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Seeking God: A Jesuit Retreat Series

Seeking God: A Jesuit Retreat Series

By The Jesuit Post
The Jesuit Post presents Ignatian preached retreats in podcast form. Each season will feature a series of talks based on the Spiritual Exercises of Saint Ignatius of Loyola presented by young Jesuits. Each episode features a talk that guides you through the dynamics of the retreat, along with reflection questions to aid you on your spiritual journey.

Season 1: A 6-day retreat for Holy week 2020.
Season 2: An anti-racism retreat, presented through the themes of the Spiritual Exercises of St. Ignatius of Loyola.
Season 3: Our annual 6-day Holy Week retreat for Lent 2021.
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Talk 6: Do You Love Me? The Resurrection of Jesus Christ | Live the Questions: A Holy Week Retreat
This episode draws us into the Fourth Week of the Exercises and explores a question Jesus asks of all of us: do you love me? We begin this episode in Jesus’ tomb and consider the Paschal path – that path of success, misunderstanding, suffering, death, and redemption that we all experience. We witness Jesus resurrected and allow him to continue transforming our lives through the gifts of joy and consolation that the resurrection offers. And, to conclude our retreat, we engage the Contemplation to Attain Divine Love, a prayer made in gratitude that inspires us to continue our journey of partnership with a good and loving God. Suggested texts: John 21:15-17 John 20:1-29 Luke 24:13-35 Matthew 28: 16-20 The Suscipe Prayer: Take Lord, receive all my liberty, my memory, my understanding, my entire will - all I have and possess. You have given all to me, and I give it all back to you, God - it’s all yours. Do with it what you will. Give me only your love and your grace - that’s enough for me. Points for reflection: Where do you find yourself on the Paschal Path right now? When have you found yourself or someone near you in the tomb? When Jesus asks you if you love him, how do you respond? When you contemplate God’s love for you, what consolation arises? What gifts do you recognize? What do you feel called to give back?
30:31
April 3, 2021
Talk 5: Surely, It Is Not I, Lord? The Passion of Jesus | Live the Questions: A Holy Week Retreat
This talk considers Judas’s question to Jesus at the Last Supper: Surely, it is not I, Lord? Given our Holy Week experience, it moves us into the Third Week of the Exercises, and explores the suffering of Jesus on the cross as an essential part of the Paschal mystery of the Christian faith. In facing that suffering, we will also consider the ways we cause suffering, we experience suffering, and we accompany suffering. Using the story of Jesus’ Passion and death, we are invited to feel more deeply the fullness of our relationship with him by walking with him on the way of the Cross. Suggested texts: Matthew 26:20-25 Luke 22:39-65 Luke 23:26-49 John 19:31-42 Points for reflection: What lingers with you as you consider the Passion and death of Jesus? What parts of the story resonate? What images come to mind as you accompany Jesus? Where have you encountered suffering in your life? How can Jesus be a companion for you in that suffering?
29:18
April 2, 2021
Talk 4: What Do You Want? The Public Ministry of Jesus | Live the Questions: A Holy Week Retreat
This talk continues our experience of the Second Week of the Spiritual Exercises of St. Ignatius, exploring the public ministry of Jesus and the relationships he formed with the people he served. It focuses on the question, “What do you want?” By engaging in imaginative prayer, we will explore more deeply who the person of Jesus was as a minister, and how in relationship with him we come to receive the abundant grace that God offers us. This episode will also explore a key meditation in the Spiritual Exercises – The Two Standards – and help us consider how we can align ourselves more fully to Jesus and his call – the call to follow him in his way of serving the world. Suggested texts: Mark 10:46-52 Mark 5:21-42 Mark 2:1-12 Mark 6:34-44 Matthew 14:22-33 John Monroe on The Two Standards Points for reflection: What do you truly desire in your life? How do you invite God to share in that desire? Who is Jesus as a minister? How did he treat the people who came to him for help? And, who in my life best exemplifies Jesus? In what ways am I deepening my friendship with Jesus? In what ways do I struggle to follow the way of Jesus?
