture (OI). A recent Washington Library research fellow, Wulf is writing a history of genealogy's essential role in British American society.  She also discusses the OI's leadership in the Georgian Papers Programme, and the OI's work to explore #vastearlyamerica.  About Our Guest: Karin Wulf is the director of the Omohundro Institute of Early American History and Culture, which has been publishing the William and Mary Quarterly, the leading journal in early American scholarship, and books with the University of North Carolina Press, since 1943. She is also Professor of History at the College of William & Mary, and co-chair the College’s Neurodiversity Working Group. Her scholarship focuses on women, gender and family in the early modern British Atlantic. About Our Host: Jim Ambuske leads the Center for Digital History at the Washington Library. He received his Ph.D. in history from the University of Virginia in 2016 with a focus on Scotland and America in an Age of War and Revolution. He is a former Farmer Postdoctoral Fellow in Digital Humanities at the University of Virginia Law Library. At UVA, Ambuske co-directed the 1828 Catalogue Project and the Scottish Court of Session Project.  He is the co-author with Randall Flaherty of "Reading Law in the Early Republic: Legal Education in the Age of Jefferson," in The Founding of Thomas Jefferson's University ed. by John A. Rogasta, Peter S. Onuf, and Andrew O'Shaughnessy (Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 2019). Ambuske is currently at work on a book entitled Emigration and Empire: America and Scotland in the Revolutionary Era, as well as a chapter on Scottish loyalism during the American Revolution for a volume to be published by the University of Edinburgh Press.
48:28
January 2, 2020
Happy Holidays from the Washington Library
The podcast team is off for the holidays. We'll be back in the new year with new thought-provoking interviews with the likes of Jeanette Patrick, Karin Wulf, and Max Edelson. In the meantime, be sure to check out our full back catalog featuring conversations with historians, teachers, prize-winning authors, game designers, and much more. From all of us at the Washington Library, we wish you Happy Holidays and a Happy New Year! 
00:19
December 26, 2019
Seeing the British Side of the American Revolution with Andrew O'Shaughnessy
What does the American Revolution look like from a British vantage point? How does that change the way we think about the origins of the United States, and major figures such as George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, or George III? And in the new republic, how did Jefferson try to keep the revolution alive through his ideas on education. On today’s episode, Dr. Andrew O’Shaughnessy helps us explore these questions. O’Shaughnessy is a historian of the American Revolution. He is also the Saunders Director of the Robert H. Smith International Center for Jefferson Studies at Thomas Jefferson’s Monticello. The ICJS is one of the premier institutes for the study of the American Revolution and the early Republic. In 2014, O’Shaughnessy was awarded the George Washington Book Prize for his book, The Men who Lost America: British Leadership, the American Revolution, and the Fate of Empire. He is currently at work on a book about Thomas Jefferson and his vision for education in the early United States. We recorded our conversation at ICJS, just down the mountain from Monticello, and as you’ll hear, O’Shaughnessy oversees a major educational enterprise. About Our Guest: Andrew O’Shaughnessy is Vice President of Monticello, the Saunders Director of the Robert H. Smith International Center for Jefferson Studies at the Thomas Jefferson Foundation and Professor of History at the University of Virginia.  He is the author of An Empire Divided: The American Revolution and the British Caribbean (Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2000).  His most recent book The Men Who Lost America: British Leadership, the American Revolution and the Fate of the Empire (New Haven: Yale University Press, 2013) received eight national awards including the New York Historical Society American History Book Prize, the George Washington Book Prize, and the Society of Military History Book Prize.   About Our Host: Jim Ambuske leads the Center for Digital History at the Washington Library. He received his Ph.D. in history from the University of Virginia in 2016 with a focus on Scotland and America in an Age of War and Revolution. He is a former Farmer Postdoctoral Fellow in Digital Humanities at the University of Virginia Law Library. At UVA, Ambuske co-directed the 1828 Catalogue Project and the Scottish Court of Session Project.  He is the co-author with Randall Flaherty of "Reading Law in the Early Republic: Legal Education in the Age of Jefferson," in The Founding of Thomas Jefferson's University ed. by John A. Rogasta, Peter S. Onuf, and Andrew O'Shaughnessy (Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 2019). Ambuske is currently at work on a book entitled Emigration and Empire: America and Scotland in the Revolutionary Era, as well as a chapter on Scottish loyalism during the American Revolution for a volume to be published by the University of Edinburgh Press.
50:28
December 19, 2019
Executing Major John André with D.A.B. Ronald
On October 2, 1780, Major John André was executed as a spy on George Washington’s orders. The British officer had convinced American general Benedict Arnold to switch allegiances, but having been caught in the act, André was condemned to die a spy's death. He was hung from the gallows like a common criminal, having been denied the honor of facing a firing squad, like an officer and a gentleman. He took comfort in the fact that it would “be but a momentary pang.” While you may know André best for bagging Arnold, and meeting his death bravely, you may not know the whole story. André was involved in the world of secret warfare – of gathering intelligence, seducing his way into private company, and using personal relationships and acquired information to Britain’s military advantage. On today’s episode, Dr. D.A.B. Ronald introduces us to André – a highly educated and cultured young man skilled in the arts of treachery and war. About Our Guest: Dr D. A. B. Ronald has published several books, including Young Nelsons: Boy Soldiers during the Napoleonic Wars (2009), and Youth, Heroism and War Propaganda: Britain and the Young Maritime Hero 1754–1820 (2015). Prior to becoming an academic and full-time writer, he ran his own company as an investment banker in the City of London. His most recent book is The Life of John André: The Redcoat Who Turned Benedict Arnold (2019). About Our Host: Jim Ambuske leads the Center for Digital History at the Washington Library. He received his Ph.D. in history from the University of Virginia in 2016 with a focus on Scotland and America in an Age of War and Revolution. He is a former Farmer Postdoctoral Fellow in Digital Humanities at the University of Virginia Law Library. At UVA, Ambuske co-directed the 1828 Catalogue Project and the Scottish Court of Session Project.  Ambuske is currently at work on a book entitled Emigration and Empire: America and Scotland in the Revolutionary Era, as well as a chapter on Scottish loyalism during the American Revolution for a volume to be published by the University of Edinburgh Press.
56:37
December 12, 2019
Editing Early America with Nadine Zimmerli
Dr. Nadine Zimmerli recently joined The University of Virginia Press as its editor of History and Social Sciences books. A former editor at the Omohundro Institute of Early American History & Culture, Zimmerli is a historian of 20th century Europe by training. She is also a native of Germany, having grown up in East Germany in the years surrounding the fall of the Berlin Wall.  In this episode, Dr. Zimmerli shares with Jim Ambuske what it was like to grow up in East Germany before reunification in 1990 and how her family's own history inspired her professional career as a historian and editor. You'll also hear how she knew from a young age that she wanted to be an editor, her sense of the big questions that have shaped and reshaped our understanding of the early American past., and the opportunities she sees at the UVA Press.  About Our Guest: Dr. Nadine Zimmerli is the Editor of History and Social Sciences at The University of Virginia Press. She holds a Ph.D. in history from the University of Wisconsin-Madison and began her editorial career at the University of Wisconsin Press as a project assistant for the George L. Mosse Series in Modern European Cultural and Intellectual History. Previously, she was Associate Editor of Books at the Omohundro Institute of Early American History & Culture, where she edited award-winning books such as Susanah Shaw Romney’s New Netherland Connections: Intimate Networks and Atlantic Ties in Seventeenth-Century America, and Robert G. Parkinson’s The Common Cause: Creating Race and Nation in the American Revolution. About Our Host: Jim Ambuske leads the Center for Digital History at the Washington Library. He received his Ph.D. in history from the University of Virginia in 2016 with a focus on Scotland and America in an Age of War and Revolution. He is a former Farmer Postdoctoral Fellow in Digital Humanities at the University of Virginia Law Library. At UVA, Ambuske co-directed the 1828 Catalogue Project and the Scottish Court of Session Project.  Ambuske is currently at work on a book entitled Emigration and Empire: America and Scotland in the Revolutionary Era, as well as a chapter on Scottish loyalism during the American Revolution for a volume to be published by the University of Edinburgh Press.
48:41
December 5, 2019
A Constitutional Thanksgiving
We’re off this week for the Thanksgiving holiday. We’ll be back next week with conversations featuring some of the leading lights in early American history. But we didn’t want to leave you holding the short end of the wishbone. So we put together a short history lesson for you about George Washington's Thanksgiving Proclamation of 1789.  Be sure to read the full proclamation and Professor T. K. Bryon's Digital Encyclopedia entry on the history behind it.  Happy Thanksgiving! About our Host: Jim Ambuske leads the Center for Digital History at the Washington Library. He received his Ph.D. in history from the University of Virginia in 2016 with a focus on Scotland and America in an Age of War and Revolution. He is a former Farmer Postdoctoral Fellow in Digital Humanities at the University of Virginia Law Library. At UVA, Ambuske co-directed the 1828 Catalogue Project and the Scottish Court of Session Project.  Ambuske is currently at work on a book entitled Emigration and Empire: America and Scotland in the Revolutionary Era, as well as a chapter on Scottish loyalism during the American Revolution for a volume to be published by the University of Edinburgh Press.
04:02
November 28, 2019
Facing the Wrath of Rachel Jackson's God with Melissa Gismondi
If you know anything about Rachel Jackson, chances are you know her best as Andrew Jackson’s wife. You might also know that Rachel died in late 1828, just before Andrew became president.  During Andrew’s presidential campaigns in 1824 and 1828, his political enemies attacked Rachel as an adulterer. Legally speaking, she was. In the early 1790s, Rachel and Andrew learned that her first husband, Lewis Robards, had never finalized their divorce. The Jacksons’ marriage was seemingly illegitimate. After a court granted Robards a divorce in 1794 on the basis of Rachel’s alleged adultery, Rachel and Andrew married again just to be safe. But when these private events became public years later, Andrew’s opponents used them against him. Rachel died from a heart attack in 1828. Andrew attributed her death in part to the public slanders against her.  What you may not know is that Rachel dwelled deeply on God Almighty. While she labored in his Kingdom on Earth, she dreamed of the Almighty and his Kingdom of Heaven. Rachel was an evangelical Christian. And her fear of God’s judgement shaped her life and her relationship with Andrew. On today’s episode, Dr. Melissa Gismondi offers us a portrait of a devote woman tormented by the changing world around here. Gismondi, an expert on Rachel Jackson and the early republic, is a Senior Producer on the popular radio program Backstory.  About our Guest: Melissa Gismondi, Ph.D., is a senior producer for Backstory, a program of Virginia Humanities. She holds a Ph.D. in history from the University of Virginia. An award-winning writer and multimedia journalist, Gismondi's work has appeared in The Walrus and The New York Times. In 2019, she was selected by acclaimed author Charlotte Gray and the Writers’ Trust of Canada to be part of their inaugural Rising Star program. About our Host: Jim Ambuske leads the Center for Digital History at the Washington Library. He received his Ph.D. in history from the University of Virginia in 2016 with a focus on Scotland and America in an Age of War and Revolution. He is a former Farmer Postdoctoral Fellow in Digital Humanities at the University of Virginia Law Library. At UVA, Ambuske co-directed the 1828 Catalogue Project and the Scottish Court of Session Project.  Ambuske is currently at work on a book entitled Emigration and Empire: America and Scotland in the Revolutionary Era, as well as a chapter on Scottish loyalism during the American Revolution for a volume to be published by the University of Edinburgh Press.
