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Welcome to the (AfAm) House

Welcome to the (AfAm) House

By Afro American Cultural Center at Yale
Welcome to the (AfAm) House is a podcast that explores stories from the past, present and future told by the Black people who know them best.

The Afro-American Cultural Center at Yale University (affectionately called “the House”) was established in the fall of 1969 after the rise of issues surrounding race and civil unrest at Yale and throughout the New Haven community. Learn more about the House at afam.yalecollege.yale.edu.

Want to hear the full unedited interviews with our speakers and get access to so much more? Join our Patreon www.patreon.com/user?u=41836892
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Currently playing episode

Healing Hands

Welcome to the (AfAm) House

Healing Hands

Welcome to the (AfAm) House

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The Power of Vulnerability
Emily Bernard is the the Julian Lindsay Green & Gold Professor of English at the University of Vermont and an award winning author. In this episode, we explore the concept of vulnerability, a powerful theme present throughout her latest book Black is the Body: Stories from My Grandmother’s Time, My Mother’s Time, and Mine. Episode Resources Emily Bernard’s website Why I Finally Forgave My Fathers Mistress by Emily Bernard  Episode Question What does vulnerability mean to you? What are some of the ways you incorporate vulnerability into your life? Who are you able to be vulnerable with? What is the purpose of vulnerability? What makes you feel powerful? Is feeling powerful important to you? What story are you writing about yourself?
57:19
March 22, 2021
A Gap Year To Remember
Ife Desamours Adeyeri is a PhD student at Yale University studying Microbiology. She joins us to talk about what it was like growing up in six different countries as the daughter of a UN Human Rights lawyer, and the many fascinating experiences she had during her gap year.  Episode Questions 1) What are the places you want to travel to? What do you want to do when you get there? 2) How do you decide which places to travel to? What are your safety considerations? 3) When is the last time you did something new? Credits This episode was hosted, edited and produced by me, Shantrice King. Special thank you to the Afro American Cultural Center at Yale and our guest Ife Desamours Ayederi. Music provided by pixabay.com
52:12
March 8, 2021
More Love, More Joy
Dr. Margo Okazawa-Rey aka DJ MOR Love, Joy is an activist and educator working on issues of militarism, armed conflict and violence against women. Margo was a member of the historic Black feminist Combahee River Collective. She is a founding member of the Afro-Asian Relations Council, East Asia-U.S. Women’s Network Against Militarism, and the Institute for Multiracial Justice and the International Network of Women Against Militarism. She has a long standing relationship to social justice work in South Korea and with the Women’s Centre for Legal Aid and Counseling in Palestine.   Episode Questions 1) What do you love? 2) What brings you joy? 3) How are you working to be in service of others? Resources Black and Asian Feminist Solidarities Breakdown of wealth gaps amongst Asians in the US Feminist Freedom Warriors by Mohanty & Carty (2018) http://feministfreedomwarriors.org/book.php Gendered Lives: Intersectional Perspectives by Kirk & Okazawa-Rey (2020) https://learninglink.oup.com/access/kirk-okazawa-rey-7e Credits This episode was hosted, edited and produced by me, Shantrice King. Special thank you to the Afro American Cultural Center at Yale and our co-sponsor for this episode, Asian American Cultural Center. Music provided by pixabay.com
01:00:20
March 1, 2021
A Lesson in Authenticity
Rosa Clemente has been an organizer since the 1990s, working on and studying Black and Brown liberation efforts in the US. Her work has taken her from hip hop centered organizing with youth in Brooklyn as a part of the Malcom X Grassroots Movement to campaigning across the country as a Vice Presidential candidate in 2008 for the Green Party. Through it all, one thing that has always remained, her determination to show up and be her most authentic self. Bio Rosa Alicia Clemente is a Black-Puerto Rican woman born and raised in the Bronx, NY. She is an organizer, producer, independent journalist and scholar-activist. Rosa was the first ever Afro-Latina woman to run for Vice-President of the United States in 2008 on the Green Party ticket. She and her running mate, Cynthia McKinney, were to this date the only women of color ticket in American presidential history. She is a frequent guest on television, radio and online media, as her opinions on critical current events are widely sought after. As president of Know Thy Self Productions, she has produced several major community activism tours over the last 20 years. As a co-founder and national coordinator of the first ever National Hip-Hop Political Convention in 2003, Rosa helped bring together more than 3000 activists to create and implement a national political agenda for the Hip-Hop generation. She also co-founded the REACH Hip-Hop Coalition, a Hip-Hop generation-based media justice organization. You can learn more about her and her work on her website.  