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Naturally Florida

Naturally Florida

By Shannon Carnevale and Lara Milligan
Naturally Florida is a podcast about Florida's natural areas and the wild things that live here.

This podcast is brought to you by UF/IFAS Extension's Natural Resources programs in Polk and Pinellas Counties.
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Rat Poisons and Wildlife: What’s the Big Deal
Nobody likes pests, hence why pesticides were invented. Rodenticides are a specific type of pesticide used to control rats and mice, but they can have impacts throughout the food chain if not used correctly. In this episode, we will explore the science behind rodenticides, the impact of rodenticides, and of course, best management practices when it comes to controlling rodents in our yards and neighborhoods. Learn more: National Pesticide Information Center: What are rodenticides? - http://npic.orst.edu/factsheets/rodenticides.html AskIFAS: Rat and Mouse Control - https://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/publication/DH044 Potential Risks of Nine Rodenticides to Birds and Nontarget Mammals: a Comparative Approach - https://www.fluoridealert.org/wp-content/pesticides/EPA-HQ-OPP-2006-0955-0005.pdf Rodent management options in and around the home - https://blogs.ifas.ufl.edu/pinellasco/2022/07/25/management-of-rodents/  How You Can Help: Share what you learned with a friend! Implement integrated pest management (IPM) - http://ipm.ucanr.edu/PMG/PESTNOTES/pn74106.html If resorting to rodenticides, ensure you read the label and apply correctly - https://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/publication/PI284 Sources for this Episode: Cornell Wildlife Health Lab: Rodenticide Toxicity - https://cwhl.vet.cornell.edu/disease/rodenticide-toxicity National Pesticide Information Center: What are rodenticides? - http://npic.orst.edu/factsheets/rodenticides.html Potential Risks of Nine Rodenticides to Birds and Nontarget Mammals: a Comparative Approach - https://www.fluoridealert.org/wp-content/pesticides/EPA-HQ-OPP-2006-0955-0005.pdf AskIFAS: Rat and Mouse Control - https://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/publication/DH044 If you enjoyed this episode, please consider sharing it with a friend who might enjoy learning about Florida's natural areas and the wild things that live here! If you're active on iNaturalist, consider joining our iNaturalist project, Naturally Florida's Listener Observations, here: https://www.inaturalist.org/projects/naturally-florida-s-listener-observations
19:02
July 18, 2022
Microplastic Pollution ... What Is It?
Plastic pollution has been a known problem for decades, but more recently researchers have been focusing on this idea of microplastics, that is plastic particles about 5mm in size or smaller. Where do microplastics come from? What are the threats? And what can we do? Find out in this episode.  Learn more: What are microplastics? https://oceanservice.noaa.gov/facts/microplastics.html  Watch a webinar on “Microplastics 101” – https://youtu.be/v0xVeMkxDZc (Taught by Lara)  Science by the Slice Podcast: https://piecenter.com/media/podcast/  How You Can Help: Share what you learned with a friend!  Get involved with the Florida Microplastics Awareness Project – https://flseagrant.ifas.ufl.edu/microplastics/  Take the pledge – A brief pledge of easy ways you can lessen your contribution to microplastics: https://ufl.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_3kgYVW8A9qOhu6h  Use your voice – Ask your favorite companies to make a change, write to your elected officials, and lead by example.  Sources for this Episode: Primary Microplastics in the Oceans: a Global Evaluation of Sources – https://portals.iucn.org/library/sites/library/files/documents/2017-002-En.pdf  Microplastics removal from a primary settler tank in a wastewater treatment plant – https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0269749122004122?via%3Dihub  Microplastics Increase Soil pH and Decrease Microbial Activities – https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fenvs.2021.675803/full  If you enjoyed this episode, please consider sharing it with a friend who might enjoy learning about Florida's natural areas and the wild things that live here!  If you're active on iNaturalist, consider joining our iNaturalist project, Naturally Florida's Listener Observations, here: https://www.inaturalist.org/projects/naturally-florida-s-listener-observations
20:07
June 21, 2022
Toads as Big as Your Head! Cane Toads in Florida
Cane toads are well known for posing a threat to our pets. They are one of many invasive animal species we have here in Florida. In this episode you will learn all about this invasive toad species, how it became established in Florida, impacts of its presence, and ways you can help. Learn more: Florida’s Frogs & Toads – Cane Toad -  https://ufwildlife.ifas.ufl.edu/frogs/canetoad.shtml (includes videos on identification, action steps if a pet is poisoned by a cane toad, and how to humanely euthanize them) Cane Toad or “Bufo” Toad (Rhinella marina) in Florida - https://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/publication/UW432 Southern Toad or Cane Toad – a compare/contrast video - https://youtu.be/7jTDEVEolu8 What to do if a pet encounters a cane toad (video) - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Cg1HUuxM7Zc How You Can Help: Share what you learned with a friend! Report invasive cane toads outside of current range See Figure 1 from https://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/publication/UW432 and report any sightings outside of the green area – email Dr. Johnson (tadpole@ufl.edu) with location information for the cane toad sighting and at least two focused pictures, one showing the top of the head and another of the shoulder area.  