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NCLA Podcast

NCLA Podcast

By Rachael Mann
This podcast is brought to you by NCLA. In each episode, our host, Rachael Mann, is joined by Career and Technical Education (CTE) thought leaders to share innovative approaches to local challenges that will inspire CTE administrators across the nation.
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“CTSO and CTE Programs Ruin Students and Educators for Life!” with Guest, Frank Kitchen

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Success by Design with Guests Tammy Bonner and Jennifer Brooks
In this episode of the NCLA podcast, Tammy Bonner and Jennifer Brooks share grassroots efforts to statewide consortia and current partnerships in Arizona. Our guests address best practices and strategies that CTE leaders should consider when planning for career and technical education programs in schools and districts. Tammy Bonner is currently the Director of the Arizona CTE Curriculum Consortium. As the Director she manages the development of the AZCTECC curriculum resources and provides professional development to CTE teachers across Arizona. Before moving to Career and Technical Education at Pima JTED and then to the AZ CTE Curriculum Consortium, she began her career in the dental industry. She received her BA in Organizational Leadership through Arizona State University and is driven to advocate for CTE and help teachers succeed in their classrooms. She is currently a member of ACTE and an ACTEAZ Fellow. Jennifer currently serves as the Assistant Director of the Arizona CTE Curriculum Consortium.  Prior to that, she was the Director of Curriculum and Instruction as well as an Instructional Specialist at West-MEC, a CTE District in the West Valley of Phoenix.  She began her career in education straight from industry teaching CTE (Business, Marketing, and Culinary Arts) for eleven years.  A former purchasing agent for a Fortune 500 Oil Company and pastry chef at Marriott,  Jennifer embraced her role as a teacher and continued to pursue education earning her Masters in Career & Technical Education in 2006.  Jennifer is a passionate advocate for quality teaching & learning and champions many initiatives at the Consortium designed to support CTE teachers and programs.  She strongly believes in the value of the CTE Delivery Model and the life-changing opportunities that CTE programs provide to students. To learn more about these efforts and to connect with Tammy and Jennifer, visit https://www.ctecaz.org/
36:22
April 26, 2021
Entrepreneurial Education in a Virtual World
In this episode of the NCLA podcast, the Chief Executive Officer of the Virtual Startup Academy, Gregory Keele M.A. Ed shares his vision for the future of Career and Technical Education.  Bio: My professional experience includes five years at California Virtual Academies, an online charter school in California, where I have taught Entrepreneurship.  I have a BA in Economics from Claremont McKenna College and a MA Ed in Learning and Technology from Azusa Pacific University.  I hold a Single Subject Business credential, an Economics authorization, and CTE Credentials in Marketing, Service and Sales, and Business and Finance, and hold the Certiport certification for Entrepreneurship and Small Business. In the entrepreneurial world, I have started multiple companies in the tech sector and was a management consultant while running my software company.  I have also helped multiple other startups launch and grow in an advisory role.  For the last 10 years, I have also been a high school football coach and continue that today. Website: www.virtualstartup.academy Twitter: @gregkeele LinkedIn:https://www.linkedin.com/in/gregory-keele-24887744/ Email: greg@virtualstartup.academy
44:24
April 26, 2021
"CTE in a Virtual World" with Milton Hershey School CTE Director, Dave Curry
When the world turned upside down a little over a year ago, many things had to stop and pivot with it. The in-person learning and hands-on experiences that were the norm for teaching trade and vocational skills had to be reimagined factoring in physical distancing and virtual instruction. Educators had to be creative, and students had to be open to these new models, knowing that it would be worth it–and that’s exactly what happened at Milton Hershey School. As a result of the pandemic, career and technical education has become more important than ever. There is a higher demand for skilled jobs and unforeseen disruption in other career paths. The higher education landscape also shifted. It is the role of career and technical education to change with the times, teaching courses like carpentry, agriculture, design, and technology, while also providing practical skills that are marketable, adaptable, and essential. At Milton Hershey School, a pre-K through 12th-grade residential school for children from low-income backgrounds, vocational training has been a core part of the curriculum throughout the school’s 110-year history. The Career and Technical Education (CTE) program, and its 12 career pathways, prepare students for college or career by introducing a wide range of disciplines. Beginning in elementary school, students are exposed to careers and progress through real-life experiences in and out of the classroom as part of the CTE curriculum. While the school never closed as a result of the pandemic, the typical methods of instruction adjusted but also created opportunities for innovative lessons that address the real need for CTE. Here are some examples of how CTE teachers have tapped into different instructional methods to create unique learning opportunities for students: (Click here to continue reading: https://drive.google.com/file/d/1PQSfs91juG4oMMKl2atiDxk-1DPuRsBf/view?usp=sharing) Dave Curry is the director of career and technical education (CTE) at the Milton Hershey School in Hershey, Pa. He leads a program that offers 12 CTE pathways, each combining tailor-made instruction and hands-on learning with the ability to gain industry-recognized certifications and real-life experience through internships, co-ops, and pre-apprenticeships.
43:33
April 7, 2021
Balance Boundaries and Breaks with Evan Whitehead
Evan Whitehead has been an educator for more than 20 years spanning three decades.  Over the course of his career, he has held the following positions: special education paraprofessional, special education high school teacher, Latino parent outreach coordinator, dean of student discipline, community outreach coordinator, director of special services, director of bilingual education, and English learners, Title I director, and assistant superintendent of special services. Currently, Evan is the director of special services for a PK–8 school district in Illinois. In his current role, Evan oversees all federal programs (special education, McKinney-Vento,  English learners, and Title I); early childhood education; a multi-tiered system of support (MTSS); social-emotional learning, equity, diversity, and cultural competency. Evan is also a National Consultant, Trainer, Presenter, Speaker; Frequent Podcast Contributor; Mental Health Advocate; Mindfulness Practitioner; and proponent of Equity, Diversity, and Intercultural competency. Evan’s 3Bs” Balance, Boundaries, and Breaks” (#BalanceBoundariesandBreaks) promotes self -advocacy in the areas of mental health, self-care, and wellness. “It’s OK to be SELFISH about your mental health/wellness in order to be the best version of yourself so that you can be SELFLESS for others you help and support. https://mailchi.mp/865946491663/whats-new-with-pbl-in-ohio-4225829?e=c51a102555
01:23:06
February 8, 2021
Panda Pilots, Harry Potter, and Doc Brown: Leading with Fun (Interview with Eddie Small)
Eddie Small is a passionate leader, instructional coach, and innovative educator. His work in education and educational technology has focused on connecting teachers and students in engaging solutions and instructional design. As a Principal Consultant with Instructure, Eddie works with educators, administrators, and district leadership in designing success for Canvas. Eddie believes in digital learning strategies that make an immediate K-12 impact. As a former CTE Innovation Coach for Central Nine Career Center, Eddie developed several innovative solutions to educational technology in a career-based environment. He also created digital learning initiatives through their LMS with a focus on project-based learning. As a role model and resource for teachers, Eddie guided a strategy of support that allowed an individualized learning approach for CTE educator's professional development. Eddie also mentored new and seasoned educators in best practices in course design, classroom management, and district leadership. You can find Eddie on Twitter @smallindiana.
