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Nèg Mawon Podcast

Nèg Mawon Podcast

By Patrick Jean-Baptiste
We are on a 12-year project to bring you 1200 Haitian & Haitianists scholars, artists, and all others who, big or small, are making an impact on telling our stories not filtered through white media.
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[Scholar Series #10] "The Immortals" (Post - 2010 Earthquake Fiction): A conversation with the Translator Prof. Nathan Dize

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[Scholar Series #15] "Legal Identity: Race and Belonging in the Dominican Republic". A Conversation with Dr. Eve Hayes de Kalaf
Legal identity is universal, transcending national and socioeconomic borders. It is a central tenet of the UN’s 2030 SDGs and cuts across over 70 development indicators, including birth registration. Evidentiary proof of citizenship is now a necessary tool to ensure access to health, education, and welfare services. As Laurence Chandy, director of Data, Research and Policy at the UN Children’s Fund (UNICEF), recently stated: the prioritization of documentation within global policy, including the transition from paper to digital identity systems, is ‘one of the most under-appreciated revolutions in international development’. During a period of intense global political-economic reconfiguration, inter-governmental organizations, multi-lateral and national aid agencies have problematized under-documentation. They have contributed significant levels of financial and technical assistance to governments to improve civil registries and ensure that all citizens everywhere have their paperwork.  Over this time, formal identification has come to be considered a ‘prerequisite for development in the modern world’ (Gelb and Clark, 2013). It is now essential to development strategy planning and assumed in both policy and practice to constitute a common good for all beneficiaries. With a focus on the Caribbean, this book highlights how identification practices as promulgated by the World Bank, United Nations (UN) and the Inter-American Development Bank can force the thorny question of nationality, unsettling long-established identities, and entitlements. Notably, the book is the first to identify tensions in social policy over the use of social protection mechanisms promoting legal identity measures with disputes over race, national identity, and belonging.  The book illustrates how, while keen to follow the World Bank’s lead in promoting a legal identity for all – not least to continue benefiting from external funding and support – the Dominican Republic balked at pressure to recognize the national status of persons of Haitian ancestry. It used social policy programs and international donor funding to trace and register the national origins of persons of non-Dominican ancestry.  This culminated in the now notorious 2013 Constitutional Tribunal ruling that retroactively stripped tens of thousands of persons of Haitian descent of their Dominican citizenship. Significantly, these measures not only affected undocumented or stateless populations – persons living at the fringes of citizenship – but also had a major impact on documented citizens already in possession of a state-issued birth certificate, national identity card, and/or passport as Dominicans.
48:27
May 18, 2022
[Scholar Series #12b] Radio Haiti Archive. A Conversation w/ Dr. Laura Wagner
From 2015 to 2019, Laura Wagner was the project archivist for the Radio Haiti Archive at the David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library at Duke University. She holds a PhD in cultural anthropology from UNC Chapel Hill, where her research focused on displacement, humanitarian aid, and everyday life in the aftermath of the 2010 earthquake in Haiti. Her writings on the earthquake and the Radio Haiti project have appeared in Slate, Salon, sx archipelagos, PRI’s The World, and other venues. She is also also the author of Hold Tight, Don’t Let Go, a young adult novel about the Haiti earthquake, which was published by Abrams/Amulet in 2015. In the fall of 2021, Laura will be a fellow at the Camargo Foundation, where she will be working on a book about the history and legacy of Radio Haïti-Inter,
57:22
May 14, 2022
[Scholar Series #11b] Visions of a Modern Nation - Haiti at the World's Fair: A Conversation w/ Prof. Hadassah St. Hubert