29:31
April 1, 2021
Talk 3: How Can this Be? The Early and Hidden Years of Jesus’ Life | Live the Questions: A Holy Week Retreat
This episode considers the question, “How can this be?” It hearkens Mary’s response to the angel Gabriel and begins our entry into the Second Week of the Spiritual Exercises of St. Ignatius. In considering the Incarnation, the Nativity, and what are sometimes called the ‘Hidden Years’ of Jesus’ life, we are invited to consider how it can be that God chooses to participate fully in the human experience, and how we can be in relationship with God as a result. Suggested texts: Luke 1:26-38 Luke 2:1-14 Luke 2:41-52 Denise Levertov – “Annunciation” Points for reflection: What unexpected news have you gotten in your life? How have you been able to find God at work in that news? When you consider the Nativity of the Lord, what images come to mind? How do you imagine the scene of the birth of Jesus? What has happened in the course of your whole life? Given your own experience, what might Jesus’ first thirty years of living been like?
28:25
March 31, 2021
Talk 2: Who Told You That? Sin and God's Boundless Love | Live the Questions: A Holy Week Retreat
This talk explores the second question God asks humanity in the sacred scriptures: who told you that? It considers the First Week of the Spiritual Exercises of St. Ignatius Loyola, which centers around God’s boundless love for us. It invites us to consider sin, and the ways that God’s love and mercy help us to move beyond our sinfulness and into greater freedom. Suggested texts: Psalm 51 Genesis 3:10-13 John 8:1-11 Romans 7:13-23 Points for reflection: In what ways do you miss the mark regarding how you want to live? Who or what supply the voices in your life that lead you away from God? How have you felt God’s love and mercy present to you, even in the midst of difficulty and struggle? What tools do you have that help you carry on in the face of hardship and the recognition of sin?
33:02
March 30, 2021
Talk 1: Where are you? The First Principle and Foundation | Live the Questions: A Holy Week Retreat
This first talk explores a foundational question in the spiritual life: where are you? It serves as an introduction to the broad theme of this retreat, which is framed around asking six key questions in the spiritual life. It includes a brief overview of the life of St. Ignatius, as well as an introduction to the retreat’s host, Eric Immel, SJ. Finally, it presents a key to Ignatian spirituality: the ‘First Principle and Foundation.’ Suggested texts: Psalm 139 Genesis 3:1-10 John 1:1-5 The First Principle and Foundation: God created human beings to praise, reverence, and serve God, and by doing this, to save their souls. God created all other things on the face of the earth to help fulfill this purpose. From this, it follows that we are to use the things of this world only to the extent that they help us to this end, and we ought to rid ourselves of the things of this world to the extent that they get in the way of this end. For this it is necessary to make ourselves indifferent to all created things as much as we are able, so that we do not necessarily want health rather than sickness, riches rather than poverty, honor rather than dishonor, a long rather than a short life, and so in all the rest, so that we ultimately desire and choose only what is most conducive for us to the end for which God created us. Points for reflection: Where are you? Where do you find yourself on your spiritual journey these days? How would you describe the goal and purpose of your life? Where are you in honoring that goal and purpose? In what ways do you struggle to choose goodness and spiritual freedom? Where are you in moving beyond that struggle? Where do you feel called to change for the better?
31:01
March 29, 2021
2021 Holy Week Retreat: Live the Questions
Join Eric Immel, SJ, for a week-long online retreat starting on Monday, March 29 and lasting throughout Holy Week. In this retreat we'll explore themes of the Spiritual Exercises of St. Ignatius of Loyola as we prepare to celebrate the Resurrection at Easter. Episodes will be available daily in both video and podcast format. You can find the podcast in this feed and the videos are available on our website (www.theJesuitPost.org) and our YouTube Channel (@theJesuitPost). Join us! 
