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Teaching Matters Edinburgh

Teaching Matters Edinburgh

By Teaching Matters

Teaching Matters Edinburgh, created by the University of Edinburgh, complements the University's Teaching Matters blog. We invite students and staff to engage in topical conversations, both debating and celebrating aspects of Higher Education.
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Student Mental Health & Online Engagement Part 2

Teaching Matters Edinburgh

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Guy Fletcher & Marc Geddes (Teaching Awards series)
Guy Fletcher & Marc Geddes (Teaching Awards series)
In this episode, we hear from senior lecturers Guy Fletcher at the School of Philosophy and Marc Geddes at the School of Politics, who share good practice by examining the successes and challenges of their student-nominated courses at The University of Edinburgh. This is the third episode of our Teaching Awards series, which features reflective conversations between nominees from the 13th Annual Teaching Awards, held by the Edinburgh University Students' Association.  Timestamps: 1:28 – Guy and Marc introduce themselves and their research topics 3:30 – The two outline their respective courses, considering in particular ways to make 'dry' concepts more compelling 9:53 – Guy and Marc assess the way their teaching has evolved over the course of the pandemic 15:21 – The two speakers discuss what their students were most able to take away from their courses 21:42 – Our nominees conclude by reflecting on why they believe their courses were nominated for Teaching Awards Transcript. Music for this episode was provided by Hooksounds.
27:44
November 03, 2022
UNCOVERing good evidence reviews
UNCOVERing good evidence reviews
In this final uncovering UNCOVER podcast episode, Ruth McQuillan and Marshall Dozier both core members of UNCOVER, describe key features of a good evidence review, and provide tips to novice reviewers on how to create a good evidence review. Madhurima Nundy, an UNCOVER Reviewer, shares her experience collaborating with staff in a review team, and what challenges she faced. Music in this episode is provided by hooksounds. 
32:55
July 25, 2022
UNCOVERing student and staff support
UNCOVERing student and staff support
In this episode, Neneh Rowa-Dewar UNCOVER’s student-staff liaison, and Thulani Ashcroft and Udani DE Silva both UNCOVER Reviewers, each discuss their roles in UNCOVER. Neneh highlights how students are supported in UNCOVER and how this support benefits students. Thulani and Udani describe how UNCOVER’s resources has benefited them. Music for this episode is provided by hooksounds.
26:42
July 25, 2022
Uncovering UNCOVER
Uncovering UNCOVER
In this introduction episode, Nadege Atkins an UNCOVER Reviewer and also co-producer of the  uncovering UNCOVER podcast series, shares her experience as a member of UNCOVER. She discusses what UNCOVER is and how she became involved in UNCOVER.  Nadege also speaks of the benefits and challenges she has faced, and what skills she has developed being a part of UNCOVER. Music for this episode is provided by hooksounds.
07:17
July 19, 2022
Filip Taneski & Brittany Blankinship (Teaching Awards series)
Filip Taneski & Brittany Blankinship (Teaching Awards series)
In this episode, Filip Taneski, a PhD student within the School of Engineering, and Brittany Blankinship, a PhD student in the School of Philosophy, Psychology and Language Sciences, share good practice by discussing their nominations for the 2022 Student Tutor of the Year. They discuss the relationship between their research and teaching, how their role as tutor has changed over the last two years, the difficult task of facilitating engagement while teaching in online classrooms, how they’ve adapted their practices in teaching and research the past few years, and much more. Timestamps: 1:20 - Filip and Brittany introduce themselves and their research topics 3:10 - The two discuss: how have they found this academic year compared to previous academic years? 9:10 - Filip and Brittany discuss how they've balanced research and teaching during their PhDs 22:20 - The two finish off by reflecting on some experiences they remember fondly from their time teaching Transcript Music for this episode was provided by Hooksounds.
26:21
June 08, 2022
Michael Merlin & Richard Blythe (Teaching Awards series)
Michael Merlin & Richard Blythe (Teaching Awards series)
In this episode, Michael Merlin, a lecturer within the School of Engineering, and Richard Blythe, a professor of Complex Systems in the School of Physics and Astronomy, share good practice by discussing their nominations for the 2022 Personal Tutor of the Year. They begin by discussing: what actually is the role of a personal tutor? Michael mentions it being both “everything and nothing”, while Richard touches on how he views the supportive role. Their conversation then expands to cover various aspects of the role.  How has it changed during the pandemic/online learning? How does it interact with teaching and research? What's the relationship between personal tutoring and mentorship? And how did they each respond to their nominations? Throughout the episode, the thought and intentionality Michael and Richard bring to their roles are apparent, making this episode a must-listen for anyone interested in hearing about supportive roles, particularly within academia. Timestamps: 1:15 – Michael and Richard discuss what they consider the role of a personal tutor to be 2:50 – The two discuss: how has the scope of personal tutoring changed with the advent of virtual learning? 12:20 – Michael and Richard discuss connecting with students on a personal level, how personal tutoring interacts with their research and teaching, and their responses to their nominations Transcript Music for this episode was provided by Hooksounds. 
24:52
May 25, 2022
Media Hopper Create: the benefits of OERs
Media Hopper Create: the benefits of OERs
In this episode, Charlie Farley, the Open Educational Resources advisor at the University's Information Services, and Ewan McAndrew, the University of Edinburgh’s Wikipedian in Residence, discuss the benefits of Media Hopper Create, particularly in regard to the service's ability to create Open Educational Resources (OERs). They discuss how they each use media hopper create, the benefits of open educational resources, why they’re so important (especially in wake of the pandemic), and how media hopper create can benefit potential users. Timestamps: 1:05 - Charlie and Ewan introduce themselves and how they use Media Hopper Create in their work 4:35 - The duo discusses the benefits of OERs more generally, and how Media Hopper Create is used to create them 16:10 - Ewan and Charlie conclude by discussing the importance of having a tool like Media Hopper Create during the pandemic, and give their pitches for those considering using the service Transcript Lego replica of the University of Edinburgh Main Library Music for today's episode was provided by Hooksounds.
25:35
May 20, 2022
The stories of Media Hopper Create
The stories of Media Hopper Create
In this episode, four University of Edinburgh staff members, Jo Merrifield, Education Programme Manager at the Edinburgh Clinical Research Facility, Michael Gallagher, Programme Director of the MSc in Digital Education, Velda McCune, Deputy Director of the Institute for Academic Development and Brian Mather, Senior E-Learning Developer at the Veterinary school, reconnect to discuss anecdotes from using Media Hopper Create, along with their pitch for prospective users of the service.  The episode begins with the participants' stories. Jo discusses a piece of positive feedback she received on a webinar series she cocreated, Michael shares about teaching his next-door neighbor how to use Media Hopper Create, and Velda and Brian touch on the benefits of using it as a collaborative tool. After, they share their pitches for prospective users of Media Hopper Create, touching on its accessibility and the benefits that come from being able to share academic content Timestamps: 0:58 - Participants share their stories from using Media Hopper Create 8:57 - The group gives their 'pitches' for encouraging people to give Media Hopper Create a try Transcript Music for this episode was provided by Hooksounds. 
13:39
May 13, 2022
The tips, tricks and challenges of Media Hopper Create
The tips, tricks and challenges of Media Hopper Create
In this episode, four University of Edinburgh staff members, Jo Merrifield, Education Programme Manager at the Edinburgh Clinical Research Facility, Michael Gallagher, Programme Director of the MSc in Digital Education, Velda McCune, Deputy Director of the Institute for Academic Development and Brian Mather, Senior E-Learning Developer at the Veterinary school, reconnect to discuss the tips, tricks and challenges they've found in using Media Hopper Create. The conversation begins with the group discussing tips. They discuss keeping your content short and succinct, taking advantage of a dialogic approach, thinking about what you want to create across before you record and finally involving fellow students and staff in a co-creative model. Their conversation then shifts to the challenges of using Media Hopper Create. How do we ensure the intended audience finds their way to the content? What about those who are uncomfortable recording videos? How does one bring intentionality to whose voices are being heard when editing content? While entertaining these challenges, the group manages to find quite a few silver linings. Timestamps: 1:00 - Participants discuss the greatest 'tips and tricks' they've found in using Media Hopper Create 9:40 - The group entertains the challenges they've found when using the service, and finds a few silver linings Transcript Music for this episode was provided by Hooksounds. 
20:49
April 29, 2022
Media Hopper Create and its many uses
Media Hopper Create and its many uses
In the premiere of our Media Hopper series, four University of Edinburgh staff members, Jo Merrifield, Education Programme Manager at the Edinburgh Clinical Research Facility, Michael Gallagher, Programme Director of the MSc in Digital Education, Velda McCune, Deputy Director of the Institute for Academic Development and Brian Mather, Senior E-Learning Developer at the Veterinary school, connect to discuss how they use Media Hopper in their work. Media Hopper Create is the University's Media Asset Management system, which puts video at the heart of teaching, learning, research and public engagement. The quartet's conversation begins with each participant detailing how they use Media Hopper Create in their work, also touching on its usefulness during the pandemic. Among the variety of uses mentioned are lecture recordings, student assessment, student-staff co-creation, creating learning resources, podcasts and research dissemination. The conversation also covers the aspects of Media Hopper Create that the participants particularly appreciate, including its captioning and capacity for inclusivity, accessibility and interoperability. Timestamps: 1:18 - Each participant introduces themself and discusses the ways in which they use Media Hopper Create in their work 14:15 - The participants discuss which features they find particularly useful, including Media Hopper Create's accessibility and usability Transcript:  'Media Hopper Create and its many uses' Transcript Music provided by Hooksounds. 