Humanely euthanize invasive cane toads - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JCZlSVbOkWU Sources for this Episode: Cane Toad or “Bufo” Toad (Rhinella marina) in Florida - https://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/publication/UW432 Florida Wildlife Extension – Marine Toad - https://wec.ifas.ufl.edu/extension/wildlife_info/frogstoads/rhinella_marina.php Department of Wildlife & Ecology – UF Wildlife – Johnson Lab - https://ufwildlife.ifas.ufl.edu/frogs/canetoad.shtml Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission - https://myfwc.com/wildlifehabitats/profiles/amphibians/cane-toad/ If you enjoyed this episode, please consider sharing it with a friend who might enjoy learning about Florida's natural areas and the wild things that live here! If you're active on iNaturalist, consider joining our iNaturalist project, Naturally Florida's Listener Observations, here: https://www.inaturalist.org/projects/naturally-florida-s-listener-observations
20:44
May 17, 2022
Coyotes are here to stay!
Coyotes have been in Florida since the 1970s but still feel like a relatively new species for many. In this episode, Shannon and Lara explore the latest research, facts, findings, and realities of living with coyotes. Learn more: Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission Species Profile Page for coyotes - https://myfwc.com/wildlifehabitats/profiles/mammals/land/coyote/ Watch a webinar on coyotes in Florida - https://youtu.be/0Q3gZnPtwTM  (Taught by Lara!) How You Can Help: Share what you learned with a friend! Secure attractants like pet food and garbage - https://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/publication/UW437 Haze coyotes that are getting too close to humans: Here is a video from FWC explaining why and how it should be done - https://youtu.be/PnSo45n3mHM Have nuisance coyotes trapped by a licensed wildlife trapper - https://app.myfwc.com/HGM/NWT/NWTSearch.aspx Sources for this Episode: Dr. Martin B. Main, Department of Wildlife Ecology and Conservation, University of Florida Angeline Barker, Certified Wildlife Biologist®, Biological Administrator I, Wildlife & Habitat Management Section, Division of Habitat and Species Conservation, Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission – Coyotes - https://myfwc.com/wildlifehabitats/profiles/mammals/land/coyote/ If you enjoyed this episode, please consider sharing it with a friend who might enjoy learning about Florida's natural areas and the wild things that live here! If you're active on iNaturalist, consider joining our iNaturalist project, Naturally Florida's Listener Observations, here: https://www.inaturalist.org/projects/naturally-florida-s-listener-observations
21:51
April 19, 2022
Special Interview with Dr. Scott Angle, UF Sr. Vice President of Agriculture and Natural Resources
The University of Florida's Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (UF/IFAS) is a federal-state-county partnership dedicated to developing knowledge in agriculture, human and natural resources, and the life sciences. Join Lara and Shannon as they interview Dr. J. Scott Angle, UF Senior Vice President for Agriculture and Natural Resources and leader of UF/IFAS. Learn more: Dr. Angle has recently published a commentary on UF/IFAS’ snail kite work. Read it, here: Signs of hope for endangered Everglade snail kite | The Invading Sea Everglades snail kite – Learn more about this species on the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission page - https://myfwc.com/wildlifehabitats/profiles/birds/raptors-and-vultures/everglade-snail-kite/ Citrus Under Protective Screen (CUPS) - https://crec.ifas.ufl.edu/horticulture/cups/#:~:text=Citrus%20Under%20Protective%20Screen%20(CUPS)%20is%20an%20integrated%20system%20for,of%20Huanglongbing%20disease%20(HLB). About UF/IFAS - The mission of UF/IFAS is to develop knowledge in agricultural, human, and natural resources, and to make that knowledge accessible to sustain and enhance the quality of human life: https://ifas.ufl.edu/about-us/ About Dr. J. Scott Angle - https://ifas.ufl.edu/vp-office/about/j-scott-angle/ Follow Dr. Scott Angle on Twitter - https://twitter.com/IFAS_VP?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw About Dr. Robert J. Fletcher - https://vivo.ufl.edu/display/n11658 How You Can Help: Connect with UF/IFAS through social media networks – Help us share the great works, findings, and opportunities from UF/IFAS: https://ifas.ufl.edu/social-media/ Subscribe to the UF/IFAS Blogs site – Learn what UF/IFAS faculty and staff are doing around the state or subscribe to a particular county’s blog site: https://blogs.ifas.ufl.edu/global/ Support conservation of our agricultural and natural lands – There are numerous organizations working to support our agricultural and natural lands. Consider finding one whose mission you wish to support. Participate in conservation work – Find a local organization conducting regular tree plantings, restoration, clean-ups, invasive species removal, etc., and get involved. Sources for this Episode: All About Birds – The Cornell Lab of Ornithology: https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Snail_Kite/overview If you enjoyed this episode, please consider sharing it with a friend who might enjoy learning about Florida's natural areas and the wild things that live here!