01:35
March 28, 2021
Talk 12 - "Laboring with the Resurrected Jesus" | Know Justice, Know Peace: A Jesuit Antiracism Retreat
God never stops laboring for us and for our world, laboring for justice, reconciliation, and the end of racism. We clearly see this in the awakening that has spread throughout the world after the “lynching” of George Floyd. At the end of the Fourth Week of the Spiritual Exercises, St. Ignatius invites us to respond in gratitude to God’s unceasing love for us. In the last talk of our Jesuit Antiracism Retreat, Michael Bachmeier explains how this gratitude manifests in our willingness to surrender ourselves and join the labors of God through the marginalized. Verses for Prayer: Matthew 28:16-20 - The Great Commission Reflection Questions: How can I be a better ally? Whose voices do I need to listen to? Do I trust the experiences of people from BIPOC communities? What am I going to do differently after this retreat? How is God calling me to be a co-laborer in the fight against racism? Imagine Jesus missioning you from this retreat. Is there something specific Jesus is sending you to do?
09:06
August 28, 2020
Talk 11 - "Eucharist, Hope and Antiracism" | Know Justice, Know Peace: A Jesuit Antiracism Retreat
The Eucharist, which is the source and summit of our faith, completely defies the logic of racism. Like the disciples on the road to Emmaus, Jesus’s breaking of the bread impulses us toward our community with renewed hope and consolation. Peter Bell reflects on letting the Body of Christ renew our antiracist commitment to one another. Verses for Prayer: Luke 24:13-35 - The Walk to Emmaus Reflection Questions: How do I see myself moving from the muck and despair into action? How might contemplating the Eucharist help me in my antiracist journey? What do I need to give thanks for over the course of this retreat, what truth have my eyes been opened to? Do I, like the disciples, need help to see Jesus at work in the world, and if so, how might I seek that help and be open to it?
11:06
August 26, 2020
Talk 10 - "We Are Not Alone" | Know Justice, Know Peace: A Jesuit Antiracism Retreat
Where is the Risen Lord in the racism we’ve been confronting for so long? Jesus conquered sin and death as He rose from the dead. But his wounds were still there when He showed up to his disciples. In the beginning of the fourth week, Eric Couto reminds us that our hope and joy as Christians comes not from naivete, but from our faith that Jesus walks with us, as we transform the painful realities of our world. Verses for Prayer: Matthew 28 - The Resurrection of Jesus Reflection Questions: What does the message of the Resurrection mean for you? What gives you hope and consolation about this mission towards antiracism? Where do you find the Risen Lord consoling you?
09:38
August 24, 2020
Talk 9 - "White Apathy and the Crucifixion" | Know Justice, Know Peace: A Jesuit Antiracism Retreat
Grieving with others is not the only way we commit to solidarity. Becoming aware of one’s participation in the oppression of others, is another way of opening the eyes of the heart and deciding to be responsible. Brian Engelhart, SJ, describes the apathy White people often exercise when dealing with the realities of racism that affect Black, Indigenous, and People of Color (BIPOC), and finishes the third week of our “Know Justice, Know Peace: A Jesuit Antiracism Retreat” with one contemporary example, as well as with an invitation to get rid of indifference. Verses for Prayer: Matthew 26:17-27:56 - The Passion of Jesus According to Matthew Reflection Questions: What is the pain Jesus feels at this stage of the Passion? Am I staying with Jesus in his suffering, or am I looking for ways to escape and reduce my own pain? What do I feel as I realize that Jesus is suffering on account of my sins? How does my reaction to Jesus’ Passion compare with my reaction to the sufferings of BIPOC today? Can I recognize that pain, sit with it, and acknowledge my role in it?