23:27
April 22, 2022
Wikimedia and History
Wikimedia and History
In this episode, Ewan McAndrew, the University of Edinburgh's Wikimedian in Residence, is joined by Diana Paton, lecturer at the University of Edinburgh and the William Robertson Chair of History, Lucy Crompton-Reid, Chief Executive of Wikimedia UK, Lucy Parfitt, former President of the University History Society, two history students, Grace King and Siân Davies, and Hannah Rothmann, a former Wikimedia intern and Classics student, to discuss Wikimedia, History how the two topics are interconnected. Particularly, they discuss the Scotland Slavery and Black History Project. This episode is the fifth and final of our Wikimedia Series, which aims to recontextualize Wikimedia's role in academia on its 21st birthday. The conversation begins with each participant detailing what drew them to the project and its formulation. They also consider Edward Gibbon's quote, "History is indeed little more than the register of the crimes, follies, and misfortunes of mankind." While the group's conversation revolves around the Scotland Slavery and Black History Project, it often diverges into fascinating territory regarding Wikipedia and History. Is Wikipedia a source, a source aggregator, or both? What role can Wikipedia play in documenting history's ever-changing nature? What kind of conversations follow a project such as this one, and what conversations does it necessitate? This link leads to more information about the Scotland Slavery and Black History Project.  Timestamps: 2:00 - Introduction of participants, entertainment of Edward Gibbon's quote, and discussion about the inception of the Scotland Slavery and Black History Project 13:40 - The participants discuss the 'othering' of Wikipedia, more about the conversations the project necessitated, and whether Wikipedia is a source or a source aggregator 33:00 - Each participant reflects on the project, detailing what they got out of it and their final thoughts Transcript Music for this episode was provided by Hooksounds. 
40:26
April 15, 2022
Wikipedia: Where are the women?
Wikipedia: Where are the women?
In this episode, Lucy Crompton-Reid, the Chief Executive of Wikimedia UK, is joined by Linda Bauld, Professor of Public Health, Sarah Lappin, head of the Edinburgh Women in STEM Society, and Áine Kavanagh, a former reproductive biology student at the university, to discuss the underrepresentation of women on Wikipedia pages. This episode is the fourth of our Wikimedia Series, which aims to recontextualize Wikimedia’s role in academia on its 21st birthday. The quartet offers a variety of perspectives on why women are underrepresented on Wikipedia and what can be done about it.  They discuss the ‘vicious cycle’ of the media favoring male scientists and how the underrepresentation is not confined to just women. They also discuss: How has the education sector improved in regards to representation of women in STEM? What areas need further improvement? And what is each participant’s call to action? This concise, call-to-action episode is an essential listen for anyone interested in bringing equality to digital spaces and looking to improve the representation of underrepresented groups. Timestamps: 1:27 – Beginning of conversation, each participant answers: ‘Where are the women?’ 5:43 – Are schools and universities doing enough in encouraging girls to pursue STEM careers and supporting them when they do so? 8:15 – Each participant shares one thing they would encourage the listener to think about differently? What’s their call to action? Music provided by Hooksounds. 
13:34
February 23, 2022
Improving science communication with... Wikipedia?
Improving science communication with... Wikipedia?
Many people turn to Wikipedia articles when introduced to an unfamiliar medical term, especially when it pertains to themselves or a loved one. But who writes these articles?  Some come from within The University of Edinburgh, where fourth-year students in the Reproductive Biology BSc programme have been creating articles about previously unpublished medical terms for the past six years. In this episode, Áine Kavanagh, a former student from The University of Edinburgh's Reproductive Biology BSc, and her former professor and program organiser, Norah Spears, detail a class project which involves developing new Wikipedia articles about unpublished medical terms.  They discuss this with Ewan McAndrew, The University of Edinburgh's Wikimedian in residence, and Lucy Crompton-Reid, the Chief Executive of Wikimedia UK.  This episode is the third of our Wikimedia Series, which aims to recontextualize Wikimedia's role in academia on its 21st birthday. The quartet cover captivating questions: What do students gain from these types of projects? What strategies are used to write scientific articles that are digestible to a lay audience? What role do diagrams play, and how are they created?  And, does Wikipedia Medicine have a higher 'standard of proof' than other Wikipedias? This exciting, informative episode is an essential listen for anyone interested in how medical articles on Wikipedia are actually formed, and how projects such as these can be integrated into the curriculum. Timestamps: 2:09 - Beginning of conversation, with insight into the Wikipedia project involved in the Reproductive Biology BSc course 4:57 - The group discusses: Does the project work in practice? Áine and Norah detail their experiences 10:00 - The group discusses the role of diagrams in medical Wikipedia articles and how they are created 12:40 - Lucy gives a personal anecdote about using Wikipedia with a medical issue Music for this episode was provided by Hooksounds. 
18:45
February 10, 2022
Wikimedia and Language
Wikimedia and Language
In this episode, Wikimedians Ewan McAndrew and Jason Evans unpack the role of languages in Wikipedia with Richard Nevell (Wikimedia Programme Director), Lorna Campbell (OER services manager) and three Translation Studies MSc students, Binjie Xiang, Huichao Wang and Nora Albawardi.  This episode is the second of our Wikimedia Series, which aims to recontextualize Wikimedia's role in academia on its 21st birthday. The group covers fascinating questions: Does translation open the door to a more complete and diverse selection of sources?  What role does machine translation play in the translating process? People typically edit Wikipedia independently, but is this in some ways a community event? And what opportunities are there in Wikipedia for indigenous languages? This thought-provoking episode is an essential listen for anyone interested in digital representation, the ins and outs of translation and the role Wikimedia can play within academia. Timestamps: 1:30 - Introductions and each participant detailing why they believe it's important to have Wikipedia pages in multiple languages 11:45 - The group covers issues that arise with translation, the role of machine translation and having sources in multiple languages 23:35 - The group discusses the opportunities and challenges faced by smaller Wikipedias and the communal rejuvenation of the Scots Wikipedia Ewan McAndrew, our Wikimedian in Residence, provided the following resources for anyone interested in further readings regarding Wikimedia and languages: Building bridges not walls – Wikipedia in Translation Studies Address Knowledge Gaps (Program) Growing Wikipedia Across Languages via Recommendation Videos on Wikipedia and Translation Studies Videos on Translation more generally
37:21
February 02, 2022
Wikimedia and Academia
Wikimedia and Academia
In this episode, University staff (Kirsty Lingstadt), students (Hannah Rothmann, Grace King and Lucy Parfitt) and Wikimedians (Ewan McAndrew and Richard Nevell) discuss Wikimedia's current role within academia and hypothesize what that role can be in the future.  This episode is the first of our Wikimedia Series, which aims to recontextualize Wikimedia's role in academia on its 20th anniversary. The group's conversation begins with each member detailing how they use Wikipedia in their work, then expands to Wikipedia's current and potential role in academia. Throughout, fascinating questions are posed and talked through: Is Wikipedia regulated, and to what extent? What utility does it have in academia? And is there a role for Wikipedia to be a middle ground between academia and the public? This episode serves as a fantastic re-introduction to Wikipedia, and we hope it helps listeners join in on recontextualizing Wikipedia's role in academia on its 20th anniversary. Timestamps: 2:30 - Introductions with each participant detailing how they use Wikipedia in their work 7:22 - The group entertains Wikipedia's reputation of being unreliable and discusses the role of media literacy 13:33 - The group discusses Wikipedia's potential to be a middle ground between academia and the public 19:30 - The group finishes off the discussion by theorizing Wikipedia's potential role within academia Ewan McAndrew, The University of Edinburgh's Wikimedian in Residence, provided the following resources for anyone interested in further readings regarding Wikimedia: Wikipedia on Olive Schreiner, like it or what?  Wikimedia in Education (collection of case studies) How Wikipedia keeps political discourse from turning ugly (Harvard Business Review article) Why didn’t Wikipedia have an article on Donna Strickland, winner of a Nobel Prize? (Wikipedia Foundation article) Female Nobel prize winner deemed not important enough for Wikipedia entry (additional article about Donna Strickland from the Guardian) Music for this episode is provided by Hooksounds.  Cover art was created by Eric Berger using a template from http://ereyes.github.io/
24:05
January 26, 2022
Learning together in a global pandemic
Learning together in a global pandemic