01:02:12
February 2, 2021
Increasing Career Opportunity Awareness While Decreasing Opportunity Cost: Interview with Joe Belsterling
Joe Belsterling is the Founder and CEO of MajorClarity, an academic planning and career exploration platform serving thousands of schools nationwide. He previously has consulted schools and organizations on building entrepreneurship programs for students, worked on political campaigns, and done various advisory work including helping the U.S Department of Education build better resources and guidelines for schools conducting EdTech pilots. Joe is a graduate from the College of William & Mary. MajorClarity Trailer: http://bit.ly/MajorClarityTrailer Learn How COVID-19 is Impacting CCR: http://virtual.majorclarity.com/ Email Joe at joe@majorclarity.com
33:34
January 25, 2021
Credentialing Additional Language Proficiency across CTE Career Pathways with the Seal of Biliteracy (Interview with Dina R. Yoshimi)
Our nation’s multilingual talent has long been one of our best-kept secrets, but it’s one we can no longer afford to keep. With our 21st century penchant for stretching supply lines, educational opportunities, production processes, collaborative research endeavors, and leisure travel around the globe, the need for proficient multilingual skills in the workforce has never been greater. Addressing this need is not merely aspirational; it is essential.  The competitiveness of American industry, the strength of our national security, the global engagement of our researchers and educators, and the equitable access to human services for limited English proficient populations all depend on our doing so. Continue Reading Here: https://docs.google.com/document/d/1YSn1_KdhyX5pJtd9Gfu4y-dFY9h0Yo0S0nsR_giO_x8/edit?usp=sharing Dina Rudolph Yoshimi (Ph.D., Applied Linguistics, University of Southern California) is an Associate Professor in the Department of East Asian Languages & Literatures at the University of Hawai‘i-Mānoa and Director of the Hawai'i Language Roadmap Initiative (UH-Mānoa College of Arts, Languages, & Letters). Her research interests include the pragmatics of everyday language use and language use in the state’s workforce. During her tenure as Roadmap Director, she has coordinated the launch of the Hawai'i Language Roadmap and provided key leadership in the development and implementation of the state’s Seal of Biliteracy. Under her guidance, the Roadmap has promoted the development of a multilingual workforce for Hawai‘i through statewide symposia, multilingual career development programs, and outreach endeavors that have reached over 3500 employers, educators, students, and job seekers across the state. She is currently directing the Roadmap’s initiative to promote the credentialing of language proficiency as an additional workforce skill in Hawai‘i’s high-demand industry sectors. As Roadmap Director, Dr. Yoshimi serves on the State of Hawai‘i Workforce Development Council’s Sector Strategies and Career Pathways Committee and its Performance Standards Committee, the UH-Mānoa College of Education’s Multilingual Learner Teacher Education Committee, and the Moanalua High School World Language Learning Center Advisory Board. Dina R. Yoshimi, Ph.D. Director, Hawai‘i Language Roadmap Initiative College of Arts, Languages and Letters Moore Hall 382 University of Hawai'i-Mānoa Office: (808) 956-2077 Web: nflrc.hawaii.edu/languageroadmap/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/HawaiiLanguageRoadmap Instagram: @hawaiilanguageroadmap
55:37
January 8, 2021
Real World Connections through EVERFI with Guests, Samantha du Preez and Erica Hart
We have to show students that there is a real connection between what they learn in school and the world beyond the classroom. How can educators help students connect with real-world problems, and navigate them in a low-risk environment? Engage students in many ways. One size does not fit all, and students need to hear and engage with content in many different ways. CTE programs are integral to diversifying students’ learning opportunities. EVERFI supports that learning with another method of practicing skills using interactive, online lessons and games. In EVERFI: Financial Literacy, students learn about personal finance, planning for the future, and protecting themselves through six 20-minute lessons, all at their own pace on their computer, Chromebook, or tablet. Provide authentic learning opportunities. Learning through true-to-life simulations and real-world experience transforms a students’ understanding. EVERFI’s virtual lessons provide an opportunity to put those skills to the test. For example, if you want to give your students a foundation in entrepreneurship, Venture: Entrepreneurial Expedition guides students through designing and running their own virtual food truck business.  A virtual simulation can get the conversation started, while providing a foundation in concepts students need to be successful. Read more here:  https://docs.google.com/document/d/1hC7GbgaDnCeocSJI81pwqaG3hy8BNKxdO7dZAwMCgaA/edit?usp=sharing Samantha du Preez is EVERFI's K-12 Community Engagement Manager. She has worked with EVERFI over the last five years to connect with educators and equip them with the resources they need to prepare students for the real world. A former elementary and ESL educator herself, Samantha has taught in communities in Los Angeles, Arizona, and South Korea. She has her M.Ed in Curriculum and Instruction from the American College of Education, two B.A. degrees in English and Journalism from the University of Arizona, and her research on early language acquisition has been published in the Korea TESOL Journal. Now a resident of Detroit, she continues to advocate for education locally, but spends most of her free time keeping warm and well-fed with her spouse and two dogs. Erica Hart is a Senior Schools manager based in her hometown of Kansas City. She graduated from Missouri State University with a Bachelor’s in Education and earned her Master's degree in Educational Technology from the University of Central Missouri. Erica was an educator in MO for 7 years before joining EVERFI as a Schools Manager where she helps to train teachers, provide ongoing support, and share data with schools and districts about the impact of EVERFI’s resources.