Dr. Hadassah St. Hubert's dissertation focuses on the motivations of successive Haitian governments from the late nineteenth century to the 1960s in participating in world’s fairs abroad and in mounting expositions in Haiti. In particular, it explores why and how world’s fairs became a primary path through which Haitian officials and elites sought to represent and defend the nation’s image internationally. World’s fairs were mostly held in countries of the global north as showcases of national progress, imperial reach and power. Having overthrown French colonial rule in 1804 and been denigrated by detractors abroad for decades thereafter, Haitian governments sought to demonstrate through participation in late nineteenth century expositions that they and people of African descent more broadly were capable of “civilization.” While colonized “others” were being displayed at human zoos at these international events, Haiti, the sole independent black nation participating, attempted to represent itself as a beacon of black progress through the nation’s pavilion architecture and displays. Haitian governments in the late nineteenth century also sought investment and new markets for Haitian goods and products through participation in and mounting of world’s fairs. The government of Sténio Vincent (1930-1941) participated particularly actively in international expositions, even while Haiti was still under U.S. occupation. Vincent used each event to declare Haiti's sovereignty, seek European trade and investment, and highlight Haitian history and culture to attract tourism. His administration created a precedent for how future Haitian governments represented the nation abroad in these contexts. Under the presidency of Dumarsais Estimé (1946-1950), Haiti launched its own Bicentennial International Exposition (1949-1950), which transformed a portion of the capital of Port-au-Prince into a visionary “modern” city that celebrated the culture and production of the Haitian masses in order to draw tourists. My study concludes with an examination of Haiti’s participation in expositions in the 1960s during the dictatorship of François Duvalier (1957-1971). The Duvalier regime continued Haiti’s long-standing tradition of participation in world’s fairs and expositions to counter negative international portrayals of the country. In this case, the bad press Duvalier sought to counter stemmed from his authoritarian abuses of power. The Duvalier regime, known for its black nationalist rhetoric asserting Haiti’s autonomy, participated in these international events to attract foreign investment, revealing a dependency on the very western nations from which it claimed its independence. My dissertation contributes to our understanding of how successive Haitian governments negotiated neocolonial relationships at these international events to uplift the nation’s image, open foreign markets for Haitian products, encourage foreign investment, and cultivate tourism.
43:55
May 08, 2022
[Scholar Legacy Series #6b] The Guise of Exceptionalism: Unmasking the National Narratives of Haiti & the United States. (Part 2) Conversations w/ Prof. Robert Fatton
[Scholar Legacy Series #6b]  (In Kreyol/French/Mostly English) This is part 2 where we dig deeper into Dr Fatton's latest book, The Guise of Exceptionalism, which  compares the historical origins of Haitian and American exceptionalisms. It also traces how exceptionalism as a narrative of uniqueness has shaped relations between the two countries from their early days of independence through the contemporary period. As a social invention, it changes over time, but always within the parameters of its original principles. Guest Profile Page https://neg.fm/dr-robert-fatton-jr/
01:17:04
April 29, 2022
[Scholar Series #13b] Red and Black in Haiti: Radicalism Conflict and Political Change 1941-1957. A Conversation with Prof. Matthew J. Smith (Part 2)