In this podcast, the Institute for Academic Development's (IAD) Dr Catherine Bovill, Senior Lecturer in Student Engagement, and Celeste McLaughlin, Head of Academic Development for Digital Education, discuss a collaborative international research project that sought to understand the changes to teaching practices as they went online during the initial period of the Covid-19 pandemic. This episode complements the blogpost, "Learning together during a global pandemic: Practices and principles for teaching and assessing online in uncertain times". Catherine and Celeste's conversation covers fascinating questions about how teachers have collectively adapted to the pandemic, as well.  How did sentiment towards online learning change from the onset of the pandemic to six months in? How has online teaching led educators to rethink their practices? How has the pandemic changed the practices of teachers who were already teaching in a digital space? What did educators consider to be the 'biggest losses' from transitioning to online teaching? Timestamps: 1:05 - Celeste and Catherine introduce themselves and their research project 6:29 - Celeste and Catherine discuss educators' sentiments about the 'emergency period', and how these compare to the responses gathered well into the pandemic 9:00 - Catherine introduces the idea that teachers have had the opportunity to 'step back' from their normal teaching practices, and the two discuss 14:50 - The pair discuss how smaller blocks of recorded content has been used as an adaptation to digital learning
19:38
January 19, 2022
Decolonising the Curriculum – Sharing Ideas with Lauren Hall-Lew
Decolonising the Curriculum – Sharing Ideas with Lauren Hall-Lew
In this Teaching Matters podcast series, produced by The Race Equality and Anti-Racist Sub-Committee (REAR) at The University of Edinburgh in collaboration with Teaching Matters, we hear from different academics at the University about what Decolonising the Curriculum means for them, and how they have put this into practice in their learning and teaching or research. They also share some readings that they have found useful. In this episode, Professor Emerita Rowena Arshad, Chair in Multicultural and Anti-Racist Education talks to Dr. Lauren Hall-Lew, a Reader in Linguistics and English Language in the School of Philosophy, Psychology and Language Sciences at the University of Edinburgh. Dr. Hall-Lew’s Recommendations Rosa, Jonathan, and Nelson Flores. “Unsettling race and language: Toward a raciolinguistic perspective.” Language in society 46, no. 5 (2017): 621-647. Hudley, Anne H. Charity, Christine Mallinson, and Mary Bucholtz. “Toward racial justice in linguistics: Interdisciplinary insights into theorizing race in the discipline and diversifying the profession.” Language 96.4 (2020): e200-e235. García, Ofelia, Nelson Flores, Kate Seltzer, Li Wei, Ricardo Otheguy, and Jonathan Rosa. “Rejecting abyssal thinking in the language and education of racialized bilinguals: A manifesto.” Critical Inquiry in Language Studies (2021): 1-26. Webinars on “Racial Justice, Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion in the Linguistics Curriculum” https://www.linguisticsociety.org/resource/lsa-webinar-series-racial-justice-equity-diversity-and-in…
22:04
November 24, 2021
Decolonising the Curriculum – Sharing Ideas with David Kluth
Decolonising the Curriculum – Sharing Ideas with David Kluth
In this Teaching Matters podcast series, produced by The Race Equality and Anti-Racist Sub-Committee (REAR) at The University of Edinburgh in collaboration with Teaching Matters, we hear from different academics at the University about what Decolonising the Curriculum means for them, and how they have put this into practice in their learning and teaching or research. They also share some readings that they have found useful. In this episode, Professor Emerita Rowena Arshad, Chair in Multicultural and Anti-Racist Education talks to Professor David Kluth, Chair of Medical Education, Deanery of Clinical Sciences at the University of Edinburgh and a consultant nephrologist. Prof. David Kluth Recommendations: Hannaford, Ivan. Race : the History of an Idea in the West / Ivan Hannaford. Washington, D.C: Woodrow Wilson Center Press, 1996. Givens, Marjory L et al. “Deconstructing Inequities — Transparent Values in Measurement and Analytic Choices.” The New England journal of medicine 384.19 (2021): 1861–1865. Amutah, Christina et al. “Misrepresenting Race — The Role of Medical Schools in Propagating Physician Bias.” The New England journal of medicine 384.9 (2021): 872–878. Oni-Orisan, Akinyemi et al. “Embracing Genetic Diversity to Improve Black Health.” The New England journal of medicine 384.12 (2021): 1163–1167. Mukwende, Malone, Peter Tamony, and Margaret Turner. Mind the Gap : a Handbook of Clinical Signs in Black and Brown Skin / Mukwende, M,  Tamony, P, Turner, M. First edition. London: St George’s, University of London, 2020.
14:54
November 18, 2021
Decolonising the Curriculum – Sharing Ideas with Julie Cupples
Decolonising the Curriculum – Sharing Ideas with Julie Cupples
In this Teaching Matters podcast series, produced by The Race Equality and Anti-Racist Sub-Committee (REAR) at The University of Edinburgh in collaboration with Teaching Matters, we hear from different academics at the University about what Decolonising the Curriculum means for them, and how they have put this into practice in their learning and teaching or research. They also share some readings that they have found useful. In this episode, Professor Emerita Rowena Arshad, Chair in Multicultural and Anti-Racist Education talks to Julie Cupples, Professor of Human Geography and Cultural Studies; Head of Geography and the Lived Environment Research Institute at the University of Edinburgh. Prof. Julie Cupples Recommendations: Smith, Linda Tuhiwai. Decolonizing Methodologies : Research and Indigenous Peoples / Linda Tuhiwai Smith. New York: Zed Books, 1999 Ramón Grosfoguel, and Julie Cupples. Unsettling Eurocentrism in the Westernized University. Taylor and Francis, 2018. Hooker, Juliet et al. Black and Indigenous Resistance in the Americas : from Multiculturalism to Racist Backlash : a Project of the Antiracist Research and Action Network (RAIAR) / Edited by Juliet Hooker ; Translated by Giorleny Altamirano Rayo, Aileen Ford, and Steven Lownes. Lanham: Lexington Books, 2020. Hooker, Juliet. Theorizing Race in the Americas : Douglass, Sarmiento, Du Bois, and Vasconcelos / Juliet Hooker. New York, NY: Oxford University Press, 2017. Hooker, Juliet. Race and the Politics of Solidarity / Juliet Hooker. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2009 Tzul, Gladys Tzul. “Rebuilding Communal Life: Ixil Women and the Desire for Life in Guatemala.” NACLA report on the Americas (1993) 50.4 (2018): 404–407. Tzul, Gladys Tzul. “Communal Strategies for Controlling Microfinance in Chuimeq’ena’ Guatemala.” The South Atlantic quarterly 115.3 (2016): 625–631. Santos, Boaventura de Sousa. The End of the Cognitive Empire : the Coming of Age of Epistemologies of the South / Boaventura de Sousa Santos. Durham: Duke University Press, 2018. Mutu (Ngāti Kahu, Te Rarawa and Ngāti Whātua nations). “‘To Honour the Treaty, We Must First Settle Colonisation’ (Moana Jackson 2015): The Long Road from Colonial Devastation to Balance, Peace and Harmony.” Journal of the Royal Society of New Zealand 49.sup1 (2019): 4–18.
20:19
November 10, 2021
COP26 and The University with Dave Reay
COP26 and The University with Dave Reay
Dave Reay, Professor of Carbon Management and Education in the School of Geosciences and a Director of the Edinburgh Climate Change Institute, discusses his hopes for COP26 and the university's involvement in an interview with Joséphine Foucher, Teaching Matters Co-Editor and Student Engagement Officer.  This episode accompanies our November and December Hot Topic theme: COP26 and embedding the climate emergency in our teaching. Dave begins by outlining some of the Edinburgh Climate Change Institute's (ECCI) work at the University, before expanding into all things COP26. Throughout, he contextualizes the conference, while considering interesting questions. How can climate change become embedded in our curriculum? How are students participating in the conference? What outcomes are we looking for in the conference? And climate change historically has been viewed as being all about big business or the individual, but what might a different perspective look like? We hope you enjoy this special one-off episode of Teaching Matters!  Timestamps: 1:25 - Beginning of the interview with Dave Reay speaking about the ECCI's work at the university  6:45 - Dave and Josephine discuss student and alum involvement in COP26 10:10 - Dave on his and the ECCI's hopes for the outcomes of the conference 17:30 - Dave discusses how climate change/action can be embedded into university courses  Music for today's episode was provided by Tunesounds.  Cop26 logo provided by UK Government - https://www.gov.uk/government/topical-events/cop26, OGL 3, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=99448137
23:22
November 04, 2021
Decolonising the Curriculum – Sharing Ideas: Radhika Govinda
Decolonising the Curriculum – Sharing Ideas: Radhika Govinda
In this episode, Johanna Holtan Co-Convenor of the Race Equality and Anti-Racist Sub-Committee (REAR) and Programme Director, Mastercard Foundation Scholars Program talks to intersectional feminist scholar from the Global South, Dr Radhika Govinda, Senior Lecturer in Sociology at the School of Social and Political Science. Dr Govinda sits on the steering committees for the University’s GenderED and RACE.ED networks. She is Associate Director of CRITIQUE, and an active member of the Centre for South Asian Studies.  In this episode, she discusses decolonisation as a process of decentring whiteness, which entails unpacking the historical implications of deconstructing knowledge production. For her, the classroom is a key entry point for undertaking such a process in inspiring students to insert dilemmas into their subjectivities. In this way, the classroom is conducive space for exploring discomforts, assumptions, and vulnerabilities. Dr Radhika Govinda's Recommendations: Mohanty, Chandra Talpade. “‘Under Western Eyes’ Revisited: Feminist Solidarity through Anticapitalist Struggles.” Signs, vol. 28, no. 2, 2003, pp. 499–535. Hooks, Bell.  (1994).  Teaching to transgress : education as the practice of freedom. New York:  Routledge Crenshaw, Kimberle. “Mapping the Margins: Intersectionality, Identity Politics, and Violence against Women of Color.” Stanford Law Review, vol. 43, no. 6, 1991, pp. 1241–1299.