46:12
December 21, 2020
An Education-Business Relationship: The Story of a Partnership Journey with Guests Lindsey Balderaz and John Turcic
In this episode of the NCLA podcast, our host, Rachael Mann, is joined by guests Lindsey Balderaz and John Turcic to discuss their proof-of-concept initiative with the Transformative Leadership Academy (TLA) in West Texas.  This project is part of an education/business partnership development pilot effort to test the effectiveness of the program’s methodologies, concepts, and curriculum approaches. Tune in to hear about this partnership, a discussion on disruptive technology, innovation, leadership, and more. To learn more about today's guests, visit:  John Turcic's Bio: https://docs.google.com/document/d/1Xcxwsl9V9FxeVreDiSTWXkDCuACG0kPCwZNKtm28J0w/edit?usp=sharing Dr. Lindsey Baleraz's Bio: https://docs.google.com/document/d/1s_46yQ_7Mvbe3ycHuwGOZEtI0SwLNh-M5xEZohbUa_Q/edit?usp=sharing Transformative Leadership Academy: https://thetlacademy.com/ UTB Professor Starts Her Own School https://www.oaoa.com/news/education/utpb-professor-starts-her-own-school/article_d45b0478-d424-11ea-9a22-135f7827200a.html
58:55
November 7, 2020
Professional Organization Membership, Engagement, and Leadership: Interview with Jon Quatman
Bio: Jon Quatman was Assistant Superintendent and Vice President for Great Oaks, the career-technical school district serving 30,000 youth and adults at four campuses in southwestern Ohio.  After earning his BA at Thomas More College and his Masters from Xavier University, Jon held administrative positions in a large Cincinnati suburb, Forest Hills. When Jon came to Great Oaks in 1996 as Director of the largest Great Oaks campus, he was immediately charged with restructuring the school into professional academies. After successfully completing this challenge, Jon earned a vice presidency position. At Great Oaks, Jon successfully integrated assessment and accountability into the learning process. Jon required individual academic plans for each student which have led to improved graduation rates, employment and continuing education. He enhanced accountability through the integration of a more accurate and accessible student management system. He has also restructured assessment and professional development at Great Oaks to upgrade the accuracy and relevancy of assessments in each career program.  He oversaw all student services, secondary marketing and State data reporting for the district and the curriculum department. Jon’s expertise has been recognized and valued by his peers.  He was tapped for Leadership Cincinnati – the first non-superintendent.  He was selected to work on the Ohio Taskforce to set standards for supporting students with special needs in a rigorous academic environment. He served on the Ohio Taskforce to define performance measures for Ohio CTE; he has been the Chair of the Ohio North Central Accreditation Association, President of the Ohio Association of Career and Technical Education, President of the National Council of Local Administrators, and Vice President of Region I for Association of Career and Technical Education, representing the Northeastern States from Maine to West Virginia to Michigan, including Washington DC. He received the Ambassador Award from the Special Needs Division of Ohio Association of Career and Technical Education, the Stanley Fox Excellence in Education Award in 2003 from Ohio NCA-CASI and Ohio Excellence in Education Award in 2010 from Advanced ED. Blog Post: https://www.acteonline.org/professional-organization-membership-engagement-and-leadership/
34:16
November 6, 2020
Interview with Dr. Aaron Smith: The Future of Work Depends on the Autonomous Learning Skills We Build Today
In this episode of the NCLA Podcast, Dr. Aaron L. Smith reminds listeners to remember that academia must bridge careers (ABCs) through CTE and STEM and discusses building a robust workforce in these areas through collaboration. Aaron is an author and international speaker, and an active educator leading one of the most award-winning STEM magnet schools in the Commonwealth of Virginia. Specializing in advanced workforce development, Dr. Smith brings an inspiring message all over the nation on the transformation of STEM Career and Technical Ed public education. Visit the following links to learn more about Dr. Smith's work: https://www.aaronsmithphd.com/ https://www.amazon.com/Blank-Check-Novel-Reinvent-Schools/dp/1642798851/ref=sr_1_1?dchild=1&keywords=Blank+Check+Aaron+Smith&qid=1585740734&sr=8-1 https://www.amazon.com/Awakening-Your-School-Aaron-Smith/dp/1633930610/ref=sr_1_1?dchild=1&keywords=Awakening+Your+STEM+School&qid=1586862286&sr=8-1
32:07
November 6, 2020
Leading the Way with NCLA Board Member, Eric Ripley
Eric Ripley has 18 years of professional experience in Career and Technical Education (CTE) including his current roles as the Director of CTE for the Grand Forks Public Schools (North Dakota) and Director of the Grand Forks Area Career & Technology Center. A graduate of the University of North Dakota, Eric’s educational background includes a Bachelor's Degree in Business Education and a Master's Degree in Career & Technical Education/Educational Leadership. Prior to his current administrative position, Eric previously taught as a middle school CTE computer teacher and high school information technology instructor. Eric is passionate about the importance of Career and Technical Education within public education and expanding opportunities for all students to partake in CTE. Eric is married to Sadie, and has three sons, Toby, Grady, and Ethan.
26:02
November 3, 2020
Communication and Collaboration are KEY to CTE! Interview with Fran Bromley-Norwood
Podcast Subject: K-12 and Post-Secondary Collaboration Fran Bromley-Norwood is the Computer Science and Cybersecurity Lead for the Clark County School District in Nevada, where she trains teachers and prepares Career and Technical Education students to be career-ready for industry positions. Fran earned her Bachelor's Degree at Towson State University in Maryland and her Master's Degree at Dowling College in New York. She continues to earn college credits and industry certifications in order to stay up-to-date with industry standards. She is a 2020 ACTE Fellow and Nominating Committee member representing the eTED Division. She was also selected to be part of the ACTE LEAD program in 2019. Fran currently sits on the Nevada ACTE executive board. Fran is a member of the Nevada State K-12 Computer Science Standards writing team and a standards development member for the CTE Cybersecurity program of study. She is a member of the CTE Computer Science and Cybersecurity assessment teams and continues working with colleagues to increase the rigor for the CTE Computer Science standards. Fran moved from New York to Las Vegas in 2001, where she now lives with her husband and two sons. Fran has a passion for all kinds of sports including aquatics, hockey, and auto racing, where she met her husband. https://linkedin.com/in/fran-bromley-norwood-932b46148 https://twitter.com/itchcompsci
35:25
September 30, 2020
UnEarthing Leadership Mastery with Del Johnson
Del Johnson is the Vice President of Business Development at Orgametrics. Del’s education and corporate experience, most notably running the college and career center for Minneapolis Public Schools, gives him unique insight into understanding the challenges of organizations wishing to develop truly effective and aligned teams and leaders. https://orgametrics.net/ 
16:09
September 29, 2020
Looking Forward with NCLA Board Member, Dave Keaton
Dave Keaton began his current CTE Regional Director/Superintendent position at Region Two School of Applied Technology located in Houlton, Maine, in July 2012. Previously, Dave was CTE Director of Somerset Career & Technical Center in Skowhegan, Maine for 6 years, was a Pre K -12 Principal at Ashland Schools, Director of Learning at Loring Job Corps, CTE Director at St. John Valley Technology Center, and K - 12 Principal at Limestone Community School. Dave earned his Bachelor's Degree at the University of Maine at Presque Isle, his Master's and Certificate of Advance Studies Degrees at the University of Maine in Educational Leadership. Dave has recently completed a three-year term, as Vice President of Career & Technical Education National Association for Region I comprising of 15 states and the District of Columbia. While a member of the ACTE Dave recently was a finalist of ACTE’s Administrator of the Year Award and winner of Region I Administrator of the Year. He also was selected for the Scott Westbrook III Humanitarian Award and the Jim Hanneman Award. Dave is the President-Elect of National Council of Local Administrators of CTE (NCLA) and will assume the President position in school year FY18. Dave is the Chair for Northern New England CTE Consortium comprised of Maine, New Hampshire, and Vermont. Dave also serves on the state committee of the Employer Support of the Guard & Reserve since his military retirement in 2000 as a Field Artillery Captain. Serves on the Board of Directors of Aroostook County Action Program. Dave also serves on serves on several other state and local committees. He lives in Caribou, Maine with his wife and two daughters.
