Songscapes

Songscapes

By Hamilton Naturalists' Club
Season 2: "A Day in Cootes Paradise" - a full mid-summer day of Songscapes, from dawn to dusk. Updating daily in November 2019. Soundscapes from nature sanctuaries and natural areas in southern Ontario, Canada. Includes birds, amphibians, insects, and more. Produced from field recordings of the Hamilton Bioacoustic Research Project & the Hamilton Naturalists' Club in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada.
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8 p.m. Evensong
Songscapes Season 2: A Day in Cootes Paradise was recorded on July 5, 2019 in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. Cootes Paradise is a 1500 acre wetland on the western edge of Lake Ontario, owned and managed by the Royal Botanical Gardens (RBG), a charitable organization. It lies alongside the city of Hamilton, Ontario. The site is a National Historic Site, a Nationally Important Bird Area (IBA), and an Important Amphibian and Reptile Area (IMPARA). It is one of the most biodiverse wetlands in all of Canada. Audio engineering by Rob Porter. For more information, see http://hamiltonnature.org/songscapes
1:00:00
December 7, 2019
7 p.m. Denouement
Songscapes Season 2: A Day in Cootes Paradise was recorded on July 5, 2019 in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. Cootes Paradise is a 1500 acre wetland on the western edge of Lake Ontario, owned and managed by the Royal Botanical Gardens (RBG), a charitable organization. It lies alongside the city of Hamilton, Ontario. The site is a National Historic Site, a Nationally Important Bird Area (IBA), and an Important Amphibian and Reptile Area (IMPARA). It is one of the most biodiverse wetlands in all of Canada. Audio engineering by Rob Porter. For more information, see http://hamiltonnature.org/songscapes
1:00:00
December 7, 2019
6 p.m. Undulations
Songscapes Season 2: A Day in Cootes Paradise was recorded on July 5, 2019 in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. Cootes Paradise is a 1500 acre wetland on the western edge of Lake Ontario, owned and managed by the Royal Botanical Gardens (RBG), a charitable organization. It lies alongside the city of Hamilton, Ontario. The site is a National Historic Site, a Nationally Important Bird Area (IBA), and an Important Amphibian and Reptile Area (IMPARA). It is one of the most biodiverse wetlands in all of Canada. Audio engineering by Rob Porter. For more information, see http://hamiltonnature.org/songscapes
1:00:00
November 19, 2019
5 p.m. Rainfall
Songscapes Season 2: A Day in Cootes Paradise was recorded on July 5, 2019 in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. Cootes Paradise is a 1500 acre wetland on the western edge of Lake Ontario, owned and managed by the Royal Botanical Gardens (RBG), a  charitable organization. It lies alongside the city of Hamilton, Ontario. The site is a National Historic Site, a Nationally Important Bird Area (IBA), and an Important Amphibian and Reptile Area (IMPARA). It is one of the most biodiverse wetlands in all of Canada. Audio engineering by Rob Porter. For more information, see http://hamiltonnature.org/songscapes
1:00:00
November 18, 2019
4 p.m. Brooding
Songscapes Season 2: A Day in Cootes Paradise was recorded on July 5, 2019 in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. Cootes Paradise is a 1500 acre wetland on the western edge of Lake Ontario, owned and managed by the Royal Botanical Gardens (RBG), a charitable organization. It lies alongside the city of Hamilton, Ontario. The site is a National Historic Site, a Nationally Important Bird Area (IBA), and an Important Amphibian and Reptile Area (IMPARA). It is one of the most biodiverse wetlands in all of Canada. Audio engineering by Rob Porter. For more information, see http://hamiltonnature.org/songscapes
1:00:00
November 17, 2019
3 p.m. Distant Thunder
Songscapes Season 2: A Day in Cootes Paradise was recorded on July 5, 2019 in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. Cootes Paradise is a 1500 acre wetland on the western edge of Lake    Ontario, owned and managed by the Royal Botanical Gardens (RBG), a    charitable organization. It lies alongside the city of Hamilton,    Ontario. The site is a National Historic Site, a Nationally Important    Bird Area (IBA), and an Important Amphibian and Reptile Area (IMPARA).    It is one of the most biodiverse wetlands in all of Canada. Audio engineering by Rob Porter. For more information, see http://hamiltonnature.org/songscapes