In 1934 the republic of Haiti celebrated its 130th anniversary as an independent nation. In that year, too, another sort of Haitian independence occurred, as the United States ended nearly two decades of occupation. In the first comprehensive political history of postoccupation Haiti, Matthew Smith argues that the period from 1934 until the rise of dictator Francois "Papa Doc" Duvalier to the presidency in 1957 constituted modern Haiti's greatest moment of political promise.  Smith emphasizes the key role that radical groups, particularly Marxists and black nationalists, played in shaping contemporary Haitian history. These movements transformed Haiti's political culture, widened political discourse, and presented several ideological alternatives for the nation's future. They were doomed, however, by a combination of intense internal rivalries, pressures from both state authorities and the traditional elite class, and the harsh climate of U.S. anticommunism. Ultimately, the political activism of the era failed to set Haiti firmly on the path to a strong independent future. Profile Page https://neg.fm/dr-matthew-smith/
41:57
April 22, 2022
[Scholar Series #13a] "Red and Black in Haiti: Radicalism, Conflict, and Political Change, 1934-1957": A Conversation w/ Prof. Matthew J. Smith (Part 1)
In 1934 the republic of Haiti celebrated its 130th anniversary as an independent nation. In that year, too, another sort of Haitian independence occurred, as the United States ended nearly two decades of occupation. In the first comprehensive political history of postoccupation Haiti, Matthew Smith argues that the period from 1934 until the rise of dictator Francois "Papa Doc" Duvalier to the presidency in 1957 constituted modern Haiti's greatest moment of political promise. Smith emphasizes the key role that radical groups, particularly Marxists and black nationalists, played in shaping contemporary Haitian history. These movements transformed Haiti's political culture, widened political discourse, and presented several ideological alternatives for the nation's future. They were doomed, however, by a combination of intense internal rivalries, pressures from both state authorities and the traditional elite class, and the harsh climate of U.S. anticommunism. Ultimately, the political activism of the era failed to set Haiti firmly on the path to a strong independent future. Profile Page https://neg.fm/dr-matthew-smith/
49:24
April 15, 2022
[Scholar Series #11a] Mining The Haitian Archives. A Conversation with Dr. Hadassah St Hubert
[Scholar Series #11a] Mining The Haitian Archives. A Conversation with Dr. Hadassah St Hubert.  Colorism in the archives; weaponized language. And you thought doing research was boring. 
45:48
April 09, 2022
[Scholar Series #12a] Nou P ap Dòmi Bliye: Radio Haiti Still Speaks w/ Dr. Laura Wagner
[Episode is in French/English/Kreyol] To commemorate the anniversary of the assassination of Jean Dominique, Nèg Mawon Podcast gives you a taste of the archive of Radio Haïti-Inter and what it can still tell us today. Hear the voices of grassroots activists, intellectual luminaries, and, of course, Radio Haiti's journalists discussing human rights, artistic creation, US imperialism, dictatorship, memory, mobilization, and mawonaj. The voices you hear from Radio Haiti’s archive clips  include Sony Estéus, Magalie Marcelin, peyizan from Kay Jakmèl, a woman from Damassin attending a congress of the Mouvman Peyizan Papay, Emmanuel Ambroise, Roger Gaillard, Frankétienne, Rose-Marie Desruisseau, Konpè Filo, Charles Suffrard, Michèle Montas, and Jean Léopold Dominique. Useful links: Radio Haïti-Inter archive at Duke  Follow the archive on Twitter: @achivradyoayiti  (In the spirit of Konbit, ht/chapo ba goes to Dr. Laura Wagner for bringing Nèg Mawon Podcast's first-ever collaborative effort to fruition. It was truly a great and fun experience. This episode wouldn't have turned out as well as it did without her preeminent expertise on Radio Haïti-Inter--she's even got some post-production chops that are notable! Laura is truly a great human being, scholar, and permanent resident in the Lakou.)
20:58
April 07, 2022
[Lakou Series #8] Haitians Thriving in London
This episode went looking for Haitians in London and we found them! We talked primarily in Kreyol about a range of subjects: from racism, opportunities in London, Haitian Chamber of Commerce, Queen Marie-Louise Christophe, immigration, census, and how the relatively small Haitian community living in London are thriving living abroad.  Wilford told me they've built a bridge in London for other Haitians to come. For those of you looking for a change, London may be the place for you. Join me in a fascinating conversation with Michelet and Wilford.