30:19
September 26, 2020
Not Your Father's Shop Class: CTE is an "Everybody Option" with NCLA Board Member, Chris Bailey
In this episode of the NCLA podcast, Chris Bailey shares the importance of CTE to economic development and how teachers need to think of themselves as industry trainers and recruiters. Tune in to hear why every student should be required to take a Career and Technical Education class and how his daughter's experience in CTE saved him potentially $200k in a potentially wrong career decision.  Learn more about his CTE program in Onslow: https://www.ednc.org/not-your-fathers-shop-class/ Chris Bailey is the Career & Technical Education Director for Onslow County Schools in southeastern North Carolina. Beginning his career as an agricultural education teacher, Chris has served as a CTE teacher, career development coordinator, elementary assistant principal, high school assistant principal and CTE Director. Chris served Craven County Schools for eight years as CTE Director and has recently returned to Onslow County Schools to lead CTE. He was the recipient of the Dave Berryman Leadership Scholarship in 2016, NC Southeast Region CTE Director of the Year in 2015 and 2018, and the North Carolina CTE Director of the Year in 2019. He holds a Bachelor of Science in Agricultural Education from North Carolina State University and a Masters of School Administration from East Carolina University. His wife, Beth, is an Agricultural Education teacher in Onslow County. They have one daughter, Caitlyn, who is a freshman at Western Carolina University.
44:23
September 4, 2020
Interview with Massachusetts's Longest Serving School Superintendent, Dr. Gerry Paist
Gerry Paist has been the Superintendent of the Pathfinder Regional Vocational Technical High School District in Palmer, Massachusetts since 1974 and is currently the longest-serving school superintendent in Massachusetts. He credits that longevity to the students and staff of the District and especially to the outstanding members of the Pathfinder School Committee (a.k.a. School Board). Previously he spent six years as an administrator at Westfield State College in the office of the Vice President and Academic Dean. At Westfield State, he oversaw the Vocational Teacher Training Program and was responsible for creating the college’s first full-time day graduate program in the Administration of Occupational Education. A native of Pennsylvania, Gerry grew up and attended high school in suburban Philadelphia. In the fall of 1957, he entered Lafayette College where he earned his Bachelor of Arts degree in 1961. Following graduation from Lafayette, he went directly to Harvard University’s Graduate School of Education where he received his M.A.T. degree in June 1962. He subsequently served as a mathematics teacher in the public schools of Wayland and Stoneham, Massachusetts. In 1966 he received a leave of absence from Stoneham to pursue doctoral work at Harvard where he received his Ed.D. from the Graduate School of Education’s Administrative Career Program in June 1971. Gerry reports that a school superintendent’s position is often a 70-hour week, but he finds time to be a season ticket holder for the Springfield (MA) Thunderbirds hockey team, the Springfield Symphony Orchestra, Broadway in Boston, City Stage, and the University of Massachusetts Fine Arts Center. Gerry’s professional associations include the American Association of School Administrators, Mass. Assn. of School Superintendents, Mass. Assn. of Vocational Administrators, Mass. Vocational Assn. and ACTE. He is a long time Board Member and past Chairman of the Quaboag Hills Chamber of Commerce in Palmer, Mass.
49:23
August 24, 2020
"If You're Not Improving, You're Backing Up" with Pat Edmunds
Pat Edmunds is the Director of Arkansas Tech Career Center in Russellville, Arkansas. Spending more than 25 years in CTE, she has accepted the role as an educational administrator, leader, and mentor excitedly. She took a 1972 vo-tech model and modernized it by facilitating a merger with a two-year institution, updating programming, incorporating industry credentials, and growing enrollment by 200%. She brought industry to the table to have real conversations about growing a local modern workforce. Her motto is, “If you’re not improving, you’re backing up.” When she’s not in her garden, she and her husband, Jerry, love spending time with their precious grandbabies or traveling to her favorite haunts in New Orleans.
34:29
August 22, 2020
Safely Opening Careerteched: Best Practices and Considerations for Fall 2020 with Dr. Edward Bouquillon
In this episode, Dr. Edward A. Bouquillon, Superintendent-Director of the Minuteman Regional Vocational Technical School District, shares the details of his district's efforts to navigate a global pandemic while ensuring that the needs of students, staff, and the community are met. This podcast features best practices and innovative approaches that CTE leaders across the country can implement for the 2020-2021 school year to integrate on-site school learning with e-learning while ensuring safety first for all stakeholders. Podcast note: Dr. Bouquillon started as the vocational coordinator in 1988. Connect with Dr. Bouquillon to discuss the podcast, ask questions, or learn more about plans for the upcoming school year: e.bouquillon@minuteman.org Dr. Bouquillon's work has been featured in the following publications: Education Week: Coronavirus, Economic Crisis Cloud Resurgence of Career and Technical Education National Association of School Superintendents: It is the constant, daily, intentional choice of love over fear that will bring us all through this. AASA: Career Skills vs Academics: Not an Either/Or Proposition Video of Minuteman’s drive-thru 2020 graduation Dr. Edward A. Bouquillon is a veteran educator who is widely recognized as an innovator and champion for career and technical education. He was appointed Superintendent-Director of the Minuteman Regional Vocational Technical School District in 2007 and has nearly three decades of experience. In 2019, Bouquillon was nominated as semi-finalist for the National Superintendent of the Year Award from the National Association of School Superintendents. Dr. Bouquillon believes that career and technical education, coupled with rigorous academic courses, gives Minuteman graduates a competitive edge in the new global economy. That’s why he describes Minuteman as “a revolution in learning.” His leadership and collaboration with local and state leaders was instrumental in the construction of a new state-of-the-art building for Minuteman Regional Vocational Technical High School, which opened in September 2019. The new facility fosters a robust college and career academy model that has led to new or expanded programs to respond to labor demands, including biotechnology, engineering technology, environmental science, advanced manufacturing, multimedia engineering, and soon, animal science. During his tenure, Minuteman has consistently performed well on statewide student testing and outperformed the state average on graduation rates. In 2018, Minuteman was one of only three vocational-technical schools designated as a Blue Ribbon School by the U.S. Department of Education for overall excellence. Dr. Bouquillon is an active member of the Massachusetts Association of Vocational Administrators (MAVA) and served as its president from 2013-2014, and now sits on its Board of Directors. He’s a founding member of the Alliance for Vocational Education and is a trustee to the National Occupational Competency Training Institute (NOCTI.) He also served on the Lexington, MA Chamber of Commerce’s Board of Directors and was elected Chairman in 2012, and is involved in numerous additional organizations. He holds a PhD in Workforce Education and a master’s degree in Animal Studies, both from Pennsylvania State University, and a Bachelor of Science Degree in Occupational and Vocational Education from the University of Connecticut.