1:00:00
November 16, 2019
2 p.m. Winds
Songscapes Season 2: A Day in Cootes Paradise was recorded on July 5, 2019 in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. Cootes Paradise is a 1500 acre wetland on the western edge of Lake Ontario, owned and managed by the Royal Botanical Gardens (RBG), a charitable organization. It lies alongside the city of Hamilton, Ontario. The site is a National Historic Site, a Nationally Important Bird Area (IBA), and an Important Amphibian and Reptile Area (IMPARA). It is one of the most biodiverse wetlands in all of Canada. Audio engineering by Rob Porter. For more information, see http://hamiltonnature.org/songscapes
1:00:00
November 15, 2019
1 p.m. Horizon
Songscapes Season 2: A Day in Cootes Paradise was recorded on July 5, 2019 in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. Cootes Paradise is a 1500 acre wetland on the western edge of Lake   Ontario, owned and managed by the Royal Botanical Gardens (RBG), a   charitable organization. It lies alongside the city of Hamilton,   Ontario. The site is a National Historic Site, a Nationally Important   Bird Area (IBA), and an Important Amphibian and Reptile Area (IMPARA).   It is one of the most biodiverse wetlands in all of Canada. Audio engineering by Rob Porter. For more information, see http://hamiltonnature.org/songscapes
1:00:00
November 14, 2019
12 p.m. Foreshadowing
Songscapes Season 2: A Day in Cootes Paradise was recorded on July 5, 2019 in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. Cootes Paradise is a 1500 acre wetland on the western edge of Lake  Ontario, owned and managed by the Royal Botanical Gardens (RBG), a  charitable organization. It lies alongside the city of Hamilton,  Ontario. The site is a National Historic Site, a Nationally Important  Bird Area (IBA), and an Important Amphibian and Reptile Area (IMPARA).  It is one of the most biodiverse wetlands in all of Canada. Audio engineering by Rob Porter. For more information, see http://hamiltonnature.org/songscapes
1:00:00
November 12, 2019
11 a.m. Repose
Songscapes Season 2: A Day in Cootes Paradise was recorded on July 5, 2019 in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. Cootes Paradise is a 1500 acre wetland on the western edge of Lake  Ontario, owned and managed by the Royal Botanical Gardens (RBG), a  charitable organization. It lies alongside the city of Hamilton,  Ontario. The site is a National Historic Site, a Nationally Important  Bird Area (IBA), and an Important Amphibian and Reptile Area (IMPARA).  It is one of the most biodiverse wetlands in all of Canada. Audio engineering by Rob Porter. For more information, see http://hamiltonnature.org/songscapes
1:00:00
November 11, 2019
10 a.m. Morning Calm
After hours of intense morning songs, a new calm begins to establish itself. Songscapes Season 2: A Day in Cootes Paradise was recorded on July 5, 2019 in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. Cootes Paradise is a 1500 acre wetland on the western edge of Lake Ontario, owned and managed by the Royal Botanical Gardens (RBG), a charitable organization. It lies alongside the city of Hamilton, Ontario. The site is a National Historic Site, a Nationally Important Bird Area (IBA), and an Important Amphibian and Reptile Area (IMPARA). It is one of the most biodiverse wetlands in all of Canada. Audio engineering by Rob Porter. For more information, see http://hamiltonnature.org/songscapes
59:38
November 9, 2019
9 a.m. Wax and Wane
A song cycle of waxing and waning intensity begins. Pauses between songs become longer, then shorter, then longer again. Songscapes Season 2: A Day in Cootes Paradise was recorded on July 5, 2019 in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. Cootes Paradise is a 1500 acre wetland on the western edge of Lake Ontario, owned and managed by the Royal Botanical Gardens (RBG), a charitable organization. It lies alongside the city of Hamilton, Ontario. The site is a National Historic Site, a Nationally Important Bird Area (IBA), and an Important Amphibian and Reptile Area (IMPARA). It is one of the most biodiverse wetlands in all of Canada. Audio engineering by Rob Porter. For more information, see http://hamiltonnature.org/songscapes
59:21
November 8, 2019
8 a.m. Songs Sustained
