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Tacoma Historical Society

Tacoma Historical Society

By Tacoma Historical Society
It's our mission to collect, document, and share the unique history of Tacoma, Washington — and our passion to share it with you. At Tacoma Historical Society, we forge connections between generations, foster an appreciation for the past, and cultivate a sense of place within our community.
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Happy Birthday, House!
In honor of Preservation Month, join THS Communications Manager Kim Davenport as she celebrates the 100th birthday of her home, the Gray House in Tacoma's Lincoln District. In addition to learning the interesting history of the man who built the home and seeing some of the home's architectural details, Kim will also share her story of learning to use local research tools to uncover the home's history. Kim is joined by Spencer Bowman, Northwest Room librarian for Tacoma Public Libraries, and Susan Johnson, Historic Preservation Coordinator for the City of Tacoma, to share resources that are available to anyone interested in learning more about the history of an historic Tacoma home or property. With thanks to Tacoma Creates for support of our public programming.
26:22
May 10, 2022
Grit City Stories: America's Car Museum
Joe Bomar interviews Paul Miller about the origins of Tacoma's own "America's Car Museum."
28:33
April 25, 2022
Grit City Stories: Brown & Haley
Joe Bomar interviews Kathi Rennaker, Director of Marketing for Brown & Haley Candy Co., and self-appointed B&H historian.
39:23
April 18, 2022
Grit City Stories: 62nd Airlift Wing
Joe Bomar interviews local historian Erin Lasley about the 62nd Air Lift Wing at McChord.
38:48
April 14, 2022
April 2022 Virtual Meeting: Claiming Space
Claiming Space: The Bricks That Lay Our Foundation In conjunction with our new exhibit, Finding Home: LGBTQ+ Communities in Tacoma, THS Communications Manager Kim Davenport interviews Diversity Alliance of the Puget Sound board members Oliver Webb and Skye Locke about their organization's history and work in the community.
01:10:33
April 12, 2022
Grit City Stories: McChord History
Joe Bomar interviews local historian Erin Lasley about the history of McChord Air Force Base (now part of JBLM).
38:25
April 11, 2022
Grit City Stories: Fircrest History
Joe Bomar interviews Fircrest resident Blake Surina about the history of Fircrest.
38:10
April 07, 2022
Grit City Stories: D.B. Cooper
Joe Bomar interviews local historian Erin Lasley about D.B. Cooper, the mysterious unidentified man who hijacked a Boeing 727 aircraft in 1971.
26:15
April 04, 2022
Grit City Stories: Gather - 27 Years of Hilltop Artists at TAM
Joe Bomar interviews Trenton Quiocho, curator of the new exhibit at Tacoma Art Museum, GATHER: 27 Years of Hilltop Artists, which runs March 26 - September 4, 2022 For more information about the exhibit: https://www.tacomaartmuseum.org/exhibit/gather-27-years-of-hilltop-artists/
08:55
March 30, 2022
Grit City Stories: Tacoma Art Museum History
Joe Bomar interviews Margaret Bullock, Chief Curator of Tacoma Art Museum, about the history of TAM.
25:55
March 30, 2022
March 2022 Virtual Meeting: New Salishan - Celebrating 20 Years
For our March 2022 Virtual Meeting, we are honored to share an interview with Michael Mirra, recently retired as executive director of Tacoma Housing Authority. As we prepare to celebrate the 20th anniversary of the New Salishan project at our upcoming Destiny Dinner on April 2, this interview is an excellent opportunity to learn more about the history behind the original Salishan development during World War II and the award-winning redevelopment of New Salishan which began in 2002. For more information about the Destiny Dinner, visit: www.tacomahistory.org/destiny-dinner
43:42
March 15, 2022
Passing the Torch: Origins of the UPS BSU
Tacoma Historical Society is honored to share this interview featuring Lou Smith, the first president of the Black Student Union at the University of Puget Sound, which, at its inception in 1967, was the first BSU established in the state of Washington. Current UPS students Kellen Hagans and Serena Sevasin interview Mr. Smith and THS board president Bill Baarsma, who worked with the first BSU leaders at UPS in his role as acting coordinator of the Black Studies program.