55:01
August 14, 2020
CTE, STEM, and The Future of Work with Guest, Larisa Schelkin
Larisa K. Schelkin is CEO & Founder, Global STEM Education Center, Inc. 501(c) (3) nonprofit and President, Global STEM Education Consulting, LLC. Larisa is the author of the Global STEM Classroom® - globally connected teaching and learning model. She develops and runs collaborative global STEM programs with schools in Massachusetts and around the world. Larisa is the recipient of MAVA Friend of Career & Technical Education Award (2016) and serves on the Steering Committee of MAVA Connecting for Success Annual Conference. She is a frequent speaker at career technical education conferences on the topics of Artificial Intelligence, Machine Learning, BIG Data, the Future of Work and CTE education. Her Global STEM program was highlighted by ACTE, CTE, Longview Foundation, Asia Society in the white paper on workforce development. She led PD, coaching and implementation of the Global STEM CTE program for 4 years at a career technical high school (Electrical/Plumbing/Auto-Collision/Culinary) and for 10 years at regional public high/middle schools. She managed Global STEM Classroom programs in collaboration with educators in France, UK, Russia, the Netherlands, Norway, Ukraine, Mexico and India. Her programs were recognized and presented at MA STEM Summit, MAVA, ACTE, ISTE, ASCD, METAA, MassCUE, NSTA, CoSN. Larisa held executive positions in academia and STEM global corporations (WPI, WIT, Tufts University; TYCO Electronics Global Corporation).  Larisa is a NASA GLOBE Certified educator (since 2014). She is a Fellow for Education Policy, Rennie Center for Educational Research and Policy & Institute for Education Leadership (IEL), Washington, DC (Class 2015); Larisa studied Global Education at Harvard University Graduate School of Education ”Think Tank” (2015-2019); Larisa Schelkin holds BS/MS in Petroleum Engineering & MS in Computer Science. Learn more about the Global STEM Education Center on page 2 of this white paper: Preparing a Globally competent workforce through a high-quality career technical education: https://asiasociety.org/sites/default/files/preparing-a-globally-competent-workforce-june-2016.pdf
47:26
August 10, 2020
Access to Critical Thinking and The Education Equity Equation with Colin Seale
“Adults need to commit to changing the narrative and stop treating critical thinking as a luxury good. Closing this gap for all students is our only hope for giving all students access to 21st-century opportunities.” Colin Seale Colin Seale is an award-winning educator, advocate, entrepreneur, critical thinking expert, author of Thinking Like a Lawyer, Forbes contributor, and the founder of Think Law.  Connect with Colin and learn more about his work:  https://www.thinklaw.us/about/. Twitter: @ColinESeale Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ceseale LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/thinklaw/ Sign up for his webinar here: https://www.thinklaw.us/the-educational-equity-equation-webinar-series/
46:06
July 15, 2020
Teachers Need Coaches Now More Than Ever, with Will Morris
When you think of essential workers in career and technical education, what comes to mind? If your first thought was coaches, you are ahead of the game. Our teachers need coaches now more than ever. In this episode, Will Morris, the founder of social enterprise EdConnective, shares how coaching can help teachers embrace distance learning and help students thrive during this challenging time. There isn’t a teacher in America who was teaching during the last pandemic that caused schools to close en masse. That happened in 1918. With COVID-19 forcing teachers to deliver distance learning practically overnight, schools and districts are facing the monumental task of “wholesale retraining” their workforce. Superintendents of massive urban school districts are calling this is, “an adaptive challenge on a scale not seen in a generation.” The closest example from the past 85 years is probably the wartime effort of World War II that saw factories retool to produce supplies for the war effort, and bring women to the workforce on a scale not previously seen. Too dramatic a comparison? Perhaps. But that’s the magnitude of what we’re asking educators to do. Read more here: https://www.therenewalproject.com/you-may-not-think-teachers-need-coaches-but-theyre-essential-now-more-than-ever/ Will Morris is the Founder and CEO of EdConnective. Will received his Masters of Education from the University of Pennsylvania's Graduate School of Education. There he researched instructional coaching as a promising lever of teacher quality. Before UPenn, Will spent a year working with a cohort of 30 African American freshmen as an Urban Prep Fellow in a Chicago Charter School. During his year in Chicago, Will became a Starting Bloc Social Innovation Fellow and participated in a social entrepreneurship institute that sparked his desire to create systemic impact through social innovation.  Connect with Will Morris and learn more about his work:  https://www.edconnective.com/ Twitter: @edconnective Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/EdConnectiveCoaching/ Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/company/edconnective
44:07
June 27, 2020
STEM Careers and CTE Events Gone Virtual with Tiffanie Rosier and Brittany Hollis
In this episode, Rachael Mann is joined by guests, Tiffanie Rosier and Brittany Hollis to discuss Northern Virginia Community College's STEM outreach program and the successful move to a virtual platform. Virtual STEM Careers Event Recap, written by Tiffanie and Brittany Many programs at Northern Virginia Community College (NOVA) have effectively adjusted their events from in-person to virtual and NOVA SySTEMic, NOVA's STEM outreach program, has done the same with STEM Camps, STEMinars and CTE Career Exploration. In March, NOVA SySTEMic successfully pivoted major in-person events to a virtual format using Zoom, including Virtual Interviewing Skills Workshops, Virtual Mock Interviews, and a STEM Careers Series. Virtual CTE Career Exploration Fair In response to COVID 19, NOVA went into telework and remote instruction in mid-March, just 72 hours before the CTE Career Exploration Fair. Faced with the decision to cancel, reschedule or modify the event, NOVA SySTEMic decided to put on a Virtual Career Fair so that students and parents would not miss the important and timely information that could still be relayed through Zoom. The Virtual CTE Career Exploration Fair provided access to valuable information on NOVA Programs, Services and Career Exploration.  Although 91 students had signed up for the original in-person event, 29 participants and 15 of NOVA's programs of study and student services departments were retained for the Virtual Fair.  This new format allowed for small group interaction and allowed participants to learn more about a variety of programs in one setting from their own home.  While the turnaround time to modify the event was short, the goal of providing information to current and prospective students was still met effectively. This fall our goal is to conduct a series of Virtual CTE Program Session Overviews in October that will also provide session recordings that will be available on the NOVA SySTEMic YouTube Channel. To continue reading, click here. Tiffanie Rosier is a STEM Education Coordinator for Northern Virginia Community College.  She has a Bachelor's in Public Relations from James Madison University, a Masters in Higher Education Administration from Western Kentucky University, and holds the Global Career Development Facilitator Certification.  Tiffanie has worked in Career Services at several institutions. Brittany Hollis is the Information and Engineering Technology Career Coach for Northern Virginia Community College. She has a Bachelor's in Biology and Teacher Education from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and a Masters in Higher Education from North Carolina State University. Brittany was a former high school science teacher before transitioning to higher education and has worked with several STEM education programs at the collegiate level.