As the morning songs continue, some Black-capped Chickadees arrive with both songs and calls. Songscapes Season 2: A Day in Cootes Paradise was recorded on July 5, 2019 in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. Cootes Paradise is a 1500 acre wetland on the western edge of Lake Ontario, owned and managed by the Royal Botanical Gardens (RBG), a charitable organization. It lies alongside the city of Hamilton, Ontario. The site is a National Historic Site, a Nationally Important Bird Area (IBA), and an Important Amphibian and Reptile Area (IMPARA). It is one of the most biodiverse wetlands in all of Canada. Audio engineering by Rob Porter. For more information, see http://hamiltonnature.org/songscapes
1:00:00
November 7, 2019
7 a.m. Territory
With the dawn chorus complete, the Red-winged Blackbirds disperse to their daytime territories, with just a few staying behind. Red-eyed Vireos, Carolina Wren, Indigo Buntings, Yellow Warblers are just some of the other species that emerge from the cacophony.  Songscapes Season 2: A Day in Cootes Paradise was recorded on July 5, 2019 in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. Cootes Paradise is a 1500 acre wetland on the western edge of Lake Ontario, owned and managed by the Royal Botanical Gardens (RBG), a charitable organization. It lies alongside the city of Hamilton, Ontario. The site is a National Historic Site, a Nationally Important Bird Area (IBA), and an Important Amphibian and Reptile Area (IMPARA). It is one of the most biodiverse wetlands in all of Canada. Audio engineering by Rob Porter. For more information, see http://hamiltonnature.org/songscapes
1:00:00
November 6, 2019
6 a.m. The Golden Hour
As more birds awake, so do some insects, and squirrels. In the distance, the sounds of a city waking to a new day. Songscapes Season 2: A Day in Cootes Paradise was recorded on July 5, 2019 in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. Cootes Paradise is a 1500 acre wetland on the western edge of Lake Ontario, owned and managed by the Royal Botanical Gardens (RBG), a charitable organization. It lies alongside the city of Hamilton, Ontario. The site is a National Historic Site, a Nationally Important Bird Area (IBA), and an Important Amphibian and Reptile Area (IMPARA). It is one of the most biodiverse wetlands in all of Canada. Audio engineering by Rob Porter. For more information, see http://hamiltonnature.org/songscapes
1:00:00
November 5, 2019
5 a.m. Morning Twilight
The day begins with the occasional call of the green frog, and distant singing Red-winged Blackbirds and American Robins. As the light emerges, bird songs are brought to the fore, and more species add their voices to the building dawn chorus. Songscapes Season 2: A Day in Cootes Paradise was recorded on July 5, 2019 in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. Cootes Paradise is a 1500 acre wetland on the western edge of Lake Ontario, owned and managed by the Royal Botanical Gardens (RBG), a charitable organization. It lies alongside the city of Hamilton, Ontario. The site is a National Historic Site, a Nationally Important Bird Area (IBA), and an Important Amphibian and Reptile Area (IMPARA). It is one of the most biodiverse wetlands in all of Canada. Audio engineering by Rob Porter. For more information, see http://hamiltonnature.org/songscapes
1:00:00
November 5, 2019
Who cooks for you?
On a cold February night, deep in the woods of Hayesland Swamp, a lone Barred Owl sings its telltale "Who cooks for you?" song. Recorded on February 3, 2019 at Hayesland Swamp Nature Sanctuary in Flamborough, Ontario. Audio editing by Rob Porter and Simon Carter. For more information, see http://hamiltonnature.org/songscapes
07:22
August 6, 2019
The Hungry Hawk
Once fledged from the nest, juvenile Red-tailed Hawks still require regular feeding by the parents. As you will hear in this soundscape, they are not subtle! Also heard in this soundscape: Indigo Bunting, Song Sparrow, Field Sparrow, American Goldfinch, Tree Swallow, American Robin, Yellow-billed Cuckoo, and more. Audio editing by Rob Porter. For more information, see http://hamiltonnature.org/songscapes
21:12
July 17, 2019
Wood Thrush
The song of the Wood Thrush is one of the most widely-loved songs of all North American birds. Known by the mnemonic "ee-oh-lay", the male song is able to produce two notes at the same time, giving it a flute-like quality. This is a blend of two recordings, recorded on July 1, 2018 & June 30, 2019 at McMaster Forest in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada with an iPhone 6S and Edutige EIM-001 microphone. Audio recording and editing by Rob Porter. For more information, see http://hamiltonnature.org/songscapes
15:03
July 7, 2019
Gunk, Gunk!