07:41
August 21, 2020
Talk 8 - "Lament Must Precede Solidarity" | Know Justice, Know Peace: A Jesuit Antiracism Retreat
Some realities in life can only be known through tears. The participation of Black, Indigenous, and People of Color (BIPOC) members in antiracism is not a hobby or an optional venture: it's a matter of survival. They do not have the luxury that White people have to retire from the conversation of racism and flee from its painful realities. Matt Briand, SJ, invites us to put aside our fear to weep with those who weep because of racism, for true Christian love suffers along the beloved, and commits to justice.   Questions and Verses for Prayer:  Ask God for this grace that St. Ignatius encourages for the Third Week of the Spiritual Exercises: “ask [God] for grief with Christ in grief, anguish with Christ in anguish, tears and interior pain at such great pain which Christ suffered for me.”  Read John 19:16-30 two or three times.  Meditate on the scene by offering your imagination to God. Be patient and let God reveal the scene to you. Engage your senses. Imagine standing with Mary, Mary Magdalene and John. What do you see? What do you hear? What do you feel?  After contemplating the scene, have a conversation with Jesus. Ask him, “Lord, how are you still suffering in the bodies of black people, indigenous people, and other people of color? And how am I to love those in my own community or city and resist the structures and forces that cause them to suffer?”
09:20
August 19, 2020
Talk 7 - "Bear Witness to Suffering" | Know Justice, Know Peace: A Jesuit Antiracism Retreat
Feeling grief for the suffering of others is one of the first steps toward a commitment to serve them. It helps us to have a greater sense of urgency for justice, as well as a deeper understanding of what is at stake. When we accompany those who suffer from racism in their mourning, we walk with our neighbors and bear witness to our Christian vocation. River Simpson, SJ, introduces us to the third week of our “Know Justice, Know Peace: A Jesuit Antiracism Retreat,” and invites us to remain faithfully present to the agonizing Jesus, through our accompaniment of the victims of racism. Reflection Questions: How do I handle disappointment, feelings of hopelessness amidst great suffering and specifically as it relates to racism? Where or to whom do I turn for consolation during these moments? What does it mean to stand in witness to another’s pain, another’s suffering, particularly within the context of racial injustice? Moreover, what does it mean to grieve? How can I credibly and appropriately lament another’s suffering, perhaps, even my own? What feelings do these reflections rouse in me? Verses for prayer: Mark 14:32-42 - The agony of Jesus (The episode says Mark 13, but it is actually Mark 14. Sorry for any confusion.)
10:08
August 17, 2020
Talk 6 - "Humility and Antiracism" | Know Justice, Know Peace: A Jesuit Antiracism Retreat
Humility plays a vital role in anti-racism work. Intellectual and moral humility allows individuals to admit complicity in a culture of racism and commit themselves to the ongoing struggle of anti-racism. By looking at the Call of Simon Peter, contemplating the story of Martha and Mary, and meditating on what it means to be “childlike,” Sullivan McCormick, SJ, invites us to reflect on where in our lives we might need more humility as anti-racists.     Reflection verses and questions:   Where do I need more humility (intellectual and/or moral) in my life as an anti-racist?    Call of Simon the Fisherman (Luke 5: 1-11)  How is Peter a model for moral humility in anti-racism work?   How can I learn from Peter?    The Praise of the Father (Matthew 11: 25-27)   What does it mean to be a “childlike” anti-racist?    Martha and Mary (Luke 10: 38-42)  How can I look to Mary as a model of intellectual humility in anti-racism work?
12:20
August 14, 2020
Talk 5 - "Accountability and the Oppressed Jesus" | Know Justice, Know Peace: A Jesuit Antiracism Retreat
When I speak about racism, am I generally more worried about how white people will feel, react, or think of me than I am about how people of color will?  Does my Church, my workplace, my classroom consider mainly the sensitives, comfort and concerns of white people?  Billy Critchley-Menor, SJ, points the antiracism conversation in the right direction when he explains that it is about White people being held accountable to People of Color. White supremacy has shaped society around the accountability of White people. Antiracism refocuses our attention so we are held accountable by the oppressed in our society; those in whom Jesus lives according to the Gospels.