53:32
June 20, 2020
The Urban Access: Providing Access and Opportunity for Underserved and Underrepresented Groups with guest, Kevin McCaskill
Blog post written by Kevin McCaskill, Executive Director at Madison Park Technical Vocational High School Malcolm X once quoted, “education is the passport to the future, for tomorrow belongs to those who prepare for it today.”  That preparation has been disrupted by the current COVID-19 pandemic.  School districts across the country have turned to remote learning to salvage formal education, a far cry from normalcy.  Although means and methods have been put in place by districts across the country to supplement learning, inequities abound.  As school districts remain closed and the summer learning opportunities In our urban school districts, these inequities are very apparent.  Special education and English Learners, whose numbers are substantially greater than suburban districts, are at a disadvantage in accessing and comprehending remote lessons.  These students thrive on face-to-face interactions; the personal touch enhances the learning process due to the rapports that are developed, the ability for students to ask questions, the ability for teachers to “read the room” for understanding, and the ability for students to learn from each other. The inequities don’t stop there; access to technology and factors involving housing, food, and other socioeconomic issues have made learning for many students a difficult and trying ordeal.  Urban districts must first look to meet the most basic needs of its students before the educational process even starts. Urban districts have been responsible for providing laptops and hotspots to families; urban districts have been very instrumental in lobbying internet companies in providing free or reduced rate service for families. Homelessness and transiency are real obstacles for districts as families as they struggle to solve short-term housing issues in an effort to meet an immediate need.  Education becomes secondary to this most basic need; the uncertainty of where one may lay their head for any given evening proves to be more of a priority than logging on to solve Math problems.  For students who live in tight quarters with multiple family members, finding a place to study that is conducive to positive results is problematic.  If the family only has one computer, accessing remote learning in a timely fashion may be compromised. Food shortages and proper nutrition are factors that affect student outcomes.   Families that are in need of food make this their priority; most of these families depend on schools to provide at least two meals per day, five days a week for their children.  Families that have experienced temporary layoffs now must depend on their children to find employment to supplement income in an effort to provide means for the family.  These students place employment and providing for their families a priority; education must wait. Urban districts have been proactive in providing meals for families and individual schools have ponied up funds to distribute gift cards and grocery store vouchers for families to meet short-term shortfalls.  Schools have reached out to outside agencies such as counseling, social work, housing authorities, and healthcare, as well as school partners to support students and families any way they can. In summary, our urban districts must support the most basic needs of students and families first before any thought of successful navigation of remote learning can occur.  For some urban families, education is important but it cannot compete with the attainment of basic family needs.  Urban districts play an important role in attempting to fill the gaps.  These districts provide students and families with access to equipment, supplies, and necessities in an effort for students to take advantage of educational opportunities that can support all their future hopes, dreams, and aspirations.
20:13
June 2, 2020
"Think Back. Look Forward. Build the Future" with Guest, Snehal Bhakta
In this episode, Snehal Bhakta and Rachael Mann discuss looking forward while building the foundation and what’s in store for the future of education and CTE. Blog post by Snehal: Normally, as the school year wraps up, I try to reflect on the work of our CTE Department and myself to support our schools, principals, teachers, and most importantly our students.  For whatever reason, this year feels different.  Almost like that, there isn’t an end in sight at all. The 2019-2020 school year will be known as the year education changed...no really, let’s hope that is what it is remembered as.  Change is always difficult, frustrating, challenging, and a number of other words… however, in order to look forward, innovate, and truly succeed, then change must happen. As I and many of us reflect on this past year, there are many things we can all be proud of that we did for education and our students.  We began planning for more equity initiatives and increasing middle school career exploration based on Perkins V.  As well as continuing to grow the current programs that align with our local industries.  Yes, it was shaping up to be another “banner” year of successes and some items for growth and improvement. Then, we entered March... the home stretch. Making summer plans, trying something new, and counting the days till the end of the school year.  Unfortunately, the world stopped.  It wasn’t just education... it was everything. Stay at home orders, social distancing, and this thing called “distance” or “remote” learning.  Many things were closed; however, a lot isn’t… phone calls, reading, family time, exercise, laughing, and hope is not cancelled. Now is the time to embrace what we have. Yes, we need to look forward to what the future holds...the opportunities, the hope, and the possibilities.  What better time than during a global pandemic to “rebuild” education...or just blow it up and start from scratch. Snehal Bhakta started his professional career by working in the private sector, primarily in business and technology consulting for 15 years prior to entering into public education. When the opportunity presented itself for him to lead a new Career and Technical Education(CTE) program focusing on technology within Clark County School District(CCSD), he welcomed the opportunity to fuel his passion of helping others and working with the next generation of innovators. Currently, he is a CTE Administrator employed for the 5th largest school district in the country with over 320,000 students, focusing on ensuring Nevada’s future workforce is prepared for success. Snehal has worked on projects related to increasing student and community participation with National Job Shadow Day, started an Annual Student Workforce & Innovation Summit, promotion and growth of Career & Technical Student Organizations, and leading CCSD’s #GirlsinSTEM and #GirlsinTECH Initiative as well as supporting STEM equity programs across 59 middle and 47 high schools for all students and especially those underserved and underrepresented students. Snehal also serves as the Affiliate Coordinator for NCWIT(National Center for Women & Information Technology), marketing and event chair for the Society of Information Management(SIM) of Las Vegas, steering committee member for the Intermountain STEM(IM STEM), and holds board positions on several other local organizations.  In 2017, he was awarded the Top Tech Exec Award in the Education Category by Cox Communications and in 2019, the National Alliance for Partnerships in Equity(NAPE) awarded Snehal the 2019 Rising Star award at their National Summit for Educational Equity in Washington, D.C as well as he recently received the COX Business 2019 Top Tech Lifetime Achievement Award for his work with diversity in the workforce in Southern Nevada.