54:55
March 01, 2022
February 2022 Virtual Meeting: Exploring Black History in Tacoma
Join Tacoma Historical Society for our February 2022 virtual meeting, when in honor of Black History Month we will share a sampling of stories from Tacoma's Black History from our own research and exhibits. We hope the presentation will inspire you to continue exploring the deep and rich history of black lives in our community. 
05:39
February 28, 2022
Grit City Stories: Buffelen Lumber Company
Joe Bomar interviews John Buffelen Haley about the Buffelen Lumber Company and its role in building early Tacoma.
30:28
February 21, 2022
Grit City Stories: Museum of Glass
Joe Bomar visited the Museum of Glass and spoke with MoG curator Katie Buckingham about the origins of the museum and its role in the revitalization of downtown Tacoma.  Learn more about the Museum of Glass on their website: https://www.museumofglass.org/
27:01
February 14, 2022
Grit City Stories: Foss Waterway Seaport
Joe Bomar visits the Foss Waterway Seaport and talks with Julia Berg, Director of Education, about the Seaport facility and the fascinating exhibits on display there. Learn more about the Foss Waterway Seaport on their website: https://fosswaterwayseaport.org/
41:42
February 07, 2022
January 2022 THS Meeting: Pretty Gritty History
For our January 2022 virtual meeting, THS Communications Manager Kim Davenport interviews Pretty Gritty Tours founder Chris Staudinger about some of his favorite stories from Tacoma history.
29:24
January 27, 2022
Grit City Stories: Bill Baarsma
Joe Bomar interviews Tacoma Historical Society board president and former Tacoma mayor Bill Baarsma about his time in office.
44:39
December 17, 2021
Grit City Stories: Family Flight History with John Buffelen Haley
Joe Bomar sits down again with John Buffelen Haley, this time for a discussion of some stories from his family's connections to local aviation history.
25:31
December 10, 2021
Grit City Stories: Spooky Tacoma with Chris Staudinger
Joe Bomar chats with Gritty City Tours founder Chris Staudinger about some spooky stories from Tacoma's past.
33:09
December 03, 2021
November 2021 THS Meeting: Among the First to France: Camp Lewis in 1917
Tacoma Historical Society's November 2021 virtual meeting, in honor of Veterans Day, features Donald Christian, retired United States Air Force Veteran.  Christian's resume includes TV/Video Producer, Investigative Researcher, Historical Archivist, WW1 Historian, and Public Speaker. He is the proud son of WW1 Veteran AEF Engineer Ernest Earle Christian. Don has written a book about WW1 and the first AEF Engineers to arrive in France in August 1917.  Christian's presentation for Tacoma Historical Society will place his father's time at Camp Lewis into his larger story of service, with a focus on some of his father's collection of photographs from WWI, which have never been shared before. His intimate and historical photo archive presents a new personal side that the U. S. AEF troops brought to the war effort, both here and overseas in France.  This multi-media lecture tells the story of the vital construction work done by the US American Expeditionary Force and the 18th Engineers Regiment in WW1. AEF Engineer Ernest Earle Christian was among the first American engineers to arrive in France in late August of 1917. He was among the 1,700 handpicked Pacific Coast Engineers who were tasked with building a 10-berth, 4,100’ dock and railroad infrastructure at Bassens, France. This American base and dock supply depot’s location was important as it allowed the US to quickly move AEF troops and supplies to the French war front. It was built in record time, over existing lowland mudflats, and with minimal equipment, tools and supplies. View on our YouTube Channel to see photographs shared in the presentation.
26:12
November 09, 2021
Grit City Stories: John Buffelen Haley
Joe Bomar interviews John Buffelen Haley, who shares stories from his family's long history in Tacoma.
34:41
October 14, 2021
October 2021 THS Meeting: The Wind Will Not Stop
THS Communications Manager Kim Davenport interviews Judy Carlson Hulbert, author of the new book, The Wind Will Not Stop. The Wind Will Not Stop, the first book published by the Chinese Reconciliation Park Foundation, addresses the topic of the expulsion of Chinese residents from Tacoma in 1885 in a way that is accessible to younger readers. The author achieves this by making the Chinese expulsion the backdrop to a story about a young boy who sees his Chinese neighbors forcibly removed from town. With thanks to Tacoma Creates for support of our public programs.