44:27
November 21, 2019
Quartering Troops in Early America with John McCurdy
In the Declaration of Independence, Thomas Jefferson criticized George III for "Quartering large bodies of armed troops among us" in the years before the American Revolution. To hear Jefferson tell it, quartered troops had long been a problem in early America. In this episode, Dr. John McCurdy of Eastern Michigan University reveals how the history of accommodating troops in North America is more complicated than you might think. Far from being an objectionable practice that motivated Americans to revolt against the British, colonists accepted that quartering soldiers was a necessary and even welcome event under certain conditions. McCurdy, who is the author of the new book, Quarters: The Accommodation of the British Army and the Coming of the American Revolution, will reshape what you know about the relationship between soldiers, civilians, and space in the era of the American Revolution.  About our Guest: John McCurdy, Ph.D. specializes in colonial and Revolutionary America, gender and LGBTQ history, and the Atlantic world. His research examines the connections between social and political history in eighteenth-century North America. He is the author of Citizen Bachelors: Manhood and the Creation of the United States, which examines how ideas about marital status in the colonial era gave rise to American citizenship. His most recent book, Quarters: The Accommodation of the British Army and the Coming of the American Revolution, explores how debates over military power shaped notions of place in Revolutionary America. About our Host: Jim Ambuske leads the Center for Digital History at the Washington Library. He received his Ph.D. in history from the University of Virginia in 2016 with a focus on Scotland and America in an Age of War and Revolution. He is a former Farmer Postdoctoral Fellow in Digital Humanities at the University of Virginia Law Library. At UVA, Ambuske co-directed the 1828 Catalogue Project and the Scottish Court of Session Project.  Ambuske is currently at work on a book entitled Emigration and Empire: America and Scotland in the Revolutionary Era, as well as a chapter on Scottish loyalism during the American Revolution for a volume to be published by the University of Edinburgh Press.
41:32
November 14, 2019
Let's Get Digital With Loren Moulds
How has technology changed the way that historians and educators tell stories about the past? What does it mean to do "digital history" and how can one get started?  On today's episode, Dr. Loren Moulds of the University of Virginia Law Library sits down with Jim Ambuske to explore how technology is enhancing our ability to interpret the past. A historian of 20th century America, Moulds's work on backyard barbecues and federal housing policy shapes the way he thinks about the role technology can play to recover hidden voices from obscure sources. You'll hear about the Law Library's latest projects, including those that deal with early America, and others that reveal some of the darkest moments of the 20th century.  About our Guest: Loren Moulds leads the University of Virginia Law Library's efforts to develop online research tools and to promote, create and preserve its digital collections. Moulds received his bachelor's in English and American studies from Kalamazoo College in 2004 and earned a Ph.D. in History at the University of Virginia. He served as the director of the Project for Technology in History Education at the University of Virginia's Corcoran Department of History as well as the technology coordinator for UVA's Digital Classroom Initiative. About our Host: Jim Ambuske leads the Center for Digital History at the Washington Library. He received his Ph.D. in history from the University of Virginia in 2016 with a focus on Scotland and America in an Age of War and Revolution. He is a former Farmer Postdoctoral Fellow in Digital Humanities at the University of Virginia Law Library. At UVA, Ambuske co-directed the 1828 Catalogue Project and the Scottish Court of Session Project.  Ambuske is currently at work on a book entitled Emigration and Empire: America and Scotland in the Revolutionary Era, as well as a chapter on Scottish loyalism during the American Revolution for a volume to be published by the University of Edinburgh Press.
55:39
November 7, 2019
Writing the History of Early America for Children with David Bruce Smith
Historians spend a lot of time thinking about audience. Whether speaking at academic meetings, talking with the general public, or teaching students, we consider how we can best communicate our ideas to different groups.  So how do we write the history of Early America for a much younger crowd? In a world full of hungry caterpillars and pigeons eager to drive city buses, how do we communicate the complexity of the past to children? Author David Bruce Smith sits down with Jim Ambuske to discuss his new book, Abigail & John, a portrait of the famous Adams couple from Massachusetts. The inaugural volume in "The Grateful American Book Series," Abigail and John features illustrations by Clarice Smith, David's mother, to tell the story of one of the most important partnerships in American history.  About our Guest: David Bruce Smith is the author of 12 books, and founder of the Grateful American™ Foundation, which is restoring enthusiasm about American history–for kids and adults–through videos, podcasts, and interactive activities. The Grateful American™ Book Prize promotes excellence in adolescent historical fiction and non-fiction that is focused on the United States since the country’s founding. In 2019 he launched The Grateful American Book Series; a series of children’s books about historical couples that were–in actuality–partnerships. About our Host: Jim Ambuske leads the Center for Digital History at the Washington Library. He received his Ph.D. in history from the University of Virginia in 2016 with a focus on Scotland and America in an Age of War and Revolution. He is a former Farmer Postdoctoral Fellow in Digital Humanities at the University of Virginia Law Library. At UVA, Ambuske co-directed the 1828 Catalogue Project and the Scottish Court of Session Project.  Ambuske is currently at work on a book entitled Emigration and Empire: America and Scotland in the Revolutionary Era, as well as a chapter on Scottish loyalism during the American Revolution for a volume to be published by the University of Edinburgh Press.
34:40
October 31, 2019
Mapping a Nation with Erin Holmes and Janine Yorimoto Boldt
Maps do more than visualize landscapes, identify political borders, or chart rivers and oceans. They show us the many and varied ways that we make sense of the world around us. How then, did Early Americans make sense of their world through maps?  Mapping a Nation: Shaping the Early American Republic offers one answer. It is an exhibit currently on display at the American Philosophical Society (APS) in Philadelphia. Using maps, the tools to make them, and other objects, the exhibition shows "how maps were used to create and extend the physical, political, and ideological boundaries of the new nation while creating and reinforcing structural inequalities in the Early Republic." On this episode, lead curator Dr. Erin Holmes and co-curator Dr. Janine Yorimoto Boldt sit down with Jim Ambuske to discuss how they brought Mapping a Nation to life. You'll also get a sneak peak at Dr. Boldt's next exhibition, Dr. Franklin, Citizen Scientist, which will open at APS in Spring 2020. About Our Guests: Erin Holmes is the Kinder Postdoctoral Fellow at the University of Missouri. She is a former Washington Library Fellow. She is also a former Andrew W. Mellon Post-Doctoral Curatorial Fellow at the American Philosophical Society where was lead curator for Mapping a Nation: Shaping the Early American Republic. She received her Ph.D. in History from the University of South Carolina in 2017 and B.A. in History from the College of William and Mary. Her research compares the evolution of plantation slavery and colonial identity through the built environment in Virginia, South Carolina, and Barbados during the long 18th century. Janine Yorimoto Boldt is the 2018-2020 Andrew W. Mellon Foundation Postdoctoral Curatorial Fellow at the American Philosophical Society. She is lead curator for the 2020 exhibition, Dr. Franklin, Citizen Scientist, and was co-curator of Mapping a Nation: Shaping the Early American Republic. Janine received her PhD in American Studies from William & Mary in 2018. Her current book project investigates the political function and development of portraiture in colonial Virginia. About Our Host: Jim Ambuske leads the Center for Digital History at the Washington Library. He received his Ph.D. in history from the University of Virginia in 2016 with a focus on Scotland and America in an Age of War and Revolution. He is a former Farmer Postdoctoral Fellow in Digital Humanities at the University of Virginia Law Library. At UVA, Ambuske co-directed the 1828 Catalogue Project and the Scottish Court of Session Project.  Ambuske is currently at work on a book entitled Emigration and Empire: America and Scotland in the Revolutionary Era, as well as a chapter on Scottish loyalism during the American Revolution for a volume to be published by the University of Edinburgh Press.
36:59
October 24, 2019
Digitizing the Constitution with Julie Silverbrook
The word “impeachment” is in the air these days. Wouldn’t it be nice if we had a website to find information about what the Constitution’s framers thought about impeachment or any other Constitutional issue. Well, The Constitutional Sources Project is the place for you. The project, called ConSource for short, is a Washington, D.C.-based initiative to digitize and transcribe the documents that shaped the Federal Constitution, and increase our historical literacy. On today’s episode, you’ll hear from Julie Silverbrook, ConSource’s executive director. Julie is an attorney and she is leading the charge to help us all better understand our constitutional past. If you'd like to support this podcast as well as new research into George Washington and his world, please consider becoming a Mount Vernon Member.  About Our Guest: Julie Silverbrook is Executive Director of The Constitutional Sources Project, a non-partisan, not-for-profit organization devoted to increasing understanding, facilitating research, and encouraging discussion of the US Constitution by connecting individuals with the documentary history of its creation, ratification, and amendment. Silverbrook holds a J.D. from the William & Mary Law School, where she received the National Association of Women Lawyers Award and the Thurgood Marshall Award and served as a Senior Articles Editor on the William & Mary Bill of Rights Journal. About Our Host: Jim Ambuske leads the Center for Digital History at the Washington Library. He received his Ph.D. in history from the University of Virginia in 2016 with a focus on Scotland and America in an Age of War and Revolution. He is a former Farmer Postdoctoral Fellow in Digital Humanities at the University of Virginia Law Library. At UVA, Ambuske co-directed the 1828 Catalogue Project and the Scottish Court of Session Project.  Ambuske is currently at work on a book entitled Emigration and Empire: America and Scotland in the Revolutionary Era, as well as a chapter on Scottish loyalism during the American Revolution for a volume to be published by the University of Edinburgh Press.