The Green Frog is a fairly common amphibian found in eastern North America in shallow, permanent water features. It's well known for its "gunk, gunk!" call. In this soundscape you'll hear it along with many other wetland and forest edge singers: Swamp Sparrow, Red-winged Blackbird, Common Yellowthroat, Warbling Vireo, Red-eyed Vireo, Chipping Sparrow, Yellow-bellied Sapsucker, and more. Recorded on July 1, 2019 at Britton Tract in Halton, Ontario, Canada with an iPhone 6S and Edutige EIM-001 mic. Audio recording and editing by Rob Porter. For more information, see http://hamiltonnature.org/songscapes
42:06
July 4, 2019
The "Sore-throated" Vireo
The Yellow-throated Vireo shares much in common with it's red-eyed cousins. Their song is only different in its harsh intonation, making it sound like a "sore-throated" rendition of the Red-eyed Vireo song. Found in wet forest habitats, it sometimes overlaps with Red-eyed Vireos, making them difficult to separate to the untrained ear. This soundscape features two different Yellow-throated Vireos, both on breeding territory on the south share of Cootes Paradise along the Ravine Road Trail, bordering McMaster University in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. In the final minutes of the soundscape, after 14m 30s, both Yellow-throated and Red-eyed Vireos are heard in contrast to one another. Also heard: Carolina Wren, American Redstart, Red-winged Blackbird, Yellow Warbler, Northern Cardinal, American Robin, Red-tailed Hawk, and more! Recorded on June 30, 2019. Audio recording editing by Rob Porter. Recorded on an iPhone 6S with an Edutige EIM-001 mic. For more information, see http://hamiltonnature.org/songscapes
17:54
June 30, 2019
Creekside with the Eastern Wood-Pewee
Known for the distinctive "puh-wee" call, the Eastern Wood-Pewee is a very common breeding bird in forests throughout eastern North America. They are also very persistent, seeming to sing constantly throughout the day and sometimes continuing long after sunset until it's truly dark out. This soundscape features a nearby flowing creek within a ravine of a small patch of old growth forest. It captures a more lively early morning pewee song transitioning into the simpler and more relaxed song heard throughout the day. Recorded on June 16, 2019 at McMaster Forest in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. Audio editing by Rob Porter. For more information, see http://hamiltonnature.org/songscapes
1:18:09
June 25, 2019
An Urban Meadowlark
The Eastern Meadowlark is typically found at agricultural sites throughout southern Ontario, but can sometimes be found at large open parkland in urban areas. In this soundscape you'll hear both the song and "rattle" call of the Eastern Meadowlark. In the background you'll hear various species such as Red-winged Blackbird, Savannah Sparrow, Song Sparrow, Cedar Waxwing, Common Grackle, Northern Flicker, Chipping Sparrow, American Goldfinch, Yellow Warbler, an unknown woodpecker species pecking away at a tree, and a brief cameo by the elusive Orchard Oriole. Recorded on June 23, 2019 at the Elam Martin Farmstead in RIM Park, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada with an iPhone 6S and Edutige EIM-001 microphone. Audio recording and editing by Rob Porter. For more information, see http://hamiltonnature.org/songscapes
12:07
June 24, 2019
Oh Sweet Cacophony!