22:03
October 20, 2021
Decolonising the Curriculum – Sharing Ideas: Shadaab Rahemtulla
Decolonising the Curriculum – Sharing Ideas: Shadaab Rahemtulla
In this Teaching Matters podcast series, produced by The Race Equality and Anti-Racist Sub-Committee (REAR) at The University of Edinburgh in collaboration with Teaching Matters, we hear from different academics at the University about what Decolonising the Curriculum means for them, and how they have put this into practice in their learning and teaching or research. They also share some readings that they have found useful. In this episode, Johanna Holtan Co-Convenor of the Race Equality and Anti-Racist Sub-Committee (REAR) and Programme Director of the Mastercard Foundation Scholars Program talks to Dr Shadaab Rahemtulla, a Lecturer in Islam and Christian-Muslim Relations at the School of Divinity. He is also the Programme Director of the newly launched Masters in Islam and Christian-Muslim Relations. He argues that decolonisation is a conversation about power that consists in robbing knowledge of its so-called neutrality and innocence and understanding knowledge-production as located within a social context that is always filled with hierarchies and inequalities. In this humbling conversation, Dr Rahemtulla discusses how decolonising the curriculum is a reflexive exercise that those in power have a responsibility to practice. Dr Shadaab Rahemtulla’s Recommendations: X, Malcolm and Alex Haley, The Autobiography of Malcolm X (1965):  https://www.penguin.co.uk/books/572/57282/the-autobiography-of-malcolm-x/9780141185439.html Rowland, Christopher (ed). The Cambridge Companion to Liberation Theology (2008): https://www.cambridge.org/core/books/cambridge-companion-to-liberation-theology/F500C9F34574087A4C4EA2658E89762B Rahemtulla, Shadaab. Qur’an of the Oppressed: Liberation Theology and Gender Justice in Islam (2018): https://global.oup.com/academic/product/quran-of-the-oppressed-9780198820093?cc=gb&lang=en&# “Decolonising Divinity: A Roundtable Discussion” (15 March 2021, New College, Uni of Edinburgh): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V-qy8eMkNrA
14:07
October 13, 2021
Decolonising the Curriculum – Sharing Ideas: Ayanda Ngobeni
Decolonising the Curriculum – Sharing Ideas: Ayanda Ngobeni
In this Teaching Matters podcast series, produced by The Race Equality and Anti-Racist Sub-Committee (REAR) at The University of Edinburgh in collaboration with Teaching Matters, we hear from different academics at the University about what Decolonising the Curriculum means for them, and how they have put this into practice in their learning and teaching or research. They also share some readings that they have found useful. In this episode, Professor Emerita Rowena Arshad, Chair in Multicultural and Anti-Racist Education talks to Ayanda Ngobeni a Law Student at The University of Edinburgh, Black and Ethnic Minority Liberation Campaign Officer and Mastercard Foundation Scholar African Leadership Academy Alum (Class of 2016). Ayanda Ngobeni’s Recommendations: Angelou, Maya. “Still I Rise.” Making Literature Matter: An Anthology for Readers and Writers, edited by John Schilb and John Clifford, 7th ed., Bedford/St. Martin’s, 2020, pp. 127-131
21:01
October 06, 2021
Decolonising the Curriculum – Sharing Ideas: Dr Gwenetta Curry
Decolonising the Curriculum – Sharing Ideas: Dr Gwenetta Curry
Welcome to this podcast series produced by The Race Equality and Anti-Racist Sub-Committee (REAR) at The University of Edinburgh in collaboration with Teaching Matters where we hear from different academics at the University about what Decolonising the Curriculum means for them and how they have put this into practice in their learning and teaching or research. They also share some readings they have found useful. In this episode, Dr Gwenetta Curry, a lecturer in Race, Ethnicity, and Health in the Usher Institute discusses with Prof Rowena Arshad about decolonising the curriculum as a practice that consists of acknowledging the racist history of certain disciplines. Trained as a medical sociologist, Dr Curry endeavours to embed issues of race and racism within the medical training programme at the Usher’s institute. Her role ranges from redesigning course material to include the lens of race and racism, to delivering webinars for the NHS to raise awareness about how systemic racism impacts patient care. In this engaging conversation, Dr Curry reminds of the importance of questioning the power dynamics that underlie various forms of knowledge-making. If you are interested in contributing a podcast to this series, please get in touch with Emily Sena (emily.sena@ed.ac.uk) or Johanna Holtan (johanna.holtan@ed.ac.uk), co-convenors of the Race Equality and Anti-Racist Sub-Committee. Dr Gwenetta Curry’s Reading Recommendations: Fanon, Frantz Black Skin White Masks New York : Grove Press, Inc., (1952, 1967) Fanon, Frantz The Wretched of the Earth New York: Grove Press, (1968) Curry, Tommy J. Decolonizing the Intersection: Black Male Studies as a Critique of Intersectionality’s Indebtedness to Subculture of Violence Theory in Critical Psychology Praxis: Psychosocial Non-Alignment to Modernity/Coloniality (Advances in Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology Series) (pp.132-154) Chapter Eleven, Publisher: Routledge Curry, Tommy J. The Derelictical Crisis of African American Philosophy: How African American Philosophy Fails to Contribute to the Study of African-Descended People. Journal of Black Studies. 2011, 42(3):314-333 Ladner, Joyce A. The Death of White Sociology (1973)
12:43
September 28, 2021
Inclusive Cultures: What experiences give students a sense of belonging or exclusion?
Inclusive Cultures: What experiences give students a sense of belonging or exclusion?
In this episode, Rachel Hunt, a lecturer in Geohumanities, Clare Barnes, an Interdisciplinary Lecturer in Sustainable Livelihoods and Gabrielle King, a research assistant in Geosciences and supporter of widening participation, introduce their research on inclusive culture within the School of Geosciences. This episode accompanies our July-August ‘Hot Topic’: “Lessons from the Learning and Teaching Conference 2021“. Which experiences leave students feeling like they belong, and which leave them feeling excluded? Rachel, Claire, and Gabrielle's ongoing research involves asking students to reflect on moments of inclusion and exclusion, aiming to better understand and improve widening participation interventions.  In their presentation, they stitch together student testimonials to provide their data in narrative form, allowing the listener to hear stories of belonging and exclusion throughout the university experience.  These stories can help us better understand student belonging, making this episode an essential listen for anyone in the teaching and learning environment.  Timestamps: 2:03 - Eric's episode-specific introduction  5:40 - Beginning of student testimonials in narrative form 12:35 - Rachel, Claire and Gabriel's recommendations on widening participation from their research Music featured is Longest Year by Scott Holmes Music, and otherwise provided by Tunesounds. 
15:21
September 03, 2021
Why use a full range of marks? (part two)
Why use a full range of marks? (part two)
In this episode, Dr. Michael Daw, Director of Quality in the Deanery of Biomedical Sciences, continues discussing his analysis of marking schemes and assessment styles, particularly addressing why it using the full range of marks might be something to strive for. This episode accompanies our July-August ‘Hot Topic’: “Lessons from the Learning and Teaching Conference 2021“.