54:25
April 01, 2022
[Artist Series #1] The Dear Remote Nearness of You: A Conversation w/ Boston's Professor/Poet Laureate Prof. Danielle Legros Georges
"THE DEAR REMOTE NEARNESS OF YOU speaks poetry's origin in new and startling ways. This is the precise intelligence that knows it must step carefully across the light on the surface of the water... These poems form the contiguous dance of language choosing its own body at will, traveling across light and the dimensions of unarticulated history. This is the word rubbed onto the palimpsest of our being, the careful solo soprano in the space where music ends and poetry moves in to name what is eternal and what is only in the abbreviation of now. What a delightful book from Boston's Poet Laureate."—Afaa Michael Weaver Guest Profile https://neg.fm/danielle-legros-georges/
54:01
March 25, 2022
[Scholar Series #10] "The Immortals" (Post - 2010 Earthquake Fiction): A conversation with the Translator Prof. Nathan Dize
The Immortals is set in an infamous neighborhood of Port-au-Prince, on Grand-Rue, where many women, young and old, trade in flesh, sex, and desire. We learn, in glimpses and fragments, about the lives of women who fall in love with the moving images of television, the romance of a novel, and the dreams of escape. This moving novel asks, What becomes of these women, their lives, their stories, their desires, and their whims when a violent earthquake brings the capital city and its brothels to their knees? To preserve the memory of women she lived and worked with, the anonymous narrator makes a deal with her client once she discovers that he is a writer: sex in exchange for recording the stories of the friends who were buried beneath the rubble. She tells the stories of women who were friends, lovers, daughters, and mothers—all while their profession sought to hide any trace of intimacy or interiority through pseudonyms and artifice. Ultimately the book reveals how a group of women sought to make a name for themselves in life, demanding that they not be forgotten in death. Winner of France's 2012 Prix Thyde Monnier de la Société des Gens de Lettres, The Immortals is the first work of fiction by the celebrated Haitian writer Makenzy Orcel. Mingling poetry and prose, Orcel centers stories that too often go untold, while reflecting on the power and limits of storytelling in the face of catastrophe.
39:16
March 21, 2022
[Scholar Legacy Series #9a] Conversations w/ Dr. Patrick Bellegarde-Smith
In this first episode in the Ginen mini-series, we cover the central tenets of Haitian Vodou, the life, love, and expansive mind of the distinguished scholar, Patrick Bellegarde-Smith.  Professor Emeritus Patrick Bellegarde-Smith received his doctorate in international relations, comparative politics, and Latin American Studies, in 1977. He taught in the field of international development, political economy, and culture, at Bradley University,  then later, at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, in the field of  African-American Studies with a focus on Caribbean cultures, politics and history, Afro-Caribbean religions, and in the area of Black feminisms.  He is the author or editor of five books, among them, In the Shadow of Powers (Humanities Press International, 1985, 2nd ed. Vanderbilt University Press, 2019), The Breached Citadel (Westview Press, 1990, 2nd ed. Canadian Scholars Press, 2004), and Fragments of Bone: Neo-African Religions in a New World,  ed. (Illinois University Press, 2005). The sixth book on gender identities and African religious systems is in preparation. Some of his writings have been anthologized, notably, "Hormones and Melanin: The  Dimensions of 'Race,' Sex and Gender: Reflexive Journeys," in Jacqueline  Bobo et al., The Black Studies Reader (New York: Routledge, 2004). For his work on issues of ethnic,  racial, and national identities, he received from the State University of Haiti, the Jean Price-Mars Medal in 2013, and the Lifetime  Achievement Award for Scholarship from the Haitian Studies  Association in 2010. Some of his books and articles have been translated into French, Spanish, Kreyol (Haitian), and Portuguese. Bellegarde-Smith served as the President of the Congress of Santa  Barbara (KOSANBA), a scholarly association for the study of Vodou and other African-derived religions, and is a former president of the  Haitian Studies Association, (HSA). He is an associate editor for the Journal of Haitian Studies and served on the editorial boards of Kalfou: A Journal of Comparative and Relational Ethnic Studies, and the Journal of Africana Religions. He is an advisory board member/Elders-Distinguished Member of the  Institute for the Study of Canadian Slavery, in Halifax, NSCAD, Nova  Scotia. He is a Houngan asogwe, a priest of Haitian Vodou. He attended The University of the Virgin Islands, the "youngest" HBCU,  Syracuse University at Utica College, and The American University,  School of International Service. Dr. Bellegarde-Smith is the author of many books, including In the Shadow of Powers (1985, 2nd edition 2019), The Breached Citadel (1990, 2nd edition 2004), Fragments of Bone, ed. (2005). For his books and articles on issues of national and personal identities, he received from the University of Haiti, the Jean Price-Mars Medal in 2013, and the Lifetime Achievement Award for Scholarship from the Haitian Studies Association in 2010. Some of his works have been translated into French, Spanish, and Portuguese, and some of his writings are anthologized.