19:05
March 21, 2022
Words Matter: When and How to Use the Words Invasive Species
Florida is a hotspot for nonnative and invasive species, but there hasn't been a consistent way to talk about these species until now. In this episode, we explore the various words biologists, park rangers, the public, and news media use to describe nonnative and invasive species. We will define and explain invasive species vocabulary and clarify what these words mean.  Learn more: Florida Invasive Species Council - The mission of the Florida Invasive Species Council is to reduce the impacts of invasive plants in Florida through the exchange of scientific, educational, and technical information - https://floridainvasivespecies.org/  Watch a webinar on proper terminology (Designed for practitioners) https://ufl.zoom.us/rec/share/44S0gD4WDRW8Kd_iAl_RXGN5WQtde3BuIxKBOMpzZCYtMZ60-aQ79uGhUbX0PhE6.7fADGgWMwrlZqruO (Taught by Shannon) How You Can Help: Research plants before you buy them! – Check the IFAS Assessment: https://assessment.ifas.ufl.edu/ Research permit requirements for nonnative wildlife and reptiles - https://myfwc.com/license/captive-wildlife/ and https://myfwc.com/wildlifehabitats/nonnatives/rule-development/ Remove invasive species from your yard - Contact your local extension office for help: https://sfyl.ifas.ufl.edu/find-your-local-office/ Report sightings of nonnative plants and wildlife online or via smartphone app: https://www.eddmaps.org/ Report sightings of high-priority nonnative reptiles- (Examples of high-priority nonnative reptiles are nonnative snakes of any species, tegus, monitor lizards) Contact FWC's invasive species hotline at 1-888-483-4681 or online at ExoticReports@MyFWC.com (include photos!) Sources for this Episode: UF/IFAS EDIS Publication, "Standardized Invasive Species Terminology for Effective Outreach Education" (Shannon is a co-author!) - https://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/pdf/FR/FR439/FR439-Dsr1ns611r.pdf Journal of Extension, "Invasive Species Terminology: Standardizing for Stakeholder Education" (Shannon is a co-author!) - https://tigerprints.clemson.edu/joe/vol58/iss3/27/#.YhZAiDBNQi0.link Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission websites: https://myfwc.com/wildlifehabitats/nonnatives/ If you enjoyed this episode, please consider sharing it with a friend who might enjoy learning about Florida's natural areas and the wild things that live here! If you're active on iNaturalist, consider joining our iNaturalist project, Naturally Florida's Listener Observations, here: https://www.inaturalist.org/projects/naturally-florida-s-listener-observations
21:50
February 22, 2022
Is It Getting Hotter in Our Cities? It's the Urban Heat Island Effect!
