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Astronomy News with The Cosmic Companion

Astronomy News with The Cosmic Companion

By The Cosmic Companion
The latest astronomy and space news from around the world. PLUS casual interviews with astronomers and other scientists seeking to understand the cosmos. All delivered in an easy-to-understand style with a dash of humor.

Named Best Astronomy Podcast in the world by Starlust! starlust.org/space-podcasts

Coming up March 16: Neil deGrasse Tyson!
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Jenifer Millard from the Awesome Astronomy podcast Talks About Star Parties (sneak preview)
Next week on Astronomy News with The Cosmic Companion: Dr. Jenifer Millard, host of The Awesome Astronomy Podcast, talks about astronomy, star parties, and the wonder of science. Listen to the sneak preview!  plus Esen Ercan Alp of Argonne National Laboratory – one of the few people to have seen samples from the asteroid Ryugu! Full interview drops 19 October. Future episodes: 26 October (s5/e16): Halloween Special! The science of Halloween with Erika Engelhaupt, author of Gory Details. 2 November (s5/e17): Professor Tara Murphy, University of Sydney, on strange radio signals coming from near the center of our galaxy. 9 November (s5/e18): NASA’s Psyche Mission to the Asteroid Belt! Guest TBA Subscribe or follow us today, and never miss an episode!
00:42
October 15, 2021
ASKAP J173608.2-321635 - The Strange Radio Burst Seen Near the Center of the Milky Way - w/ Tara Murphy, University of Sydney - Sneak Preview
What is ASKAP J173608.2-321635 - the strange radio burst from near the center of the Milky Way? We talk with Professor Tara Murphy of the University of Sydney, who helped lead this discovery.    Here's a sneak preview - enjoy! Full interview drops 2 November. Follow or subscribe today and never miss an episode.
00:57
October 13, 2021
Homer Hickam "Don't Blow Yourself Up" - Astronomy News with The Cosmic Companion 12 October 2021
This week on Astronomy News with The Cosmic Companion, we welcome NASA legend Homer Hickam to the show. The inspiration for the movie October Sky talks about growing up in a West Virginia coal-mining town, his new book, Don’t Blow Yourself Up, and... teaching David Letterman how to SCUBA dive?   But first, we look in on an extreme exoplanet where iron rains down from the sky, we join NASA as they ready to deflect an asteroid for the first time, and we will join a Russian film crew which recently arrived at the ISS, preparing to shoot the first movie in space.   Listen to this interview with Homer Hickam here, or watch the video version of this episode at: https://youtu.be/Y1QzOHO-HyI
40:28
October 12, 2021
The Night Sky in October - Amateur Astronomy in October 2021 w/ Starcharts -- The Cosmic Companion
Amateur astronomers have a lot to look up to in October 2021.   Jupiter, Saturn, Venus, and the Moon all put on dazzling shows, plus a pair of meteor showers! Listen to the podcast here, or watch the video version of this guide to the night sky at: https://youtu.be/-9a9klMgJ2o
02:00
October 6, 2021
Robots in Space - Astrobees and Beyond - Astronomy News with The Cosmic Companion 5 October, 2021
A look at robotics and artificial intelligence in space as NASA's Trey Smith and Jose Benavides visit Astronomy News with The Cosmic Companion!   But first, we look at a triple star system that may be home to an odd exoplanet, we ride along with the BepiColombo craft exploring Mercury, and we talk about what's coming to the night sky in October!   Listen to the podcast here, or watch the video version of this episode at: https://youtu.be/PrqyFLHvbaw
26:34
October 5, 2021
Roman Chiporuhka, Space VIP, talks Private Spaceflight - The Cosmic Companion 28 Sept. 2021
This week on Astronomy News with The Cosmic Companion, we talk with Roman Chiporuhka, CEO of Space VIP, about the future of private spaceflight, and what it could mean for the future of humanity.   We'll also take a look at the VIPER spacecraft which will soon scout locations for the return of humans to the Moon. Then, we'll head out to Mars, hearing about a new study showing water on Mars may have been doomed from the start. We're also going to take a look at light from a distant galaxy, seen as an Einstein ring in a new image from the Hubble Space Telescope.
30:33
September 28, 2021
Dillon Dong, Caltech Graduate Student, Talks About an Unusual Supernova - Astronomy News with The Cosmic Companion 21 Sept. 2021
This week on Astronomy News with The Cosmic Companion, we welcome Dillon Dong, a graduate student at Caltech to the show. We're going to talk about his work discovering a previously-unseen type of supernova eruption.   But first, we learn about a supernova due for a return engagement, we hear how Steve Wozniak could be entering the space salvage business, and we will look in on Inspiration 4, the first all-civilian flight to space.
22:04
September 21, 2021
Cathy Olkin of SwRI - The Lucy mission to Jupiter's Trojan Asteroids - The Cosmic Companion 14 Sept. 2021
This week on Astronomy News with The Cosmic Companion, we welcome Dr. Cathy Olkin from the Southwest Research Institute to the show. We will talk about Lucy – the first mission to explore the Trojan asteroids of Jupiter.   But first, we look in on an unusual radio signal coming from near the center of our galaxy. Next, we journey out to the International Space Station, where a signal from a smoke alarm caused concern prior to a spacewalk. Finally, we explore the Cosmos in the most-detailed virtual universe yet created before welcoming our special guest.   Listen to the podcast version of this episode here, or watch it as a video at: https://youtu.be/0cXJIEymjnc.   Next week: Dillon Dong, graduate student at Caltech, talking about discovering a new type of supernova!  Please subscribe or follow today, and never miss an episode!