01:13:12
March 21, 2022
[Scholar Series #5b] Live Recorded Event w/ Dr. Cécile Accilien
Covering a broad set of topics on Haitian culture, Dr. Cécile Accilien took questions from a live audience on the Clubhouse platform. 
01:36:29
March 21, 2022
[Scholar Series #8] Diplomacy in Black and White: John Adams, Toussaint Louverture, and Their Atlantic World Alliance. A Conversation w/ Prof. Ronald A. Johnson
From 1797 to 1801, during the Haitian Revolution, President John Adams and Toussaint Louverture forged diplomatic relations that empowered white Americans to embrace freedom and independence for people of color in Saint-Domingue. The United States supported the Dominguan revolutionaries with economic assistance and arms and munitions; the conflict was also the U.S. Navy’s first military action on behalf of a foreign ally. This cross-cultural cooperation was of immense and strategic importance as it helped to bring forth a new nation: Haiti. Diplomacy in Black and White is the first book on the Adams-Louverture alliance. Historian and former diplomat Ronald Angelo Johnson details the aspirations of the Americans and Dominguans―two revolutionary peoples―and how they played significant roles in a hostile Atlantic world. Remarkably, leaders of both governments established multiracial relationships amid environments dominated by slavery and racial hierarchy. And though U.S.-Dominguan diplomacy did not end slavery in the United States, it altered Atlantic world discussions of slavery and race well into the twentieth century. Diplomacy in Black and White reflects the capacity of leaders from disparate backgrounds to negotiate political and societal constraints to make lives better for the groups they represent. Adams and Louverture brought their peoples to the threshold of a lasting transracial relationship. And their shared history reveals the impact of decisions made by powerful people at pivotal moments. But in the end, a permanent alliance failed to emerge, and instead, the two republics born of revolution took divergent paths.
55:39
March 05, 2022
[Artist Series 2] Ulrick Jean-Pierre: Guardian of History. A conversion with Haitian Film Maker Tatiana Bacchus
The Ulrick documentary introduces audiences to Haitian master painter Ulrick Jean-Pierre, who channels his ancestors and pours his soul onto the canvas with exacting detail and visceral impact.
59:06
February 19, 2022
[Scholar Legacy Series #6a] "The Guise of Exceptionalism: Unmasking the National Narratives of Haiti and the United States:" A Conversation with Dr. Robert Fatton
The Guise of Exceptionalism compares the historical origins of Haitian and American exceptionalisms. It also traces how exceptionalism as a narrative of uniqueness has shaped relations between the two countries from their early days of independence through the contemporary period. As a social invention, it changes over time, but always within the parameters of its original principles. Guest Profile Page https://neg.fm/dr-robert-fatton-jr/
31:49
February 13, 2022
[Scholar Series #5a] "Teaching Haiti: Strategies for Creating New Narratives." A Conversation with Dr. Cécile Accilien
This volume is the first to focus on teaching about Haiti’s complex history and culture from a multidisciplinary perspective. Listen as Prof. Accilien makes broad connections between Haiti and the rest of the Caribbean. Other contributors in this book provide pedagogical guidance on how to approach the country from different lenses in course curricula. They offer practical suggestions, theories on a wide variety of texts, examples of syllabi, and classroom experiences. Teaching Haiti dispels stereotypes associating Haiti with disaster, poverty, and negative ideas of Vodou, going beyond the simplistic neocolonial, imperialist, and racist descriptions often found in literary and historical accounts. Instructors in diverse subject areas discuss ways of reshaping old narratives through women’s and gender studies, poetry, theater, art, religion, language, politics, history, and popular culture, and they