33:29
October 12, 2021
Back to School with Tacoma Historical Society
As the 2021-2022 school year begins, Tacoma Historical Society shares several ways in which teachers and students of all ages can get involved with Tacoma Historical Society - learning through exploring local history!
05:57
September 14, 2021
September 2021 THS Meeting: Wicked Tacoma: Crime in Tacoma 1850-1950
September 2021 virtual meeting, with featured speaker Karla Stover, author of the recent book, Wicked Tacoma. Tacoma, the city where the rails meet the sails, has always been a place of innovation and rule-breakers. When the railroad came in the nineteenth century, business boomed, along with smuggling, bootlegging and prostitution. Men such as Peter Sandberg walked the line between criminal and respectable. Police in the growing town had their hands full not just with human criminals, but with stray cows, ducks and the occasional bear. Rumor has it that in the 1920s, gangsters Lucky Luciano and Frank Nitti were sent to cool their heels in the port city and may have been behind a smoke bomb attack on a movie theater. Join author Karla Stover as she delves into the wild and colorful past of the City of Destiny.  ***   With thanks to Tacoma Creates for support of our public programs.
45:14
September 14, 2021
August 2021 THS Meeting: Dickman Mill Headsaw Project
Metro Parks Tacoma historian and Planning and Asset Management Administrator Claire Keller-Scholz spoke on the recent Dickman Mill Park project, sharing the history of the site and the process through which the Tacoma Landmark head saw has at long last been restored to its original waterfront location. She will discuss the significance of the head saw to lumber history in Tacoma, and walk us through the stages of park development as the mill site was transformed from burned out rubble to a welcoming natural shoreline habitat and recreation space over the past thirty years. *** With thanks to Tacoma Creates for support of our public programming.
47:02
August 10, 2021
July 2021 THS Meeting: Tacoma Narrows Bridge
On Monday, July 12, 2021, Tacoma Historical Society hosted our first in-person meeting in more than a year. The featured speaker was Donald Tjossem, whose latest book for Arcadia Publishing's Images of America Series, "Tacoma Narrows Bridge," has just been released. For those who were not able to attend in person, we are pleased to share the audio from that evening's presentation.
54:18
July 19, 2021
Homewaters Author Interview
THS Communications Manager Kim Davenport interviews David B. Williams, author of the new book Homewaters, now available from University of Washington Press. Not far from Seattle skyscrapers live 150-year-old clams, more than 250 species of fish, and underwater kelp forests as complex as any terrestrial ecosystem. For millennia, vibrant Coast Salish communities have lived beside these waters dense with nutrient-rich foods, with cultures intertwined through exchanges across the waterways. Transformed by settlement and resource extraction, Puget Sound and its future health now depend on a better understanding of the region’s ecological complexities. Focusing on the area south of Port Townsend and between the Cascade and Olympic mountains, Williams uncovers human and natural histories in, on, and around the Sound. In conversations with archaeologists, biologists, and tribal authorities, Williams traces how generations of humans have interacted with such species as geoducks, salmon, orcas, rockfish, and herring. He sheds light on how warfare shaped development and how people have moved across this maritime highway, in canoes, the mosquito fleet, and today’s ferry system. The book also takes an unflinching look at how the Sound’s ecosystems have suffered from human behavior, including pollution, habitat destruction, and the effects of climate change. With thanks to Tacoma Creates for support of our public programming.
26:55
June 15, 2021
Sounds of our City: Twenty-One Musical Tales from Tacoma History
"Sounds of our City: Twenty-One Musical Tales from Tacoma History," written by Kim Davenport. Audiobook read by the author. Author's Note: Music is universal. Styles may change with time and place, but human beings have always created music for personal expression, communication, and entertainment. Music, therefore, can serve as a lens through which to explore history. What type of music did people make when, and why? The twenty-one stories in this book do not necessarily represent the most famous or successful musicians ever to create music in Tacoma. They do not give us a comprehensive understanding of any particular musical genre. Rather, they teach us more about the history of the city we live in, through exploring the lives of musicians who were in one way or another shaped by Tacoma. Music clips in the order in which they are heard: "Tacoma: The Rose of the West" (1910), performed by Drew Shipman and Kim Davenport. "You'll Like Tacoma" (1909), performed by Drew Shipman and Kim Davenport. Samuel Coleridge-Taylor: "Pilgrim's Song," Op.59 No.20 (1905), performed by Kim Davenport.
