Temple Solel Paradise Valley Arizona

Temple Solel Paradise Valley Arizona

By Temple Solel
We are offering the best from Temple Solel in Paradise Valley Arizona as our clergy team of Rabbi John Linder, Rabbi Debbie Stiel, and Cantorial Soloist Todd Herzog share their weekly insights from our Shabbat services and beyond. Temple Solel is a vibrant and engaged Reform community grounded in relationships and deeds, and elevated by Shabbat and Torah. We welcome all who seek a connection to Jewish life regardless of religious background, race, ethnicity, gender, socioeconomic status, ability, age, sexual orientation and gender identity.
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Rabbi Linder 06122020
El Na Refa Na La
13:45
June 19, 2020
Rabbi Langowitz June 5
Rabbi Langowitz June 5
09:29
June 9, 2020
Rabbi Linder 05292020
Rabbi Linder 05292020
13:19
June 1, 2020
Rabbi Langowitz and Cantorial Soloist Todd Herzog: Bonus from 05222020
Rabbi Langowitz and Cantorial Soloist Todd Herzog 
02:28
May 24, 2020
Rabbi Linder Erev Shabbat Services 05222
Rabbi Linder Erev Shabbat Services 05222
11:49
May 24, 2020
Rabbi Langowitz Erev Shabbat Services 051520
Erev Shabbat Services 051520
11:06
May 18, 2020
05082020 Rabbi Langowitz
05082020 Rabbi Langowitz
09:37
May 11, 2020
Rabbi Linder 050102020
Rabbi Linder 050102020
12:35
May 3, 2020
Rabbi Linder 04242020
Rabbi Linder 04242020
12:41
April 25, 2020
Rabbi Langowitz 04172020
Rabbi Langowitz 04172020
09:26
April 18, 2020
Rabbi Linder 04.10
Rabbi Linder 04.10
08:36
April 16, 2020
Rabbi Langowitz April 3
Rabbi Langowitz April 3
09:52
April 16, 2020
Rabbi Linder 03272020
Rabbi Linder 03272020 Parashat Vayikra Faith in Uncertain Times March 27, 2020 – Nisan 2, 5780 Temple Solel, Paradise Valley, AZ Rabbi John A. Linder As a religious leader, there have been many questions on my mind over the past couple of weeks, as COVID-19 takes center stage across the United States, the latest stop in its unyielding pandemic spread. Foremost, for me, is the question, “How can our respective faith traditions help us navigate this crisis.” In these times of magnified disorientation, fear, loss, uncertainty, and instability, what does Judaism offer, to a solid foundation upon which to stand? First of all, Judaism has never presented the world as a place of order and certainty. Quite to the contrary, our creation story dismissed from the start any illusion that life will be lived in the perfection of the Garden of Eden. Adam and Eve, after a brief taste of the garden, leave that mythical place behind, and step into the real world of uncertainty and chaos. At the end of the day, the essence of Judaism is to use the agency we have, to respond to a world in which we have little control. To the degree possible, Judaism helps us to make order out of chaos. That’s the purpose of the Vayikra, the Book of Leviticus that we begin this week. In the ancient world, day to day life was simply much more precarious ours today. All the more so living in the wilderness. Food supply, wild animals and disease presented everyday challenges. The Israelites, momentarily celebrated their first taste of freedom having safely crossed the red sea; with timbrals in hand singing mi chamocha. That party didn’t last long. Now, how that had to figure out how to survive in the world as a free people, fashioning living a holy life in relationship with the one God of heaven and earth. Before turning to the Book of Leviticus, the Israelites have just completed a portable sanctuary, a mishkan, a place for God to dwell. So God is always with the Israelites, whether they are encamped or moving. God is with them. The first three words we read in this Torah portion are, “Vayikra el Moshe, The Lord called Moses.” That might not be curious to you, but it is to the rabbis over the centuries, trying to interpret the wisdom of Torah. Through the first two books of