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ScienceWhys: Questions at the Confluence of Science and Ethics

ScienceWhys: Questions at the Confluence of Science and Ethics

By Nobel Conference
When big scientific questions meet big ethical questions, the waters can get pretty choppy. Lisa Heldke, philosopher and director of the Nobel Conference at Gustavus Adolphus College, interviews scientists, researchers, scholars and thinkers about how science and ethics mingle, eddy, roil and churn in their own work. The podcast for anyone who hears about a scientific breakthrough and thinks “what are the downstream consequences of that?”
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Kate Knutson and Delaney Bluhm Discuss Rhema Vaithianathan, Mini Podcast
Kate Knutson and Delaney Bluhm discuss Rhema Vaithianathan in this miniature podcast.
08:48
October 12, 2021
Our Goal is to Bring Together the Humanities, Social Sciences, Data Sciences, Network Sciences and Engineering to Take on the Hard Problems That Face us
Wendy Chun, Canada 150 Research Chair Leader, the Digital Democracies Institute Simon Fraser University.
01:07:21
October 1, 2021
Interview with Tom LoFaro and Karl Larson
In anticipation of Nobel Conference 2021, Lisa interviews two conference chairs: Tom & Karl.
28:44
September 25, 2021
What are Ways that we can Excite the Public Around Statistics and Data Science?
Talithia Williams, Professor of Mathematics, Harvey Mudd College.
01:13:47
September 23, 2021
Jillian Downey on Talithia Williams, Mini Podcast
First of the mini podcasts, Lisa Heldke and Jillian Downey converse about Talithia Williams in anticipation of her upcoming podcast on 9/23/21
05:43
September 20, 2021
How do we as Human Workers Unleash the Tremendous Power of Electronic Medical Records
Rhema Vaithianathan, Professor of Health Economics Director, Centre for Social Data Analytics Auckland University of Technology.
01:16:36
September 16, 2021
As a Data Scientist, I Provide Evidence for Policy Makers to Help the Most Vulnerable People in Society
Francesca Dominici,Clarence James Gamble Professor of Biostatistics, Population and Data Science Co-Director, the Data Science Initiative Harvard University.
01:18:20
September 9, 2021
I’m Trying to Predict the Future in Ways that a Human can Understand
Cynthia Rudin, Professor of Computer Science, Electrical and Computer Engineering, and Statistical Science Director, Prediction Analysis Lab Duke University
01:17:39
September 2, 2021
“Big Data (R)Evolution” the Podcast
Lisa Heldke, Director of the Nobel Conference and Professor of Philosophy at Gustavus.
04:08
September 1, 2021
For the Sake of the Young Ones of all Species, I Stand Against the Corporate Plunder of the Planet
Kathleen Dean Moore, public philosopher and environmental thought-leader.
01:33:55
February 17, 2021
My Work Brings Data Sets Together and Asks “If Carbon Dioxide Warms the Climate, What Should We be Looking for?”
Gabi Hegerl, Professor of Climate Systems Science, University of Edinburgh.
01:22:33
February 10, 2021
That is The Holistic Approach to That We Use as Inuit to Teach Our Children
Siila Watt-Cloutier, Inuit advocate for environment, culture and human rights.
01:04:53
February 3, 2021
I Began to Realize that the Problems Climate Change Presents Us as a Society Are Not Going to be Solved by More Data…
Mike Hulme, Professor of Human Geography at the University of Cambridge and Fellow in Geography at Pembroke College.
01:09:57
December 27, 2020
One Word Summarizes All of it, and That is Perspective
Paul Mayewski,  director and professor of the Climate Change Institute at the University of Maine, has done climate research at all three “poles”--the North Pole, the South Pole, and Everest. He discusses the transformation of climate science during his career, and his work to gather evidence for the possibility for the climate to change abruptly. Toward the end of the podcast, Paul mentions a website he and colleagues have developed, that allows you to look up climate data for your own area. You can find it here.   [https://www.whyclimatematters.com/]
59:16
December 17, 2020
Being One With the Forest is What Has Guided My Research Questions
Suzanne Simard, a Professor in the Department of Forest and Conservation Science, describes her upbringing in the forests of British Columbia, and discusses her work as the leader of the Mother Tree Project, a multi-year project to understand how to support forests in a way that will protect biodiversity, promote carbon sequestration, and encourage regeneration.