01:17:59
May 27, 2021
Tacoma Opera
UW Tacoma student David Derouin discusses the history of Tacoma Opera with someone who knows it intimately, Lisa Ingraham. She has been the opera’s orchestra manager for about two decades and also serves as a violinist. David produced this podcast episode as an assignment in the UW Tacoma class “Musical History of Tacoma,” taught by Kim Davenport in Winter Quarter 2021. 
20:00
April 16, 2021
Becoming Nisei
For our April 2021 virtual meeting, THS Communications Manager Kim Davenport interviews UW Tacoma faculty members Dr. Lisa Hoffman and Dr. Mary Hanneman about their new book, Becoming Nisei: Japanese American Urban Lives in Prewar Tacoma.   Tacoma’s vibrant Nihonmachi of the 1920s and '30s was home to a significant number of first generation Japanese immigrants and their second generation American children, and these families formed tight-knit bonds despite their diverse religious, prefectural, and economic backgrounds. As the city’s Nisei grew up attending the secular Japanese Language School, they absorbed the Meiji-era cultural practices and ethics of the previous generation. At the same time, they positioned themselves in new and dynamic ways, including resisting their parents and pursuing lives that diverged from traditional expectations.   Becoming Nisei, based on more than forty interviews, shares stories of growing up in Japanese American Tacoma before the incarceration. Recording these early twentieth-century lives counteracts the structural forgetting and erasure of prewar histories in both Tacoma and many other urban settings after World War II. Lisa Hoffman and Mary Hanneman underscore both the agency of Nisei in these processes as well as their negotiations of prevailing social and power relations.   The book is available for purchase in the THS Museum Store, located at 406 Tacoma Avenue S, open from 11am-3pm, Wednesday-Saturday.  ***  With thanks to Tacoma Creates for support of our public programming.
01:05:22
April 13, 2021
Exploring Tacoma's Nihonmachi
In conversation with his wife Dahlia, UW Tacoma student Jonathan Ohashi shares his research into Tacoma’s Nihonmachi (Japantown), with a specific mention of the music that would have been experienced by Tacoma’s pre-war Japanese-American population.  Jonathan produced this podcast episode as an assignment in the UW Tacoma class “Musical History of Tacoma,” taught by Kim Davenport in Winter Quarter 2021. The podcast is dedicated to Jonathan’s Japanese immigrant grandmother, who was lost to COVID in March 2020. Jonathan utilized the following resources in conducting his research: Hoffman, M. Lisa, and Mary L. Hanneman. Becoming Nisei. University of Washington Press, 2021. May, Elizabeth. “The Influence of the Meiji Period on Japanese Children's Music.” Journal of Research in Music Education, vol. 13, no. 2, 1965, pp. 110–120. JSTOR, www.jstor.org/stable/3344448. Accessed 08 Mar. 2021. Nimura, Tamiko. “Tacoma Neighborhoods: Japantown (Nihonmachi) – Thumbnail History” HistoryLink.26, Oct. 2016, https://historylink.org/File/20177. Temple History. Tacoma Buddhist Temple. 10, Mar. 2020, https://www.tacomabt.org/history/. Wadland, Justin. “Tacoma Buddhist Temple” HistoryLink. 16, Nov. 2018, https://historylink.org/File/20668. Wadland, Justin, and Tamiko Nimura. “Tacoma Buddhist Temple” HistoryLink. 16, Nov. 2018, https://historylink.org/File/20668.
20:57
March 23, 2021
Telling the Stories of our Lives
Join us for our March 2021 virtual meeting as we host a conversation between writer Anthea Karanasos Hubanks and retiree and book artist An Gates. THS Communications Manager Kim Davenport will interview the two women about their recent experience with capturing and sharing An's oral history, as part of the "Telling the Stories of our Lives" project. Learn more about Hubanks' oral history project, and An's life story, by visiting our Tales of Tacoma blog, where we have shared several oral histories resulting from the project. Tune in right here, on our YouTube Channel, or on our Facebook page to watch the broadcast on Monday, March 8 at 7pm. *** With thanks to Tacoma Creates for support of our public programming.