The song of the White-throated Sparrow, known by the mnemonic "Oh Sweet Canada, Canada, Canada!", is considered to be one of the most musically pleasing songs... when there is just one bird singing. What happens when several White-throated Sparrows sing together in dawn chorus? The effect is likely to be described differently by each listener. For many it might be described as a soundscape of eerie other-worldly birds. To the musically-trained ear it may induce cringing. And, while the sparrows in this recording are mostly singing in the background, their songs dominate the mood of this early morning chorus. Recorded around dawn at McMaster Forest, Hamilton, Ontario on May 4, 2019. Audio editing by Rob Porter. For more information, see http://hamiltonnature.org/songscapes
16:47
June 8, 2019
Interview With the Catbird
At 5:13 a.m. on May 31 of this year, a male Gray Catbird perched right in front of our field recorder and gave us a nine-minute "interview". The very next morning at nearly the exact same time, he give us another six minutes. Gray Catbirds are mimics -- males sing to impress potential mates with their diverse repertoire. Studies have found that catbirds with the highest number of different songs and calls are preferred for mating over less well-versed singers. While there are a wide variety of background singers in this recording, the catbird was so incredibly close to the recorder that they are merely a distant-sounding backdrop. This specific catbird's mimicry is limited to a mixture of harsh calls with short segments from other bird species songs and calls. There is a brief fade out & fade in between the two separate recordings. Recorded at McMaster Forest, in Hamilton, Ontario. Audio editing by Rob Porter. For more information, see http://hamiltonnature.org/songscapes
15:57
June 7, 2019
Redstarts of the Lake Huron Fringe
The American Redstart is an abundant and friendly warbler that can be found in deciduous forests and forest edges. It has a fairly simple and short warble, with a fairly wide range of variability in the song. In this soundscape, they are singing nearly constantly. This soundscape was recorded at MacGregor Point Provincial Park along the Old Shore Road Trail on May 19, 2019 using an iPhone with an Edutige EIM-001 omnidirectional microphone. This recording was done one week before the start of the annual Huron Fringe Birding Festival. Heard in this recording are: American Redstart, Black-throated Blue Warbler, Black-throated Green Warbler, Blackpoll Warbler, Yellow Warbler, Ovenbird, Yellow-rumped (Myrtle) Warbler, Black-and-white Warbler, Common Yellowthroat, Red-eyed Vireo, American Robin, American Goldfinch, Blue Jay, Black-capped Chickadee, American Crow, and more. Audio editing & recording: Rob Porter For more information, see http://hamiltonnature.org/songscapes
53:37
May 27, 2019
The "Variable" Warbler, Part 2: Golden-winged Warbler
Together the Blue-winged Warbler and Golden-winged Warbler form a species complex that isn't fully understood. Each species can breed with the other, and produce offspring hybrids that themselves can produce further offspring, leading to all kinds of variations in plumage. This unfortunately has lead to a competition that the Blue-winged Warbler is winning: it is "breeding out" the Golden-winged Warbler throughout much of its traditional range. In this part we hear the Golden-winged Warbler's "Bee-buzz-buzz-(buzz)" song, which sounds more like buzzing than warbling. This soundscape was recorded at MacGregor Point Provincial Park on May 19, 2019 using an iPhone with an Edutige EIM-001 omnidirectional microphone. Heard in this recording are: Golden-winged Warbler, White-throated Sparrow, Common Yellowthroat, Yellow Warbler, Least Flycatcher, Song Sparrow, Red-breasted Nuthatch, American Crow, American Robin, and more. Audio editing & recording: Rob Porter For more information, see http://hamiltonnature.org/songscapes
08:14
May 20, 2019
The "Variable" Warbler, Part 1: Blue-winged Warbler
Together the Blue-winged Warbler and Golden-winged Warbler form a species complex that isn't fully understood. Each species can breed with the other, and produce offspring hybrids that themselves can produce further offspring, leading to all kinds of variations in plumage. This unfortunately has lead to a competition that the Blue-winged Warbler is winning: it is "breeding out" the Golden-winged Warbler throughout much of its traditional range. In this part we hear the Blue-winged Warbler's respiratory-sounding "Bee-buzzzzz" song, which sounds more like buzzing than warbling. This soundscape was recorded at McMaster Forest in Hamilton, Ontario on May 11, 2019. Heard in this recording are: Blue-winged Warbler, Gray Catbird, Yellow Warbler, Chestnut-sided Warbler, Field Sparrow, American Goldfinch, Ovenbird, Song Sparrow, and more. Audio editing: Doug Welch, Rob Porter Audio sourced from the Hamilton Bioacoustics Research Project of the Hamilton Naturalists' Club. For more information, see http://hamiltonnature.org/songscapes