advocate for including Haiti in American and Latin American studies courses. Portraying Haiti not as “the poorest nation in the Western Hemisphere” but as a nation with a multifaceted culture that plays an important part on the world’s stage, this volume offers valuable lessons about Haiti’s past and present related to immigration, migration, locality, and globality. The essays remind us that these themes are increasingly relevant in an era in which teachers are often called to address neoliberalist views and practices and isolationist politics. Contributors: Cécile Accilien | Jessica Adams | Alessandra Benedicty-Kokken | Anne M. François | Régine Michelle Jean-Charles | Elizabeth Langley | Valérie K. Orlando | Agnès Peysson-Zeiss | John D. Ribó | Joubert Satyre | Darren Staloff | Bonnie Thomas | Don E. Walicek | Sophie Watt
46:16
February 12, 2022
[Scholar Series #3b] Live Recorded Event w/ Dr. Yveline Alexis
On the 12th anniversary of the 2010 earthquake in Haiti, we invited Prof. Yveline Alexis to talk about that tragic event and her prize-winning book, "Haiti Fights Back: The Life and Legacy of Charlemagne Peralt." Lots of intelligent questions from our hardcore Neg et Fanm Mawon audience. Guest Profile Page https://neg.fm/dr-yveline-alexis/
02:16:51
January 28, 2022
[Scholar Series #4a] Rituals, Runaways, and the Haitian Revolution (1521 - 1791) :A Conversation with Prof. Crystal Eddins
Book Description A new analysis of the origins of the Haitian Revolution, revealing the consciousness, solidarity, and resistance that helped it succeed. About the Author Crystal Eddins is Assistant Professor in the Department of Africana Studies at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte. Her research has been supported by the Ruth J. Simmons Postdoctoral Fellowship, the John Carter Brown Library, and the National Science Foundation. Editorial Reviews Reviews ‘A compelling, elegantly written, and brilliantly conceived study in the development of racial definitions and solidarity. Eddins bravely opens windows and doors to a subversive and proud Haiti, and its role in the global context. The reader is observing the birth of a ‘new’ classic.’ Patrick Bellegarde-Smith, author of In the Shadow of Powers: Dantes Bellegarde in Haitian Social Thought ‘This beautifully crafted and overwhelmingly researched work restores the place of the multitude of known and unknown individuals who deployed myriad cultural, ethnic and religious practices derived from their African homelands to resist the dehumanization of slavery in 18th-century Saint Domingue (Haiti) in pursuit of racial liberation and human dignity. The book’s de-colonial perspective makes a seminal contribution to current Black and African diasporic studies. It is historical scholarship at its best.’ Carolyn Fick, author of The Making of Haiti: The Saint Domingue Revolution from Below ‘Crystal Eddins tells an important and fascinating story that reveals how oppression can be overturned under the most unlikely of circumstances. Perhaps most striking is her brilliant and counterintuitive analysis of advertisements designed to capture runaway slaves - advertisements that provide clues to piece together processes leading to collective consciousness needed to drive revolution.’ Rory McVeigh, University of Notre Dame ‘Crystal Eddins’s groundbreaking study reveals the agency of marronage and self-determination as key drivers of liberation and revolution. Her stunning analysis of thousands of fugitive advertisements challenges historical sociology and social movement studies with a Black/African diaspora reading of the collective efforts ‘from below’ that negated white-dominated capitalist structures. Her creative and exacting deployment of big data demands that we reconceptualize freedom, citizenship, property, and identity on a wider scale. Bravo!’ Mimi Sheller, Drexel University
44:08
January 10, 2022
[Scholar Series #4b] Ti Kal Istwa [Little Piece of Haitian History] with Prof Crystal Eddins
El Maniel Maroon community and women's reproductive rights.