48:28
May 23, 2020
Maintaining Balance in a COVID-19 World with Guest, Shelly Thome
By Shelly Thome We are living in unsettling and unpredictable times.  COVID-19 has taken a toll on our country’s economy, medical systems, and schools.  It has also rocked the foundation of our feelings of safety, social connection, and hope. During this COVID-19 world, we now find ourselves in, it is of increasing importance to find and then maintain balance in our lives.  This need for balance is critical for educational staff.  In a matter of days- not months or years- schools were asked to turn educational structures upside down and create new distance learning methods while engaging students and assuring access and equity.  Educators (teachers, administrators, counselors, administrative assistants, and more) rose to the challenge and have made remote learning successful while maintaining connections to their students. We need to look at the emotional cost to our educators and to develop strategies of support.  Our educators not only became IT specialists, but they also had to create at home offices with capabilities to support learning.  Those well-developed lesson plans and upcoming critical professional development courses had to be thrown out and immediately converted to a new format.  All of this occurred while educators had worries about their own health and safety and cared for those in their lives that need support as well.  Many now transitioned into not only teaching their students remotely but also becoming a home school teacher to their own children while balancing work duties. To help transition our staff through this challenging time, we need to make sure we put the person before the position.  District leadership, as well as every staff member, needs to continue their connections to one another, encourage office hours that allow individuals to bring their workday to a close, and to have strategies to manage stress.  This can be accomplished through informative and supportive emails, regular check-ins that do not have a printed agenda attached, and through resources of support.  Once our staff is cared for and emotionally healthy, they are then able to model this balance for students and the community. CTE is one big family.  During this time of COVID-19 and social distancing, let’s work together to be certain that social distancing does not equate to social isolation.  Let’s help each other maintain balance and prepare for the time in which we can be together again soon without the need for virtual meetings. Shelly Thome, LPC, CCTP, CCTSI Shelly Thome is a Licensed Professional Counselor in Arizona.  She is not only a private practice therapist but also a school counselor for over 20 years.  In Shelly’s current role as the Exceptional Student Services Manager at West-MEC, she not only provides intervention resources for students and staff but is also a trainer for suicide awareness programs of More Than Sad and Youth Mental Health First Aid.  Shelly also provides professional development classes such as Working with Adolescents with Anxiety, Kick Compassion Fatigue to the Curb, and Serving Exceptional Students in CTE.  Shelly serves on the policy committee for the ACTE Counseling and Career Development Division and is engaged in the development of the ACTE Mentorship Program for Inclusion, Access, Equity, and Diversity. Connect with Shelly via email, Shelly.Thome@west-mec.org  or on Twitter, @ThomeShelly.
42:12
May 16, 2020
Real Talk About Education- Distance/eLearning with Guest, Ken Shelton
In this podcast, Ken Shelton and Rachael Mann discuss remote learning in career and technical education and the equity and access issues that are magnified in the face of a global pandemic.  Excerpt from Ken's Blog: "Distance Learning, Remote Learning, eLearning, no matter what you call it or how you package it, is not working. Here's the thing, it never had a chance in the first place. When the decision to shut down in-person schooling swept the country, even the world, educators, and support staff across the educational spectrum had to make significant adjustments. In far too many of these cases, the changes had to be implemented within just a few days. Who would have planned for a pandemic of this magnitude, let alone included something this catastrophic in their strategic plan? The problem is, no amount of planning or preparation would have shielded a significant percentage of students in schools without looking at the systemic structures in the first place. It has been seen, written, and experienced that this entire situation we are managing has revealed the deep enduring wound covered by the comfort of complacency, platitudes, and diversionary rhetoric so often prevalent in education. “Be aware of when privilege tries to speak everyone’s stories. It’s not true.”  This entire situation is affecting so many people in so many different ways. Yes, we get the stories of how some kids are thriving during remote learning or how some educators have managed to remain closely connected with their students. There are many lessons to be learned through these examples, but they do not account for the majority. In fact, in education, we tend to highlight and celebrate the outliers while conveniently ignoring the most vulnerable, the marginalized. Continue reading this blog post here: http://kennethshelton.net/blog Ken holds an M.A. in Education with a specialization in Educational Technology as well as New Media Design and Production. He has worked as an Educator for over 20 years and most recently taught technology at the Middle School level. As a part of his active involvement within the Educational Technology community, Ken is an Apple Distinguished Educator and a Google Certified Innovator. Ken has worked extensively at the policy level and was named to the California State Superintendent of Public Instruction's Education Technology Task Force. Ken regularly gives keynotes, presentations, consults, and leads workshops, covering a wide variety of Educational Technology, Equity and Inclusion, Multimedia Literacy, Cultural Relevance, Visual Storytelling, and Instructional Design topics. Ken is the ISTE Digital Equity PLN 2018 Excellence Award winner. Ken has provided and continues to provide consulting support to many companies, State Departments of Education, Ministries of Education, school districts/systems Nationally and Internationally, as well as non-profits such as the California Emerging Technology Fund's School2Home program which is designed to support closing the Achievement Gap and Digital Divide at low-performing California middle schools. Connect with Ken on Twitter, https://twitter.com/k_shelton, and visit his website, http://kennethshelton.net/home.
54:12
May 11, 2020
PBL in a Remote Learning Environment with Guest, Tisha Richmond
Project-based learning in a remote learning environment is a challenge for our Career and Technical Education programs, but it's also an opportunity to find innovative approaches to hands-on learning. In this episode, listeners will learn about tools that CTE leaders can share with teachers to help students engage in real-world projects.  Our guest for this episode is Tisha Richmond. Tisha is an innovative district Tech Integration Specialist, speaker, and author from Southern Oregon. She has taught Family and Consumer Science for 25 years and has served in various leadership roles in her school and district as well as on Oregon regional and state edtech cadres. Tisha is the author of the book Make Learning MAGICAL, & she speaks nationally on a variety of topics related to teaching and learning in all content and grade levels, Family and Consumer Science being her specialty. To learn more about her work, visit https://www.tisharichmond.com/, and connect with her on Twitter, @tishrich.