11:39
May 20, 2019
Winter Wren on a Summer Day
The Winter Wren can have one of the most lengthy continuous songs of all of Ontario's breeding birds, and is amongst one of the loudest in spite of its tiny size. This soundscape was recorded at Petrel Point Nature Preserve in Red Bay, Ontario in July of 2018. Heard in this recording: Winter Wren, Great-crested Flycatcher, Black-throated Green Warbler, American Redstart, Black-capped Chickadee, Northern Cardinal, White-breasted Nuthatch, American Robin, Common Grackle, Brown Creeper, Yellow Warbler, and more. Audio editing & recording: Rob Porter Audio sourced from the Hamilton Bioacoustics Research Project of the Hamilton Naturalists' Club. For more information, see http://hamiltonnature.org/songscapes
36:39
May 15, 2019
Arrival of the Northern Waterthrush
The Northern Waterthrush arrives late April in the Hamilton area, preferring swampy forested habitat. Its song is described as a loud and ringing warble, that accelerates into a jumble of quick notes. For the trained ear, it is similar to the related Yellow Warbler. This soundscape is derived from recordings made in the morning of April 25, 2019 at Hayesland Swamp Nature Sanctuary, Flamborough, Ontario. You will hear: American Robin, Northern Waterthrush, Wild Turkey, Song Sparrow, Red-bellied Woodpecker, Downy Woodpecker, Hairy Woodpecker, American Crow, White-breasted Nuthatch, Black-capped Chickadee, Brown Creeper, Red-winged Blackbird, Brown-headed Cowbird, Rusty Blackbird (very briefly), Northern Flicker, Canada Goose. Audio editing: Rob Porter Audio sourced from the Hamilton Bioacoustics Research Project of the Hamilton Naturalists' Club. For more information, see http://hamiltonnature.org/songscapes
26:36
May 9, 2019
Songs of the Spring Floods
In 2019, the Hamilton Naturalists' Club acquired a new property in the Upper Hayesland Swamp, known now as the Hayesland Swamp Nature Sanctuary. It is a flooded forest in the spring, providing habitat to many wetland wildlife species. This soundscape opens with harsh song of the wood frog (Lithobates sylvaticus), and as the morning progresses the soft and airy songs of the Winter Wren and Brown Creeper are heard. A lone Wood Duck makes a "splash" part way through. You will hear: Wood frog, chorus frog (background), Winter Wren, Brown Creeper, Song Sparrow, Wood Duck. Taken from recordings of the morning of April 9, 2019. Audio editing: Rob Porter Audio sourced from the Hamilton Bioacoustics Research Project of the Hamilton Naturalists' Club. For more information, visit http://hamiltonnature.org/songscapes
18:17
May 2, 2019
Whip-poor-will
A short recording that includes the song of the Eastern Whip-poor-will. This species is now only heard and seen in the Hamilton area during migration, as the local breeding populations have all collapsed. To hear one sing, you need to be up at night or at dawn during the brief migration window as they are a nocturnal bird. This song was a pleasant surprise discovery in our recordings. This recording begins at 5:41 a.m., April 24, 2019 at McMaster Forest in Ancaster, Ontario. Heard singing, calling, or both in this recording: Eastern Whip-poor-will, American Woodcock, Song Sparrow, Northern Cardinal, Field Sparrow, Eastern Towhee, Black-capped Chickadee. Editing by Doug Welch and Rob Porter. Audio sourced from the Hamilton Bioacoustics Research Project of the Hamilton Naturalists' Club. For more information, visit http://hamiltonnature.org/songscapes
06:42
April 28, 2019
Early Spring Dawnsong at McMaster Forest
This urban recording begins at dawn with the wind-down of the outlandish nocturnal mating calls ("peents") and display of the American Woodcock. Next comes the Song Sparrow and Northern Cardinal as the light grows. Finally, the Field Sparrows and Eastern Towhee begin their songs. Of the songbirds of the Hamilton area, these represent a mix of early migrants and year-round resident species. This soundscape was edited from recordings of the morning of April 10, 2019 at McMaster Forest in Ancaster, Ontario. This was the very first day the Eastern Towhee was heard singing at McMaster Forest on recording, which presumably means this species arrived overnight as a nocturnal migrant from more southern climes. Note that this location is urban, located between the communities of Dundas, Ancaster, and West Hamilton. The most prominent anthropogenic background noise is the 403 Highway and nearby train line. This soundscape has been lightly edited to reduce this noise. Heard singing, calling, or both in this episode: American Woodcock, Song Sparrow, Northern Cardinal, Field Sparrow, Eastern Towhee, Carolina Wren, American Crow, Canada Goose, American Goldfinch, Red-bellied Woodpecker, Common Grackle, Ring-billed Gull, Red-winged Blackbird. Audio editing by Rob Porter Audio sourced from the Hamilton Bioacoustics Research Project of the Hamilton Naturalists' Club. More specifically, this recording comes from one continuous recording started early March going through mid-May to capture the arrival dates of breeding songbirds. For more information, visit http://hamiltonnature.org/songscapes