52:39
October 17, 2019
Walking through The Field of Blood with Joanne B. Freeman
What comes to mind when you think about Congress in the nineteenth century? Perhaps you imagine great orators like Henry Clay or Daniel Webster declaiming on the important issues then facing the republic. And yes, in 1856, South Carolina Congressman Preston Brooks attacked Massachusetts Senator Charles Sumner on the floor of the Senate. But Congress generally was model of solemnity, right? Well, you would be wrong. As Dr. Joanne B. Freeman of Yale University argues in her latest book, The Field of Blood: Violence in Congress and the Road to Civil War, the federal legislature was often a very dangerous place. The peoples’ representatives caned their political opponents, engaged in fisticuffs, and resorted to dueling. And as Freeman finds, these violent delights had violent ends. About Our Guest: Joanne B. Freeman, Professor of History, specializes in the politics and political culture of the revolutionary and early national periods of American History.  She earned her Ph.D. at the University of Virginia.  She is the author of Affairs of Honor: National Politics in the New Republic (Yale University Press), which won the Best Book award from the Society of Historians of the Early American Republic, and her edited volume, Alexander Hamilton: Writings (Library of America) was one of the Atlantic Monthly’s “best books” of 2001.  Her most recent book, The Field of Blood: Violence in Congress and the Road to Civil War, explores physical violence in the U.S. Congress between 1830 and the Civil War, and what it suggests about the institution of Congress, the nature of American sectionalism, the challenges of a young nation’s developing democracy, and the longstanding roots of the Civil War. About Our Host: Jim Ambuske leads the Center for Digital History at the Washington Library. He received his Ph.D. in history from the University of Virginia in 2016 with a focus on Scotland and America in an Age of War and Revolution. He is a former Farmer Postdoctoral Fellow in Digital Humanities at the University of Virginia Law Library. At UVA, Ambuske co-directed the 1828 Catalogue Project and the Scottish Court of Session Project.  Ambuske is currently at work on a book entitled Emigration and Empire: America and Scotland in the Revolutionary Era, as well as a chapter on Scottish loyalism during the American Revolution for a volume to be published by the University of Edinburgh Press.
53:09
October 10, 2019
Entering a World of Paine with Harlow Giles Unger
On today’s show, veteran journalist and biographer Harlow Giles Unger talks to Jim Ambuske about revolutionary radical Thomas Paine, one of his predecessors in the newspaper business. He is the author of the new book, Thomas Paine and the Clarion Call for American Independence. It is the latest in a long line of Unger biographies about the founding generation. Unger reveals a fascinating character in Paine, a man who never met a revolution he didn’t like. He also shares with Ambuske about how his previous life as a journalist informs his approach to biography.  You’ll get as much of a lesson in twentieth-century journalism as you will in eighteenth-century political radicalism. About Our Guest: A former Distinguished Visiting Fellow in American History at George Washington’s Mount Vernon, Harlow Giles Unger is a veteran journalist, broadcaster, educator, and historian. He is the author of 27 books, including 10 biographies of the Founding Fathers—among them, Patrick Henry (Lion of Liberty); James Monroe (The Last Founding Father); the award winning Lafayette; and The Unexpected George Washington: His Private Life. Mr. Unger is a graduate of Yale University and has a Master of Arts from California State University. He spent many years as a foreign correspondent and American Affairs analyst for The New York Herald Tribune Overseas News Service, The Times and The Sunday Times (London), and the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, and he is a former associate professor of English and journalism. About Our Host: Jim Ambuske leads the Center for Digital History at the Washington Library. He received his Ph.D. in history from the University of Virginia in 2016 with a focus on Scotland and America in an Age of War and Revolution. He is a former Farmer Postdoctoral Fellow in Digital Humanities at the University of Virginia Law Library. At UVA, Ambuske co-directed the 1828 Catalogue Project and the Scottish Court of Session Project.  Ambuske is currently at work on a book entitled Emigration and Empire: America and Scotland in the Revolutionary Era, as well as a chapter on Scottish loyalism during the American Revolution for a volume to be published by the University of Edinburgh Press.
51:14
October 3, 2019
Simulating 1793 and the Fate of the Republic with Trey Alsup and Sadie Troy
Imagine you lived in the year 1793. The United States has recently suffered its worst military defeat in its history at the hands of the Miami-Shawnee Confederacy. The French Revolution has turned horrifically violent and France is now at war with most of Europe. And both the British and the French are pressuring the United States to choose a side.  Now imagine that you are one of the American, European, or indigenous leaders whose voices will shape how the U.S. responds to these events. Well, now you can be. On today’s show, Game designer Trey Alsup and Mount Vernon Student Learning Specialist Sadie Troy give you a sneak peak at The Situation Room Experience: Washington's Cabinet. It's a new Live Action Role Playing Game for students, and it's a remarkable way to teach young people about the early history of the United States. The game will debut in the coming months at the Washington Library.  About Our Guests: Trey Alsup is the founder of Wishcraft Simulations, Inc., a company devoted to writing and designing cinematic educational simulations. Its first project was the Situation Room Experience, now open at the Ronald Reagan Presidential Library in Simi Valley, CA and the George W. Bush Presidential Library in Dallas, TX. Wishcraft Simulations works with clients to craft custom solutions to each institution's unique set of needs and goals. Upcoming projects include the Pacific Aviation Museum in Hawaii and Mount Vernon in Virginia. Alsup has worked as a Writer/Producer and Editor on projects for Disney Channel, ABC Family, A&E, History and TLC. He received his BA in Film-Cinema-Video Studies at Vassar College and MFA in Cinema-Television from University of Southern California. Sadie Troy is the Student Learning Specialist in Mount Vernon's Education Department. Sadie's primary responsibilities include coordinating, supporting, and creating student programming. She serves as the Mount Vernon lead on The Situation Room Experience: Washington's Cabinet.  About Our Host: Jim Ambuske leads the Center for Digital History at the Washington Library. He received his Ph.D. in history from the University of Virginia in 2016 with a focus on Scotland and America in an Age of War and Revolution. He is a former Farmer Postdoctoral Fellow in Digital Humanities at the University of Virginia Law Library. At UVA, Ambuske co-directed the 1828 Catalogue Project and the Scottish Court of Session Project.  Ambuske is currently at work on a book entitled Emigration and Empire: America and Scotland in the Revolutionary Era, as well as a chapter on Scottish loyalism during the American Revolution for a volume to be published by the University of Edinburgh Press.
56:52
September 26, 2019
The Power Broker and the King Maker: The Life of Elizabeth Willing Powel with Samantha Snyder
In this episode of Conversations at the Washington Library, Samantha Snyder speaks to Jim Ambuske about the life of Elizabeth Willing Powel. Powel was a prominent Philadelphian who became close to the Washington family. Although her loyalties were unclear in the early years of the American War for Independence, she eventually embraced the Revolution. Powel was at the center of Philadelphia politics, but her influence reached beyond the city to the banks of the Potomac and places further afield. In an era in which women could not vote or hold elected office, Powel was a power broker and king maker in Early American society.  About Our Guest: Samantha Snyder is the Reference Librarian at the Washington Library. She is responsible for developing the library's general collections and electronic resources, as well as managing all reference inquiries. She is currently at work on a biography of the life of Elizabeth Willing Powel.  About Our Host: Jim Ambuske leads the Center for Digital History at the Washington Library. He received his Ph.D. in history from the University of Virginia in 2016 with a focus on Scotland and America in an Age of War and Revolution. He is a former Farmer Postdoctoral Fellow in Digital Humanities at the University of Virginia Law Library. At UVA, Ambuske co-directed the 1828 Catalogue Project and the Scottish Court of Session Project.  Ambuske is currently at work on a book entitled Emigration and Empire: America and Scotland in the Revolutionary Era, as well as a chapter on Scottish loyalism during the American Revolution for a volume to be published by the University of Edinburgh Press.
45:42
September 19, 2019
Tracing the Rise and Fall of Light-Horse Harry Lee with Ryan Cole
You may know him as Robert E. Lee’s father, but Henry “Light-Horse Harry” Lee was so much more. Born into a Virginia dynasty, the man who would become one of George Washington’s protégés came of age with the American Revolution itself. Lee was a graduate of Princeton University, a cavalry commander in the war’s brutal southern theater, and he later served two terms as Virginia’s governor. He was a dashing figure who romanticized the ancient world and aspired to be one of the new nation’s great slave-holding planters. But death and despair undercut the life that Lee imagined for himself. On today’s program, Ryan Cole joins us to discuss Lee’s tragic story. Cole is a journalist and former member of the Lincoln Bicentennial Commission. He is the author of the new book, Light-Horse Harry Lee: The Rise and Fall of a Revolutionary Hero. About our Guest: Ryan Cole, a former assistant to Indiana Governor Mitch Daniels and speechwriter at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, holds degrees in history and journalism from Indiana University. He has written extensively about American history and literature for the Wall Street Journal, National Review, the New Criterion, Civil War Times, the American Interest, and the Indianapolis Star. Additionally, he has written for Indiana University and the Lumina Foundation, and he served on the staff of the U.S. Abraham Lincoln Bicentennial Commission. About Our Host: Jim Ambuske leads the digital history initiatives at the Washington Library. He received his Ph.D. in history from the University of Virginia in 2016 with a focus on Scotland and America in an Age of War and Revolution. He is a former Farmer Postdoctoral Fellow in Digital Humanities at the University of Virginia Law Library. At UVA, Ambuske co-directed the 1828 Catalogue Project and the Scottish Court of Session Project.  Ambuske is currently at work on a book entitled Emigration and Empire: America and Scotland in the Revolutionary Era, as well as a chapter on Scottish loyalism during the American Revolution for a volume to be published by the University of Edinburgh Press.
53:47
September 12, 2019
Making Sense of Murder in the Shenandoah with Jessica Lowe: Explorations in Early American Law Part 4
On July 4, 1791, fifteen years after Americans declared independence, two men walked into a Virginia field. Only one walked out alive. John Crane, the son of an elite Virginia family, killed a man named Abraham Vanhorn after the two exchanged some heated words. Crane was arrested in the name of the law, but two decades earlier he would have been detained in the name of the king. Why does this change matter? And what does it have to tell us about how Virginians and other Americans remade their British identity into an American one in the years after independence? Today's episode features Dr. Jessica Lowe of the University of Virginia School of Law. In her new book, Murder in the Shenandoah: Making Law Sovereign in Revolutionary Virginia, Professor Lowe unpacks the case of Commonwealth v. Crane and what it meant to create a republic of laws and not kings. This episode concludes our four-part mini-series on the history of early American law. Check out previous episodes at www.mountvernon.org/podcast. You can support this podcast as well as new research into George Washington and his world by becoming a Mount Vernon member.   About Our Guest: Jessica Lowe, Ph.D. specializes in 18th- and 19th-century American legal history. She received her J.D. with honors from Harvard Law School, and clerked in the District of Connecticut and on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit. Lowe also practiced litigation and appellate law at Jones Day in Washington, D.C., where she worked on a number of cases before the U.S. Supreme Court. She is admitted to practice in Virginia and the District of Columbia. She received her Ph.D. in American history from Princeton University. About Our Host: Jim Ambuske leads the digital history initiatives at the Washington Library. He received his Ph.D. in history from the University of Virginia in 2016 with a focus on Scotland and America in an Age of War and Revolution. He is a former Farmer Postdoctoral Fellow in Digital Humanities at the University of Virginia Law Library. At UVA, Ambuske co-directed the 1828 Catalogue Project and the Scottish Court of Session Project.  Ambuske is currently at work on a book entitled Emigration and Empire: America and Scotland in the Revolutionary Era, as well as a chapter on Scottish loyalism during the American Revolution for a volume to be published by the University of Edinburgh Press.