Episode Questions 1) How does authenticity show up in your life? 2) Are you a part of any social movements? Do those spaces affirm you and allow you to show up as your whole self? 3) What are ways we can be sure to uplift our community members and comrades? 4) What has been authentic cost you?  5) What do you think you gain by being authentic? Resources  Revolutionary Mothering: Love on the Front Lines edited by Alexis Pauline Gumbs, Mai'a Williams, China Martens Don't Leave Your Friends Behind: Concrete Ways to Support Families in Social Justice Movements and Communities by Victoria Law  During our full interview Rosa talked about the Green Party's radical platform, here is a link to it. Credits This episode was hosted, edited and produced by me, Shantrice King. Special thank you to the Afro American Cultural Center at Yale and our co-sponsor for this episode, La Casa Cultural de Julia de Burgos Latino Cultural Center. Music from the episode is from bensound.com 
26:57
October 28, 2020
Congratulations Black 2020 Graduates
A Tribute to the Black Yale graduating class of 2020.  Special thank you to Alyssa Ince for sharing her rich experiences at Yale with us on this episode.  
06:44
May 31, 2020
Black at Yale
Alyse Robinson and Raajii Daniel are the Co-Presidents of the Black Student Alliance at Yale (BSAY). This interview provides a glimpse into their experiences as Black students and Black leaders at Yale . Stay up to date with BSAY by following them on their instagram, BSAY instagram, or checking out their website, BSAY website. Find out more about the Afro-American Cultural Center at Yale by checking out our website and following us on instagram.  
34:47
April 30, 2020
Black Church
Two Black Churches, same city, different work. Music in this episode is by Universal Jubilaires and the song is entitled childhood days
54:39
April 24, 2020
Healing Hands
This week's episode of Welcome to the (AfAM) House explores traditions of healing amongst Black people in the United States.  Our guests for this episode are Dr. Deidre Cooper Owens,  Thema Haida, Hanifa Nayo, and Leonne Tanis. Through their rich knowledge,  we delve into the  stories of the earliest known Black healers, Black women, and move through history to investigate how Black people have retained traditions that keep them healthy and cared for. Guest Speaker Bios  Dr. Deidre Cooper Owens  is the Charles and Linda Wilson Professor in the History of Medicine and Director of the Humanities in Medicine program. She is also an Organization of American Historians’ (OAH) Distinguished Lecturer. Her first book, Medical Bondage: Race, Gender and the Origins of American Gynecology (UGA Press, 2017) won the 2018 Darlene Clark Hine Book Award from the OAH as the best book written in African American women’s and gender history. Professor Cooper Owens is also the Director of the Program in African American History at the Library Company of Philadelphia, the country’s oldest cultural institution. Stay connected and learn more about her by visiting her website.  Thema Haida is the co-founding Practitioner of One Village Healing.  is a certified Usui/Holy Fire Reiki Master Teacher, a 200hr Yoga Alliance Registered Yoga Instructor, and a certified Advanced Metaphysical Healing Practitioner. While holding a space of non-judgement and care, Thema combines Reiki with intuitive energy assessments to facilitate and guide people on their healing journey to wholeness. Her practice as a energy healer and yoga instructor has focused on supporting community activists, artists, healers, and people of color- the people that hold and bring life to communities that are most affected by racism, systematic oppression and inequality. . Hanifa Nayo Washington is the Principle Organizer and co-founding Practitioner of One Village Healing.  She is an award winning cultural activist, storyteller, singer songwriter, performing artist, and a certified Usui/Holy Fire Reiki Master Practitioner who graduated from Beloit College in 2001 with a B.A. in Communications & Russian & Soviet Studies. Hanifa is a former Arts Fellow of the William Caspar Graustein Memorial Fund and currently works with The Word Poetry, Co-Creating Effective and Inclusive Organizations (CEIO), serves as an Intern for Beyond Diversity 101, and is a leader of the New Haven Community Leadership Program. As a cultural activist Hanifa views her creativity as a radical tool for liberation, healing, and community building. Most recently Hanifa was awarded a Phenomenal Woman in the Arts Award by the Arts Council of Greater New Haven. Leonne Tanis is a change agent, evolving leader, former finance executive and current student midwife. Leonne Tanis left her 15 year financial career to pursue her calling in midwifery. Leonne’s mission is to change the birthing profession for birthing people especially black women and persons and people within the LGBTQIA community. Leonne believes that birthing care should be centered around the person giving birth and her/his/their chosen support structure. Leonne is a Haitian-American with an engineering degree from the University of Pennsylvania. She is a Master’s of Science in Nursing candidate at the Yale School of Nursing a Board member of the National Association to  Advance Black Birth.   This episode is hosted, written and produced by Shantrice King.
47:13
April 10, 2020