Florida is known for being hot in the summer, but Florida cities are even hotter. Energy from the sun gets absorbed by buildings and paved areas (like roads) which makes the whole urban area significantly hotter than natural areas. This is a phenomenon known as an urban heat island. Today we are going to explore urban heat islands and their associated impacts on our natural world. Learn more: Climate Kids - https://climatekids.nasa.gov/heat-islands/ Learn About Heat Islands - https://www.epa.gov/heatislands/learn-about-heat-islands Planting Trees for Energy Savings - https://gardeningsolutions.ifas.ufl.edu/design/landscaping-for-specific-sites/planting-trees-for-energy-savings.html Public health benefits of urban trees: https://www.nature.org/content/dam/tnc/nature/en/documents/Public_Health_Benefits_Urban_Trees_FINAL.pdf How You Can Help: Plant a tree – Planting trees that shade west and east-facing walls will help to keep your house cool during summer, but make sure to do your research so you plant the right tree in the right place. Find your local Extension office here: https://sfyl.ifas.ufl.edu/find-your-local-office/ OR read information on planting trees: https://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/pdf%5CEP%5CEP31400.pdf Support green infrastructure - Let your city or town know that you value a greener city. Talk to commissioners, speak at meetings, and let your thoughts be heard! You can learn more about green infrastructure and its potential impact on your local built environment, HERE: https://soils.ifas.ufl.edu/extension/videos/low-impact-development/ OR http://www.pinellascounty.org/publicworks/pdf/green-infrastructure.pdf Encourage neighbors, family, friends, and local governments to keep current trees intact - Large, mature trees provide significant pollution removal among many other ecosystem services including mental and physical health benefits. Sources for this Episode: Air Pollution Removal and Temperature Reductions by Gainesville’s Urban Forest - https://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/pdf/FR/FR27800.pdf T. Chakraborty, X. Lee, "A simplified urban-extent algorithm to characterize surface urban heat islands on a global scale and examine vegetation control on their spatiotemporal variability", International Journal of Applied Earth Observation and Geoinformation. 74, 269-280, 2019. Volatile trees - https://earthdata.nasa.gov/learn/sensing-our-planet/volatile-trees   If you enjoyed this episode, please consider sharing it with a friend who might enjoy learning about Florida's natural areas and the wild things that live here!
18:57
January 25, 2022
American White Pelicans, Florida's Other Snowbird
American white pelicans are one of the largest birds in North America with wingspans up to 9.5 feet across. These majestic birds migrate to Florida for winter feeding grounds, before retreating north and west for the breeding season. Floridians may see these snowy white cousins of the year-round resident brown pelican, feeding in shallow water or soaring across the sky in silent flying V’s. Learn more: Read and share our blog post on American White Pelicans: http://blogs.ifas.ufl.edu/polkco/2017/11/22/american-white-pelicans-floridas-other-snowbird/  Learn about feather adaptations birds have in "Bird Feathers: A Guide to North American Species" by S. David Scott, and Casey McFarland, https://www.google.com/books/edition/Bird_Feathers/LhdExsnFNKIC?hl=en&gbpv=0 The black flight feathers described by Lara are included on pages 35-38. How You Can Help: Resist the urge to feed Florida's waterbirds Read more about why, here: https://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/publication/UW193  Resist the urge to scare a flock into flight while enjoying Florida's waterways American White Pelicans are very shy, compared to other water birds. Harassment of their flocks may lead them to abandon a feeding area, increasing their risk of exhaustion or starvation during their migration. So, consider avoiding flocks you may encounter on our beautiful waterways, give them a wide berth.  Encourage your local government to support the protection and restoration of Florida's wetlands and waterways American white pelicans and other migratory waterbirds in Florida, such as ducks, depend on healthy aquatic ecosystems with ample vegetation, prey items, and good water quality.  If you enjoyed this episode, please consider sharing it with a friend who might enjoy learning about Florida's natural areas and the wild things that live here! If you're active on iNaturalist, consider joining our iNaturalist project, Naturally Florida's Listener Observations, here: https://www.inaturalist.org/projects/naturally-florida-s-listener-observations
23:09
December 21, 2021
Florida on Fire: Prescribed Fire in the Sunshine State