44:23
September 5, 2019
Interpreting George Washington's Constitution with Lindsay Chervinsky: Explorations in Early American Law Part 3
In the fall of 1789, George Washington ordered a printed copy of the Constitution along with the laws passed by the First Federal Congress. A book binder bound the printed sheets in leather and added the words "President of the United States" to the front cover. Washington referred to the volume as the "Acts of Congress." Inside, he made a few short marginal notations next to key passages in the Constitution. You can see a digitized version of the Acts of Congress here. Why did Washington write in this book? And what can his brief scribbles tell us about how he interpreted the Constitution as well as his actions as the first president of the United States?  In our own time we wrestle with questions about the Constitution’s meaning. Is it a document fixed in time, to be understood as its Framers and the American people understood it in the 18th century, or is it a living, flexible document responsive to historical change? Washington’s answers to these questions may surprise you. On today’s episode, Dr. Lindsay Chervinsky of the White House Historical Association helps us to understand George Washington’s Constitution. She is the author of a recently published article in the journal Law and History Review that is the first to make sense of Washington’s careful notations. She is also the author of a soon to be published book entitled The Cabinet: George Washington and the Creation of an American Institution. Dr. Chervinsky dropped by the studio after speaking with teachers as part of Mount Vernon's Teacher's Institute. If you are a teacher, click the link to learn how you can participate in this program.  This is Part 3 of our Explorations in Early American Law mini-series. Be sure to check out Part 1 with Dr. Nicola Phillips and Part 2 with Dr. Kate Brown.  About Our Guest: Dr. Lindsay M. Chervinsky is a White House Historian for the White House Historical Association. She received her B.A. with honors in history and political science from George Washington University and her masters and Ph.D. in Early American History from the University of California, Davis. She also completed a postdoctoral fellowship at the Center for Presidential History at Southern Methodist University before joining the WHHA.  About Our Host: Jim Ambuske leads the digital history initiatives at the Washington Library. He received his Ph.D. in history from the University of Virginia in 2016 with a focus on Scotland and America in an Age of War and Revolution. He is a former Farmer Postdoctoral Fellow in Digital Humanities at the University of Virginia Law Library. At UVA, Ambuske co-directed the 1828 Catalogue Project and the Scottish Court of Session Project. Ambuske is currently at work on a book entitled Emigration and Empire: America and Scotland in the Revolutionary Era.
59:27
August 29, 2019
Meeting Alexander Hamilton, Attorney at Law, with Kate Brown: Explorations in Early American Law Part 2
We all know Alexander Hamilton for his service during the Revolutionary War, his tenure as the first Secretary of the Treasury, and his death at the hands of Aaron Burr. But have you met Alexander Hamilton, Attorney at Law? In Part 2 of our four-part exploration of early American law, Dr. Kate Elizabeth Brown of Western Kentucky University introduces us to a man who was as ferocious in the court room as he was battling Thomas Jefferson over the National Bank. And as Dr. Brown argues in her book, Alexander Hamilton and the Development of American Law, you can't separate the one Hamilton from the other. Hamilton's law practice in the 1780s shaped his approach to federal power in the 1790s. His time representing American Loyalists and other clients in New York state courts informed his thinking about the law, the Constitution, and the young republic's place in the world. It may also surprise you to learn that Hamilton was as concerned with individual rights as he was creating a more powerful national government.  Dr. Brown was in town to lecture as part of Mount Vernon's Teacher's Institute and she stopped by after class to talk about Hamilton and the law. If you'd like more information about our teacher programs, please click the link above.  Be sure to check out Part 1 of this mini-series on early American law featuring Dr. Nicola Phillips and her research into Thomas Erskine, and tune in next week for Part 3 when we talk to Dr. Lindsay Chervinsky about George Washington's Constitution.  About our Guest: Dr. Kate Elizabeth Brown is an assistant professor of history at Western Kentucky University specializing in American legal and constitutional history and the early republic. In addition to her book, Alexander Hamilton and the Development of American Law, she has published articles in the Law and History Review and the Federal History Journal. She has also received numerous fellowships and research grants including a James C. Rees Fellowship from the Fred W. Smith National Library for the Study of George Washington, a Larry J. Hackman Research Residency Grant at the New York State Archives, a Cromwell Senior Research Grant from the American Society of Legal History and a fellowship at the Gilder-Lehrman Institute for American History.    About Our Host:  Jim Ambuske leads the digital history initiatives at the Washington Library. He received his Ph.D. in history from the University of Virginia in 2016 with a focus on Scotland and America in an Age of War and Revolution. He is a former Farmer Postdoctoral Fellow in Digital Humanities at the University of Virginia Law Library. At UVA, Ambuske co-directed the 1828 Catalogue Project and the Scottish Court of Session Project.  Ambuske is currently at work on a book entitled Emigration and Empire: America and Scotland in the Revolutionary Era, as well as a chapter on Scottish loyalism during the American Revolution for a volume to be published by the University of Edinburgh Press.  
48:49
August 22, 2019
The Transatlantic Reach of Thomas Erskine and Law in the Age of Revolutions with Nicola Phillips: Explorations in Early American Law Part 1
In what ways did the United States remain bound to Great Britain in the decades after American Independence? As it turns out, the law and legal ideas served as a connection between Americans and their former British brethren. In today's episode we talk to Dr. Nicola Phillips of Royal Hollway, University of London, about the life and career of Thomas Erskine. The Scottish-born Erskine was a member of an elite family whose ranks included Henry, Lord Advocate of Scotland, and David, 11th Earl of Buchan and correspondent of George Washington. Thomas, who practiced law in England, championed ideas on freedom of the press and trial by jury that resonated with Americans as they remade their laws to suit the new republic.  This episode is part one of a four-part miniseries on the history of early American law featuring Drs. Nicola Phillips, Kate Brown, Lindsay Chervinsky, and Jessica Lowe.     About Our Guest: Nicola Phillips, Ph.D., is Lecturer in History at Royal Hollway, University of London where she also co-directs The Bedford Centre for the History of Women and Gender. She is an expert in Gender History c. 1660-1830 and a Fellow of the Royal Historical Society. Her first book examined the legal, cultural, social and economic position of Women in Business, 1700-1850 (Boydell Press, 2006). Her second book, The Profligate Son; Or, a True Story of Family Conflict, Fashionable Vice and Financial Ruin in Regency England (OUP, Oxford & Basic Books, New York 2013) was listed as one of the top ten books of the year by The Washington Post. Nicola is a former Library of Congress Georgian Papers Programme Fellow.   About Our Host: Jim Ambuske leads the digital history initiatives at the Washington Library. He received his Ph.D. in history from the University of Virginia in 2016 with a focus on Scotland and America in an Age of War and Revolution. He is a former Farmer Postdoctoral Fellow in Digital Humanities at the University of Virginia Law Library. At UVA, Ambuske co-directed the 1828 Catalogue Project and the Scottish Court of Session Project.  Ambuske is currently at work on a book entitled Emigration and Empire: America and Scotland in the Revolutionary Era, as well as a chapter on Scottish loyalism during the American Revolution for a volume to be published by the University of Edinburgh Press. 
41:44
August 15, 2019
Finding George Washington in Scotland with Rachel Hosker
How did a George Washington letter find a home Scotland? In this episode of Conversations at the Washington Library, Jim Ambuske talks with Rachel Hosker, deputy head of special collections and archives manager at the University Edinburgh Library about a document that connects Washington to Adam Ferguson, one of the major figures of the Scottish Enlightenment. Recorded in Edinburgh at the library's Centre for Research Collections, Ambuske and Hosker also look over Washington's Political Legacies, a book published in New York in the months just after Washington's death. They also discuss Hosker's early fascination with manuscripts and rare books and the university library's amazing collections. Haste ye back!
39:46
August 8, 2019
Resilience in a Time of War: A Special Purple Heart Commemoration Day Conversation with LTC Matthew Kutilek, USMC
In this episode, Jim Ambuske chats with LTC Matthew Kutilek, USMC, a 2001 graduate of The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina. Kutilek is a United States Marine Special Operations Officer with 18+ years of active duty service with multiple combat deployments to Iraq and Afghanistan. He is this year's featured speaker at Mount Vernon's Purple Heart Commemoration Day on August 10th. In this podcast, Kutilek discusses his passion for history, service in the Marine Corps, and the 2010 combat wound that changed his life. 
49:45
August 1, 2019
Looking for Lafayette with Jordan Pellerito
In this episode, Jim Ambuske sits down with first year Ph.D. student Jordan Pellerito of the University of Missouri who is interning this summer at the Washington Library. Pellerito tells us about her Master’s degree work on the Marquis de Lafayette and how she is spending her summer working with the Library’s collection of Rare Books while researching early U.S. Chambers of Commerce.
34:02
July 29, 2019
The Only Unavoidable Subject of Regret with Mary Thompson: Part 2
The Only Unavoidable Subject of Regret Part 1 In this episode Dr Jim Ambuske continues his conversation with the Washington Librarys Research Historian Mary V Thompson to discuss her new book The Only Unavoidable Subject of Regret George Washington Slavery and the Enslaved Community at Mount Vernon For more information check out our website wwwmountvernonorgpodcast
00:40
July 11, 2019
The Only Unavoidable Subject of Regret with Mary Thompson: Part 1
The Only Unavoidable Subject of Regret Part 1 In this episode Dr Jim Ambuske sits down with the Washington Librarys Research Historian Mary V Thompson to discuss her new book The Only Unavoidable Subject of Regret George Washington Slavery and the Enslaved Community at Mount Vernon For more information check out our website wwwmountvernonorgpodcast
00:30
July 4, 2019
Republican Laws and Monarchical Education with Mark Boonshoft
Republican Laws and Monarchical Education In this episode Dr Jim Ambuske sits down with Library research fellow Dr Mark Boonshoft to discuss education in the early republic For more information check out our website wwwmountvernonorgpodcast
00:31
June 27, 2019
Welcome Jim Ambuske!