56:24
May 4, 2020
“CTSO and CTE Programs Ruin Students and Educators for Life!” with Guest, Frank Kitchen
“CTSO and CTE Programs Ruin Students and Educators for Life!” I shared this comment while working with a group of student leaders, CTE advisors and State Directors in Virginia. The statement was in reference to my thoughts about CTE programs. The statement shocked some at first, then I continued speaking. “CTSO and CTE Programs Ruin Students and Educators for Life in a good way!” I see CTE and CTSO programs as a career and leadership incubator. A combination of soft skills and hard skills are gained through participation. These skills and knowledge will be applied to their lives and careers of those who participate. Many go on to excel personally and professionally after their CTE/CTSO Days are long gone. Why do I use the word “ruin?” Google defines ruin as the physical destruction or disintegration of something or the state of disintegrating or being destroyed. Quite simply ruin can be a positive or negative term. I see it as a positive. Before anyone joins a CTE or CTSO they are in a certain physical or mental state. That physical or mental state is transformed through participation in to an individual who recognizes and becomes confident in their abilities. They have an understanding of the opportunities available to them and how to capitalize on those opportunities. Read more here: https://docs.google.com/document/d/1z2VA195ZE8XW0b1H4OFxNg8npoDY3UQxbWoP3ch9u_M/edit?usp=sharing In this podcast, our moderator, Rachael Mann, is joined by Frank Kitchen. Frank is “The F.R.E.S.H. Mindset Expert.” He works with Professional Associations that want their Members to Maximize their Potential and Produce the Tasty Results everyone desires. Frank’s Motivational Keynote Speeches and Training Programs energize, educate, and empower leaders and their teams to get hungry and transform their personal and professional dreams into reality. He has been blessed to speak professionally around the world for numerous associations, corporations, schools, colleges, universities, nonprofits, and civic organizations. Please contact Frank to learn how he can make your next Conference, Convention, or Training Event a F.R.E.S.H. Experience and follow him on LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram @FrankKitchen. www.frankkitchen.com
55:31
April 18, 2020
West Sound Technical Skills Center Tackles Remote Learning, with Guest, Shani Watkins
Blog post by: Shani Watkins, Director of West Sound Technical Skills Center Friday, March 13, our school superintendent, along with the rest of the superintendents in our local educational service district, told us at noon that it would be our last day of school for a while. Though we knew from the sessions with the governor and state superintendent that the time was likely coming, we were hopeful that we would be out of school for a few weeks and then return. The following Monday, our governor and superintendent of public instruction that all schools across the state were being closed. While we were already closed, it was a shock. That first week after the announcement, my focus was on helping my staff navigate their shock and feelings and help them begin to think differently about delivering career and technical education in alternative formats. Each teacher was expected to connect with every family during this time. Once the shock subsided, we moved into figuring out what do we do to support our students and create as much of a normal learning environment during this most unusual time.  Our most significant concern has been developing an equitable learning environment for all of our students. We continue to ponder how best to deliver distance learning that supports equitable student learning and supports our most vulnerable children. Teachers are developing weekly sessions with students, whether pre-recorded ‘how-to’ videos and live sessions where they can work together. They are working to support students where they are at and encourage continued learning. Though much of what our teachers are doing would not be considered innovative, it is definitely out of their normal teaching repertoire. Teachers are simultaneously learning Google Classroom, Google Sites, Remind, and how to develop YouTube videos.  Teachers are setting up ‘classrooms’ in their homes, where they can prepare demonstrations to share with students. Last week another challenge struck when we learned that we would not be returning to school this year. Not only are our students disappointed that they won’t be able to return for the year, but the staff is also equally as upset. This poses the next concern for our technical center: what do grades look like from now until the end of the school year. The state directive requires districts to provide new learning weekly, but, does not allow the new learning to be counted against students if they do not complete the work. We determined that students would earn pass or no credit for any new learning. The concern, though, is that there will be an increased gap in learning between those that have access and those that do not. Our next concern is how to ensure that students meet dual credit expectations for courses that articulate to college courses. Many of the students would have met the requirements had the school year been ‘normal’; however, now it is challenging to determine how best to ensure students complete the competencies with the same depth had all been ‘normal’. I am hopeful that there are written methods to show their knowledge versus demonstrating knowledge through primarily project-based, hands-on activities. I am thankful that our superintendent, governor, and state superintendent chose earlier on to close schools in order to support the stay safe and stay healthy social distancing orders. I realize the upcoming challenges that will happen but am grateful that social distancing is working and saving lives. I am thankful for teachers that care deeply about their students and ensuring that not only do students have access to new learning, but they also have caring adults that continue to check in with them regularly. Connect with Shani via email, shani.watkins@westsoundtech.org or on Twitter, @watkins_shani
34:12
April 18, 2020
Removing the Restraints During COVID-19 with Guest, Crissy Lauterbach
COVID-19 has profoundly transformed our education system, and this isn't necessarily a bad thing. In this episode, listeners will hear innovative approaches to online leading and learning, ways to navigate the digital divide, how to streamline processes, how to balance the roles of remote leading while parenting, homeschooling, and navigating an epidemic, what limits to place on social media intake, and so much more! Connect with our guest, Crissy Lauterbach, on Twitter @ContactLearning or visit her website, www.contactlearning.com.
34:23
April 11, 2020
Finding Balance in a Time of Uncertainty, with Guest, Aaron Polansky
This week's guest, Aaron Polansky is the Superintendent-Director of Old Colony Regional Vocational Technical High School in Rochester, author, and keynote speaker with over 20 years of experience in the field of education.  In this episode, Aaron will share how to find balance in a time of uncertainty. “Is our delivery powerful enough to move the masses? We don’t move unless we are moved. It’s time to lead with love and teach resilience. When times are tough, we cannot buckle. We can’t curl up in fear or avoid the important. It is okay to be afraid. Growth is waiting on the other side of fear. We have an obligation to face our fears and to encourage our students to do the same. Our focus needs to shift to what’s really important? What do we need to teach during this hiatus from normalcy and how do we do it in a manner that folks would pay admission for?” Excerpt from Reflection on Education in These Coronavirus Times by Aaron Polansky Stay connected with Aaron: Email: apolansky@oldcolony.us Twitter: @aaronpolansky Website: http://authentricityspeaks.com/
38:06
April 3, 2020
What COVID-19 and Remote Learning Means for CareerTechEd: Updates from our guest, Alisha Hyslop
We are seeing the impact of COVID-19 across all aspects of our lives. In light of the rapid spread of the virus, many schools across the country are closing. The move to remote learning comes with unique challenges and issues for CTE programs. This week's guest, Alisha Hyslop is the director of public policy at ACTE and plays a pivotal role in keeping Career and Technical Education leaders updated. In this episode, Alisha will share how ACTE is responding to the COVID19 pandemic, resources that are available for leaders as we move to remote learning environments, and policy changes that have been made or that are in the works at the federal level to help support schools.  Please note, changes are occurring rapidly and the information shared is current as of March 26, 2020. 
25:17
March 27, 2020