23:57
September 14, 2021
What are Fast Radio Bursts? With Kaitlyn Shin, CHIME member - Astronomy News with The Cosmic Companion 7 September 2021
This week on Astronomy News with The Cosmic Companion, we welcome CHIME member Kaitlyn Shin to the show, and she's going to  teach us about fast radio bursts coming from space. But first, we look at a new study showing that stars eating planets may be more common than we thought, a new type of supernova is seen by astronomers as a black hole or neutron star collides with its parent star, and China takes the first steps toward building a space station a kilometer long. Listen to the podcast here, or watch this episode as a video at: https://youtu.be/cvs0vvAgDbA
22:27
September 7, 2021
Geoff Notkin, Meteorite Men, Talk Meteorites - Astronomy News with The Cosmic Companion 31 Aug. 2021
This week on Astronomy News with The Cosmic Companion, we welcome Geoff Notkin to the show. He is the two-time Emmy Awarding-winning host of STEM Journals, and he hosted Meteorite Men on the Science Channel. He’s going to tell us all about meteorites!    But first, we discuss the future of space stations as the ISS nears the end of its operational life. We also find that supermassive black holes wandering through space may be more common than we thought, and we hear about the discovery of an asteroid by someone who is very familiar to fans of Star Trek. Listen to the podcast here, or watch this episode as a video at: https://youtu.be/0axG2zDOd1s
30:13
August 31, 2021
Geoff Notkin on Growing Up Around Science - 31 August Episode Preview
Good news: We have Geoff Notkin, Emmy Award-winning host of Meteorite Men and STEM Journals on next week, talking about meteorites, and his adventures searching the globe for treasures from space. Better news: We have a sneak preview of the episode for you right now! Enjoy!
00:51
August 24, 2021
Cosmic Connections: The Dragons of Ara, Woolly Mammoths, and Floods
The premiere episode of our newest short-form series, Cosmic Connections! This week, we explore the connections between a nebula in space called the Dragons of Ara, and learn its connections to woolly mammoths, floods, and more! 
04:12
August 19, 2021
Richard Teague and Davide Farnocchia - Astronomy News with The Cosmic Companion 17 Aug. 2021
This week on Astronomy News with The Cosmic Companion, we have a special double interview as we welcome Dr. Richard Teague from the Center for Astrophysics to the show, talking about finding the first moon ever discovered in another solar system. We will also talk with Dr. Davide Farnocchia, asteroid dynamicist at Jet Propulsion Laboratory, about the asteroid Bennu, which could be headed for a collision with Earth (but, probably not). We also have an exploding star, and we take a look at the development of robotic attendants aboard space stations and colonies of the future. Listen to the podcast version of this episode here, or watch the video version at: https://youtu.be/FPqJRN68VXA
34:45
August 17, 2021
Jonathan Lunine and the Volcanoes of Venus - Astronomy News with The Cosmic Companion 10 Aug. 2021
This week on Astronomy News with The Cosmic Companion, we welcome Dr. Jonathan Lunine, chair of the astronomy department at Cornell University to the show, telling us all about the volcanoes of Venus!  But first, we journey out to the L 98-59 planetary system, exploring a trio of intriguing exoplanets.  Next, we take a trip out to the Trojan asteroids of Jupiter, along with the Lucy spacecraft, as it readies for launch. Finally, we ready for the Perseid meteor shower, due to rain down to Earth on the nights of the 12th and 13th of August.   New examination of the L 98–59 planetary system reveals hidden details of three exoplanets in that planetary system. One of these is found to have a mass just half that of Venus, while another appears to be a water world. This new study by researchers at the European Southern Observatory also shows evidence for a fourth, and possibly even a fifth world in that stellar system, a mere 35 light years from Earth.   Listen to the podcast version of the episode here, or watch this show as a video at: https://youtu.be/e0kxpujd1Ok.
22:39
August 10, 2021
Teaching Children Science w/ Dr. Stephanie Ryan - Astronomy News with The Cosmic Companion 3 August 2021
This week on Astronomy News with The Cosmic Companion, we welcome Dr. Stephanie Ryan to the show. She is the author of Let's Learn About Chemistry, and we will be talking about teaching science to children.   But first, we look at a new study suggesting clay, not water, may be hidden under the icy  South Pole of Mars. We also examine the radio galaxy Centaurus A in a new light, and look up at Saturn during a close(-ish) approach to Earth.   New examinations of radar reflections seen on Mars in 2018 suggests these features may be the result of clay, not underground lakes, near the south pole of the Red Planet. When radar images of the south pole of Mars were recorded by the Mars Express orbiter three years ago, researchers suggested the features might be the result of underground water. This was an intriguing possibility. A trio of new papers, however, finds that clay under the surface, not water, may, in fact, be responsible for the data seen by researchers. Astronomers using the Event Horizon Telescope have carried out the most-detailed observations ever of the radio galaxy Centaurus A. Researchers detailed the source of jets emanating from the supermassive black hole at the center of the galaxy. Astronomers suggest that examination of this galaxy at shorter wavelengths might produce an image similar to that seen in 2019 of the supermassive black hole in M87, taken by this same network of radio telescopes. On the night of Monday 2 August, Saturn and Earth made their closest approach to each other for this year. This offered amateur astronomers a chance to view the Ringed Planet at its closest and brightest. The rings are also currently aligned at around 18 degrees from edge-on as seen from Earth, offering stunning views of the rings, and the Moon on Monday stayed hidden until late at night. If you missed this close encounter, Saturn is still shining brightly in the southern sky, anytime after sunset, for most skywatchers in the northern hemisphere. Listen to this episode as a podcast here, or watch it as a video at: https://youtu.be/1rWxEJjLjEY
23:56
August 3, 2021
Stephen Kane of UC Riverside - The Value of Private Spaceflight - Astronomy News with The Cosmic Companion 27 July 2021
This week on Astronomy News with The Cosmic Companion, we welcome planetary astrophysicist Dr. Stephen Kane to the show. We discuss the role private spaceflight plays in society and developing science.    We will also learn about the first discovery of a moon in another solar system. Next, we head to Mars, where the InSight rover has mapped the inner structure of the planet in detail for the first time. Finally, we take a glimpse at a new-generation telescope that could revolutionize astronomy, before welcoming our special guest.   Listen to the podcast here, or watch the video version of this episode at: https://youtu.be/OJhXYEQmQ80
31:15
July 27, 2021
Earl Swift Takes Us Across the Airless Wilds - Astronomy News with The Cosmic Companion 20 July 2021
This week on Astronomy News with The Cosmic Companion, we welcome New York Times best-selling author Earl Swift to the show. He recently released a new book, Across the Airless Wilds, the first major history of NASA's lunar buggy.   We're also going to hear about NASA's latest success story, as the Hubble Space Telescope is successfully repaired, readying to continue exploring the Cosmos. We will also journey out to Venus, looking at the ultimate source of phosphine in the atmosphere of our planetary neighbor. Finally, we learn a possible answer to a 40-year-old mystery about the King of the Solar System, Jupiter.   Listen to the video version of this episode here, or watch the video version of this episode at: https://bit.ly/TCC-210720-pod. Please help support The Cosmic Companion with a purchase of Across the Airless Wilds: https://amzn.to/3iwxoNe.