Torah, when God wants to speak, well, God just does that, he speaks, Vayomer Elohim, God said, let there be light, and, there was light. Vayomer Adonai El Avram, and God said to Avram, Vayomer Adonai El Moshe, and God said to Moses. When God want to speak, he does that, and well, the universe and people have now problem hearing him. But, here for the first time, God firsts calls to Moses, and it begs the question, Why. Why doesn’t God just speak to Moses like he always has, why now call to Moses. One of the most profound interpretations comes from Rabbi Kalman Kalonymmus Shapiro. Rabbi Shapiro, one of revered 20th centuries Hasidic rabbis from Poland died in Rabbi Shapira's memory is revered, and he is held as an example of faith under enormous duress. He was murdered in the Trawniki concentration camp in Lublin, Poland. Responding to these words, “The Lord called to Moses”, Rabbi Shapiro, drawing from another midrash, images that God is like a human being who cries out to a friend, saying, “help me carry the burden.” Nobody would know more than Rabbi Shapiro, such a burden that God wants help carrying is our human suffering. God feels the suffering as we do. Yet, Judaism’s boldness believes in a God who needs our help in carrying and helping to alleviate human suffering. God takes comfort in not having to carry it alone. So like calling out to a friend, God calls to Moses for help. And another midrash answering why God needs to call Moses, imagines that Moses is simply too far from God to hear him speak. God has to call out to him to get his attention “Moses, over hear, I’ve got something to say to you.” Perhaps Moses thought, after compl
11:26
March 29, 2020
Rabbi Langowitz 03202020
Rabbi Langowitz 03202020
13:13
March 22, 2020
Erev Shabbat Services 03132020
Erev Shabbat Services 03132020
14:20
March 16, 2020
Erev Shabbat 03062020
Erev Shabbat 03062020
09:30
March 10, 2020
Erev Shabbat Services 02282020
Erev Shabbat Services 02282020
04:30
March 3, 2020
Erev Shabbat Services 02212020
Erev Shabbat Services 02212020
06:34
February 23, 2020
Erev Shabbat Service 2142020
Erev Shabbat Service 2142020
13:05
February 16, 2020
Rabbi Langowitz Erev Shabbat Services 02072020
Rabbi Langowitz Erev Shabbat Services 02072020
11:46
February 10, 2020
Rabbi Langowitz 01312020
Rabbi Langowitz 01312020
11:48
February 2, 2020
Rabbi Linder 01242020
Rabbi Linder 01242020
10:21
January 29, 2020
Rabbi Langowitz 01172020
Rabbi Langowitz 01172020
11:40
January 22, 2020
Rabbi Linder 01102020
Rabbi Linder 01102020
13:43
January 22, 2020
01032020 Rabbi Langowitz
01032020 Rabbi Langowitz
12:41
January 5, 2020
Rabbi Linder 122719
Rabbi Linder 122719
13:34
December 28, 2019
Vayeshev Rabbi Langowitz 122019
Vayeshev Rabbi Langowitz 122019
11:05
December 23, 2019
Rabbi Langowitz 121319
Rabbi Langowitz 121319
13:07
December 17, 2019
Judy Schaffert 120619
Judy Schaffert 120619
09:20
December 17, 2019
Rabbi Linder 112919
Rabbi Linder 112919
10:50
December 17, 2019
Rabbi Langowitz 112219
Rabbi Langowitz 112219
12:02
December 17, 2019
Rabbi Langowitz 111519
Rabbi Langowitz 111519
08:01
December 17, 2019
Rabbi Linder 110819
Rabbi Linder 110819
10:30
December 17, 2019
Rabbi Langowitz 110119
Rabbi Langowitz 110119 
10:25
December 16, 2019
Rabbi Linder October 25, 2019
Rabbi Linder October 25, 2019 
10:10
December 16, 2019
Rabbi Linder 101819
Rabbi Linder 101819
09:47
October 20, 2019
Rabbi Langowitz 101119
Rabbi Langowitz 101119
10:32
October 20, 2019
Rabbi Linder Yom Kippur 2019
Rabbi Linder Yom Kippur 2019 Originally Broadcast 10/09/19 
23:02
October 10, 2019
Rabbi Langowitz Kol Nidre 2019
Rabbi Langowitz Kol Nidre Originally Broadcast 10/08/19
16:12
October 10, 2019
Rabbi Linder Shabbat Shuva 100519
Rabbi Linder Shabbat Shuva 100519
22:07
October 8, 2019
Rabbi Langowitz RH Sermon with song
Rabbi Langowitz - Rosh Hashanah Sermon "Grace" with Brandi Carlile song "Most of All"