04:46
December 28, 2021
[Scholar Series #3a] Haiti Fights Back: The Life & Legacy of Charlemagne Péralte (1915-1934) - A Conversation w/ Prof. Yveline Alexis
Winner of the 2021 Haitian Studies Association Book Prize Haiti Fights Back: The Life and Legacy of Charlemagne Péralte is the first US scholarly examination of the politician and caco leader (guerrilla fighter) who fought against the US military occupation of Haiti. The occupation lasted close to two decades, from 1915-1934. Listen as Professor Alexis argues for the importance of documenting resistance while exploring the occupation’s mechanics and its imperialism. She takes us to Haiti, exploring the sites of what she labels as resistance zones, including Péralte’s hometown of Hinche and the nation’s large port areas--Port-au-Prince and Cap-Haïtien. Alexis offers a new reading of U.S. military archival sources that record Haitian protests as banditry. Haiti Fights Back illuminates how Péralte launched a political movement, and meticulously captures how Haitian women and men resisted occupation through silence, military battles, and writings. She locates and assembles rare, multilingual primary sources from traditional repositories, living archives (oral stories), and artistic representations in Haiti and the United States. The interdisciplinary work draws on legislation, cacos’ letters, newspapers, and murals, offering a unique examination of Péralte’s life (1885-1919) and the significance of his legacy through the twenty-first century. Haiti Fights Back offers a new approach to the study of the U.S. invasion of the Americas by chronicling how Caribbean people fought back. Guest Profile Page https://neg.fm/dr-yveline-alexis/
47:19
December 26, 2021
[Scholar Series #2] "Baron de Vastey and the Origins of Black Atlantic Humanism ( (1781-1820)": A Conversation with Prof. Marlene Daut
Key Research Terms  —Baron de Vastey —Noel Colombel —Haiti’s Isolation —Regeneration —Haiti’s Kingdom vs. Haiti the Republic —Edouard Glissant’s Theory of Opacity —The Unmediated Agency of Early Haitian Writings —Black Atlantic Humanism —Earliest formulations of what would later become CRT Episode Description Focusing on the influential life and works of the Haitian political writer and statesman, Baron de Vastey (1781-1820), in this book Marlene L. Daut examines the legacy of Vastey's extensive writings as a form of what she calls black Atlantic humanism, a discourse devoted to attacking the enlightenment foundations of colonialism. Daut argues that Vastey, the most important secretary of Haiti's King Henry Christophe, was a pioneer in a tradition of deconstructing colonial racism and colonial slavery that is much more closely associated with twentieth-century writers like W.E.B. Du Bois, Frantz Fanon, and Aimé Césaire. By expertly forging exciting new historical and theoretical connections among Vastey and these later twentieth-century writers, as well as eighteenth- and nineteenth-century black Atlantic authors, such as Phillis Wheatley, Olaudah Equiano, William Wells Brown, and Harriet Jacobs, Daut proves that any understanding of the genesis of Afro-diasporic thought must include Haiti's Baron de Vastey.
45:04
November 24, 2021
[Scholar Series #1] Slave Revolt on Screen: The Haitian Revolution in Film and Video Games - A Conversation with Prof. Alyssa Sepinwall
From the publisher: In Slave Revolt on Screen: The Haitian Revolution in Film and Video Games, Dr. Alyssa Goldstein Sepinwall analyzes how films and video games from around the world have depicted slave revolt, focusing on the Haitian Revolution (1791–1804).  Despite Hollywood’s near-silence on this event, some films on the Revolution do exist—from directors in Haiti, the US, France, and elsewhere. Slave Revolt on Screen offers the first-ever comprehensive analysis of Haitian Revolution cinema, including completed films and planned projects that were never made. In addition to studying cinema, this book also breaks ground in examining video games, a pop-culture form long neglected by historians. Sepinwall scrutinizes video game depictions of Haitian slave revolt that appear in games like the Assassin’s Creed series that have reached millions more players than comparable films. In analyzing films and games on the revolution, Slave Revolt on Screen calls attention to the ways that economic legacies of slavery and colonialism warp pop-culture portrayals of the past and leave audiences with distorted understandings. - Carolyn E. Fick, author of The Making of Haiti: The Saint Domingue Revolution from Below, writes: "Alyssa Sepinwall’s exciting new book, Slave Revolt on Screen, examines how the Haitian Revolution—the modern world’s first and only successful Black slave revolt—has been portrayed in film throughout the past century, exposing not only the flagrant distortions and factual departures from the historical record in these films, but also their exoticitized notions about Haiti and their implicitly and often explicitly white supremacist attitudes toward Haitians, and toward Blacks in general, that have permeated Hollywood and the film industry up to today. The book draws upon a sweeping range of films and video games (a new genre) on or about the Revolution as well as personal relationships and interviews with some recent filmmakers. Yet the skillful hand of the historian is omnipresent as Sepinwall brilliantly weaves together the history of the Haitian Revolution and the history of filmmaking about it, urgently calling for the yet-to-come masterpiece film on this historically epic Black liberation struggle for freedom."