28:53
July 20, 2021
Stella Kafka, AAVSO, Talks Betelgeuse! Astronomy News with The Cosmic Companion Podcast July 13, 2021
This week on Astronomy News with The Cosmic Companion, we welcome Dr. Stella Kafka back to the show. She is CEO of The American Association of Variable Star Observers, and she's going to teach us all about Betelgeuse.   We are also going to look at the night sky, as Venus, Mars, and the Moon huddle close together. Then, we venture out Enceladus, one of the mighty moons of Saturn, examining its geysers for signs of life. Finally, we journey back to ancient Earth, learning about massive impacts on its young surface.   Listen to this interview with Stella Kafka here, or watch the video version of this episode at: https://youtu.be/nMuNnhmlEiY.
21:15
July 13, 2021
Astronomy News with The Cosmic Companion July 6, 2021 - Hubble Space Telescope Repairs, a Tiny White Dwarf, and Stellar Murder Mysteries!
This week on Astronomy News with The Cosmic Companion, we learn how gravitational waves show evidence for a pair of ancient stellar murder mysteries, we meet a white dwarf the size of our Moon, and we pay a visit to our ailing friend, the Hubble Space Telescope.   This week's scheduled interview with Earl Swift, author of Across the Airless Wilds, has been postponed until July 20, due to technical problems. Make sure to join us then for an inside look at NASA's lunar buggy!    Listen to the podcast version of this episode here, or watch the video version of this episode at: https://youtu.be/60amV2NtG_c Catch up on every episode of this show at: www.thecosmiccompanion.tv! Subscribe or follow today and never miss an episode!   For more details on space and astronomy news, please visit: www.thecosmiccompanion.net.
06:29
July 6, 2021
Pedro Bernardinelli on Comet UN271 and Alyssa Mills on Ganymede - The Cosmic Companion June 29, 2021
This week, we visit with Alyssa Mills. She is a graduate student at the University of Alabama, and we will talk about her work studying the largest moon in the Solar System – Ganymede. We also talk with Pedro Bernardinelli, the astronomer who recently found the largest comet ever seen – and it is coming our way. We also look in on the Hubble Space Telescope, which is still out of operation, following a computer failure. And, we learn details about Comet Bernardinelli-Bernstein before talking with the astronomer who first found this massive iceberg in space. Finally, we learn about a new study showing which nearby exoplanets are the most-likely places from which to find life on Earth, before we explore Jupiter's massive moon Ganymede with astronomer Alyssa Mills. Listen to this episode as a podcast here, or watch it as a video at: https://youtu.be/AgmPvdXZJtQ View our past episodes at: www.thecosmiccompanion.tv Subscribe to this channel today, and never miss an episode!
42:21
June 29, 2021
Brittany Zimmerman, CEO of Yummet, Talks Space Exploration and Saving Earth - The Cosmic Companion 22 June 2021
This week, we welcome Brittany Zimmerman to the show. She is CEO of Yummet, an organization developing technology for living in space, as well as preserving our environment right here on Earth. We also check in on new findings about Betelgeuse, explained by Dr. Stella Kafka of the American Association of Variable Star Observers! But first, we look in on the Hubble Space Telescope, as that famed instrument powers down, following a computer failure. Next, we look at a new study examining the causes of the recent dimming of the star Betelgeuse. Finally, we journey out to a pair of distant galaxies that appear to be missing one critical ingredient – dark matter. Listen to the podcast here or watch the video version of this episode at: https://youtu.be/gLA-860WDME
25:19
June 22, 2021
Noah Petro on NASA's Return to the Moon and the LRO - The Cosmic Companion June 15, 2021
This week on Astronomy News with The Cosmic Companion, we welcome Dr. Noah Petro, Project Scientist for the NASA's Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) to the show. We talk about exploring the lunar surface, the Artemis missions, and the return of humans to the Moon!    But first, we visit the CHIME radio Telescope in Canada, which recorded 535 fast radio bursts coming from around the Cosmos. Then, we will zoom in on Jupiter's system of moons as the Juno spacecraft records the first closeup images in 20 years of the giant moon Ganymede. Next, we will take a look at a new study finding that moons orbiting gas giants could be home to water, even without a parent star.   Listen to the podcast version of this episode here, or watch it as a video at: https://youtu.be/JMMC9mBqj5M
21:20
June 15, 2021
Bruce Betts of The Planetary Society talks Planetary Defense - Astronomy News with The Cosmic Companion June 8, 2021
This week on Astronomy News with The Cosmic Companion, we welcome Dr. Bruce Betts to the show. He is Chief Scientist and LightSail Program Manager for The Planetary Society. We will be talking about near-Earth objects, and how we might protect our world from potentially-hazardous asteroids and comets. But first, we journey back almost 75,000  years, to a time when the Toba volcano erupted, wiping out much of the human population at that time. Then, we look up at our planetary companion, the Moon, as it  pays visits in the night sky to four planets of our Solar System throughout the month. And, we're gonna tell you how to see it happen. Plus, we get an inside look at an upcoming book about one of NASA's most-inspiring figures, Katherine Johnson. Finally, before welcoming Dr. Betts to the show, we learn about a solar eclipse taking place this week that's really for the snowbirds! Listen to the podcast here, or watch the video version of this episode at: https://youtu.be/NmFw2oHcgj4
28:48
June 8, 2021
Dr. Sabine Stanley JHU - Studying the Atmosphere of Saturn - Astronomy News with The Cosmic Companion June 1, 2021
This week on Astronomy News with The Cosmic Companion, we are joined by Dr. Sabine Stanley of Johns Hopkins University. Listen in as we talk about her work using computer modeling to study the atmosphere of Saturn. But first, we go about as far back in time as we can get, examining conditions in the first millionth of a second after the Big Bang. Next, we learn how oxygen affected ancient forms of life on Earth long ago. Then, we examine a new source of X-rays discovered near the heart of the Milky Way galaxy, and hear how long-period comets can still produce meteor showers in our modern day.