23:12
October 3, 2019
092919 Rabbi Linder Erev RH Trad Sermon
092919 Rabbi Linder Erev RH Trad Sermon "Empathy through three lenses: our Jewish story, art and bearing witness".
20:13
October 3, 2019
093019 Rabbi Langowitz Sermon Grace
Rabbi Langowitz RH AM Traditional Service Sermon Grace
18:32
October 3, 2019
Rabbi Langowitz 092719
Rabbi Langowitz 092719
10:52
October 2, 2019
09/006/19 Rabbi Linder Shoftim
Rabbi Linder Shoftim from September 6, 2019 צֶדֶק צֶדֶק תִּרְדּף
12:33
September 7, 2019
08/30/19 Rabbi Langowitz Re'eh
08/30/19 Rabbi Langowitz Re'eh Grace at the US Open
13:18
September 6, 2019
Rabbi Linder Gratitude Ekev 082319
Rabbi Linder Gratitude Ekev 082319 witha very special guest!
2:07:53
August 25, 2019
Rabbi Langowitz on Vaetchanan 081619
 Rabbi Langowitz on Vaetchanan 081619 
10:56
August 18, 2019
Rabbi Linder 08/09/19
Rabbi Linder 08/09/19 A very special message from Rabbi Linder on Devarim.
17:18
August 12, 2019
Rabbi Langowitz 07/26/19 Pinchas
Rabbi Langowitz 07/26/19 Pinchas
12:03
July 31, 2019
Rabbi Linder 07/19/19
Rabbi Linder 07/19 Fifty years ago, after the 230,000-mile voyage, Apollo 11 successfully landed on the Moon. The first time in the history of humanity. If you’re over 55, you likely recall exactly where you were on that day. I was a 12-year-old boy at Camp Kennebec - a secular, Jewish boys camp in the north woods of Maine. Just this past Wednesday, I called my life-long friend and brother, Stanley Weil. We reminisced about gathering in the camp’s mess hall in the middle of that July afternoon, 1969; some 200 campers and counselors, eyes affixed on a small, staticky black and white Zenith television set. Little did we know that we were amongst the world’s largest viewing audience to this day; some 650 million people, a quarter of the Earth’s population, holding our collective breath; witnessing the successful landing; hearing astronaut Neil Armstrong report, “Houston, Tranquility Base here, the Eagle has landed;” then, some hours later, Armstrong stepped out of the lunar-module, down the ladder, the first human being to set foot on the Moon. Armstrong put that singular achievement in perspective for us all, “That’s one small step for man, one giant leap for mankind.” It was a dizzying, dazzling moment for this wide-eyed and open-hearted 12-year-old camper. As it is with adolescent boys’ insecurities, I momentarily turned away from my friends with eyes welling up. Before going about the business of collecting Moon rocks and soil, making this more than a Cold War competition between the two earthly superpowers, rather helping earthlings better understand our cosmic creation story and our place in the universe, Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin set up an American flag and a plaque that read, “Here men from the planet Earth first set foot upon the Moon. July 1969 AD. We came in peace for all mankind.” Armstrong then took a photograph of Aldrin saluting the American flag. All the while, unsung hero, Commander Mike Collins, was orbiting 60 miles above the Moon, his job – to collect his fellow astronauts and return safely to Earth. Collins, alone in his command module, yet not lonely, described being awestruck by the magnificent spectacle of seeing the moon up close. “The sun,” he said, “was coming around it, cascading and making a golden halo…As impressive as the view was of this alien Moon seen up close, it was nothing compared to the sight of the Earth. The Earth was the main show. The Earth was it. It’s tiny, it’s shiny, it’s beautiful, it’s home and it’s fragile.”  In 1961, President John F. Kennedy boldly (and with much controversy) set the course for America to invest in space exploration, specifically aiming to put a man on the Moon within the decade. What a shame he wouldn’t live to see that day. In announcing the program, Kennedy declared, “There is no strife, no prejudice, no national conflict in outer space as yet.” Kennedy provided an infusion to NASA while America and countries around the globe were embroiled in conflict. Indeed, it was enticing to move our gaze from earthly concerns, into the unexplored frontier of outer space.