In this episode, we explore fire in Florida, what ecosystems burn and why, the history and current state of fire in Florida, and some neat adaptations found in plants and animals of fire-depended ecosystems. Learn more: Fire and Habitat - https://sfyl.ifas.ufl.edu/archive/hot_topics/environment/fire_habitat.shtml Effects of Fire on Florida’s Wildlife and Wildlife Habitat - https://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/publication/uw132 Wind and Trees: Lessons Learned from Hurricanes (Mentioned by Shannon) - https://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/publication/FR173 How You Can Help: Consider Creating a Firewise Landscape - These documents outline actions homeowners can take to better prepare their landscape for a possible wildfire: https://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/publication/FR076 https://www.fdacs.gov/Forest-Wildfire/For-Communities/Firewise-USA/Create-Defensible-Space-Around-Homes https://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/publication/FR334 https://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/publication/FR147 https://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/publication/FR151 Support Prescribed Burning Programs – These resources outline prescribed burning efforts throughout Florida: https://www.fdacs.gov/Forest-Wildfire/Wildland-Fire/Prescribed-Fire https://myfwc.com/wildlifehabitats/habitat/prescribed-fire/ Sources for this Episode: Gopher Frogs, Burrows, and Fire: Interactions in the Longleaf Pine Ecosystem - https://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/publication/UW295 Effects of fire history, tree age, and canopy seed bank size on serotiny of Ocala sand pine (Pinus clausa var. clausa) in Florida scrub - https://www.jstor.org/stable/26477959 Chapter 9 – Ecological Effects - https://www.fdacs.gov/content/download/39688/file/pft_chapter_09_ecological_effects.pdf If you enjoyed this episode, please consider sharing it with a friend who might enjoy learning about Florida's natural areas and the wild things that live here! If you're active on iNaturalist, consider joining our iNaturalist project, Naturally Florida's Listener Observations, here: https://www.inaturalist.org/projects/naturally-florida-s-listener-observations
19:16
November 23, 2021
Birds and Their Houses: Cavity Nesters in Florida
Birds come in all shapes, sizes, and colors. They play a critical role in our ecosystems, keeping insect populations in-check, serving as a valuable prey item for our larger mammals, and helping to disperse seeds! Just like people, birds need food, water and shelter to survive. In this episode, we will explore a special type of bird called cavity nesters, who, as the name implies, need cavities to nest, reproduce and thrive. Sign Up: Register for our upcoming webinar all about cavity nesters and consider signing up for a workshop to build your own Eastern Screech Owl nest box: https://cavitynesters21.eventbrite.com/?aff=anchor Learn more: Helping Cavity-Nesters in Florida - https://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/publication/UW058 All About Birdhouses: Next Box Placement - https://nestwatch.org/learn/all-about-birdhouses/nest-box-placement/ Bird Buddies - http://blogs.ifas.ufl.edu/pinellasco/2021/10/11/bird-buddies/ How You Can Help: Provide snags – Snags are standing dead trees, and they provide excellent natural habitat for cavity nesters. Primary cavity nesters, like woodpeckers will seek out dying trees to excavate as this wood is usually softer and easier to chip away. Build or install an artificial nest box ­– It’s important to build the right house for the right bird. There are many factors to consider when constructing a nest box. Be sure to check out our blog for more details. Provide other forms of shelter – Native plants of various heights provide excellent cover for birds and other wildlife species, plus they provide an excellent source of food. Sources for this Episode: Bird sounds by Brian Henderson, XC457516. Accessible at www.xeno-canto.org/457516 Helping Cavity-Nesters in Florida - https://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/publication/UW058 “The Sibley Guide to Birds” by David Allen Sibley “A Birder’s Guide to Pinellas County (Florida)” by Ron Smith All About Birdhouses: Next Box Placement - https://nestwatch.org/learn/all-about-birdhouses/nest-box-placement/ Predator Guards Carry Their Weight - https://nestwatch.org/connect/blog/predator-guards-carry-their-weight/ If you enjoyed this episode, please consider sharing it with a friend who might enjoy learning about Florida's natural areas and the wild things that live here! If you're active on iNaturalist, consider joining our iNaturalist project, Naturally Florida's Listener Observations, here: https://www.inaturalist.org/projects/naturally-florida-s-listener-observations
20:08
October 20, 2021
(Part 2) Florida's Most Recognizable Reptile: the American Alligator
This episode is the second half of our discussion on the American alligator. This episode will focus on busting common myths and highlighting key ways we can learn to coexist with this critically important species. Learn more: Watch an 8ft+ alligator climb a 6ft fence: https://youtu.be/z7DMjQJD7vM (ABC Channel 6, WATE) Living with Alligators: a Florida Reality: https://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/publication/uw230 How You Can Help: Never feed an alligator - If you suspect anyone of feeding alligators, intentionally or not, please consider reporting it to Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC). You will not get anyone in trouble! The 1st offense is a warning and education visit. Call the wildlife alert hotline: 888-404-FWCC (3922). Cell phone users in Florida can dial *FWC or #FWC, depending on the service provider. Sources for this Episode: Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission Human-Alligator Incidents Fact Sheet (Updated April 2019). https://myfwc.com/media/1776/human-alligatorincidentfactsheet.pdf Ober, et al., Managing Conflicts with Wildlife: Living with Alligators. https://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/uw393 Swiman, et al., Living with Alligators: A Florida Reality. https://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/uw230 Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission: Statewide Nuisance Alligator Program. https://myfwc.com/wildlifehabitats/wildlife/alligator/snap/ Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission: Alligator Management Program. https://myfwc.com/wildlifehabitats/wildlife/alligator/ If you enjoyed this episode, please consider sharing it with a friend who might enjoy learning about Florida's natural areas and the wild things that live here! If you're active on iNaturalist, consider joining our iNaturalist project, Naturally Florida's Listener Observations, here: https://www.inaturalist.org/projects/naturally-florida-s-listener-observations