21:13
June 1, 2021
Elena Provornikova and The Interstellar Probe - Astronomy News with The Cosmic Companion May 25, 2021
This week on Astronomy News with The Cosmic Companion, we take a look at a project that could become the first mission far into the void between the stars – the Interstellar Probe. We'll talk with Dr. Elena Provornikova from Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory about this futuristic mission.   But first, we journey far back in time, to an era when the Milky Way may have merged with another, smaller galaxy, and learn how that event changed our galaxy. Next, we travel even further back in time and out in space, as evidence suggests one of the most-important constants in cosmology may not be a constant after all. Finally, we look up in the sky, as a lunar eclipse will be visible early Wednesday morning over most of the United States, before welcoming our special guest. Learn more: The Cosmic Companion » Astronomy News - Exploring the wonders of the Cosmos, one mystery at a time
23:06
May 25, 2021
Lunar Eclipse May 26 - The Cosmic Companion Astronomy Minute May 25, 2021
The Lunar eclipse of May 26th should be a delight for skygazers across the United States - especially those west of the Mississippi!   Here's what's happening, where you can see it, and more!    This is the first episode of a new idea - The Astronomy Minute! One story, told in 60 seconds or less - what do you think? What do you think - should we make more?    For more information, visit: The Cosmic Companion » Astronomy News - Exploring the wonders of the Cosmos, one mystery at a time
00:58
May 25, 2021
Scott Lambros and the James Webb Space Telescope - The Cosmic Companion May 18, 2021
This week, we take an up-close look at what will be the most-advanced telescope ever to launch into space, the James Webb Space Telescope. We welcome Scott Lambros, Instrument Systems Manager for this remarkable instrument, back to the show! But first, we look at new evidence for volcanic eruptions on Mars in the surprisingly-recent past. We also head out to the distant void of space as Voyager 1 detects a faint hum which could help us better understand interstellar space. Finally, we turn our sights to the James Webb Space Telescope as it unfurls its massive mirror for the final time on Earth, before talking with our special guest, who just returned from conducting the tests. This episode is dedicated to the memory of Apollo 11 astronaut Michael Collins. Thanks for exploring the Cosmos, and liking a couple of my posts - that was awesome. Listen to the podcast here, or watch the video version of this episode at: https://youtu.be/_yP_eddfaJQ
23:40
May 18, 2021
Dr. Jack Hughes, Rutgers University - Neutrinos and Supernova Eruptions - The Cosmic Companion May 11, 2021
This week, we talk with Dr. Jack Hughes, astrophysicist at Rutgers University, telling us of new findings about supernovae, the powerful eruptions that can mark the end of life for massive stars.   But first, we will use computer simulations to peer inside the atmosphere of Saturn. We will look in on an unusual yellow supernova, and find what made this eruption so strange. And, we will look to the future, as researchers plan a massive radio telescope on the far side of the Moon.  The magnetic field of Saturn is surprisingly symmetrical near the poles, a mystery of the ringed planet that might now be explained. Researchers from Johns Hopkins University took data collected during the suicide plunge of the Cassini spacecraft into Saturn, feeding it into computer simulations similar to those used to model weather and climate here on Earth. They found that helium rain falling through the atmosphere of Saturn could explain the oddly-regular nature of this massive magnetic field.  Join us on June 1st, when we will talk with Professor Sabine Stanley of Johns Hopkins University about this unique study.
32:25
May 11, 2021
Stella Kafka AAVSO - Astronomy News with The Cosmic Companion May 4, 2021
This week, we talk with Dr. Stella Kafka, CEO and Executive Director of the American Association of Variable Star Observers. We discuss the human quest for knowledge, amateur astronomy, and, of course, variable stars.   But, first, we're going to take a look at the future of space exploration, as China successfully launches Tianhe, the first module in their upcoming space station. We will also look forward to the Interstellar Probe, a new idea being designed to view our solar system from the outside, far further than any spacecraft has yet reached.   Listen to the podcast here or watch the video at:  https://youtu.be/zEKDTDaSEaQ!
30:26
May 4, 2021
Ohad Harlev - LyteLoop - The Future of Storing Data in Space - The Cosmic Companion April 27, 2021
This week on Astronomy News with The Cosmic Companion, we look at the future of data storage in space, as we talk with Ohad Harlev, CEO of Lyteloop.   But, first, we examine the case of the missing supernova, an exploding star that should have been seen on Earth three centuries ago - and wasn't. Next, we take a look at the Chinese Space Station Telescope, a new set of eyes readying to explore the Universe. Then, we look in on the first test flights of Ingenuity – the first helicopter ever to fly on another world. Finally, we examine the first-ever production of oxygen on the Martian surface, bringing us one step closer to living on Mars.   Watch the video here or listen to the podcast version of this episode: https://bit.ly/TCC-210427-pod
25:10
April 27, 2021
Joshua Ravich and Andrew Fazekas - Astronomy News with The Cosmic Companion April 20, 2021
Hello, and welcome back to Astronomy News with The Cosmic Companion. This week, we have a pair of amazing guests. First, we talk to Joshua Ravich, NASA’s lead mechanical engineer for the Ingenuity helicopter on Mars. We will discuss the design, testing, operation of this remarkable little robotic explorer. Next, we will be joined by Andrew Fazekas, National Geographic's Night Sky Guy, discussing amateur astronomy, science, and exploring the Cosmos.   But, first, we'll examine a new study showing ways that oxygen might be produced on planets in the absence of life, and what that could mean in the search for extraterrestrial life. Next, we look in on a newly-discovered rocky world not far from our own home. Then, we journey out to the edge of out planetary family, where the New Horizons spacecraft reaches a historic milestone.