Welcome Jim Ambuske In this episode Dr Kevin Butterfield sits down with Dr Jim Ambuske the Washington Librarys new Digital Historian and future podcast host For more information check out our website wwwmountvernonorgpodcast
00:30
June 20, 2019
Aboard the USS George Washington
Aboard the USS George Washington In this episode Dr Douglas Bradburn sits down with Captain Glenn Jamison Captain Daryle D Cardone and Command Master Chief Maurice Coffey of the USS George Washington on location at the aircraft carrier For more information check out our website wwwmountvernonorgpodcast
00:25
June 13, 2019
Pen Versus Plow
Pen Versus Plow In this episode Dr Kevin Butterfield sits down with Kings College Georgian Papers Fellow Dr James Fisher to discuss his latest findings on the topic titled George Washington and the Transatlantic Circulation and Reception of Agricultural Literature and Knowledge For more information check out our website www.mountvernonorg.org/podcast
00:32
June 6, 2019
Birthing a Nation
Birthing a Nation In this episode Associate Curator Jessie MacLeod sits down with Library research fellow Sara Collini to discuss her latest findings on the topic titled Birthing a Nation Enslaved Women and Midwifery in Early America 1750-1820 For more information check out our website www.mountvernonorg.org/podcast
00:29
May 30, 2019
Valley Forge
In this episode, Dr Joe Stoltz sits down with Tom Clavin to discuss his new book entitled Valley Forge. For more information check out our website www.mountvernon.org/podcast
00:28
May 23, 2019
The British Are Coming
In this bonus-sized episode Dr Douglas Bradburn sits down with bestselling author and Pulitzer Prize winner Rick Atkinson to discuss volume one of his new Revolution Trilogy entitled The British are Coming The War for America Lexington to Princeton 1775-1777. For more information check out our website www.mountvernon.org/podcast.
01:22
May 16, 2019
In the Hurricane's Eye
In this episode, Dr Kevin C. Butterfield sits down with world renowned author and 2016 George Washington Prize winner Nathaniel Philbrick to discuss his latest book, In the Hurricanes Eye The Genius of George Washington and the Victory at Yorktown. For more information check out our website www.mountvernon.org/podcast
00:30
May 9, 2019
Buried Lives
In this episode, Dr Kevin C. Butterfield sits down with Carla McClafferty author of the book, Buried Lives The Enslaved People of George Washington's Mount Vernon. For more information check out our website www.mountvernon.org/podcast.
00:26
May 2, 2019
The Proof of the Pudding will be in the Eating
In this episode Dr Kevin C. Butterfield, sits down with Library research fellow and world-renowned chef Justin Cherry to discuss his research topic, "The Impact of George Washingtons Mount Vernon in 18th Century Foodways." For more information, check out our website at  www.mountvernon.org/podcast.
00:25
April 25, 2019
Albert Gallatin, the Early Republic, and the Atlantic World
In this episode, Dr. Kevin C. Butterfield sits down with Dr. Sean P. Harvey, Library research fellow and associate professor of history at Seton Hall University, to discuss his research topic tilted, Albert Gallatin, the Early Republic, and the Atlantic World. For more information check out our website at www.mountvernon.org/podcast.
00:32
April 18, 2019
Young Benjamin Franklin
In this episode, Dr. Kevin C. Butterfield sits down with Nick Bunker, author and 2015 George Washington Prize winner, to discuss his new book, Young Benjamin Franklin: The Birth of Ingenuity. For more information check out our website at www.mountvernon.org/podcast.
00:30
April 11, 2019
Constitution Making In Early America
In this episode, Dr. Kevin C. Butterfield sits down with research fellow Dr. James Hrdlicka to discuss his latest findings on the origins and development of American democratic constitutionalism. For more information check out our website at www.mountvernon.org/podcast.
00:32
April 4, 2019
Remember The Ladies!
In this episode, Dr. Kevin C. Butterfield sits down with Dr. Woody Holton to discuss the 10th anniversary of his Bancroft Prize winning book, Abigail Adams. For more information check out our website at www.mountvernon.org/podcast.
00:35
March 28, 2019
The National Bank Controversy
In this episode, Dr. Kevin C. Butterfield sits down with Dr. Eric Lomazoff, an Assistant Professor of Political Science at Villanova University, to discuss his new book, Reconstructing the National Bank Controversy: Politics and Law in the Early American Republic. For more information check out our website at www.mountvernon.org/podcast.
00:35
March 21, 2019
Listener Questions!
In this episode, Anthony King sits down with Dr. Joe Stoltz, Co-Director of the George Washington Leadership Institute at Mount Vernon, and Dr. Dana Stefanelli, Assistant Editor for the Papers of George Washington Project for to answer submitted listener questions about George Washington, the Revolutionary War, and the founding era. For more information check out our website at www.mountvernon.org/podcast.
00:31
March 14, 2019
Give Me Sofas Or Give Me Death!
In this episode, Dr. Joe Stoltz sits down with Adam Erby, Associate Curator at Mount Vernon, to discuss the newly restored front parlor room in the mansion. For more information check out our website at www.mountvernon.org/podcast.
00:31
March 7, 2019
Jefferson's Daughters
In this episode, Dr. Kevin C. Butterfield sits down with Dr. Catherine Kerrison, a Professor of history at Villanova University, to discuss her book, Jefferson's Daughters: Three Sisters, White and Black, in a Young America. For more information check out our website at www.mountvernon.org/podcast.
00:38
March 4, 2019
A Toast To George Washington
In this episode, Dr. Joseph Stoltz sits down again with Steve Bashore, the Director of Historic Trades at George Washington's Mount Vernon, to further discuss the whiskey production on-site. For more information check out our website at www.mountvernon.org/podcast.
00:34
February 21, 2019
The Return of the Harpsichord
In this episode, Access Services Librarian Samantha Snyder sits down with Library research fellow Dr. Joyce Lindorff to discuss her research on Nelly Parke Custis as well as the newly restored harpsichord that has been recently brought back to Mount Vernon in honor of our "Year of Music" celebration. For more information check out our website at www.mountvernon.org/podcast.
00:29
February 14, 2019
Frontier Rebels
In this episode, Dr. Kevin C. Butterfield sits down with Dr. Patrick Spero, Librarian and Director of the American Philosophical Society Library, to discuss his latest book, Frontier Rebels: The Fight for Independence in the American West, 1765-1776. For more information check out our website at www.mountvernon.org/podcast.
00:23
February 7, 2019
Researching at the Washington Library
In this episode, Anthony King sits down with Samantha Snyder, Access Services Librarian at the Fred W. Smith National Library for the Study of George Washington at Mount Vernon, to discuss the research operations at the Library as well how people can visit for their own research purposes. For more information check out our website at www.mountvernon.org/podcast.
00:26
January 31, 2019
Don't Just Lead, Revolutionize
In this episode, Anthony King sits down with Dr. Joe Stoltz, Co-Director of the George Washington Leadership Institute at Mount Vernon, to discuss leadership-based programs on-site. For more information check out our website at www.mountvernon.org/podcast.
00:34
January 24, 2019
Growing Up At Mount Vernon
In this episode, Dr. Joseph Stoltz sits down with Cassandra Good, former Library research fellow and Assistant Professor of History at Marymount University, to discuss her latest research on George Washington's step-grandchildren and their lives at Mount Vernon. For more information check out our website at www.mountvernon.org/podcast.
00:33
January 17, 2019
Gardening, Planting, and Landscaping Mount Vernon
In this episode, Dr. Joseph Stoltz sits down with Dean Norton, the Director of Horticulture, to discuss the gardens and planting operations at Mount Vernon. For more information check out our website at www.mountvernon.org/podcast.
00:28
January 10, 2019
Funding Mount Vernon
In this episode, Dr. Joseph Stoltz sits down with Joe Bondi, the Senior Vice President of Development at George Washington's Mount Vernon. The two discuss the challenges and processes behind fundraising for the various projects that keep Mount Vernon running. For more information check out our website at www.mountvernon.org/podcast.
00:35
January 3, 2019
Lives Bound Together
In this episode, Dr. Joseph Stoltz sits down with Jessie MacLeod, Associate Curator here at George Washington's Mount Vernon. The two discuss the behind-the-scenes details that went into creating the acclaimed exhibition, Lives Bound Together: Slavery at George Washington's Mount Vernon. For more information check out our website at www.mountvernon.org/podcast.
00:38
December 27, 2018
School's (In) For Summer
In this episode, Dr. Joseph Stoltz sits down with Alissa Oginsky, Manager of Teacher Programs and 2016 Mount Vernon History Teacher of the Year award winner. The two discuss the residential programs for teachers at the estate as well as the various forms of outreach and resources the education department produces for those outside of the region. For more information check out our website at www.mountvernon.org/podcast.
00:29
December 20, 2018
The Lady and George Washington: Female Genius in the Age of the Constitution
In this episode, Dr. Kevin C. Butterfield sits down with Dr. Mary Sarah Bilder, Founders Professor of Law at Boston College Law School, to discuss her latest research regarding Eliza Harriot Barons O'Connor who played a pivotal role during the Constitutional Convention. For more information check out our website at www.mountvernon.org/podcast.
00:23
December 13, 2018
John Marshall: The Man Who Made the Supreme Court
In this episode, Dr. Kevin C. Butterfield sits down with author Richard Brookhiser to discuss his newest book, John Marshall: The Man Who Made the Supreme Court. For more information check out our website at www.mountvernon.org/podcast.
00:36
December 6, 2018
Inspiring Tomorrow's Leaders
In this episode, Access Services Librarian Samantha Snyder sits down with Julie Almacy, Manager of the Mount Vernon Leadership Fellows program, to discuss the impact of this life changing experience for students as well as the process for how to apply for future fellowship classes. For more information check out our website at www.mountvernon.org/podcast.
00:16
November 29, 2018
Thanks-Giving
In this episode, Dr. Joseph Stoltz sits down with Anthony King, Library Projects Assistant at George Washington's Mount Vernon and co-producer/sound engineer of the Conversations at the Washington Library Podcast. The two reflect on the previous year recording the podcast since they took administrative and creative control over the series. From all of us here at Mount Vernon, have a happy Thanksgiving! For more information check out our website at www.mountvernon.org/podcast. 
00:26
November 22, 2018
The Ultimate Lightning Conductor: Benjamin Franklin, Espionage, and Propaganda
In this episode, Access Services Librarian Samantha Snyder sits down with author and Library research fellow George Goodwin to discuss his latest findings regarding Benjamin Franklin, espionage, and the propaganda dealings in Europe in the American Revolution. For more information check out our website at www.mountvernon.org/podcast.
00:28
November 15, 2018
More Than Putting Objects On Display: Curating Mount Vernon
In this episode, Access Services Librarian Samantha Snyder sits down with Adam Erby, Associate Curator at Mount Vernon, to discuss the his favorite items in the collection as well as a behind-the-scenes look at the process in interpreting the mansion. For more information check out our website www.mountvernon.org/podcast.
00:29
November 8, 2018
Woodland Washington
In this episode Dr Joseph Stoltz, sits down with Peter Stark author of Young Washington How Wilderness and War Forged America's Founding Father to discuss Washington's early career and its impact on his life. For more information check out our website www.mountvernon.org/podcast.