31:33
March 09, 2021
Black Voices from Tacoma's Musical Past
In this presentation, THS Communications Manager and Tacoma music historian Kim Davenport shares stories of black musicians from Tacoma's past who left an important legacy in our city. Some made Tacoma home while others were merely guests for a time, but all added to the artistic vitality of our community while confronting the realities of discrimination.  Presented in partnership between the Tacoma Public Library and Tacoma Historical Society, with support from Tacoma Creates.
47:08
February 21, 2021
A Pioneering Spirit: A Conversation with Artist Dionne Bonner
Join us for our February 2021 virtual meeting, as we share a conversation with artist Dionne Bonner. Bonner's exhibit, "A Pioneering Spirit: A Fight for Liberty and Freedom," is currently on display in our Tacoma Historical Society museum. The exhibit features oil paintings and biographical information which bring to life the journey of a handful of African American pioneers who fought tirelessly for liberty for their community in spite of their situations. For Bonner, these historical accounts encouraged her at a pivotal time in her life when she needed to see examples of strength and agency reflected in her community. Bonner joins THS Communications Manager Kim Davenport for a conversation about her work. 
26:52
February 09, 2021
Earthwise & Second Use: Salvage Stories
The City of Tacoma Historic Preservation Office presents Virtual Heritage Cafe: Broadening Horizons in Historic Preservation. Co-sponsored by Tacoma Historical Society and Historic Tacoma, with thanks to Tacoma Creates for its support of their public events. In this episode of the Virtual Heritage Cafe series, Aaron Blanchard of Earthwise Architectural Salvage and Amanda Harryman of Second Use Building Materials share stories from their work in architectural salvage.
59:24
January 25, 2021
Preserving What Matters: Building A More Inclusive Practice
The City of Tacoma Historic Preservation Office presents Virtual Heritage Cafe: Broadening Horizons in Historic Preservation. Co-sponsored by Tacoma Historical Society and Historic Tacoma, with thanks to Tacoma Creates for its support of their public events. In January of 2020, the National Register of Historic Places shared that, of the more than 95,000 entries on the list, only 2% of those places focus on the experiences of Black Americans. The follow-up question is usually "Well, how do we fix that?" but perhaps we need to start with a different set of questions. In this conversation, Jackie will share examples of work she has done to support and broaden the reach of preservation work. She will also share some ideas for where to begin, and a series of questions that may be helpful for discussing in participants' organizations and workplaces. Jackie is an independent museum consultant with a focus on exhibit development, curation and writing for history museums, historic sites and other cultural institutions. With over twelve years of exhibits experience, she has worked nationally with museums, communities and stakeholders to uncover and illuminate meaningful stories to create authentic, truthful and enlightening exhibitions. Jackie leverages the power of language and narrative to create exhibitions that attest to the nuances of our human experience, spark conversation and bring people together. Much of Jackie’s independent work has focused on storytelling through exhibitions highlighting the experiences and lives of African Americans in Washington State. Prior to pursuing an independent consulting career, Jackie served as a content developer and coordinator at the exhibition design firm Ralph Appelbaum Associates Inc. in New York. Jackie is passionate about equity in the museum field and grounds her work in the framework of diversity, access, equity and inclusion (DEAI). She serves on the steering committee for Museums & Race, an initiative that seeks equity and justice for people of color in the museum field.
01:11:50
December 20, 2020
Beneath our Streets
Dave Mylet's Digital History elective at Tacoma's School of Industrial Design, Engineering and Arts (IDEA) gives students the chance to explore local history through hands-on, project-based curriculum. Their first project as a class was to research, script and record a podcast episode for the Tacoma Historical Society. In this episode, Dylan O'Catherine explores the true story behind the legend of Tacoma's "Shanghai Tunnels." Dylan O'Catherine is a 17 year old senior at iDEA High School. They enjoy music art, and memes - which are an art form in Dylan's opinion.