37:48
April 25, 2019
Edge Habitat
Birds can be most abundant along "edge" habitats--between one discrete habitat and another. Here you will hear a mix of urban birds--Northern Cardinal, Blue Jay, Mourning Dove--along with the boreal species Yellow-rumped Warbler and a lakeside Song Sparrow. This soundscape was recorded close to a small road that divides ancient cedar forest from lake in a cottage setting. Recorded at Isthmus Bay, Georgian Bay, Ontario, Canada in July 2018. Audio editing: Rob Porter Audio sourced from the Hamilton Bioacoustics Research Project of the Hamilton Naturalists' Club. For more information, see http://hamiltonnature.org/songscapes
16:07
April 20, 2019
Many Questions
The Red-eyed Vireo is known for its repetitive song, which can sound like a loop of questions and answers. They sing throughout the summer in forests across Eastern North America, even in the hot afternoons. You may also hear a warbler or two as well... Recorded on July 19, 2018 at Otter Lake, on the Saugeen (Bruce) Peninsula, Ontario, Canada. Audio editing: Rob Porter Audio sourced from the Hamilton Bioacoustics Research Project of the Hamilton Naturalists' Club. For more information, see http://hamiltonnature.org/songscapes
22:54
April 19, 2019
The Song Dogs of Winter
Throughout the winter, we have recorded many Eastern Coyotes, also known as the "song dogs". This is a collection of coyote choruses in multiple locations near Hamilton, Ontario throughout the winter of 2019. Audio editing: Rob Porter Audio sourced from the Hamilton Bioacoustics Research Project of the Hamilton Naturalists' Club. Original raw recordings are available under Creative Commons license at archive.org. For more information, see http://hamiltonnature.org/songscapes
08:03
April 14, 2019
A Dusk Duet of Great Horned Owls
A duet of Great Horned Owls in courtship. One continuous recording of a single interaction between a likely mated pair. Note that as it begins the second owl is quite far away and quiet, and as the interaction progresses, the second owl gets much closer. By the end they are "singing" together.

 Taken from field recordings of the Short Hills Nature Sanctuary in Pelham, Ontario, Canada on March 1, 2019 at dusk. This is a continuous recording with no clipping, though some adjustments to sound frequencies were made for better clarity. Audio provided by the Hamilton Bioacoustics Research Project & Hamilton Naturalists' Club Original raw recordings are available under Creative Commons license at archive.org. For more information, see http://hamiltonnature.org/songscapes
09:19
April 13, 2019
April Morningsong
A continuous soundscape of morning field recordings from the Vinemount Meadows Nature Sanctuary in Vinemount, Ontario, Canada on April 7, 2019. Mildly edited to remove louder anthrogenic sounds. You will continually hear: Song Sparrow, 
Red-winged Blackbird, and American Robin Also present from time to time: 
Mallard (or American Black Duck)
, Canada Goose, Ring-billed Gull, Herring Gull, White-throated Sparrow, European Starling, Northern Cardinal, Savannah Sparrow, Common Grackle, Blue Jay, 
American Crow, Downy Woodpecker
, Eastern Meadowlark, Brown-headed Cowbird
, Red Squirrel, Golden-crowned Kinglet, Dark-eyed Junco, and Winter Wren. Audio sourced from the Hamilton Bioacoustics Research Project & Hamilton Naturalists' Club Audio editing: Rob Porter
 The original raw field recordings are available under Creative Commons license at archive.org. For more information, see http://hamiltonnature.org/songscapes
26:14
April 13, 2019
The Chorus Frogs of Vinemount
A continuous soundscape of nocturnal field recordings from the Vinemount Meadows Nature Sanctuary in Vinemount, Ontario, Canada in the very early hours of April 7, 2019. Mildly edited to remove louder anthrogenic sounds. You will continually hear Chorus Frogs. You will occasionally hear: 
Mallard or American Black Duck
, Canada Goose, and Great Horned Owl (very, very quietly). You might also very briefly hear: Killdeer, Wilson's Snipe, 
and American Tree Sparrow. From the Hamilton Bioacoustics Research Project & Hamilton Naturalists' Club. Audio editing: Rob Porter
 Original raw field recordings are available under Creative Commons license at archive.org. For more information, see http://hamiltonnature.org/songscapes
40:38
April 12, 2019