07:58
August 12, 2020
Talk 4 - "Solidarity and Antiracism" | Know Justice, Know Peace: A Jesuit Antiracism Retreat
Although Solidarity is one of the values of Catholic Social Teaching, it is easily forgotten that it is not just a feeling of sympathy with those who suffer. Solidarity is a constant effort to create a society centered on equity and justice. Kevin Kuehl, SJ, gives us four characteristics of true solidarity and asks us to consider with whom do we practice solidarity in our following of Jesus: with those who are fighting for justice or with those who are perpetuating oppression?   Reflection texts:  Philippians 2:1-11  Luke 10: 25-37  Two Standards Meditation from the Spiritual Exercises of St. Ignatius (https://www.ignatianspirituality.com/ignatian-prayer/the-spiritual-exercises/an-ignatian-prayer-adventure/week-5/) Go to Day 4
09:36
August 10, 2020
Talk 3 - "Racism as Man-Made Evil" | Know Justice, Know Peace: A Jesuit Antiracism Retreat
Race is a social construct originally framed to create hard boundaries that could not be crossed by people of different skin color and for the purpose of segregation. “Black”, Indigenous, and “People of Color” (BIPOC) are still discriminated against and abused because of the color of their skin. Although race as a social construct was abusively imposed as a biological determinant of skin color, our society must not fall into the trap of colorblindness as it prevents one from seeing the suffering of “BIPOC” members. Fr. Armel Setubi, SJ, asks us to imagine a society without race, while warning us about the common mistake of thinking that colorblindness is the solution to racism.    Inspired by St. Ignatius, Armel asks us to ponder God’s call to be anti-racist with three important questions: what have we done to fight the sin of racism, what are we doing now, and what will we do in the future.    Link to the NYT article by Nikole Hannah-Jones referenced in the video: https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2020/06/24/magazine/reparations-slavery.html?auth=login-google
09:58
August 7, 2020
Talk 2 - "Mundane Racism" | Know Justice, Know Peace: A Jesuit Antiracism Retreat
Racism is not just violence and big displays of oppression. It manifests in everyday situations and in the mundanity of our lives. Jorge Roque shares some instances where the idea of white superiority affects how White people are racist toward BIPOC members in a covert and harming way. Deciding to work against these harming habits requires conversion. Jorge asks to allow ourselves to be scandalized and to pray with Jesus’s lament over Jerusalem.
09:34
August 5, 2020
Talk 1 - Racism and White Supremacy | Know Justice, Know Peace: A Jesuit Antiracism Retreat
Racism manifests itself as white supremacy in the United States. Ángel Flores Fontánez introduces these and other concepts, summarizes the history of white supremacy, and identifies white fragility as a great obstacle to defeat the sin of racism. He also invites us to imitate Jesus in his ability to accept correction and convert from wrong ways. Reflection questions: How have you contributed to White Supremacy? How has White Privilege made your life easier in comparison with BIPOC members? Is White Fragility preventing you from growth? How so? Bible verses for reflection: Mark 7: 24-30 Luke 10: 25-37
11:51
August 3, 2020
Trailer: Know Justice, Know Peace: A Jesuit Antiracism Retreat
For this 2nd Season of "Seeking God: A Jesuit Retreat," the Jesuit Post presents “Know Justice, Know Peace: A Jesuit Antiracism Retreat.”  In this trailer episode, Ángel Flores Fontánez introduces you to this four-week retreat which seeks to assist Christians in their growth as antiracist followers of Jesus, based on the Spiritual Exercises of St. Ignatius of Loyola. It will consist of twelve short talks published on Monday, Wednesday, and Friday starting on August 3, 2020. 