18:00
August 27, 2021
Does your assessment really discriminate learning attainment? (part one)
Does your assessment really discriminate learning attainment? (part one)
Do the assessments we prepare for students allow them to fully showcase what they've learned? Do marking schemes affect the distribution of marks?  And what kind of assessments lead to, or don't lead to, the full range of marks?  Today's episode, the fourth of our Learning and Teaching Conference series, features Dr. Michael Daw, Director of Quality in the Deanery of Biomedical Sciences.  Michael's presentation from the conference, "The unintended consequences of approaches to marking and assessment & supporting criteria-based marking", caught our eye with its counterintuitive findings of marking schemes and assessment styles, along with Michael's commitment towards an evidence-based approach towards advising course organizers.  In this episode, Michael discusses what drew him to this analysis and showcases a few of his findings. The conversation then expands, introducing the idea of 'marking culture' within schools with Michael offering a few of his personal experiences.  He also speaks about contextual marking and how different styles of assessment generally achieve different outcomes, at least in regards to the range of marks.  This conversation begs the question: does your assessment really discriminate learning attainment?  And if it doesn't, perhaps Michael's analysis can help steer you in the right direction.  This episode is part one of our conversation with Michael, with part two coming next week, which will entertain the question: why might it be beneficial to use the full range of marks?  Is there anything wrong with using a narrow range of marks?   Timestamps 2:02 - Episode specific introduction and Michael on what drew him to this analysis 8:30 - Michael on some of his counterintuitive findings, and why marking schemes may not affect distribution of marks as much as initially thought 15:28 - Michael on marking culture, assessment styles and authentic vs non-authentic assessment
28:42
August 18, 2021
The 'Hidden Curriculum' and its impact on working-class students
The 'Hidden Curriculum' and its impact on working-class students
Is there a 'hidden curriculum' which is working against working-class students? Dr. Neil Speirs, a Widening Participation manager, practitioner and researcher at The University of Edinburgh, introduces the concept of the hidden curriculum, how we may be complicit in it, and what we can do about it. His call to action is compelling, inspiring, and maybe most importantly, actionable for anyone in the university environment, making this an essential listen for teachers and learners everywhere. This episode accompanies our July-August 'Hot Topic': “Lessons from the Learning and Teaching Conference 2021“. Timestamps:  2:02 - Episode specific introduction and Neil on the role of hidden subtexts and habitus on the university experience 8:30 - Neil on education being inherently political, Paulo Friere, and the role of doxa and illusio in the hidden curriculum  16:10 - Neil on how we can individually address the injustice of the hidden curriculum, and the Freirean notion of conscientization 22:08 - Neil on his personal experiences with working-class students and episode conclusions
28:15
August 12, 2021
Nini Fang's Story
Nini Fang's Story
In this episode, Dr. Nini Fang, lecturer in Counselling, Psychotherapy and Applied Social Sciences and Associate Director for the Centre of Creative-Relational Inquiry at The University of Edinburgh, shares her tumultuous, personal experience delivering classes on racism and colonisation at an English university. This episode accompanies our July-August 'Hot Topic': “Lessons from the Learning and Teaching Conference 2021“. In the second episode of our Learning and Teaching Conference series, Nini Fang gives an intimate retelling of her experience getting in trouble as a University Lecturer after delivering sessions on racism and decolonisation on a Difference and Diversity course. Her story poses large questions. What role does endurance play in an antiracist curriciulum? How does one walk the line of educating students on decolonisation and antiracism when these lessons may recontextualise some students’ identity while being familiar and deeply personal to other students? And how does one manage the divide that may emerge from these differing dispositions? This episode serves as a rare behind-the-scenes look at the experience of a University Lecturer attempting to get collaborative reflection about racism and colonisation, and the unjust fallout which results. At Teaching Matters, we celebrate Nini sharing her story at the 2021 Learning and Teaching Conference and appreciate her allowing it to be translated into this gripping podcast episode. Nini's story begins at 3:10.
21:43
August 04, 2021
The Curriculum Transformation Programme
The Curriculum Transformation Programme
This episode accompanies our July-August 'Hot Topic': “Lessons from the Learning and Teaching Conference 2021“. In what has the student experience changed such that needs outmatch support? What skills do recent Edinburgh graduates consider most valuable? How do we model an ‘Edinburgh Graduate’ without sacrificing diversity and individuality? These questions are addressed by the Curriculum Transformation Programme Board in this exciting premiere of our Learning and Teaching Conference series.   Members of the board Colm Harmon, Vice-Principal of Students, Richard Andrews, Head of Moray House School of Education and Sport, Iain Gordon, Head of School of Mathematics, and Lisa Kendall, Director of Academic and Student Administration for CAHSS, peel back the curtain on the Curriculum Transformation Programme and the future of the student experience. This episode serves as an introduction to the Curriculum Transformation Programme for those unfamiliar and a holistic update for those who are.  We hope you enjoy the panel's insights and look forward to bringing more insights from the Learning and Teaching Conference next week! Timestamps 3:15 – Colm Harmon on the landscape of the modern student experience, the role of the university in student development, and mentality for transformation 13:20 – Richard Andrews on perceptions of the ‘Edinburgh Graduate’ 16:50 – Ian Gordon on curriculum transformation from a college’s perspective and deconstruction of ‘curriculum’ and ‘transformation’ 21:15 – Lisa Kendall on goals for transformation, student wellbeing and streamlining pathways Transcript Cathy Bovill and Cherie Woolmer's paper, "How conceptualisations of curriculum in higher education influence student-staff co-creation in and of the curriculum"
26:50
July 28, 2021
Reflection Series: Connections and Adaptations Online
Reflection Series: Connections and Adaptations Online
This episode accompanies our "EUSA Teaching Awards 2021 Podcast Series". In this episode, Grace, a final-year Religious Studies Student, sits down with Judy Harley, Dean of Learning and Teaching for the College of Science and Engineering, and Elizabeth Bomberg, a Professor of Environmental Politics at the School of Social and Political Science, to discuss their nominations for the Edinburgh Teaching Awards. Judy, Elizabeth, and Grace entertain thought-provoking questions in their reflection. Have we changed our approach for this year? Is there a typical day in academia, online or in-person? What aspects of our old routines have we surprisingly missed? And of course, what will we be taking forward from this year?  In fluid conversation, Judy and Elizabeth bounce between relatable anecdotes from the past year and helpful insights.  They connect over the themes of connection and engagement while discussing the ways they've prioritized these themes in the online world. We hope you enjoy their conversation and continue your personal reflections as we inch closer to the next academic year.
35:44
July 23, 2021
Supervision in the Doctoral College
Supervision in the Doctoral College
This podcast accompanies Teaching Matter's July-August Learning and Teaching Enhancement theme: Showcasing the Doctoral College. In this podcast, Fiona, head of Doctoral College, speaks to Professor Patrick Hadoke, who is the Personal Chair of Arterial Remodelling and the Director of Postgraduate Student and Early Career Researcher Experience in the College of Medicine and Veterinary Medicine. He speaks generally about his experiences as a research supervisor and more specifically about his reflections on completing the UKCGE programme. He also shares some excellent insights and tips for those who are starting out as new supervisors and indeed for anyone else who has an interest in research supervision. A key takeaway is an emphasis he places on the human side of supervision, something which he stresses should not be overlooked even in a busy, high-pressure research environment. A transcript is provided and, for ease, the main themes are discussed at these times in the recording: 0.44 Overview of experience as a research supervisor, the most enjoyable and most challenging aspects 4.59 Experience of completing the UK Council for Graduate Education (UKCGE) research supervision recognition programme 9.59 Advice and tips for new PhD supervisors
13:12
July 16, 2021
Reflection Series: Grounding Exercises and Academia at Home
Reflection Series: Grounding Exercises and Academia at Home
This episode and blog post accompany our May-June ‘Hot Topic’:  “Teaching and Learning during a Pandemic: Lessons and reflections from the last year” and our "EUSA Teaching Awards 2021 Podcast Series". In this episode, Rohanie, a Peer Learning Coordinator at Edinburgh University Students' Association, sits down with Dr. Nikki Moran, a Senior Lecturer in Music at the University of Edinburgh, and two of her students, Tyler and Nicholas, to reflect on their experiences teaching and learning during the pandemic. The group's conversation touches on fascinating questions in response to a year of online learning, including, if we're no longer going into lecture halls, where is academia?  In what ways have our day-to-day schedules changed, and how have we repurposed our time? And maybe most importantly, how will we remember this time, and what will we take with us?  We hope you enjoy this thought-provoking conversation and that it encourages you to begin your reflection on this past year of teaching and learning.
33:30
June 24, 2021
Students’ Association’s Teaching Awards Podcast – Dr Dimitri Mignard and Sam Nwokoro
Students’ Association’s Teaching Awards Podcast – Dr Dimitri Mignard and Sam Nwokoro
Welcome to the Edinburgh University Student’s Association Teaching Award Podcast Series, working with the Edinburgh Hybrid Teaching Exchange to celebrate those that have been nominated and shortlisted for this year’s awards. In this episode, Grace Lavender, Student Council Facilitator and 4th Year Religious Studies Student, talks with 2021 nominees Dr. Dimitri Mignard from the School of Engineering and Sam Nwokoro, PhD student and tutor in the School of Divinity. The winners of this year’s Teaching Awards can now be viewed here. Congratulations to all nominees. LINKS AND FURTHER RESOURCES ON THE TOPICS RAISED IN THIS DISCUSSION GeoScience Outreach Course: Assessment through impactful student projects Projects, Peers, Passion, and Play: How Minecraft Transforms (Hybrid) Teaching Undergraduate Teaching Champions in the Business School The Creation of a Postgraduate Tutor Mentor Post in the School of Divinity
40:55
June 10, 2021
Internationalisation at the University of Edinburgh
Internationalisation at the University of Edinburgh
This episode of the Teaching Matters podcast accompanies our March-April 2021 series on internationalisation curated by Dr Omolabake (Labake) Fakunle as guest editor. Dr Fakunle is a Chancellor’s Fellow at the University of Edinburgh (UoE) and Coordinator of the MSc Education General Pathway at Moray House School of Education and Sport. In this episode, Dr. Fakunle talks to Professor James Smith. James is a Professor of African and Development Studies and Vice-Principal International at the University of Edinburgh. In this wide-ranging and fascinating conversation, the University’s international activities and collaborations, serves as a jumping off point, for an in-depth discussion that speaks to many of the key themes of the University’s strategy for 2030, and possible directions for curriculum transformation. This includes how Covid 19 transformed what’s core and what’s periphery in international research collaborations. At its heart this conversation is about celebrating the international community at the University and recognising the educational and civic value of having international and diverse classrooms and residences.