17:27
September 20, 2021
(Part 1) Florida's Most Recognizable Reptile: the American Alligator
Florida is known for having alligators, a fact that brings fear to many visitors and residents. But, alligators are an important species in many of our ecosystems. While we continue to develop the State, our chances of encountering an alligator increase, but there are many ways we can learn to coexist with them. This episode is the first episode in a two-part series and will discuss basic biology and some common alligator behavior. Learn more: Living with Alligators: a Florida Reality: https://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/publication/uw230 Information on alligator hunting in Florida (FWC) - https://myfwc.com/wildlifehabitats/wildlife/alligator/harvest/hunt-guide/ How You Can Help: Never feed an alligator - If you suspect anyone of feeding alligators, intentionally or not, please consider reporting it to Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC). You will not get anyone in trouble! The 1st offense is a warning and education visit. Call the wildlife alert hotline: 888-404-FWCC (3922). Cell phone users in Florida can dial *FWC or #FWC, depending on the service provider. Sources for this Episode: Ober, et al., Managing Conflicts with Wildlife: Living with Alligators. https://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/uw393 Swiman, et al., Living with Alligators: A Florida Reality. https://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/uw230 Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission: Statewide Nuisance Alligator Program. https://myfwc.com/wildlifehabitats/wildlife/alligator/snap/ Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission: Alligator Management Program. https://myfwc.com/wildlifehabitats/wildlife/alligator/ If you enjoyed this episode, please consider sharing it with a friend who might enjoy learning about Florida's natural areas and the wild things that live here! If you're active on iNaturalist, consider joining our iNaturalist project, Naturally Florida's Listener Observations, here: https://www.inaturalist.org/projects/naturally-florida-s-listener-observations
15:24
September 20, 2021
Trees and People: An intro to urban forestry
Florida is known for a wide variety of ecosystems from the Everglades to its springs, and the beaches to the national forests. While these ecosystems are a major driver for tourism here in the state, Florida is rapidly developing with most of the population now living in urban areas. In this episode, we will explore the value and importance of an ecosystem that is often overlooked, the urban forests. Learn more: What Is an Urban Forest? - https://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/publication/EP595 Economic Contributions of Urban Forestry in Florida in 2017 - https://fred.ifas.ufl.edu/extension/economic-impact-analysis-program/publications/2017-urban-forestry-in-florida/ Wind and Trees: Lessons Learned from Hurricanes (Mentioned by Shannon) - https://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/publication/FR173 How You Can Help: Explore The Value of Trees in Your Yard or Neighborhood - If you know what type of tree(s) you have in your yard or neighborhood, consider calculating their value using the Tree Benefits calculator found at www.treebenefits.com. Plant A Tree – This document can help you select which tree you are going to plant and where: https://gardeningsolutions.ifas.ufl.edu/care/planting/planting-and-establishing-trees.html  Sources for this Episode: History of State Lands - https://floridadep.gov/lands/lands-director/content/history-state-lands Florida Land Use and Land Cover Change in the Past 100 Years - https://floridaclimateinstitute.org/docs/climatebook/Ch02-Volk.pdf Urban forests and pollution mitigation: analyzing ecosystem services and disservices - https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0269749111000327?via%3Dihub City of Tampa Urban Ecological Analysis - https://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/publication/FR265 Defining urban forestry – A comparative perspective of North America and Europe - https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S1618866705000464?via%3Dihub If you enjoyed this episode, please consider sharing it with a friend who might enjoy learning about Florida's natural areas and the wild things that live here! If you're active on iNaturalist, consider joining our iNaturalist project, Naturally Florida's Listener Observations, here: https://www.inaturalist.org/projects/naturally-florida-s-listener-observations
20:01
August 24, 2021
Cuban Treefrogs, they're more than just a nuisance!