39:32
April 20, 2021
Moon Mars Conjunction April 16-17 2021 w/ Andrew Fazekas - National Geographic's Night Sky Guy
The Moon and Mars conjunction of April 16-17 will give skygazers a chance to see these two objects huddled together in the sky.    Andrew Fazekas, National Geographic's Night Sky Guy, gives us a look at what's happening, and how to see this beautiful display in the night sky.    Watch the full interview with him on April 20th, when we will talk about amateur astronomy, the human quest for knowledge, and exploring the Cosmos.    Watch past episodes at: https://thecosmiccompanion.net/astronomy-news-with-the-cosmic-companion  For more information about Astronomers Without Borders, please visit: https://my.astronomerswithoutborders.org/home
04:19
April 15, 2021
Affelia Wibisono and X-rays from Uranus - Astronomy News with The Cosmic Companion April 13, 2021
This week, we welcome Affelia Wibisono from University College London to the show, discussing the first discovery of X-rays seen radiating from the ice giant planet Uranus.   But, next up, we take a look at the oldest, closest pairs of quasars yet seen in the early Universe. We will also look at the pulsar at the core of the Crab Nebula, revealing secrets of these enigmatic bodies. Then, we travel to Mars, examining the first helicopter ever designed to fly on another world, as Ingenuity prepares for its first flight on the Red Planet.   Listen to the podcast version of this episode here, or watch the video version of this episode at: https://youtu.be/okCLultDsHA
21:58
April 13, 2021
Yuri's Night with Shuttle Astronaut Dr. Kathryn Sullivan - Astronomy News with The Cosmic Companion April 6, 2021
This week, we look forward to Yuri's Night. Monday, April 12th marks the 60th anniversary of the first human space flight, as well as the 40th anniversary of the first flight of the Space Shuttle. We will visit with three-time Shuttle astronaut Dr. Kathryn Sullivan, the first American woman to walk in space. She also just became the first woman to ever visit the deepest spot in the Earth's ocean!   But first, we discuss Yuri's Night, and look forward to the return of humans to the Moon. We learn about the International Lunar Research Station, a new plan by Russia and China to place dozens of people on the lunar surface on a permanent basis in the coming years. We will also take a look at the Nancy Grace Roman Telescope, one of NASA's next-generation space telescopes, which will soon search our galaxy for unknown worlds. Finally, we will journey out to Uranus, where astronomers see X-rays emanating from the ice giant planet for the first time.  Listen to the podcast version of this episode here, or watch the video: https://youtu.be/XfTYqpJi5zY
14:16
April 6, 2021
What is 'Oumuamua? Alan Jackson & Steven Desch ASU The Cosmic Companion March 30, 2021
This week, we have a double interview, talking with astronomer Alan Jackson and astrophysicist Steven Desch. We will talk about their new study of 'Oumuamua, an interstellar body which visited our solar system in 2017.   But first, we look at some odd geology on the Red Planet, as researchers learn how spiders on Mars form. We also see new images of the supermassive black hole at the core of the galaxy M87. Finally, we dive into the mammoth oceans of Saturn's moon, Enceladus, learning how currents flow under its icy shell. Listen to the podcast of this episode here, or watch the video version of this episode at: https://youtu.be/T4Vu3n4Z3OE Next week: Yuri's Night - celebrating the 60th anniversary of human spaceflight and the 40th anniversary of the Space Shuttle with three-time Shuttle astronaut Dr. Kathryn D. Sullivan!  
26:02
March 30, 2021
Lawrence Krauss - The Physics of Climate Change - Astronomy News with The Cosmic Companion 3-23-21
This week, we welcome renowned physicist Dr. Lawrence Krauss, the author of The Physics of Star Trek, to the show, talking about his new book, The Physics of Climate Change. But first, we're going to take a look at a new study that may have found the final resting place of the ancient water of Mars. In other watery news, we look at how life may be hiding on ocean worlds within our own solar system. Finally, we'll take another glimpse at Oumuamua, the odd body which visited our family of planets in 2017. Listen to the podcast here, or watch the video version of this episode: https://youtu.be/rN1GDBHyhsw
26:21
March 23, 2021
Neil deGrasse Tyson Interview of Cosmic Queries on Astronomy News with The Cosmic Companion March 16, 2021
This week, we are delighted to welcome Neil deGrasse Tyson to the show. We talk about his new book, Cosmic Queries, as well as the nature of intelligence, Carl Sagan, and a whole lot more. But first, we learn about one of the biggest problems in astrophysics, as a new study lends further evidence to questions about the expansion rate of the Universe. We also examine the oldest quasar jet ever seen radiating in X-rays. Then, we look at a nearby exoplanet that lost one inhospitable atmosphere, just to grow one even more noxious. Listen to the podcast of this episode here, or watch the video version at: https://youtu.be/Va_by-AuGuY
21:20
March 16, 2021
Astronomy News with The Cosmic Companion - Volcano Planets, Lava, and Space Hurricanes! Mar. 9, 2021
This week, we learn about the first space hurricane ever spotted. We will also visit two different exoplanets that may strangely look familiar to Star Wars fans. One of these is thought to be a lava world, while the other may be largely covered in volcanoes.   Plus, a sneak preview of next week's episode, when we will be joined by Neil deGrasse Tyson, talking about his new book, Cosmic Queries, as well as alien intelligence, the drive for science, Carl Sagan and more!  Subscribe today and never miss an episode! Listen here or watch the video version of this episode at: https://youtu.be/V2X-7xoseFo
07:05
March 9, 2021
Elisabeth Newton and the TOI 451 Planetary System of Exoplanets - The Cosmic Companion March 2, 2021
This week, we are joined by Dr. Elisabeth Newton, astronomer at Dartmouth College, who recently discovered three new worlds around the dwarf star TOI 451.   But first, we're going to take a look at a new study showing that water worlds like Earth may be common around the galaxy. Next, we take a look at a new image of Venus, taken by the Parker Solar Probe, that could have implications for planetary science. Finally, we learn about a new study showing microbes under the seafloor of Earth could live off products formed by natural radiation, a finding that could assist in our understanding of the development of life on other worlds. Listen to the podcast version of this episode here, or watch the video version at: https://youtu.be/qZSbOq3xuJE
26:00
March 2, 2021
Exploring Mars - Dr. Fatima Ebrahimi & Dr. Kirsten Siebach - The Cosmic Companion Feb. 23, 2021
Hello and welcome back to Astronomy News with The Cosmic Companion. This  week, continuing our fortnight of Mars, we have a pair of special  guests, offering us a look at both the present, as well as the future, of Martian exploration. First, we welcome Martian geologist Dr. Kirsten Siebach back to the show. She will give us a first-person look at how the Perseverance rover will explore the landscape of Mars. We will also talk with Dr. Fatima Ebrahimi from the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. We will discuss her work designing a new plasma engine capable of bringing spacecraft and people to Mars and beyond. But first, we take a look at the arrival of NASA's Perseverance rover at  Mars. This is the third mission to arrive at the Red Planet in the last two weeks. We also look at a new study showing microbes are able to  survive – and thrive – within Martian soil. Finally, we will journey out  to the TOI 451 star system, where three newly-discovered planets await our watchful gaze. Listen to the podcast version of this episode here, or watch the video version of this episode at: https://youtu.be/aLeeSmhW0UY Astronomy News with The Cosmic Companion has just been named the Best Astronomy Podcast in the World by the editors of Starlust.org! Thanks to all our listeners.