01:13:31
December 13, 2020
Soil is the Only Place Where Death is Resurrected Back to Life
Rattan Lal, Distinguished University Professor of Soil Science and the Director of the Carbon Management and Sequestration Center at Ohio State University, describes the path by which he came to understand the power of soil to sequester carbon, and explains why he understands soil as the foundation of all life.
01:10:32
December 3, 2020
My Research is Applying Data Analysis to Get Some Signal in the Chaos Which is Cancer Biology
Bissan Al-Lazikani, head of data science, computational biology and chemogenomics at the Institute of Cancer Research, London, explains how she and her colleagues developed the CanSAR “knowledgebase”--a database that puts together myriad types of data from anonymous cancer patient records, in order to improve the odds of successfully discovering new cancer drugs.
01:09:24
October 1, 2020
I Work Diligently and Excitedly to Bring Different Groups Together to Work Towards Solving a Complex Problem Related to Health Care Outcomes, Particularly Among Minority Populations
Chanita Hughes-Halbert, Associate Dean for Assessment and Evaluation and Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at the Medical University of South Carolina.
01:01:11
September 28, 2020
No One Before Has Actually Assessed the Psychological Impact of Prostate Cancer on Men
Suzanne Chambers, Dean of the Faculty of Health, University of Sydney, discusses her indirect path to becoming a clinical psychologist studying the impact of prostate cancer on men and their families, and the book she has written for men diagnosed with prostate cancer, Facing the Tiger.
01:06:27
September 21, 2020
With Genetic Engineering, You Can Induce the Cells to Make the Drugs For You
James Thomas, Executive Vice President, Global Head of Biotherapeutics, President of U.S. Operations for Just-Evotec Biologics, explains how the cost of biologically derived drugs has been reduced during the first thirty years of their development, and talks about what it will take to bring those costs down another order of magnitude.
01:05:24
September 17, 2020
The Conductor of the Orchestra of Our Immune System is T cells, and at the Heart of What I Do For Cancer Therapy is Making T Cells Work Better
Carl June, Richard W. Vague Professor in Immunotherapy in the Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Director of the Center for Cellular Immunotherapies at the Perelman School of Medicine, and Director of the Parker Institute for Cancer Immunotherapy at the University of Pennsylvania.
01:06:17
September 14, 2020
My Population is Cancer Patients, My Intervention is Exercise and My Outcomes Vary
Kathryn Schmitz, Professor of Public Health Sciences, and Behavioral Research Professor in Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation at the Penn State Cancer Institute, reflects on the growing body of evidence that supports the use of exercise as medicine in the treatment of cancer...and the reluctance of clinicians to prescribe exercise for their patients with cancer.
01:01:22
September 7, 2020
I Want to Solve Puzzles, and the Puzzles I’m Most Interested in Involve Cancer
Charles Sawyers, chair of the Human Oncology and Pathogenesis Program at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, talks about his path to becoming a biomedical researcher, his role in the development of Glevec, the first molecularly targeted cancer therapy, and Project GENIE, the cancer research database he launched.
01:06:45
September 2, 2020
Welcome to ScienceWhys: Questions at the Confluence of Science and Ethics
When big scientific questions meet big ethical questions, the waters can get pretty choppy. Lisa Heldke, philosopher and director of the Nobel Conference at Gustavus Adolphus College, interviews scientists, researchers, scholars and thinkers about how science and ethics mingle, eddy, roil and churn in their own work. The podcast for anyone who hears about a scientific breakthrough and thinks “what are the downstream consequences of that?”
03:40
September 1, 2020