Cuban treefrogs are an invasive species in Florida. In this episode, you'll learn how to identify a Cuban treefrogs and how to humanely euthanize them. By choosing to remove Cuban treefrogs from your yard or neighborhood, you're helping protect local native treefrogs, like the green treefrog and the squirrel treefrog. Learn more: Dr. Steve Johnson's website about Cuban Treefrogs: https://ufwildlife.ifas.ufl.edu/cuban_treefrog_inFL.shtml Factsheet on Cuban treefrogs, including identification: https://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/pdf/UW/UW25900.pdf Learn about treefrog calls for species near you! https://www.pwrc.usgs.gov/frogquiz/index.cfm?fuseaction=main.lookup How You Can Help: Report Cuban treefrog sightings in FL's panhandle to Dr. Steve Johnson's lab:  https://ufwildlife.ifas.ufl.edu/citizen_sci.shtml Remove Cuban treefrogs from your yard or neighborhood: First, properly identify and and capture the Cuban treefrog. The easiest way to humanely euthanize a Cuban treefrog is to place the bagged frog into a refrigerator for 3–4 hours then transfer it to a freezer for an additional 24 hours. Then, move the frozen, now dead treefrog, to the trashcan. (excerpt from EDIS document, below) Sources for this Episode: Johnson, S. (2017). The Cuban Treefrog (Osteopilus septentrionalis) in Florida. University of of Florida IFAS Extension EDIS. https://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/publication/uw259 Kenneth G Rice, J. Hardin Waddle, Mark W Miller, Marquette E Crockett, Frank J Mazzotti, H. Franklin Percival. Recovery of Native Treefrogs After Removal of Nonindigenous Cuban Treefrogs, Osteopilus septentrionalis. Herpetologica 1 June 2011; 67 (2): 105–117. doi: https://doi.org/10.1655/HERPETOLOGICA-D-10-00020.1 Jones, P. (2019). Expert explains key role of frogs in healthy ecosystems. University of New South Wales. Accessed via https://phys.org at https://phys.org/news/2019-03-expert-key-role-frogs-healthy.html Treefrog calls and sound clips were sourced from USGS's Patuxent Wildlife Research Center: https://www.pwrc.usgs.gov/frogquiz/index.cfm?fuseaction=main.lookup If you enjoyed this episode, please consider sharing it with a friend who might enjoy learning about Florida's natural areas and the wild things that live here! If you're active on iNaturalist, consider joining our iNaturalist project, Naturally Florida's Listener Observations, here: https://www.inaturalist.org/projects/naturally-florida-s-listener-observations
21:54
July 15, 2021
Wait, we have fireflies in Florida?
Fireflies are indeed in Florida; you just have to know where to find them. Fireflies, also known as lightning bugs, avoid areas with high volumes of artificial lights and lots of urban development. In this episode of Naturally Florida, we’ll be discussing the lifecycle and conservation of fireflies in Florida. Learn more: Where to find fireflies in Florida: http://blogs.ifas.ufl.edu/polkco/2021/06/05/where-to-find-florida-fireflies/  Learn more about the current status of fireflies in the US and Canada: https://xerces.org/blog/status-of-fireflies-in-the-united-states-and-canada  How You Can Help: Add habitat to your yard or neighborhood. Consider adding native shrubs or small trees and changing part of your yard from lawn to Florida-Friendly Landscaping to provide habitat for a variety of small critters. Learn more here: http://blogs.ifas.ufl.edu/polkco/2021/06/12/how-to-create-a-firefly-oasis/ Help us document their presence. You don't need to identify species with a microscope to help, consider submitting citizen science reports to Firefly Watch! You can learn more here: https://www.massaudubon.org/get-involved/community-science/firefly-watch/getting-started Sources for this Episode: Faust, L. (2017). Fireflies, Glow-worms, and Lightning Bugs. University of Georgia Press. 39-168 Available nationwide at a book retailer near you! The National Wildlife Federation. (n.d.). Fireflies. https://www.nwf.org/Educational-Resources/Wildlife-Guide/Invertebrates/Fireflies Firefly Conservation Research. (2021). Disappearing Fireflies. https://www.firefly.org/why-arefireflies-disappearing.html University of Florida IFAS Extension. (n.d.). How to Attract Fireflies for Homeowners.  http://sfyl.ifas.ufl.edu/images/fireflies-graphic.pdf If you enjoyed this episode, please consider sharing it with a friend who might enjoy learning about Florida's natural areas and the wild things that live here! If you're active on iNaturalist, consider joining our iNaturalist project, Naturally Florida's Listener Observations, here: https://www.inaturalist.org/projects/naturally-florida-s-listener-observations
17:51
June 21, 2021
Where does rain go after it falls?