00:32
November 1, 2018
Jack-O'-Lanterns, George, and Sheep's Blood: Halloween at Mount Vernon
In this episode, we take a spook-tacular tour of Mount Vernon's history, featuring stories and voices from across the ages. Happy Halloween from all of us here at Mount Vernon! For more information check out our website at www.mountvernon.org/podcast.
00:22
October 25, 2018
How Uncle Tom Came To Be
In this episode, Dr. Kevin C. Butterfield sits down with Washington Library research fellow Dr. Daniel Livesay to discuss his recent book, Children of Uncertain Fortune: Mixed-Race Jamaicans in Britain and the Atlantic Family, 1733-1833, as well as his new research topic about the treatment of elderly slaves in the Chesapeake region. For more information check out our website at www.mountvernon.org/podcast.
00:33
October 18, 2018
'A Deserving Brother': George Washington And Freemasonry
In this episode, Dr. Kevin C. Butterfield sits down with Washington Library research fellow Mark Tabbert to discuss his latest research regarding George Washington and his membership in/relationship with Freemasonry. For more information check out our website www.mountvernon.org/podcast.
00:30
October 11, 2018
Happy Birthday Washington Library!
In this episode, to celebrate the five-year anniversary of the opening of the Washington Library, current Executive Director Dr. Kevin C. Butterfield sits down with Dr. Douglas Bradburn, the former Founding Director of the Library and now President and C.E.O. of George Washington's Mount Vernon. The two discuss the highlights of the Library's history, the important events and acquisitions, as well as the future of the facility. For more information check out our website at www.mountvernon.org/podcast.
00:39
October 4, 2018
Rain Makes Corn, George Makes Whiskey!
In this episode, Dr. Joseph Stoltz sits down with Steve Bashore, the Director of Historic Trades at George Washington's Mount Vernon. The two discuss the history and operations at the Distillery & Gristmill, including the popular line of whiskey products produced on-site. For more information check out our website at www.mountvernon.org/podcast.
00:33
September 27, 2018
Eatin', Sleepin', and Thinkin' George
In this episode, Access Services Librarian Samantha Snyder sits down with Ph.D. candidate at the University of Edinburgh in Scotland and Washington Library research fellow Krysten Blackstone to discuss her fellowship experience. For more information check out our website at www.mountvernon.org/podcast.
00:23
September 20, 2018
Honor Amongst Georges
In this episode, Dr. Joseph Stoltz sits down with Assistant Professor of History at the William Woods University and former Washington Library research fellow Dr. Craig Bruce Smith to discuss his new book, American Honor: The Creation of the Nation's Ideals during the Revolutionary Era. For more information check out our website at www.mountvernon.org/podcast.
00:30
September 13, 2018
The Florida We Deserve
In this episode, Dr. Joseph Stoltz sits down with Associate Professor of American History at Southern Illinois University Edwardsville and Library research fellow Robert Paulett to discuss his research regarding maps and the Proclamation of 1763. For more information check out our website www.mountvernon.org/podcast.
00:31
September 6, 2018
Depressions, Recessions, and Panics, Oh My!
In this episode, Dr. Joseph Stoltz sits down with Scott Miller, a Ph.D. candidate at the University of Virginia and a former Washington Library research fellow, to discuss his latest findings regarding the economy of the early American Republic. For more information check out our website at www.mountvernon.org/podcast.
00:31
August 30, 2018
The Lakota Values and George Washington
In this episode, Mount Vernon's Vice President of Education Allison Wickens sits down with Valerie Shull, a 23-year veteran teacher of the Douglas School District in Box Elder, South Dakota and current Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings educator for the Rapid City Area Schools in Rapid City, South Dakota. In their conversation, they discuss Shull's time at Mount Vernon as a teacher fellow as well as her main research project, connecting the Lakota Values with George Washington. For more information check out our website at www.mountvernon.org/podcast.
00:35
August 23, 2018
John Jay is Here to Stay
In this episode, Dr. Joseph Stoltz sits down with Associate Professor of History at the University of Northwestern St. Paul and former Washington Library research fellow Dr. Jonathan Den Hartog to discuss his findings on John Jay. For more information check out our website at www.mountvernon.org/podcast.
00:35
August 16, 2018
Reading Dead People's Mail
In this episode, Dr. Joseph Stoltz sits down with Dr. Dana Stefanelli to discuss his role as one of the editors for the Papers of George Washington Project. For more information check out our website at www.mountvernon.org/podcast.
00:31
August 9, 2018
How Do I Reach These Kids?
In this episode, Dr. Joseph Stoltz sits down with Allison Wickens, Vice President of Education at George Washington's Mount Vernon. For more information check out our website at www.mountvernon.org/podcast.
00:32
August 2, 2018
George Washington: Master Farmer
In this episode, Dr. Joseph Stoltz sits down with Sam Murphy, Manager of Historic Trades at George Washington's Mount Vernon. For more information check out our website at www.mountvernon.org/podcast.
00:30
July 26, 2018
Who Interprets History?
In this episode, Dr. Joseph Stoltz sits down with Jeremy Ray, Manager of History Interpretation at George Washington's Mount Vernon. For more information check our website at www.mountvernon.org/podcast.
00:35
July 19, 2018
Confronting Tragic History
In this episode, Dr. Joseph Stoltz sits down with Mount Vernon character interpreter Brenda Parker to discuss the challenges of portraying and articulating the past in a modern setting. For more information check out our website at www.mountvernon.org/podcast.
00:37
July 12, 2018
"[Hamilton] History is Happening"
In this episode, Dr. Joseph Stoltz sits down with Hamilton musical U.S. tour cast members Sabrina Sloan (Angelica Schuyler) and Nicholas Christopher (Aaron Burr). For more information check out our website at www.mountvernon.org/podcast.
00:21
July 5, 2018
Reflections on a Historian's Lifetime
In this episode, Dr. Gordon Wood sits down with Dr. Douglas Bradburn, the President and C.E.O. of George Washington's Mount Vernon, to discuss Dr. Wood's fifty-three year career as a historian of early America. For more information check out our website at www.mountvernon.org/podcast.
00:34
July 4, 2018
Friends Divided: John Adams and Thomas Jefferson
In this episode, Dr. Gordon Wood sits down with Dr. Douglas Bradburn, the President and C.E.O. of George Washington's Mount Vernon, to discuss Dr. Wood's new book, Friends Divided: John Adams and Thomas Jefferson. For more information check out our website at www.mountvernon.org/podcast.
00:28
July 4, 2018
Revolution Song: A Story of American Freedom
In this episode, Dr. Douglas Bradburn, the President and C.E.O. of George Washington's Mount Vernon, sits down with author Russell Shorto to discuss his monumental new book, Revolution Song: A Story of American Freedom. For more information check out our website www.mountvernon.org/podcast.
00:33
July 4, 2018
First in Books, First in Peace
In this episode, Mount Vernon's President and C.E.O. Douglas Bradburn sits down with scholar Kevin J. Hayes to discuss his new book, George Washington: A Life in Books. For more information check out our website www.mountvernon.org/podcast.
00:38
July 4, 2018
Battlefield Office Politics
In this episode, Dr. Joseph Stoltz sits down with Washington Library research fellow Dr. Mark Edward Lender to discuss the Conway Cabal and the challenge to General Washington's leadership position. For more information check out our website at www.mountvernon.org/podcast.
00:31
July 4, 2018
#SoulClave
SoulClave In this episode Dr Joe Stoltz sits down with Library research fellow Iris de Rode to discuss the life of Franois Jean de Chastellux and his relationship with George Washington For more information check out our website wwwmountvernonorgpodcast
00:32
July 4, 2018
Codfish Olé
Codfish Ol In this episode Dr Joseph Stoltz sits down with Washington Library research fellow Dr Elisa Vargas to discuss the early diplomatic relationship between Spain and the United States focusing on the work of Diego Mara de Gardoqui Spains First Diplomatic Envoy to the United States For more information check out our website wwwmountvernonorgpodcast
00:30
July 4, 2018
Where History Has Never Gone Before
Where History Has Never Gone Before Historical Narrative in the Age of New Media In this episode Mount Vernon President and CEO Doug Bradburn sits down with the Senior Vice President of Visitor Engagement Rob Shenk to discuss the challenges and opportunities of public history in the age of New Media focusing on Mount Vernons newly renovated Revolutionary War Theater For more information check out our website wwwmountvernonorgpodcast
00:38
July 4, 2018
How To "Be Washington"
How To Be Washington A BehindtheScenes Look at Mount Vernons New Interactive Experience In this episode we take a behindthescenes look at Mount Vernons newest interactive experience Be Washington Joe Stoltz Matt Briney and Joe Cortina sitdown at Cortina Productions in Maclean VA to talk about creating a stateoftheart exhibit For more information check out our website wwwmountvernonorgpodcast
00:35
July 4, 2018
Feisty Fluid Free Trade
Feisty Fluid Free Trade In this episode Dr Joseph Stoltz sits down with Washington Library research fellow Dr Lawrence BA Hatter to discuss his topic Negotiating Independence American Overseas Merchant Communities in the Age of Revolution For more information check out our website wwwmountvernonorgpodcast
00:28
June 29, 2018
Another Badly Behaving Woman
Another Badly Behaving Woman In this episode Dr Joseph Stoltz sits down with Washington Library research fellow Dr Charlene Boyer Lewis to discuss her topic The Traitors Wife Peggy Arnold and Revolutionary America For more information check out our website wwwmountvernonorgpodcast
00:32
June 29, 2018
Patrick Henry And Jefferson Too
Patrick Henry and Jefferson Too In this episode Mount Vernon President and CEO Dr Douglas Bradburn sits down with Dr Jon Kukla to discuss his book Patrick Henry Champion of Liberty For more information check out our website wwwmountvernonorgpodcast
00:48
June 29, 2018
Transatlantic Gunrunning Playwrights
Transatlantic Gunrunning Playrights In this episode Dr Joseph Stoltz sits down with Dr Larrie Ferreiro to discuss his book Brothers At Arms American Independence and the Men of France and Spain Who Saved It For more information check out our website wwwmountvernonorgpodcast
00:34
June 29, 2018
047. Edward Gray
Dr. Edward Gray is Professor of History at Florida State University where he teaches a range of courses in U.S. history, Native American history, and the history of the Pacific in the age of Captain James Cook. He was named a Top Young Historian by History News Network and was a Fulbright Distinguished Lecturer in Japan in 2014. In this episode he discusses his book "Tom Paine's Iron Bridge: Building a United States."
1:01:15
August 2, 2017
046. Alan Taylor
Dr. Alan Taylor is the Thomas Jefferson Foundation Chair and Professor of History at the University of Virginia. He has written numerous books on colonial North America, the American Revolution, and the early Republic. Dr. Taylor has twice been awarded the Pulitzer Prize in History, most recently for "The Internal Enemy: Slavery and War in Virginia, 1772-1832," which was also a finalist for the National Book Award and the George Washington Prize. In this episode he discusses his book "American Revolutions: A Continental History, 1750-1804."