04:55
July 31, 2020
The Fourth Week: The Destination of our Journey
The grace of the Fourth Week is to enter into the joy and consolation of Jesus as he savors the glory of the Resurrection. The episode reflects on the reactions of the disciples of Jesus to his death: pain and heartbreak, fear and anguish, doubt and uncertainty, and disappointment. The Resurrected Jesus takes on the role of “consoler,” and brings joy and consolation to all his disciples in the resurrection accounts. The episode concludes with the Contemplation on Divine Love. We pray for the grace of intimate knowledge of all the goods which God lovingly shares with us, that filled with gratitude, we might love and serve the Lord. This final contemplation inspires us to set off anew on our journey of faith at the conclusion of this retreat experience. Suggested texts: John 20:1-29 John 21:1-19 Luke 24:13-35 John 15:1-17 Matthew 28:16-20 Points for Reflection: Enter into the joy and consolation of the Resurrection. Contemplate God’s love, and be filled with gratitude, so as to love and serve the Lord. What are the experiences of new life that stand out to you in your life? When has Jesus been a consoler for you? When has he brought you joy and consolation? What gifts has God given the world? What gifts has God given you? Say “thanks.” How can you give back to God, not just with words, but in action? How can you give back to God, who has given you everything? Suscipe Prayer: Take, Lord, and receive all my liberty, my memory, my understanding, and my entire will- all that I have and call my own. You have given it all to me. To you, Lord, I return it. Everything is yours; do with it what you will. Give me only your love and your grace. That is enough for me.
35:13
April 11, 2020
The Third Week: Where the Lord is Leading Us
The grace of the Third Week is to have sorrow and compassion for Jesus, to suffer with him because he goes to his passion for us. This episode begins by discussing the Paschal Path, which is where the Lord is leading us, and a path that all of us will have to walk in this life. It includes success, misunderstanding, suffering, death and loss, waiting in suspense, and new life. Jesus modeled this path for us, and we other examples in our lives of people who have modeled it for us too. When we recognize where we are on the Paschal Path, we recognize how we are in solidarity with Jesus. This episode ends by shifting the focus to Jesus on the cross. St. Ignatius encourages us in the Third Week to pause before the cross and spend time there, to place ourselves with Jesus on the cross. Suggested texts: Matthew 16:24-28 Matthew 27:33-56 Mark 15:22-41 Luke 23:33-49 John 19:16-37 Or any of the full Passion accounts from the Gospels Paschal Path: Success – Misunderstanding/Rejection – Suffering – Death/Loss – Waiting – New Life. Points for Reflection: Reflect on where you are on the Paschal Path and spend time with Jesus on the cross. Where do you find yourself on the Paschal Path right now? Who has modeled the Paschal Path for you? Use your imagination or sit in front of a crucifix. What does it look like? How does it make you feel?
36:24
April 10, 2020
The Second Week (Part 2): How to Stay on the Path
The Second Week of the Spiritual Exercises is split into two episodes. This second one focuses on how we can stay on the path to God on our journey of faith. The episode begins by outlining the discernment of spirits as a way to be attentive to the different spirits that pull us in one direction or another. Along with sharing lessons from St. Ignatius’s story, this episode offers concrete methods to help us respond to the urgings of the good spirit in our lives and resist the movements of the false spirit. Later in the episode, it shifts to friendship, beginning with our friendship with Jesus. An important component of the Second Week is praying over the life of Jesus and asking for the grace to know him more intimately, to love him more devotedly, and to follow him more completely. The technique of Ignatian Contemplation is introduced, which can help when praying with Gospel stories of Jesus. The episode also reflects on the many friends in faith who help inspire us and guide us, including friends of Jesus in the Scriptures, the Communion of Saints, and our own family and friends. Suggested texts: 1 Thessalonians 5:14-22 Psalm 34 Luke 10:29-37 Matthew 6:19-21 Points for Reflection: Reflect on the movements of the good spirit and the false spirit in your own life, and on friendships that help you stay on the path to God. How does the false spirit try to lead you astray in sneaky and subtle ways? Where do you most clearly see the good spirit at work in your life? How are you responding? How are you deepening your friendship with Jesus? Who are the friends in faith that inspire you and helps you stay on the path to God? Reflect on friends of Jesus in the Gospels, your favorite Saints, and friends and family. 3 Methods of Discernment: (1) pros and cons list, (2) imagine giving advice to a friend (3) imagine reflecting back from some time in the future.