13:29
July 22, 2019
Rabbi Langowitz 07/12/19 Chukat
 Rabbi Langowitz 07/12/19 Chukat 
11:01
July 21, 2019
Rabbi Linder B'haalot'cha 06/21
Rabbi Linder B'haalot'cha 06/21  In this week’s Torah portion, B’haalot’cha, we find the Israelite community, and those who have chosen to join them, on the first anniversary marking their Exodus from Egypt. In this first year, God has given the Torah to all present at Mt. Sinai (and each generation to follow), and the entire community has participated in building the portable Tabernacle or Mishkan, at the heart of which is the ark to carry the stone tablets of Torah. Those tablets, a manifestation of the divine, will now serve as the Jewish people’s living, eternal guidebook and moral compass; helping them navigate their way through the wilderness to the Promised Land, and wherever the road will lead our people.  The Israelites now have what they need to continue their journey, though understandably, with great trepidation of the unknown. The familiarity of slavery in Egypt is more comforting than the uncertainty of freedom that lies ahead. As with all human beings, the Israelites need signs and guides to accompany them on their journey. The divine signs from the parashah come in the form of a cloud. When the cloud settles upon the Tabernacle, the Israelites know its time to stop and set up camp. When the cloud lifts, they know it’s time to, literally, pull up stakes and resume their journey.    When I read the wonderful news this morning that Joy Harjo was just named America’s next Poet Laureate, I thought about the lovely alignment of stars between Harjo’s poetry and this week’s Torah portion. In Eagle Poem , Harjo writes: To pray you open your whole self To sky, to earth, to sun, to moon To one whole voice that is you. And know there is more That you can't see, can't hear; Can't know except in moments Steadily growing, and in languages That aren't always sound but other Circles of motion. Like eagle that Sunday morning Over Salt River. Circled in blue sky In wind, swept our hearts clean With sacred wings. We see you, see ourselves and know That we must take the utmost care And kindness in all things. Breathe in, knowing we are made of All this, and breathe, knowing We are truly blessed because we Were born, and die soon within a True circle of motion,  Like eagle rounding out the morning Inside us.  We pray that it will be done In beauty. In beauty. The sustainability of humanity and the earth entrusted to our care depends upon our ability to open our whole selves to signs all around us, so often offered from the natural world. As Harjo experiences the divine in sky, earth, sun, moon and eagle, so do the biblical authors image the divine as a cloud rising and settling. Only when we see ourselves in these signs, are we able to follow the moral compass of Torah. As this Shabbat is ushered in by the Summer Solstice, blessing us with an abundance of sunshine; let that light help us to see and know that we must take the utmost care and kindness in all things. Shabbat shalom, Rabbi John A. Linder 
12:39
June 23, 2019
Rabbi Linder Nasso 06/14/19
Rabbi Linder Nasso 06/14/19
11:30
June 19, 2019
Rabbi Langowitz Bamidbar 06/07/19
Rabbi Langowitz Bamidbar
10:30
June 19, 2019
Rabbi Langowitz Bechukotai 05/31/19
Rabbi Langowitz discusses Bechukotai.
10:20
June 19, 2019
Rabbi Linder 05/24/19 Behar
Rabbi Linder 05/24/19  Behar
13:17
May 28, 2019
05/11/19 Rabbi Langowitz Kedoshim and Confirmation
05/11/19 Rabbi Langowitz Kedoshim and Confirmation service. Please take a moment and rate our podcast. 
12:44
May 12, 2019
Rabbi Linder on Acharei Mot 05/03/19
On a special evening that included our choir and a send off to our high school seniors along with camp and Israel trip participants.Rabbi Linder gives a drash on Acharei Mot 05/03/19
11:35
May 5, 2019
Rabbi Langowitz 04/26/19
Rabbi Langowitz 04/26/19-"As we move through this Shabbat which closes our Passover experience; may we look for freedom for ourselves and others in acts of routine remembering. May we search for the right technologies to help us feel at one with others, to feel present with others, to feel present for others, even when our locations and experiences place us far away….."
10:42
April 27, 2019
Shabbat Hagadol with Rabbi Linder from April 12, 2019
Shabbat Hagadol with Rabbi Linder from April 12, 2019
08:43
April 13, 2019
Welcome Back Rabbi Linder! Listen as Rabbi Linder discusses Tazria from April 5, 2019
Welcome Back Rabbi Linder! Listen as Rabbi Linder discusses Tazria from April 5, 2019
06:34
April 9, 2019
Rabbi Langowitz and TSTY Ritual Chair Sam Banen discuss Sh'mini on March 29
Rabbi Langowitz and Temple Solel Temple Youth Ritual Chair Sam Banen discuss Sh'mini.