11:48
December 16, 2020
Falling into History
Tamiko Nimura, a third-generation Japanese American and second-generation Filipina American, is a freelance writer, essayist, community journalist, and public historian. She has degrees from UC Berkeley (BA) and the University of Washington (MA, PhD). Her academic training in literature and American ethnic studies prepared her for her current projects in storytelling, biography, arts writing, public history, social justice, and community service. She is the author of ROSA FRANKLIN: A LIFE IN HEALTH CARE, PUBLIC SERVICE, AND SOCIAL JUSTICE (Washington State Legislature Oral History Program, 2020) and has written several articles for HistoryLink on Tacoma’s Japanese American history. Other past projects include a tour of Japanese American farms on Vashon Island (RevisitWA.org). She is co-writing a graphic novel called WE HEREBY REFUSE: JAPANESE AMERICAN ACTS OF WARTIME RESISTANCE (Chin Music Press, 2021). Tamiko lives with her composer husband Josh Parmenter and their two daughters in Tacoma. This episode is part of the Virtual Heritage Cafe Series: Broadening Horizons in Historic Preservation, presented by the City of Tacoma Historic Preservation Office, and co-sponsored by Tacoma Historical Society and Historic Tacoma, with thanks to Tacoma Creates for its support of their public programs.
57:52
December 16, 2020
Aliens Were Invented in 1947
Dave Mylet's Digital History elective at Tacoma's School of Industrial Design, Engineering and Arts (IDEA) gives students the chance to explore local history through hands-on, project-based curriculum. Their first project as a class was to research, script and record a podcast episode for the Tacoma Historical Society. In this episode Bria Gold explores Tacoma's role in the UFO craze of the mid-20th century. Bria is a senior at IDEA High School who enjoys art, aliens and herbal teas. You might find her lurking at your local pond with some silkworms and a funny hat. An amateur podcaster, but a professional at being a cool gal.
13:50
December 15, 2020
William Rust
Dave Mylet's Digital History elective at Tacoma's School of Industrial Design, Engineering and Arts (IDEA) gives students the chance to explore local history through hands-on, project-based curriculum. Their first project as a class was to research, script and record a podcast episode for the Tacoma Historical Society. In this episode Jessica Christiansen explores William Rust and the Rust Mansion. Jessica enjoys painting and being outdoors. She has two pet guinea pigs who are the best. Her ultimate career goal is to become a general contractor and become one of the best in the business.
07:37
December 15, 2020
The Jake Bird Hex
Dave Mylet's Digital History elective at Tacoma's School of Industrial Design, Engineering and Arts (IDEA) gives students the chance to explore local history through hands-on, project-based curriculum. Their first project as a class was to research, script and record a podcast episode for the Tacoma Historical Society. In this episode Trinity Brigham explores the crimes, trial and curse of train-hopping murderer Jake Byrd. Trinity Brigham was born and raised in Tacoma. She is the oldest of three sisters. They are into the paranormal, crime, the supernatural, and are also geeks for many tv shows. She is a currently a senior at IDEA high school.
09:44
October 30, 2020
The Arts & Crafts Movement in the PNW
Please join us as Lawrence Kreisman shares the rich history of the Arts and Crafts movement in Washington and Oregon. Driven by the need to simplify our lives and surroundings during the fast-moving industrial and commercial growth period at the turn of the 20th century, a design celebration of grace, simplicity and comfort was born in the Arts and Crafts movement. From homes to jewelry, this influence is found in objects both public and private. Local artisans in the Pacific Northwest contributed to this rich heritage making furniture, metalwork, ceramics, and stained glass to fill Bungalow, Craftsman, and Mission style residences throughout the Pacific Northwest. Lawrence Kreisman co-founded and directed the Seattle Architecture Foundation tour program from 1990-2003. He served as Program Director of Historic Seattle for 20 years, developing tours, lectures, and special events, including a long-running Bungalow Fair and Arts and Crafts lecture series. He is the author of many articles and books on regional architecture and preservation. This lecture is based upon his 2007 publication, co-authored with Glenn Mason. Their exhibition, organized by the Museum of History & Industry in 2009, traveled to Tacoma, Spokane, and Bellingham for two years. This episode is part of the Virtual Heritage Cafe Series: Broadening Horizons in Historic Preservation, presented by the City of Tacoma Historic Preservation Office, and co-sponsored by Tacoma Historical Society and Historic Tacoma, with thanks to Tacoma Creates for its support of their public programs.