37:40
February 23, 2021
The Europa Clipper - David W. Brown, author, The Mission. Astronomy News with The Cosmic Companion Feb 16, 2021
This week, we welcome science writer David W. Brown to the show. He is a contributor for The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, and Scientific American. We will discuss his new book, The Mission, telling the story of NASA's upcoming project, the Europa Clipper. But first, we kick off the fortnight of Mars, as the first two of three new spacecraft arrive at our planetary neighbor, readying to explore the Red Planet. We will also head out to the outer reaches of our planetary family, where we meet Farfarout – the most-distant object known in our solar system. Watch the video version of this episode: https://youtu.be/qIFG5MwJZYc
25:08
February 16, 2021
The TRAPPIST-1 System - Dr. Eric Agol University of Washington - The Cosmic Companion Feb. 9, 2021
This week, we welcome Professor Eric Agol from the University of Washington to the show. He is an astrophysicist focused on the study of  exoplanets, and we will be talking about his work uncovering conditions on the seven worlds of the TRAPPIST-1 system.   But first, we look at a study proposing a new way to find dark matter – one of the greatest mysteries in astrophysics. Next, we examine a possible new method for seeing long-elusive gravitational waves. Finally, we hear the story of a student astronomer who may have found a  missing piece of the Cosmos.   Listen to the podcast version of this episode here, or watch the video at: https://youtu.be/c5YZK4916d8 Coming March 16: Neil deGrasse Tyson!    Subscribe today and never miss an episode!
27:24
February 9, 2021
The TOI-561 System and Extreme Exoplanets - Dr. Lauren Weiss, U of Hawaii - February 2, 2021
This week, we talk to Dr. Lauren Weiss, astronomer at the University of Hawaii. We will be talking about her work discovering the TOI-561 planetary system, and discussing extreme exoplanets! But first, we head out to the TRAPPIST-1 solar system, where we find each of the seven worlds in that system are surprisingly alike. Next, we look at a new study finding that earlier reports of phosphine on Venus may have been in error. Then, we look at a new conceptual idea for a next-generation plasma engine that could bring spacecraft and people to Mars and beyond. Listen to the podcast episode here, or watch it in video: https://youtu.be/r_QFsXew_Vs 
25:26
February 2, 2021
Exploring the Climates of Ancient Mars - Dr. Kirsten Siebach, Rice University, Astronomy News with The Cosmic Companion Jan 26, 2021
This week, we talk to Dr. Kirsten Siebach, a Martian geologist from Rice University, talking about her work uncovering secrets of the climate of ancient Mars. But first, we study a newly-discovered system of exoplanets featuring an extreme planet of molten lava. Next, we learn about a so-called cotton-candy planet with a density so low it wasn't thought to be possible. Finally, closer to home, we take a look at a new study revealing that Gale Crater on Mars may have once resembled Iceland, before talking to one of the lead researchers on that study. Next week, we talk to Dr. Lauren Weiss, astronomer at the University of Hawaii, on her work studying the TOI-561 solar system and extreme exoplanets!
23:52
January 26, 2021
Quasars, Supernovae, and the Early Universe - Astronomy News with The Cosmic Companion Jan. 19, 2020
This week on Astronomy News with The Cosmic Companion, we head out to Jupiter, where the Juno spacecraft readies to  spend five more years exploring the Jovian system. Next, we will travel far out in space, and back in time, exploring the oldest quasar ever seen by astronomers. Finally, we will examine the remains of a star that was seen exploding 1,700 years ago, piecing together details of a supernova long lost to history.    Video version of this episode: https://youtu.be/dn7pgwbltEY Learn more: https://thecosmiccompanion.net Subscribe today and never miss an episode!
05:51
January 19, 2021
Magnetic Fields of Exoplanets - Dr. Jake Turner, Cornell Unv. - The Cosmic Companion Jan 12, 2021
For our first interview of our fourth season, we talk to Dr. Jake Turner  of Cornell University, discussing his work finding the first hints of a  magnetic field surrounding a planet in an alien solar system.    But first, we examine an unusual radio signal coming from our closest  stellar neighbor that looks like it may have been created by an  intelligent species – but who? Next, we take a look at something you  might not expect – 2020 was, in fact, the shortest year in decades. We  will also head out to the Red Planet, where we see the largest canyon in  the Solar System in unprecedented detail.   New episodes (nearly) every Tuesday!  Subscribe today and never miss an episode.
25:21
January 12, 2021
The Top 10 Stories from Space for 2021 - Astronomy News with The Cosmic Companion Jan. 5, 2021
For the first episode of our fourth season,, we have a special episode  of Astronomy News with The Cosmic Companion, as we look forward to the  Top 10 astronomy and space stories we can expect to see unfold in 2021.  Learn about the two lunar eclipses happening in 2021, the return of  Russia to the Moon, the launch of Artemis 1, and much more!   Listen to the podcast here, or watch the video version of this episode on YouTube.  Happy New Year!
10:08
January 5, 2021
Does HD 106906 b resemble Planet X? - Dr. Paul Kalas, astronomer, UC Berkeley - Astronomy News with The Cosmic Companion Dec. 22, 2020
For this final episode of our third season, we welcome Dr. Paul Kalas from UC Berkeley to the show. He is an astronomer studying the exoplanet HD 106906, which might resemble an unseen ninth planet in our own solar system. But first, we journey far out in space and back in time, as astronomers lay their sights on the most distant – and oldest – galaxy ever seen. Closer to home, we examine the discovery of hexamine – a chemical critical to the development of life – inside an asteroid. Finally, we listen in on radio waves from the exoplanet Tau Boötis b, and learn how it shows the first-ever evidence for a magnetic field surrounding a planet in an alien solar system.