10:37
April 8, 2019
Rabbi Langowitz on Tzav from 03/22/19
Rabbi Langowitz on Tzav from 03/22/19
09:52
March 24, 2019
Rabbi Norm Cohen discusses Vayikra
Rabbi Norm Cohen discusses Vayikra
13:17
March 19, 2019
Rabbi Langowitz at HUC- JIR Founders' Day (03/7/19)
Rabbi Langowitz speaking at HUC- JIR Founders' Day (03/7/19) as Hebrew Union College establishes The Rabbi Dr. Eugene B. Borowitz  Chapel Endowment Fund.
20:02
March 11, 2019
Judy Schaffert on Parshat Pekudei
 Judy Schaffert on Parshat Pekudei. Ethics matter and the first internal audit.
08:40
March 9, 2019
Rabbi Langowitz discusses Vayakhel
Rabbi Langowitz discusses Vayakhel
08:59
March 3, 2019
Cantorial Soloist Todd Herzog on Ki Tisa
Listen as our Cantorial Soloist Todd Herzog  discusses Ki Tisa and defines "Holy".
12:16
February 23, 2019
Rabbi Langowitz on T'tzaveh
Rabbi Langowitz on T'tzaveh Public ritual; life cannot only be a series of elaborate rituals, we cannot live in the "big yes" all the time. 
09:08
February 17, 2019
Rabbi Norm Cohen on Terumah
Rabbi Norm Cohen on Terumah “the first fundraising event and why we give” for a special choir Shabbat at Temple Solel on February 8, 2019
13:49
February 10, 2019
Rabbi Langowitz on Mishpatim
Rabbi Langowitz answers questions on the role of religion in public life; how Jewish identity informs our engagement as American citizens; moving from case based concerns to ethical necessities of a just society and including all peoples narratives in our stories and how we go forward.
12:38
February 4, 2019
Judy Schaffert on Yitro
Judy Schaffert on Yitro  "The Name Game- considering the significance of names in meaning and value"
08:53
January 28, 2019
Rabbi Langowitz on B'shalach
Rabbi Langowitz on B'shalach for this very special Shabbat honoring the memory of Dr Martin Luther King.
12:28
January 20, 2019
Rabbi Norman Cohen on Bo
 Rabbi Cohen is visiting us from Minnetonka, Minnesota Rabbi Norman Cohen is rabbi emeritus of Bet Shalom Congregation in Minnetonka, where he was senior rabbi from 1981 through 2015.  His engagement in interfaith learning with Christians goes back to his college years at Holy Cross College in Worcester, Massachusetts, where he graduated with honors in 1972.  He earned his master’s degree from Hebrew Union College in Cincinnati in 1975 and was awarded an honorary doctorate of divinity there in 2001.  Rabbi Cohen returns to Holy Cross College every year to serve as chaplain and advisor to Jewish students and faculty, and he also visits Hebrew Union College as a teacher in practical rabbinics.  He has been an adjunct faculty member at several colleges and universities in Ohio and Minnesota, including St. Catherine University and St. Olaf College, and also at United Theological Seminary of the Twin Cities.  He has authored numerous magazine and newspaper articles and the book Jewish Bible Personages in the New Testament (University Press of America, 1989).  He is currently working on a new book, tentatively titled Stereotypes and Misconceptions that Christians and Jews Have about Each Other and What to do about Them.  https://www.stthomas.edu/jpc/programs/rabbis-in-residence/previousrabbis-in-residence/rabbi-norman-cohen.html
17:19
January 14, 2019
Rabbi Langowitz on Vayeira
Rabbi Langowitz discusses  Vayeira on the first Shabbat of 2019.  Why and when is Pharaoh's heart hardened? 
09:20
January 9, 2019
Rabbi John Linder on Sh'mot
Shabbat Shalom from Temple Solel Paradise Valley, Arizona on December 28, 2018 with Rabbi John Linder. www.templesolel.org Introducing Moses! These are the names of the sons of Israel who came to Egypt with Jacob, each coming with his household: Reuben, Simeon, Levi, and Judah; Issachar, Zebulun, and Benjamin; Dan and Naphtali, Gad and Asher. - Exodus 1:1-4
10:55
December 31, 2018
Rabbi Linder on Toldot
Rabbi Linder's Sermon from November 9, 2018 "Touched by Better Angels of our Nation"
10:44
November 28, 2018