31:21
May 28, 2021
EUSA Teaching Awards Podcast – Dr. Crispin Jordan and Dr. Glen Cousquer
EUSA Teaching Awards Podcast – Dr. Crispin Jordan and Dr. Glen Cousquer
Welcome to the Edinburgh University Student’s Association Teaching Award Podcast Series. Working with the Edinburgh Hybrid Teaching Exchange to celebrate those that have been nominated and shortlisted for this year’s awards. In this episode, Grace Lavender Student Council Facilitator and 4th Year Religious Studies Student, talks with 2021 nominees Dr. Crispin Jordan, a Teaching Fellow with a focus on data analysis in Edinburgh Medical School: Biomedical Sciences and Dr. Glen Cousquer, MSc Programme Co-ordinator in The Royal (Dick) School of Veterinary Studies. You can also learn more about how Crispin adapted his pedagogy to hybrid teaching and learning including his replacement of lectures with ‘live sessions’ and ‘practice problems’ in his  Reflection on his nomination. Links and Further Resources on the Topics Raised in this Discussion Podcast: Co-Creation in Hybrid Teaching and Learning (8 min) Mental Health in New Learning and Teaching Environments Teaching about sustainability through diverse and creative methods Flipped classrooms – an evidence-based reflection Applied Learning: ‘Working together on the COVID-19 indoor transmission review and publication’ Approaching coaching: Should schools be providing psychological coaching to improve student well-being? Student voice on academic feedback Mini-Series: The Politics of Knowledge and Social Justice: Introducing Intercalating Medical Students to Interpretivist Epistemology Donna J Haraway Presented By Grace Lavender, Student Council Facilitator and 4th Year Religious Studies Student Produced by Rohanie Campbell-Thakoordin, Peer Learning Coordinator, Student Opportunities & Dr. Joe Arton, Institute for Academic Development. Music Provided by HookSounds
33:58
May 21, 2021
Cocktails & Cockups: The Hidden Narratives of International Academic Collaboration Projects
Cocktails & Cockups: The Hidden Narratives of International Academic Collaboration Projects
This episode of the Teaching Matters podcast accompanies our March-April 2021 series on internationalisation curated by Dr Omolabake (Labake) Fakunle as guest editor. Dr Fakunle is a Chancellor’s Fellow at the University of Edinburgh (UoE) and Coordinator of the MSc Education General Pathway at Moray House School of Education and Sport. In this episode, Dr Fakunle talks to  Dr. Shari Sabeti, a Reader in Arts and Humanities Education at Moray House about her experience of working on an international academic collaboration project aimed at understanding Marshallese children’s experiences of displacement and belonging. They discuss the hidden narratives of international academic collaboration projects, what it takes to balance 'the doing' and 'the managing' of research, and what gets left behind in order for the publications, conference presentations and institutional data to happen. We hope you enjoy this important, practical, entertaining, and very human conversation that normalises the messiness of international collaboration projects... Further Information on Dr. Sabeti's International Academic Collaboration Project Dr. Sabeti's article about making murals – based on her participation in workshops and interview with the artist and teachers: ‘Making Murals in the Marshall Islands and Hawai’i: an exploration of the limits and possibilities of artistic agency.’ Crossings: Journal of Migration and Culture (10:1)71-87 https://doi.org/10.1386/cjmc.10.1.71_1 The Project Website: http://www.map.llc.ed.ac.uk
29:00
May 06, 2021
How Covid-19 Impacted Assessment: Academic Misconduct
How Covid-19 Impacted Assessment: Academic Misconduct
In this episode, we continue the story of how Covid-19 changed Assessment Design through an issue whose temperature has risen with the move to digital and hybrid; academic misconduct. We hear the voices of Neil Lent, a Lecturer in Learning and Teaching at the Institute for Academic Development at the University of Edinburgh and Celeste Mclaughlin, the Head of Academic Development for Digital Education at the Institute for Academic Development. In our previous March 3 episode of the Teaching Matters Podcast, we talked to Judy Hardy and Neil Lent about how Covid-19 impacted assessment design at the University of Edinburgh. We heard how for some the move from traditional in-person exams to open-book online exams and group projects had an unexpected positive impact on students’ learning outcomes. We also heard about how this change in assessment design led to increased workloads and pressures. This episode responds to many of these concerns and offers a roadmap for student success while supporting staff. Workshops, Resources, & Links Mentioned in This Episode Workshop: Practical Strategies for… Designing out Plagiarism/Misconduct Using National Student Survey (NSS) Qualitative Data and social identity theory to explore students’ experiences of assessment and feedback Implications of ‘Dimensions of Quality’ in a market environment David Willetts: Higher Education and the Student Experience HEA Knowledge Hub: https://www.heacademy.ac.uk/hub Enhancement themes (QAA) Focus on: Assessment and Feedback project: https://www.qaa.ac.uk/scotland/focus-on/feedback-from-assessment Unintended Consequences of Approaches to Marking and Assessment Produced and Presented by Dr. Joe Arton, Academic Developer, Institute for Academic Development.
11:47
April 30, 2021
Consent: The connection between learning and healing
Consent: The connection between learning and healing
In this episode of the Teaching Matters podcast, we continue our conversation with Dr Nina Burrowes, a psychologist and founder of the Consent Collective, an organisation that works with communities and institutions in helping navigate the complex terrain of consent and sexual violence. The Consent Collective has been working closely with the University of Edinburgh for over four years by providing expert psycho-education content and support in creative ways, including gameshow podcasts, panel events, cooking shows and more. In this second episode, Dr Burrowes explores how consent is an interpersonal skill learned that takes lots of practice. She also discusses the role of higher education institutions in providing spaces for healing, learning, and making mistakes. 
12:13
April 23, 2021
Consent as an embodied practice in the classroom
Consent as an embodied practice in the classroom
In this episode of the Teaching Matters podcast, we speak with Dr Nina Burrowes, a psychologist and founder of the Consent Collective, an organisation that works with communities and institutions in helping navigate the complex terrain of consent and sexual violence. The Consent Collective has been working closely with the University of Edinburgh for over four years by providing expert psycho-education content and support in creative ways, including gameshow podcasts, panel events, cooking shows and more. In this first episode of a three-part series, Dr Burrowes explores how consent is an embodied practice and ways of inviting bodies into the classroom. Dr Burrowes also shares insights about trauma-informed teaching, which is one of many research-based approaches for acknowledging trauma in teaching practices.
18:20
March 26, 2021
Teaching Matters Out Loud: Cathy Bovill on Student Positivity and Creativity as a Source of Hope
Teaching Matters Out Loud: Cathy Bovill on Student Positivity and Creativity as a Source of Hope
This week's episode of the Teaching Matters Podcast features a reading by Cathy Bovill, Senior Lecturer in Student Engagement at the Institute for Academic Development, University of Edinburgh and Visiting Fellow at the University of Winchester of her article 'Student Positivity and Creativity as a Source of Hope' that was featured in the October 2020 edition of Teaching Matters.  In Teaching Matters Out Loud, Teaching Matters contributors read their blog posts out loud giving Teaching Matters readers an alternative way to enjoy current and previous posts. 
07:38
March 18, 2021
Feminist Teaching
Feminist Teaching
Episode 15 is an engaging and heated discussion between Poppy Gerrard Abbott and Amy Andrada, both PhD sociology candidates in the School of Social and Political Science. Poppy and Amy discuss issues such as the role of teaching from a feminist perspective, the link between feminist activism and teaching, and the place of peer support in the University. Amongst many other topics, they question the structural restraints around being a mother in academia, and delve into the way we use deficient language to describe these situations. They describe what sisterhood means to them, and ask if The University of Edinburgh has a ‘feminist’ community, as well as debating the emotional labour of building such a community.
56:46
March 09, 2021
How Covid-19 Changed Assessment
How Covid-19 Changed Assessment
In this episode of the Teaching Matters Podcast we examine how the various changes to assessment and feedback have impacted the staff and student experience and whether it reveals something about some of our preconceptions of the student experience. This episode features the voices of Judy Hardy, Professor of Physics Education and Dean of Teaching and Learning in the College of Science and Engineering at the University of Edinburgh and Dr. Neil Lent, Lecturer in Teaching and Learning at the Institute for Academic Development at the University of Edinburgh.  To learn more about assessment and feedback in face-to-face, digital and hybrid modes of teaching and learning, visit the Teaching Matters Blog and the Edinburgh Hybrid Teaching Exchange. 