Florida gets a lot of rain, but our natural water cycle is shifting more towards an urban water cycle as we develop the Sunshine State. In this episode of Naturally Florida, we'll be chatting about the impacts of development on the water cycle with a focus on stormwater and its impact on the watershed. Learn more: Stormwater Runoff - https://www.swfwmd.state.fl.us/residents/education/kids/stormwater-runoff Lara has a whole webinar on stormwater you can watch on-demand: https://zoom.us/rec/share/YLiCkb4lZvEE7hR3810rIXTw9usnN6S_BOONVxp1Jca4k1bWLQuLcuQ11IKwKV0f.e5dAWjiCRRgr3dFs?startTime=1621360728000 How You Can Help: Don't let your runoff, runoff! Keeping rainwater in your yard will help improve water quality and help recharge our aquifers. Learn more about what you can to do improve water quality in your neighborhood: https://www.sfwmd.gov/community-residents/what-can-you-do Contact your local UF/IFAS Extension Office. Your local extension office will have resources and experts that can help you design a rain garden, talk about rain barrels, or share how to transition to Florida-Friendly Landscaping. Find your local office, here: http://sfyl.ifas.ufl.edu/find-your-local-office/ Sources for this Episode: 2020 Integrated Water Quality Assessment for Florida, June 2020: 2020 Integrated Water Quality Assessment for Florida: Sections 303(d), 305(b), and 314 Report and Listing Update (floridadep.gov) If you enjoyed this episode, please consider sharing it with a friend who might enjoy learning about Florida's natural areas and the wild things that live here! If you're active on iNaturalist, consider joining our iNaturalist project, Naturally Florida's Listener Observations, here: https://www.inaturalist.org/projects/naturally-florida-s-listener-observations
21:12
June 21, 2021
Lara's Favorite Species: The Green Anole
Florida's native green anole (pronounced "uh-nole"), Anolis carolinensis, is Lara's favorite species in all of Florida! In this episode of Naturally Florida, we'll be chatting about what makes the green anole so special and about their nonnative look-alike, the brown anole (Anolis sagrei). Learn more: Cuban Brown Anole or Green Anole (video): https://youtu.be/KQhnzi9mkYI Landscaping Solutions: Green Anoles: https://gardeningsolutions.ifas.ufl.edu/design/gardening-with-wildlife/anoles.html How You Can Help: Help us document their populations! If you see a green anole in your yard or while out in one of Florida's many natural areas, snap a picture with your smartphone and upload it to iNaturalist.org.  Add habitat to your yard or neighborhood. Consider adding native shrubs or small trees and changing part of your yard from lawn to Florida-Friendly Landscaping to provide habitat for a variety of small critters. Learn more here: https://ffl.ifas.ufl.edu/about-ffl/9-principles/principle-5-attract-wildlife/ Sources for this Episode: Invader Updater: Cuban Brown Anole, UF Wildlife Department (2011) https://ufwildlife.ifas.ufl.edu/InvaderUpdater/pdfs/InvaderUpdater_Winter2011.pdf Green Anole (Anolis carolinensis), Savannah River Ecology Laboratory (n.d.) https://srelherp.uga.edu/lizards/anocar.htm Analysis of the effects of an exotic lizard on a native lizard in Florida ..., University of Tennessee (2000) https://trace.tennessee.edu/utk_graddiss/4722/ Florida Lizards are Evolving, Fast, Science Connected (2014) https://magazine.scienceconnected.org/2014/10/florida-lizards-evolving-rapidly/ If you enjoyed this episode, please consider sharing it with a friend who might enjoy learning about Florida's natural areas and the wild things that live here!   If you're active on iNaturalist, consider joining our iNaturalist project, Naturally Florida's Listener Observations, here: https://www.inaturalist.org/projects/naturally-florida-s-listener-observations
17:50
June 21, 2021