1:20:40
August 1, 2017
045. Louisa Thomas
Louisa Thomas is a graduate of Harvard University and former fellow at the New America Foundation think tank. She is also a former contributor to the sports and pop culture blog Grantland and contributing editor at Newsweek. In this episode Ms. Thomas discusses her second book "Louisa: The Extraordinary Life of Mrs. Adams." Ms. Thomas spoke at the second of three Michelle Smith Lectures on April 20, 2017.
1:14:19
July 31, 2017
044. Michael Klarman
Dr. Michael Klarman is the Kirkland and Ellis Professor at Harvard Law School and received his Ph.D. in legal history from the University of Oxford, where he was a Marshall Scholar. Dr. Klarman is the author of numerous books on constitutional law and history. In this episode he discusses his book The Framers’ Coup: Building a United States, which was one of seven finalists for the 2017 George Washington Prize. Dr. Klarman spoke at a Ford Evening Book Talk on April 11, 2017.
1:13:24
July 30, 2017
043. George Goodwin
George Goodwin is Honorary Author in Residence at Benjamin Franklin House in London, the world's only remaining Franklin home. He is also a Fellow at the Royal Historical Society, the Chartered Institute of Marketing, and the Royal Society of Arts. In this episode he discusses his book "Benjamin Franklin in London: The British Life of America's Founding Father." Mr. Goodwin spoke at the 2017 Michelle Smith Lecture series on March 30, 2017.
1:10:54
July 29, 2017
042. Erica Armstrong Dunbar
Dr. Erica Armstrong Dunbar is the Blue and Gold Distinguished Professor of Black American Studies at the University of Delaware where her teaching focuses on slavery, racial injustice, and gender equality. In 2011 she was named the Inaugural Director of the Program in African American History at the Library, and her book, A Fragile Freedom: African American Women and Emancipation in the Antebellum City, was the first to chronicle the lives of African American women in the urban north during the early republic. In this episode she discusses her newest book Never Caught: The Washingtons’ Relentless Pursuit of their Runaway Slave, Ona Judge.
57:48
July 28, 2017
041. John Steele Gordon
Mr. John Steele Gordon is an independent author and historian who specializes in business and financial history. He has written numerous books on America's financial history, including "The Scarlet Woman of Wall Street: A History of Wall Street in the 1860s" and "Hamilton's Blessing: The Extraordinary Life and Times of our National Debt." In this episode he discusses his latest work "Washington's Monument: And the Fascinating History of the Obelisk." Mr. Gordon spoke at a Ford Evening Book Talk at Mount Vernon on March 1, 2017.
54:42
July 27, 2017
040. Zara Anishanslin
Dr. Zara Anishanslin is Assistant Professor of History and Art History at the University of Delaware who specializes in Early American and Atlantic world history with a focus on eighteenth century material culture. She was the Patrick Henry Postdoctoral Fellow in the history department at Johns Hopkins University and a Mellon Fellow at CUNY's Graduate Center. In this episode she discusses her first book "Portrait of a Woman in Silk: Hidden Histories of the British Atlantic World."
1:03:02
July 26, 2017
039. John Avlon
John Avlon is is Editor-in-Chief and Managing Director of the Daily Beast and is a CNN political analyst. His book "Wingnuts: How the Lunatic Fringe is Hijacking America" was praised by President Bill Clinton as providing a "clear and comprehensive review of the forces on the outer edges of the political spectrum that shape and distort our political debate." Mr. Avlon discussed his newest book "Washington's Farewell: The Founding Father's Warning to Future Generations" at a Ford Evening Book Talk on February 1, 2017.
27:45
July 25, 2017
038. Kathleen DuVal
Dr. Kathleen DuVal is the Bowman and Gordon Gray Professor of History at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Her research focuses on early America, particularly cross-cultural relations on North American borderlands. She explores how Native American, European, and African men and women interacted in the sixteenth through nineteenth centuries. She discusses her latest book, "Independence Lost: Lives on the Edge of the American Revolution," which won the Book of the Year Award from the Journal of the American Revolution and was a finalist for the 2016 George Washington Book Prize.
52:32
July 24, 2017
037. Laurie Halse Anderson
Laurie Halse Anderson is a New York Times bestselling author. Her first historical fiction novel, "Fever 1793," received multiple awards and is used in curriculums in classrooms around the nation. "Chains," the first book of her trilogy set during the Revolutionary War, was a National Book Award finalist, received the Scot O'Dell Award for Historical Fiction, and received the ALA Best Book for Young Adults award. She discusses the challenges of teaching history and slavery in a meaningful way through fiction. Laurie spoke at Mount Vernon's Educators' Evening on December 7, 2016.
51:57
July 23, 2017
036. Lydia Brandt
Dr. Lydia Brandt is Assistant Professor of Art History at the University of South Carolina, where she teaches the history of American art and architecture as well as methods of historic preservation. She was a member of the inaugural class of fellows at the Washington Library; the work she did during that time led to the publication of her first book, "First in the Homes of His Countrymen: George Washington's Mount Vernon in the American Imagination," in 2016. She discusses how replicas and imitations of Washington's estate have risen in popularity throughout history and how the home became and American Icon. Dr. Brandt spoke at a Ford Evening Book Talk on December 7, 2016.
46:58
July 22, 2017
035. David Hildebrand
Dr. David Hildebrand is a specialist in early American music, teaches American music history at the Peabody Conservatory, and is an author for the Johns Hopkins University Press. He regularly performs at museums, universities, and historical societies in duet with his wife, Ginger. He discusses how he came to study early American music and the political power of song during the Revolutionary period. His CD, "Music for the First President," is available for purchase from the Shops at Mount Vernon at shops.mountvernon.org. Dr. Hildebrand was a member of the 2016-17 class of fellows at the Washington Library.
1:00:55
August 1, 2016
034. Frank Cogliano
Dr. Frank Cogliano is Professor of American History and Dean International for North America at the University of Edinburgh and is also a member of the advisory board for the International Center for Jefferson Studies at Monticello. His latest book is "Emperor of Liberty: Thomas Jefferson's Foreign Policy." He discusses his role as a Jefferson scholar, Jefferson's reputation as a Founder, and the relationship between Jefferson, Washington, and Hamilton. Dr. Cogliano spoke at the 2016 George Washington Symposium at Mount Vernon.
39:27
August 1, 2016
033. Susan Dunn
Dr. Susan Dunn is the Massachusetts Professor of Humanities at Williams College and is the author of numerous history books exploring topics ranging from the French and American Revolutions to World War II. In this episode she discusses her early books on Franklin Delano Roosevelt, the importance of the Bill of Rights in the 20th Century, and how public education contributions to the creation of good citizens. Dr. Dunn spoke at the 2016 George Washington Symposium at Mount Vernon on November 4, 2016.
43:37
July 31, 2016
032. Richard Brookhiser
Mr. Richard Brookhiser is an American journalist, biographer, and historian, and is a senior editor at National Review. He has also written numerous books on the Founding period of American history. Mr. Brookhiser was the 2016 Gay Hart Gaines Distinguished Visiting Lecturer of American History at the Washington Library. He discusses his work on the study of George Washington.
54:44
July 30, 2016
031. Leadership Lecture with James Comey
The George Washington Leadership Lecture was held on October 3, 2016 and features a conversation with FBI Director James Comey, who will discuss leadership lessons learned throughout his personal pathway to becoming the Director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation, as well as his particular style of leading the nation's premiere federal law enforcement agency. The Lecture is held in partnership with the University of Southern California Sol Price School of Public Policy and was made possible by a generous gift by Maribeth Borthwick, USC class of '73 and Vice Regent for California of the Mount Vernon Ladies' Association.
54:47
July 28, 2016
030. Lorri Glover
Dr. Lorri Glover is Professor and the John Francis Bannon S.J. Endowed Chair at St. Louis University and was a member of the 2016-17 class of research fellows at the Washington Library. She discusses her book "The Fate of the Revolution: Virginians Debate the Constitution," Dr. Glover spoke at a Ford Evening Book Talk at the Washington Library on October 20, 2016.
1:02:41
July 27, 2016
029. Founding Debates
To celebrate the three-year anniversary of the opening of the Washington Library, we joined forces with the National Constitution Center in Philadelphia to host an old-fashioned debate entitled "Hamilton v. Jefferson on Executive Power: What Would Washington Say?" on September 27, 2016. The Founding Debates are sponsored by The Ammerman Family Foundation to honor James C. Rees, whose vision lives on with the Washington Library.
1:29:56
July 26, 2016
028. Mary Sarah Bilder
Dr. Mary Sarah Bilder is the Founders Professor of Law at Boston College Law School, where she teaches in the areas of property, trusts and estates, and American legal and constitutional history. She discusses her book "Madison’s Hand: Revising the Constitutional Convention," which was a finalist for the George Washington Book Prize. Dr. Bilder spoke at a Ford Evening Book Talk at Mount Vernon on September 15, 2016.
55:40
July 25, 2016
027. Bruce Ragsdale
Dr. Bruce Ragsdale has served as director of the Federal Judicial History Office at the Federal Judicial Center and as an associate historian at the U.S. House of Representatives. He was also a fellow at the Washington Library during the 2014-15 academic year and was the recipient of the James C. Rees Entrepreneurship Fellowship. Dr. Ragsdale discusses his work studying George Washington’s agricultural entrepreneurship, including Washington’s interest in the continual improvement of his farms at Mount Vernon.
57:14
July 24, 2016
026. Ed Larson
Dr. Edward Larson is a University Professor of history and holds the Hugh & Hazel Darling Chair in Law at Pepperdine University. He is also a Senior Fellow of the University of Georgia’s Institute of Higher Education and a visiting professor at Stanford Law. In 1998 he received the Pulitzer Prize for History for his book "Summer for the Gods: The Scopes Trial and America’s Continuing Debate Over Science and Religion." Dr. Larson spoke at the Supreme Court Lecture Series at the Washington Library on April 28, 2016.
1:03:58
July 23, 2016
025. Michael Blaakman
Michael Blakeman is a Ph.D. candidate at Yale and was the Amanda and Greg Gregory Fellow at the Washington Library for the 2014-2015 academic year. During this Lunch and Fellowship Program, recorded on August 19, 2015, Michael discusses his doctoral dissertation, "Speculation Nation: Land and Mania in the Age of the American Revolution." Over the course of the discussion you’ll hear Michael explain how the market for land speculation grew in the 1780s and 90s, why speculators purchased such vast quantities of land, and how land speculators used the American Revolution to boost their sales.