12:47
March 04, 2021
Co-Creation in Hybrid Teaching and Learning
Co-Creation in Hybrid Teaching and Learning
In this episode of the Teaching Matters Podcast, we explore how co-creation helped academic staff navigate the move to hybrid teaching and learning. Student-staff co-creation involves shared decision-making and negotiation of curriculum design or elements of the curriculum. You can watch extended conversations with the contributors on the Edinburgh Hybrid Teaching Exchange and linked below and discover more about co-creation on the Teaching Matters blog... Featuring  Catherine Bovill Dr Catherine Bovill is Senior Lecturer in Student Engagement at the Institute for Academic Development, University of Edinburgh and Visiting Fellow at the University of Winchester. She is a Principal Fellow of the Higher Education Academy, Fellow of the Staff and Educational Development Association and an Editorial Board member for Teaching in Higher Education. At Edinburgh she leads the IAD programme and course design team and the Learning and Teaching Conference team as well as supporting a range of strategic projects focused on student engagement. She regularly publishes and presents her work on partnership and co-creating curriculum internationally. In 2019-2020 she was a Fulbright Scholar based in the USA. Tina Harrison Tina is Assistant Principal Academic Standards and Quality Assurance and Professor of Financial Services Marketing and Consumption. Tina joined the University in 1993 and continues to maintain an active academic role in the Business School. She has had overall responsibility for the University’s quality assurance framework as Assistant Principal since 2009. She plays a key role in the Scottish HE quality landscape as a member of QAA Scotland’s Advisory Board, chair of the sparqs University Advisory Group, and member of the Quality Arrangements for Scottish Higher Education (QASHE) group. Video: Defining Community and Belonging for Hybrid Rayya Ghul Rayya is a National Teaching Fellow and lecturer in University Learning and Teaching. She is based in the Institute for Academic Development where she is the University Lead for the Edinburgh Teaching Award and convenes the course on Accessible and Inclusive Learning. Rayya runs Practical Strategies sessions on embedding access and inclusion into the curriculum and also ways to apply a solution focused approach to supporting students in a variety of roles. Video: Co-Creating the Classroom Tim Fawns Dr Tim Fawns is Deputy Programme Director of the MSc in Clinical Education and part-time tutor on the MSc in Digital Education. He is also the director of the international Edinburgh Summer School in Clinical Education. His main academic interests are in education, technology and memory. Video: Designing Assessments for Hybrid Teaching
07:53
February 23, 2021
"I want to bring something new to the table"
"I want to bring something new to the table"
This episode is part of an occasional series from The Teaching Matters Podcast where current and previous contributors to the Teaching Matters blog discuss their writing process as well as the social and academic relevance of their work. These discussions give insight into how contributors construct ideas and meaning around teaching and learning. In this episode, Joanna Holtan, Director of the Mastercard Scholars Foundation Program at the University of Edinburgh talks to Martine Irakoze, a Mastercard Scholar at the University of Edinburgh in International Relations & International Law. Joanna and Martine mention another Teaching Matter’s contributor, Brindley J Fortuin who you can hear in conversation with Joanna in a previous episode. Read Martine’s Teaching Matters post Leadership Revisited.
08:51
February 19, 2021
"the work is doing what it’s supposed to do"
"the work is doing what it’s supposed to do"
This episode is part of an occasional series from The Teaching Matters Podcast where current and previous contributors to the Teaching Matters blog discuss their blogging process as well as the social and academic relevance of their work. These discussions give insight into how contributors construct ideas and meaning around teaching and learning.  In this episode, Johanna Holton, Director of the Mastercard Scholars Foundation Program at the University of Edinburgh talks to Brindley Fortuin, a PhD student at the University of Edinburgh Centre of African Studies and a former Mastercard Scholar. Read Brindley’s Teaching Matters blog post ‘The Power of an Image.' Learn more about The Mastercard Scholars Foundation Program. 
10:32
February 11, 2021
The ASID Project: A Student-Centred Outlook on the Development of Hybrid Teaching and Learning
The ASID Project: A Student-Centred Outlook on the Development of Hybrid Teaching and Learning
In this episode, Colette Sheard, a former student in the School of Mathematics in conversation with David Jordan, Chancellor’s Fellow and Reader at the University of Edinburgh School of Mathematics and Charlotte Desvages, a University Teacher in Mathematical Computing about the ASID Creation Support Project (Adapt, Support, Implement, Deliver) which helped the school prepare for a successful transition to hybrid teaching. Colette also shares her own experience working on the project in a blog post on the Teaching Matters site. 
15:18
February 05, 2021
Place Based Education (Part 4)
Place Based Education (Part 4)
This episode is part of a limited series on Place-Based Education in hybrid teaching and learning. In part 4, Robbie Nicol, a professor of place based education, and Heidi Smith, a lecturer of outdoor learning at Moray House School of Education and Sport, discuss in-person tutor meetings outdoors and it's capacity to support health and wellbeing. Please feel free to share your comments with us, either directly on the blog or you can email us at teachingmatters@ed.ac.uk.
09:31
January 28, 2021
Place Based Education (Part 3)
Place Based Education (Part 3)
This episode is part of a limited series on Place-Based Education in hybrid teaching and learning. In this episode, Heidi Smith a lecturer of outdoor learning at Moray House School of Education and Sport, talks to Susan McCarthy, a student at Moray House about Susan's experience of in-person dissertation supervision outdoors.  Please feel free to share your comments with us, either directly on the blog or you can email us at teachingmatters@ed.ac.uk.
05:38
January 22, 2021
Place Based Education (Part 2)
Place Based Education (Part 2)
This episode is part of a limited series on Place-Based Education in hybrid teaching and learning.  In part 2, Robbie Nicol, a professor of place based education, and Heidi Smith, a lecturer of outdoor learning at Moray House School of Education and Sport, discuss in-person dissertation supervision outdoors and it's capacity to support health and wellbeing. Please feel free to share your comments with us, either directly on the blog or you can email us at teachingmatters@ed.ac.uk.
15:60
January 15, 2021
Assessment and Social Justice in the Hybrid University
Assessment and Social Justice in the Hybrid University
In this episode, Vel McCune Senior Lecturer and Head of the Learning and Teaching team at the Institute for Academic Development at the University of Edinburgh and Jan McArthur a Senior Lecturer at Lancaster University, discuss how to design assessment for social justice in a hybrid context. You can watch a video of this conversation at the Edinburgh Hybrid Teaching Exchange. 
22:47
January 14, 2021
Student Mental Health & Online Engagement Part 2
Student Mental Health & Online Engagement Part 2
In this two part series of the Teaching Matters podcast we examine the impact of online engagement on student’s mental health.  We explore the positive sides of online engagement, the downsides, the unintended consequences and what we can do to make things a little bit better. With Esther Mijers Director of Teaching for UG in History Classics & Archaeology University of Edinburgh Wendy Ugolini Director of Teaching for PG in History, Classics & Archaeology University of Edinburgh Niamh McCrossan  VP Welfare, Edinburgh University Students’ Association University of Edinburgh Martin Judd Assistant Director, Student Support; The Student Disability Service University of Edinburgh Vicky Madden Digital Safety Support Officer, in the Learning Teaching and Web Services Team, in Information Services University of Edinburgh Harriet Harris University Chaplain University of Edinburgh Cathy Bovill Senior Lecturer in Student Engagement, IAD University of Edinburgh Producers Joe Arton and Cathy Bovill Edited and presented by Joe Arton Music Provided By Hooksounds
10:18
January 10, 2021
Student Mental Health & Online Engagement Part 1
Student Mental Health & Online Engagement Part 1
In this two part series of the Teaching Matters podcast we examine the impact of online engagement on student’s mental health.  We explore the positive sides of online engagement, the downsides, the unintended consequences and what we can do to make things a little bit better.  With Esther Mijers Director of Teaching for UG in History Classics & Archaeology University of Edinburgh  Wendy Ugolini Director of Teaching for PG in History, Classics & Archaeology University of Edinburgh  Niamh McCrossan  VP Welfare, Edinburgh University Students’ Association University of Edinburgh  Martin Judd Assistant Director, Student Support; The Student Disability Service University of Edinburgh  Vicky Madden Digital Safety Support Officer, in the Learning Teaching and Web Services Team, in Information Services University of Edinburgh  Harriet Harris University Chaplain University of Edinburgh  Cathy Bovill Senior Lecturer in Student Engagement, IAD University of Edinburgh  Producers Joe Arton and Cathy Bovill Edited and presented by Joe Arton  Music Provided By Hooksounds 
09:17
January 08, 2021
Place Based Education (Part 1)
Place Based Education (Part 1)
This first episode is part of a limited series on creative approaches to practicals and field work in online and hybrid spaces. In this episode Robbie Nicol, a professor of place based education, and Heidi Smith, a lecturer of outdoor learning at Moray House School of Education and Sport, discuss the critical role of place based education in hybrid teaching and learning and it's capacity to support health and wellbeing. Please feel free to share your comments with us, either directly on the blog or you can email us at teachingmatters@ed.ac.uk. Music credit: Jeremy Marsan (https://jeremymarsan.com/)
11:02
December 13, 2020
Commonwealth Scholars' experience of diversity and inclusion
Commonwealth Scholars' experience of diversity and inclusion
Episode 14 is hosted by Annabel Boud, Programme Manager Policy at the Commonwealth Scholarship Commission (CSC), based in London. Led by international development objectives, CSC offers scholarships (undergraduate and postgraduate) to students living in Commonwealth countries to come and study in the UK. Since 1960, nearly 1000 Commonwealth students have studied at The University of Edinburgh under this scheme. This year, 29* students from countries such as Nigeria, Pakistan, Uganda, Sri Lanka and Bangladesh are enrolled in programmes at Edinburgh, from an MSc in Global Health Policy to a PhD in Molecular Plant Sciences. 