35:43
April 9, 2020
The Second Week (Part 1): Why We Walk This Path
The Second Week of the Spiritual Exercises is split into two episodes. This first one focuses on why we walk this particular path on our journey of faith, and not another. It begins with the Meditation on the Incarnation, and how God looks on the world with love and enters into it. Similarly, God enters into the messiness of our lives and enters into it. We constantly find evidence of God at work in our lives. Then this episode moves on to the Call of the King, a meditation in which we reflect on the compelling call of the voice of Jesus in our lives. Lastly, this episode presents the Meditation on the Two Standards, which sets up the competing calls in our life to “riches, honor, and pride,” or to “poverty, dishonor, and humility.” Suggested texts: John 1:35-45 Luke 5:1-11 Matthew 9:9-13 Matthew 4:1-11 Points for Reflection: Reflect on God’s activity in your life and the different voices that call out to you. Meditation on the Incarnation: How does God enter into the messiness of your life? Where do you find evidence of God at work? In the silence of prayer? In the busyness of your everyday life? Call of the King: Imagine a worldly leader, and then imagine Jesus. Where do you hear the voice of Jesus in your life? Where is Jesus calling you? Two Standards: When are you tempted to pursue riches, honor, and pride in an unhealthy way? How is Jesus inviting you to deepen in poverty, dishonor, and humility?
35:17
April 8, 2020
The First Week: Obstacles on Our Journey of Faith
This episode is titled “The First Week: Obstacles on Our Journey of Faith.” The grace of the First Week of the Spiritual Exercises is to feel a deep and intense sorrow for my sins, shame and confusion that my sinfulness is an obstacle between myself and God. This episode will focus on four primary types of obstacles faced on our journey of faith: sin, false idols, attachments, and self-doubt. Reflecting on the obstacles that we face always has to be framed within the context of God’s infinite love and mercy. We are sinners, loved by God. So, this episode also includes praying for the grace to experience the profound joy of being forgiven by God. Suggested texts:  John 8:1-11 Luke 18:9-14 Matthew 6:19-21 Romans 7:13-23 Psalm 51 Points for Reflection: Reflect on the obstacles on your journey of faith. Sin: What leads you to turn away from God and go the wrong way? False idols: What distracts you on your journey and causes you to lose your focus on God? Attachments: What are the things that you cling to that weigh you down? Self-doubt: Are you facing a daunting obstacle right now? Can you offer that up to Jesus?
33:18
April 7, 2020
Introduction to the Journey of Faith
This episode is titled “Introduction to the Journey of Faith.” It includes an introduction to the Spiritual Exercises and the guiding theme of this retreat, which is framed around our faith as a journey. The host, Brian Strassburger, will introduce himself, and will share from the life of St. Ignatius of Loyola and his conversion. This episode will also present a key bedrock of Ignatian spirituality called the “First Principle and Foundation.” Suggested texts: Psalm 139 – Psalm 23 – Isaiah 55 – First Principle & Foundation – Luke 18:18-23 First Principle and Foundation: God created human beings to praise, reverence, and serve God, and by doing this, to save their souls. God created all other things on the face of the earth to help fulfill this purpose. From this, it follows that we are to use the things of this world only to the extent that they help us to this end, and we ought to rid ourselves of the things of this world to the extent that they get in the way of this end. For this it is necessary to make ourselves indifferent to all created things as much as we are able, so that we do not necessarily want health rather than sickness, riches rather than poverty, honor rather than dishonor, a long rather than a short life, and so in all the rest, so that we ultimately desire and choose only what is most conducive for us to the end for which God created us. Points for Reflection: Reflect on your journey of faith, your freedom, and holy Christian indifference. Do you ever make yourself the center of the universe? How might God be reminding you that you are a supporting actor? How do you exercise the freedom to choose the good? When do you struggle to choose the good? What are the things in your life that are out of your control? How are you growing in holy Christian indifference as you approach those things?
36:07
April 6, 2020
Introduction to "Seeking God: A Jesuit Retreat"
The Jesuit Post is happy to bring you an Ignatian preached retreat in podcast form. This introductory episode will explain the format of the retreat. We will begin on Monday, April 6 and a new episode will come out each day of Holy Week. Join us to listen, reflect, and pray.
05:47
April 5, 2020