27:14
December 22, 2020
Hayabusa2 and Ryugu asteroid sample Seiji Sugita, Unv. of Tokyo - Astronomy News with The Cosmic Companion Dec. 15, 2020
Hello and welcome back to Astronomy News with The Cosmic Companion. This week, we welcome Professor Seiji Sugita of the University of Tokyo to the show. He is a researcher on the Hayabusa2 mission which recently brought the first large sample of an asteroid to Earth. But first, we take a look at a new study teaching us how spiders react to living in space. Next, we will journey to the exoplanet HD 106906 b, and learn what it could teach us about a possible unseen planet at the edge of our solar system. Finally, we will take a look at the first large samples of an asteroid ever to arrive on Earth, before we talk to one of the researchers on this historic mission.   Learn more: https://thecosmiccompanion.net
36:50
December 15, 2020
Getting to CNO About the Sun with Solar Neutrinos - Michael Wurm - Borexino Collaboration - Astronomy News with The Cosmic Companion Dec. 8, 2020
This week, we welcome Dr. Michael Wurm from the Borexino Collaboration  to the show. He recently led a new study examining neutrino emissions  from the Sun, revealing details of the nuclear furnace burning at the  heart of our parent star.   But first, we head out to the outskirts of the Solar System, where the long-lived Voyager spacecraft have seen quick-moving particles driven off the surface of the Sun. We will also journey back in time, to the formation of the Moon, as researchers using supercomputer simulations recreate a titanic collision between the Earth and a Mars-sized body four billion years ago. Then, we will take a look up in the sky, readying ourselves for the Great Conjunction of Jupiter and Saturn taking place on the Winter Solstice.
29:16
December 8, 2020
Jupiter and Saturn Close in for the Great Conjunction of 2020
On December 21, 2020, the two largest planets in our solar system will appear just one-tenth of a degree apart, or one-fifth of the diameter of a full Moon. This is the closest visible conjunction of the planets seen since the year 1226. We take a look at what to expect, and how to best prepare for this once-in-a-lifetime celestial event.
05:01
December 3, 2020
Megafloods on Mars - Dr. Ezat Heydari - Astronomy News with The Cosmic Companion Dec. 1, 2020
This week, we welcome Dr. Ezat Heydari to the show. He is a professor of  geoscience at Jackson State University. We will discuss his work  showing evidence of a possible megaflood on Mars in the ancient solar  system.   But, first, we examine fusion processes at the core of our Sun, using a  detector buried deep underground. We also take a look at a sunspot that  became visible from Earth on Thanksgiving, and learn how astronomers saw  it when it was still on the other side of the Sun. Finally, we will  take our first - but by no means last - look at a great conjunction of  planets coming soon to a sky near you.
26:54
December 1, 2020
Kilonova Explosions and Magnetars - Dr. Wen-fai Fong interview - The Cosmic Companion Nov. 24, 2020
This week, we welcome Wen-fai Fong of Northwestern University to the  show, talking about her work studying kilonova explosions and collisions  of neutron stars.   But first, we will look at new findings showing the Universe is getting  hotter, and we will examine the mysterious Blue Ring Nebula. Next, we  will journey back in time to the ancient solar system, when a massive  megaflood ravished the surface of Mars. Finally, we will bid a sad  farewell to one of the greatest telescopes in the world, as the Arecibo radio Telescope is slated for demolition.   Watch the video version of this episode: https://youtu.be/sqYE1AX-E9A Please subscribe to this podcast for weekly episodes. For more details on space and astronomy news, please visit https://thecosmiccompanion.net or http://thecosmiccompanion.com.
26:41
November 24, 2020
Designing Soil for Farming on Mars - Laura Fackrell Unv. of GA - Astronomy News with The Cosmic Companion Nov. 10, 2020
This week, we welcome Laura Fackrell, geochemist at the University of  Georgia, to the show. We will be discussing her work developing soil for  farms on Mars, capable of growing crops to feed interplanetary  colonists. We will also journey out beyond our solar system, where Voyager 2 hears from NASA for the first time in months. We examine a tiny asteroid  traveling through space along with Mars that is a near-perfect geological match for our Moon. Finally, we will explore the Solar System from our own back yards, as all seven planets visible in the sky can be seen this week from most places on Earth.
27:54
November 10, 2020
See All Seven Planets in the Night Sky This Week! - The Cosmic Companion Week of Nov. 9, 2020
Amateur astronomers have a rare treat this week, as all seven planets  visible in the sky can be observed over the course of a single night.  Here's how to find every planet in the sky visible to amateur  astronomers any night this week.    Subscribe to this channel and never miss a story!
04:55
November 8, 2020
Modeling the Cosmic Web - Dr. Oskar Elek UC Santa Cruz - The Cosmic Companion Nov. 3, 2020
This week, we are joined by Dr. Oskar Elek from the University of  California, Santa Cruz. We will be discussing his work seeking to  understand the Cosmic Web – the largest structures in the Universe –  through computer modeling and humble slime mold.    We'll also take a look at the future of farming on Mars, as a new study  examines how to turn Martian topsoil into a fertile growing medium for  Martian colonists of the future. We will examine the origin of water on  planets, and find clues to the chemistry of the early Solar System in a  Martian meteorite. And, in the dark recesses of the early solar system,  we see an ancient ice planet that may have forever shaped our family of  planets before heading out to the void of space.
29:30
November 3, 2020
Water on the Moon - And it's not Just in the Shadows! - Astronomy News with the Cosmic Companion Special Report Oct. 27, 2020
Water on the Moon has been seen before in dark craters. Now, a new study finds water in a crater exposed to sunlight. We explore the finding, and SOFIA - the airborne telescope that made the discovery.  Learn more at https://thecosmiccompanion.net/water-on-the-moon-isnt-just-hiding-in-the-shadows
06:60
October 27, 2020
Looking at Betelgeuse in a New Light - Dr. Meridith Joyce ANU - Astronomy News with The Cosmic Companion October 27, 2020
Dr. Meridith Joyce of Australian National University joins us on the  show, talking about her new finding showing that the red giant star Betelgeuse is both smaller and closer than we believed.    We'll also take a look at the OSIRIS-REx spacecraft, which touched down  last week on the surface of the asteroid Bennu. We examine a  new study identifying 1,000 worlds where extraterrestrial astronomers  could – theoretically –  easily see signs of life on Earth. Also, one  exoplanet the size of Neptune is found orbiting far too close to its  parent star. And we take a look at findings from the ALMA network of  radio telescopes, revealing the role volcanoes play in forming the  atmosphere of Io, one of the largest moons of Jupiter.