01:00:28
June 26, 2019
Who is responsible for ensuring a diverse and inclusive curriculum?
Who is responsible for ensuring a diverse and inclusive curriculum?
Episodes 12 and 13 are hosted by Diva Mukherji, Vice President Education at Edinburgh University Students’ Association in academic year 2018/19. In both episodes, Diva is joined by Diljeet Bhachu, (PhD student at Reid School of Music, Edinburgh College of Art), Rosie Taylor (BSc Biological Sciences student), and Dr Katie Nicoll Baines (Project Manager, Evidence Base, School of Chemistry).  
37:17
June 20, 2019
Diversity and inclusion at the heart of curriculum review
Diversity and inclusion at the heart of curriculum review
Episodes 12 and 13 are hosted by Diva Mukherji, Vice President Education at Edinburgh University Students’ Association in academic year 2018/19. In both episodes, Diva is joined by Diljeet Bhachu, (PhD student at Reid School of Music, Edinburgh College of Art), Rosie Taylor (BSc Biological Sciences student), and Dr Katie Nicoll Baines (Project Manager, Evidence Base, School of Chemistry). 
53:50
June 18, 2019
Lecture recording to support learning
Lecture recording to support learning
Episodes 6 to 11 align with  the Lecture Recording mini-series, which Teaching Matters ran between October and December 2018. This series was co-edited by members of the Lecture Recording Programme, and was designed to provide a snapshot of lecture recording at Edinburgh, and present a range of perspectives and experiences. Episodes 10 and 11 follow on from the conversations about the value, implementation and practicalities of lecturing recording, which are discussed in episodes 6 (Implementation of lecture recording), 7 (Practicalities of lecture recording), 8 (Using lecture recording and evaluation so far), and 9 (The value and impact of lecture recording). In these episodes, Dr Jill Mackay (a Research Fellow in Veterinary Education, and principal investigator on the lecture recording evaluation ) returns as our guest host. She is joined by Diva Mukherji (2018/19 Vice President Education, Edinburgh University Students' Association)
14:41
June 05, 2019
Building a learning community
Building a learning community
Episodes 6 to 11 align with  the Lecture Recording mini-series, which Teaching Matters ran between October and December 2018. This series was co-edited by members of the Lecture Recording Programme, and was designed to provide a snapshot of lecture recording at Edinburgh, and present a range of perspectives and experiences. Episodes 10 and 11 follow on from the conversations about the value, implementation and practicalities of lecturing recording, which are discussed in episodes 6 (Implementation of lecture recording), 7 (Practicalities of lecture recording), 8 (Using lecture recording and evaluation so far), and 9 (The value and impact of lecture recording). In these episodes, Dr Jill Mackay (a Research Fellow in Veterinary Education, and principal investigator on the lecture recording evaluation ) returns as our guest host. She is joined by Diva Mukherji (2018/19 Vice President Education, Edinburgh University Students' Association).
18:14
June 05, 2019
The value and impact of lecture recording
The value and impact of lecture recording
Episodes 6 -9 accompany the Lecture Recording mini-series, which Teaching Matters ran between October and December 2018. This series was co-edited by members of the Lecture Recording Programme, and was designed to provide a snapshot of lecture recording at Edinburgh, and present a range of perspectives and experiences.   
19:37
May 29, 2019
Using lecture recording and evaluation so far
Using lecture recording and evaluation so far
Episodes 6 -9 accompany the Lecture Recording mini-series, which Teaching Matters ran between October and December 2018. This series was co-edited by members of the Lecture Recording Programme, and was designed to provide a snapshot of lecture recording at Edinburgh, and present a range of perspectives and experiences.   
14:18
May 29, 2019
Practicalities of lecture recording
Practicalities of lecture recording
Episodes 6 -9 accompany the Lecture Recording mini-series, which Teaching Matters ran between October and December 2018. This series was co-edited by members of the Lecture Recording Programme, and was designed to provide a snapshot of lecture recording at Edinburgh, and present a range of perspectives and experiences.  
13:21
May 29, 2019
Implementation of lecture recording
Implementation of lecture recording
Episodes 6 -9 accompany the Lecture Recording mini-series, which Teaching Matters ran between October and December 2018. This series was co-edited by members of the Lecture Recording Programme, and was designed to provide a snapshot of lecture recording at Edinburgh, and present a range of perspectives and experiences. 
15:24
May 29, 2019
Blogging to enhance professional practice
Blogging to enhance professional practice
In episode 5, Karen Howie (Technology Enhanced Learning Team Manager in Learning, Teaching and Web, Information Services) hosts a conversation about blogging to develop your professional profile. She talks with University of Edinburgh staff members, Eli Appleby-Donald (Learning Technologist at Edinburgh College of Art) and Lorna Campbell (Senior Service Manager for Learning Technology in Learning, Teaching and Web, Information Services), and PhD student, James Lamb (a Doctoral Student within the Centre for Research in Digital Education, in the Moray House School of Education), about the art of blogging, the difference between various types of blogs, frequency of posts, maintaining and promoting a blog, how to deal with 'blogger's block', and engaging with your audience.  
40:57
April 24, 2019
Can blogging be used as an effective form of assessment?
Can blogging be used as an effective form of assessment?
In this episode, student guest host, Lila Pitcher (Academic Blogging Intern in Information Services), leads a discussion with Dr Nina Morris (Lecturer in Human Geography) and Dr Hazel Christie (Lecturer in University Learning and Teaching) about the benefits and challenges of using blogging as an innovative form of assessment.  Their discussion is based on their recent Principal's Teaching Award Scheme (PTAS) research, which explores how assessed blogs are being used across the University.   They discuss the use of blogs as a form of assessment with regards to marking criteria, course design, staff investment, technological limitations, writing style and digital footprint.  Nina and Hazel also provide some strategies and tips for teaching staff who may want to use blogging as an assessment tool, and for students working with blogs as part of their courses.
36:44
April 17, 2019
Climate optimism or fatalism: Teaching climate change in today’s university (Part 3)
Climate optimism or fatalism: Teaching climate change in today’s university (Part 3)
In this third episode, MSc Environmental Sustainability student, Polly Wells, returns as our guest host to continue this conversation with three University of Edinburgh staff members: Velda McCune, Emily Creamer and Hannah Chalmers. Polly asks her guests what inspired them to teach about climate change issues and their most effective ways of teaching these concerns, as well as inviting debate about the merits and challenges of interdisciplinary teaching and learning. 
34:24
February 28, 2019
Climate optimism or fatalism: Teaching climate change in today’s university (Part 2)
Climate optimism or fatalism: Teaching climate change in today’s university (Part 2)
This podcast complements the University’s Teaching Matters blog, and invites students and staff to engage in topical conversations. The first three episodes accompany the Teaching Matters mini-series on social responsibility and sustainability. In these episodes, University of Edinburgh staff and students debate how sustainability and environmental concerns are being tackled in today’s university.  In this second episode, we continue the conversations from Episode 1 on climate change, which explore if students are facing climate optimism or climate fatalism in the classroom. In this episode, our guest host, masters student Polly Wells, asks her fellow students, Ryan Gilmour, Ellie Ashton and Emily Bankert, about the roles of teachers and students in tackling climate change through teaching and learning.
30:57
February 20, 2019
Climate optimism or fatalism: Teaching climate change in today’s university (Part 1)
Climate optimism or fatalism: Teaching climate change in today’s university (Part 1)
This podcast complements the University’s Teaching Matters blog, and invites students and staff to engage in topical conversations. The first three episodes accompany the Teaching Matters mini-series on social responsibility and sustainability. In these episodes, University of Edinburgh staff and students debate how sustainability and environmental concerns are being tackled in today’s university. In this episode, students start to discuss emotionally-charged issues around climate change, asking if they are facing climate optimism or climate fatalism in the classroom. Masters student Polly Wells is our guest host, who welcomes fellow students Ryan Gilmour, Ellie Ashton and Emily Bankert to the conversation.
31:20
February 20, 2019