1:06:06
July 22, 2016
024. Patrick K. O'Donnell
Patrick K. O’Donnell is a combat historian, author, and public speaker who has written ten books recounting America’s wars. He is an expert on elite and special operations units and irregular warfare and expert on the Office of Strategic Services, America’s special operations forces during WWII and forerunner of the CIA. He discusses his latest book "Washington’s Immortals: The Untold Story of an Elite Regiment who Changed the Course of the Revolution." Mr. O'Donnell spoke at a Ford Evening Book Talk on July 5, 2016.
48:59
July 21, 2016
023. Stephen Brumwell
Dr. Stephen Brumwell is the author of numerous books and articles about early American History. He discusses his book "George Washington: Gentleman Warrior," which explores Washington's role as commander of the Continental Army. Highlights how Washington’s place in Virginia society influenced his ability to command, how important Lawrence Washington was to his brother George, and Washington’s place in history as a military commander.
1:01:12
July 20, 2016
022. T.H. Breen
Dr. T.H. Breen received his Ph.D. from Yale University in 1968 and is currently the Director of the Chabraja Center for Historical Studies and History Department Chair at Northwestern University. He discusses his book "George Washington’s Journey: The President Forges a New Nation." Dr. Breen spoke at a Ford Evening Book Talk at the Washington Library on January 20, 2016. 
51:02
July 19, 2016
021. Phil Levy
Dr. Philip Levy is a Professor of History at the University of South Florida and was a member of the 2015-16 class of fellows at the Washington Library. In 2008 he won international attention for co-leading the team that found the remains of George Washington’s childhood home at Ferry Farm in Fredericksburg, Virginia — the saga of which he recounted in his 2013 book, Where the Cherry Tree Grew: The Story of Ferry Farm, George Washington’s Boyhood Home. His latest book, George Washington Written Upon the Land, explores the many retellings of Washington’s much-fabled childhood and covers themes ranging from biography to archaeology and environmental history to rabbinic thought.
1:03:54
July 18, 2016
020. Alissa Oginsky and Kevin Casey
Alissa Oginsky is a 6th grade U.S. history teacher with Fairfax County Public Schools and is the 2016 Mount Vernon History Teacher of the Year. She discusses her challenges in her field including working with primary sources and integrating technology into social studies instruction. Kevin Casey is a 9th grade U.S. history teacher at Pittman High School in New Jersey and was a 2016 Lifeguard Teacher Fellow at Mount Vernon. His fellowship project focuses on exploring George Washington's presidency through his mansion in Philadelphia. 
54:29
July 17, 2016
019. Joshua Canale
Dr. Joshua Canale is an instructor of history at Jefferson Community College in Watertown, New York and was a member of the Washington Library's 2015-16 class of academic fellows. He discusses his dissertation topic "American Dictators: Committees for Public Safety during the American Revolution."
50:49
July 16, 2016
018. Nick Bunker
Nick Bunker is the author of "Making Haste From Babylon, a History of the Mayflower Pilgrims." A former investment banker and journalist for the Financial Times, he served for many years on the board of the Freud Museum, London. In this episode he discusses his book "An Empire on the Edge: How Britain Came to Fight America," for which he won the 2015 George Washington Book Prize. Mr. Bunker spoke at the Michelle Smith Lecture Series at the Washington Library on March 16, 2016. 
53:41
July 15, 2016
017. C.L. Bragg
C.L. Bragg is the author of "Distinction in Every Service: Brigadier General Marcellus A. Stovall, C.S.A." and coauthor of the critically acclaimed "Never for Want of Powder: The Confederate Powder Works in Augusta, Georgia," also published by the University of South Carolina Press. Bragg's interest in William Moultrie was sparked while researching his family's South Carolina heritage and his personal connection to the Revolutionary War. Bragg spoke at a Ford Evening Book Talk at the Washington Library on March 4, 2014. 
41:11
July 14, 2016
016. Lindsay Chervinsky
Lindsay Chervinsky is a Ph.D. candidate in history at the University of California, Davis whose research explores how key government institutions evolved beyond the boundaries of the United States Constitution in the Early Republic. Her work examines how George Washington drew on American perceptions of the British cabinet, executive precedent established in the state governments, and his own military leadership experience to shape the first presidential cabinet. She was a research fellow at the Washington Library during the 2015-16 academic year. 
42:36
July 13, 2016
015. Fergus Bordewich
Fergus M. Bordewich has been an independent historian and writer since the early 1970s. As a journalist he traveled extensively in Asia, the Middle East, Europe, and Africa writing on a variety of topics. He also served for brief periods as an editor and writer for the Tehran Journal in Iran in 1972-1973, a press officer for the United Nations in 1980-1982, and an advisor to the New China News Agency in Beijing in 1982-1983. In this episode he discusses his book "The First Congress: How James Madison, George Washington, and a Group of Extraordinary Men Invented the Government." He spoke at a Ford Evening Book Talk at the Washington Library on June 9, 2016.
1:02:32
July 12, 2016
014. Erik Goldstein
Erik Goldstein is Curator of Mechanical Arts & Numismatics at the Colonial Williamsburg Foundation. After receiving a BA in Fine Arts/Illustration from Parsons School of Design, he joined Harmer Rooke Numismatists, also in New York City, before spending the next 12 years as a professional numismatist and consultant. He has lectured on topics of military history and instructs a three-year syllabus on the coins, medals and paper money of Colonial America as part of the American Numismatics Association’s Summer Seminar held every July. Dr. Goldstein spoke at a Ford Evening Book Talk at the Washington Library on March 10, 2016.
41:27
July 11, 2016
013. Colin Calloway
Dr. Colin Calloway is John Kimball, Jr. 1943 Professor of History and Professor of Native American Studies at Dartmouth. He served for two years as associate director and editor of the D'Arcy McNickle Center for the History of the American Indian at the Newbury Library in Chicago. He also spent seven years teaching at the University of Wyoming. In this episode he discusses his book "The Victory with No Name: The Native American Defeat of the First American Army." Dr. Calloway spoke at a Ford Evening Book Talk at the Washington Library on December 1, 2015.
59:48
July 10, 2016
012. Adrienne M. Harrison
Dr. Adrienne M. Harrison is currently a Fellow and Consulting Historian with Battlefield Leadership, a consulting and training company specializing in providing customized experiential leadership training based in history. A graduate of West Point, she subsequently earned an M.A. and Ph.D. in Early American History from Rutgers University. Her work has been published in Oxford Bibliographies. She discusses her book "A Powerful Mind: The Self-Education of George Washington." Dr. Harrison spoke at a Ford Evening Book Talk at the Library on May 3, 2016  
49:51
July 9, 2016
011. Chris Juergens
Chris Juergens is a Ph.D. candidate at Florida State University whose research explores the German auxiliaries of the Holy Roman Empire which served dual masters during the American War of Independence. He is particularly interested in military professionalism and innovation in the Age of Revolution. Chris was a member of the Washington Library's 2015-16 class of research fellows. 
57:33
July 8, 2016
010. Ricardo Herrera
Ricardo Herrera is an Associate Professor of Military History at the School of Advanced Military Studies, U.S. Army Command and General Staff College. His teaching interests specifically include 18th and 19th Century American military history. He discusses his book "For Liberty and the Republic: The American Citizen as Soldier, 1775-1861. Mr. Herrera spoke at the George Washington Symposium on November 7, 2015. He also serves on the faculty of the George Washington Leadership Institute and assists with its excursion programs.
51:13
July 7, 2016
009. Francois Furstenberg
Francois Furstenberg is an Associate Professor of History at Johns Hopkins University. His research interests include the relationship between slavery and nationalism in the post-revolutionary period, the meaning of consent and their relationship to slavery in the 19th Century, and U.S. history from an international perspective. He is the author of "In the Name of the Father: Washington's Legacy, Slavery, and the Making of a Nation" and "When the United States Spoke French: Five Refugees Who Shaped a Nation." Dr. Furstenberg spoke at a Ford Evening Book Talk at the Washington Library on September 18, 2014. 
37:21
July 6, 2016
008. David Preston
Author David Preston discusses his book Braddock’s Defeat: the Battle of the Monongahela and the Road to Revolution, with Washington Library Founding Director Douglas Bradburn.
1:03:48
July 5, 2016
007. Paul Brandus
Paul Brandus is an author, independent member of the White House press corps, and founder of the Twitter page @WestWingReport. He is also a Washington columnist on economics and finance. He is a frequent speaker around the country before business groups and has also lectured at Columbia's Graduate School of Journalism. In this episode he discusses his book "Under This Roof: A History of the White House and Presidency." Mr. Brandus spoke at a Ford Evening Book Talk at the Washington Library on November 12, 2015. 
44:37
July 4, 2016
006. Annette Gordon-Reed And Peter Onuf
Dr. Annette Gordon-Reed is an award-winning author and the Charles Warren Professor of American Legal History at Harvard Law School. Dr. Peter S. Onus is the Thomas Jefferson Memorial Foundation Professor Emeritus at the University of Virginia. They discuss in this episode their latest joint book, "'Most Blessed of the Patriarchs': Thomas Jefferson and the Empire of the Imagination." Gordon-Reed and Onus spoke at the Washington Library's Michelle Smith Lecture Series on May 5, 2016.
44:09
July 3, 2016
005. Flora Fraser
Flora Fraser is professional writer and author of numerous historical  biographies. As a young woman she was employed as a researcher by her grandmother and mother. She co-founded the Elizabeth Longford Prize for Historical Biography and served as a trustee of the London National Portrait Gallery for ten years. In this episode she discusses her latest book "The Washingtons: George and Martha: Join'd by Friendship, Crown'd by Love." Flora spoke at the Gay Hart Gaines Lecture Series on November 4th, 2015.
47:49
July 2, 2016
004. John Fea
Dr. John Fea is Professor of American History and Chair of the History Department at Messiah College and was a fellow at the Washington Library during the 2015-16 academic year. He is the author or editor of four books, one of which - Was America Founded as a Christian Nation? - was a finalist for the George Washington book prize. Fea also blogs daily about his work at www.thewayofimprovement.com. In this episode he discusses the research he conducted while at the Library concerning religion during the colonial and Revolutionary eras. 
59:19
July 1, 2016
003. Trenton Cole Jones
Dr. Trenton Cole Jones is an assistant professor of history at Purdue University and was the Amanda and Greg Gregory Family fellow at the Library during the 2013-14 academic year. In this episode he discusses his dissertation and forthcoming book, tentatively titled "Deprived of their Liberty: Enemy Prisoners and the Culture of War in Revolutionary America."
36:37
June 30, 2016
002. Laura Auricchio
Dr. Laura Auricchio is the Dean of Bachelor’s Program for Adults and Transfer Students and of the School of Languages, and is an Associate Professor of Art History in the Parsons School of Design at The New School in New York City. In this episode she discusses her book "The Marquis: Lafayette Reconsidered." Dr. Auricchio spoke at the Michelle Smith Lecture Series on May 12, 2015.
50:09
June 29, 2016