01:08:07
October 21, 2020
Twulshootseed Language Revitalization in the Puyallup Tribal Community
Over the past 6 years, the Puyallup Tribe of Indians has valued and supported the Twulshootseed language revitalization efforts made by the Puyallup Tribal Language Program. This presentation will include the journey of the Language Program staff as they’ve serviced the Puyallup Tribal community through: Twulshootseed language use, language nesting, conversation, public speaking, working in the Tribal school and daycare, hosting storytelling nights and incorporating Twulshootseed into everyday life.   Amber Hayward is a Puyallup Tribal member, a descendant of the Confederated Salish & Kootenai Tribe and African American. She holds a Bachelor’s Degree in Native American Studies from the Reservation Based Community Determined Program at the Evergreen State College. She lives on the Puyallup Tribal reservation with her three children, and has worked for her people for over 15 years. Amber spent approximately 8 years working in the Puyallup Tribal Historic Preservation Department, sharing the history of her tribe with the community and schools. She then transferred to the Language Program as a Language Instructor, where she now holds the title of Program Director and works with an amazing staff. It brings her much joy to serve the Puyallup Tribal Community through txʷəlšucid use, material production, song, dance, storytelling and many other community events.  To learn more about the Puyallup Tribal Language Program, visit www.puyalluptriballanguage.org.  Tacoma Historical Society is proud to co-sponsor the Virtual Heritage Cafe: Broadening Horizons in Historic Preservation. Co-sponsored by the City of Tacoma Office of Historic Preservation and Historic Tacoma.  With thanks to Tacoma Creates for its support of our public events, funding has also been provided by Humanities Washington as part of the Coronavirus Aid, Relief and Economic Security (CARES) Act economic stabilization plan of 2020.
01:06:43
October 20, 2020
Speaking Out: Twenty-One of Tacoma's Social Justice and Civil Rights Champions
"Speaking Out: Twenty-One of Tacoma's Social Justice and Civil Rights Champions" was written by Katherine Dorr, with research and editorial support from Tacoma Historical Society staff and volunteers. This audiobook version is read by Bill Baarsma and Kim Davenport. This book is part of our '21 Tales' series, books which are intended to share important stories from Tacoma history with students in local schools. The book was published in conjunction with our 2017-2018 exhibit "Dreams That Matter", which was funded by a grant from the Puyallup Tribe of Indians. The printing of copies for use in Tacoma classrooms was made possible by generous support from KeyBank. For more information about this book and other educational resources related to the struggle for civil rights and social justice in Tacoma, visit: https://www.tacomahistory.org/ths-press
01:28:24
June 12, 2020
Leading Ladies: Twenty-One of Tacoma's Women of Destiny
"Leading Ladies: 21 of Tacoma's Women of Destiny," written by Deb Freedman, Michael Ann Konek, and Tacoma Historical Society. Audiobook read by Deb Freedman. Author's Note: We love Tacoma. We love its history, buildings and people. Most of all we love Tacoma's stories. But many history stories are just that, "his story." We think it's time to start telling her story. This book honors twenty-one of the many women who have played a role in the history of Tacoma, Washington: The City of Destiny. For more information about this and other titles from Tacoma Historical Society Press, visit www.tacomahistory.org/ths-press
01:14:45
June 11, 2020
Rising Up From Tacoma's Twenty-One Disasters and Defeats
"Rising Up From Tacoma's Twenty-One Disasters and Defeats," written by Deb Freedman and Tacoma Historical Society, read by Deb Freedman. Author's Note: These stories cover a wide variety of topics, from relatively minor defeats to major disasters and tragedies. Several depict poor treatment of animals and even worse treatment of racial minorities. They are not meant for children to read alone, but as a means for starting conversations and learning. The topics in this book were selected by 2012-2013 students of Seabury Middle School, and are not intended to rank as Tacoma’s top twenty-one disasters. That list would likely include the loss of Native American lands or the hanging of Chief Leschi. I feel strongly that those subjects deserve a book - and a perspective - of their own. For more information about this and other titles from Tacoma Historical Society Press, visit www.tacomahistory.org/ths-press
58:50
June 10, 2020