37:24
November 24, 2021
[Lakou Series 6] The Many Facets of a Belizean Goddess
A Conversation w/ Diego La Diosa.
01:14:15
November 24, 2021
[Lakou #2] Returning to Bois Caïman w/ Missie Etienne
Missie is a fascinating person. This episode was wide-ranging: we covered the Mariel boatlift era and what it meant for the Haitian community in Florida; the role of the Haitian Church in the community; blindness; generational continuity in terms of community service, from her grandma to her mom to her; a cautionary tale on the personal cost when one answers that call to serve others; parental grace. Talent runs deep in the Etienne family. The beautiful cover art is courtesy of Missie’s sister, Rachèl Etienne.
43:52
November 01, 2021
[Lakou Series 5] Haiti’s Reforestation Initiative (Part 2 - Strategy) - A Conversation w/ Martha Johnson
Haiti’s Reforestation Initiative - A Conversation w/ Martha Johnson, Former Administrator, US General Services Administration under the Obama administration.
55:27
October 01, 2021
[Lakou #4] Haiti’s Reforestation Initiative (Part 1 - Operations) - A Conversation w/ Michael Anello
Michael Anello has lived and worked in Haiti at a local level for ten years. Following a 32-year career as a psychotherapist in Charlottesville, VA, he was drawn to work with rural Haitian communities as they rebuilt their lives after the 2010 earthquake. In 2018 he joined Haiti Reforestation Partnership, realizing that his skills with people and the trusting relationships with Haitians that he had built would prove valuable. He works now with the 750- person CODEP organization that has planted and nurtured 15 million trees over the past 30 years. He plays a crucial role with the Animators, the CODEP leaders, as they shift away from a faith-based donor relationship with Americans and respond to two imperatives: to lead their community on its long road to improved health and well-being and to recognize, leverage, and extend their extraordinary success at reforestation. MICHAEL@HAITIREFOREST.ORG | +1 (434) 981-4464 | HAITI CELL: +509-3163-1797
54:10
September 29, 2021
[Lakou #3] A Conversation w/ the Indomitable Guerline T. Emmanuel
As a small business owner, I have a built-in bias towards action. I want to get stuff done more than I want to talk about getting stuff done. When you have to deal with payroll and all the day-to-day stuff life throws at you, you really don't have time for BS.  This is why this interview with Guerline Emmanuel, another small business owner, resonated so much with me. She doesn't suffer fools gladly when it comes to running her businesses, especially when it comes to loose talk about how to solve the myriad challenges facing Haiti. She just calls balls and strikes. I found this discussion with Guerline Emmanuel refreshing and I hope you do as well.
01:36:40
September 13, 2021
[Artist Series #3] A Conversation w/ Fashion Icon Mischemas Casimir
Today, our convo is with Mischemas Casimir—a fashion disrupter with a traditionalist bent, stylishly wrapped in self-actualization. The great poet T.S. Eliot said that you couldn't inherit tradition; it has to be earned. Mischemas has certainly put in the work.  He has a deep historical sense of where he and fashion came from. He is a disciplined traditionalist and a devil may care disrupter. Join me on this fascinating couture boat ride with Mischemas Casimir, a Haitian brother who’s making waves in the fashion world. 
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September 08, 2021