21:35
October 27, 2020
Roberto Gilli - Finding Six Galaxies Orbiting an Ancient Black Hole - The Cosmic Companion October 20, 2020
This week, we are joined by Dr. Roberto Gilli from the National  Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics, speaking with us from Italy.  We will talk about his recent discovery of six galaxies huddled around a  supermassive black hole in the early Universe.    But first, we take a look at the massive red giant star Betelgeuse,  finding it's not as big –or as close to exploding – as we thought.  Speaking of exploding stars (because, why not?) we take a look at a pair  of massive stars doomed to end their lives in a dramatic fashion. And,  we will take a look up at our night sky, and learn how to see a meteor  shower happening this week.
24:57
October 20, 2020
What's the Glitter Around the Black Hole in M87? - Maciek Wielgus - Astronomy News with The Cosmic Companion Oct. 13, 2020
This week, we are joined by Dr. Maciek Wielgus, astronomer at Harvard  University, speaking to us from Gdansk, Poland. We will discuss his work  revealing glittering around the supermassive black hole at the center  of the M 87 galaxy. But first, we look at a new study identifying 24 exoplanets that appear  to be even friendlier to life than Earth. We also see how superflares –  powerful eruptions from stars – behave, and learn how they might affect  life on other worlds. Then, we take a look at OSIRIS-REx, NASA's first  attempt to collect material from an asteroid, as the revolutionary  spacecraft readies to touch the surface of the asteroid Bennu.
24:20
October 13, 2020
Amanda Karakas and Chiaki Kobayashi - All the Gold in the Universe - Astronomy News with the Cosmic Companion Oct 6, 2020
This is a very special global episode on Astronomy News with The Cosmic  Companion, as we talk with Dr. Amanda Karakas of Monash University,  speaking from Melbourne, Australia, as well as Dr. Chiaki Kobayashi,  from the University of Hertfordshire, joining us from London. These  researchers were at the heart of the new study showing how much of the  gold in the Universe was produced by a particular type of supernova  explosion.   But first, we examine a stunning glitter seen around a supermassive  black hole. We also journey to Mars, where the Mars Express Orbiter  finds three more salty lakes beneath the surface of that world. The Red  Planet is also an easy find in the sky this week, and we will take a  look at how to find it. We will also journey back in time, where (and  when!) we will see six galaxies huddling around an ancient quasar, and  learn how the largest structures in the Universe were formed.
25:07
October 6, 2020
Six Galaxies Seen Orbiting Ancient Black Hole - Astronomy News with The Cosmic Companion Special Report
Astronomers recently found six galaxies orbiting a distant quasar from  the early age of the Universe. What can this tell us about the formation  of supermassive black holes? Dr. Roberto Gilli from the National Institute for Astrophysics in Italy will join us October 20 to talk about this discovery.  
07:12
October 2, 2020
Can We Find Alien Life from Phosphorus? Natalie Hinkel SwRI - The Cosmic Companion Sept. 22, 2020
This week, we are joined by Dr. Natalie Hinkel, planetary astrophysicist  at the Southwest Research Institute. We will talk about her work showing how we might look for phosphorus around other stars in the  search for extraterrestrial life.   We will also talk about the discovery of phosphine in the atmosphere of Venus, and what that means in the search for life on other worlds. We will learn about a new study showing how much of the gold in the  Universe was formed, and we take an in-depth look at how phosphorus in  the space around stars could help astronomers find life on planets in  nearby solar systems.
26:43
September 22, 2020
Intermediate-Mass Black Holes and Gravitational Waves - Christopher Berry, NW Unv., Unv. of Glasgow - Astronomy News with The Cosmic Companion Sept. 15, 2020
This week, we welcome Dr. Christopher Berry to the show. He is an astrophysicist who recently helped discover the first intermediate-mass black hole ever seen by astronomers. We will also look at an ancient galaxy that looks normal, and talk about why that's so  unusual. We learn of an active environment around the asteroid Bennu, and we see how our ideas of dark matter may change, due to an unexpected bending of light. Video version of this episode: https://youtu.be/vMGk_k93IKA
32:38
September 15, 2020
Is Life on Mars Hidden Underground? Astronomy News with The Cosmic Companion Sept. 8, 2020
This week, we welcome Dr. Dimitra Atri to the show. He is an astrophysicist from New York University Abu Dhabi, and we will be discussing his work showing how life might survive just beneath the surface of Mars, aided by galactic cosmic rays. We will also look at how astronomers found a type of black hole they always expected to find as well as one thought impossible. We examine the most detailed images ever recorded of the Sun, taken by astronomers at Europe's largest solar telescope. Lastly, we will journey to the Moon, where investigators recently found hematite – a mineral which forms from water and free oxygen – both of which are rare on the lunar surface.
24:40
September 8, 2020
Did a Supernova Cause the Devonian Extinction? Brian Fields of the Unv. of Illinois - Astronomy News with The Cosmic Companion Sept. 1, 2020
This week, we are joined by Dr. Brian Fields of the University of Illinois. He recently headed a study showing how the Devonian extinction which took place on Earth 359 million years ago, may have been triggered by the supernova explosion of a nearby star. We also look at a new experiment showing how life might survive a trip aboard an asteroid traveling from Mars to Earth, and we discuss new ideas showing how Earth may have been a water world since soon after its formation. Finally, we gaze out to the nearby galaxy, Andromeda, as the Hubble Space Telescope reveals a massive halo of ionized gas surrounding the massive collection of stars.
27:18
September 1, 2020
Why Did Betelgeuse Dim? Andrea Dupree Center for Astrophysics - Astronomy News w/ The Cosmic Companion 08/25/20
This week, we are joined by Dr. Andrea Dupree, senior astrophysicist with the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics. She recently carried out a study showing why the red supergiant star Betelgeuse recently dimmed, a sight seen by millions of amateur astronomers worldwide. We also look at how the development of life on Earth may have been shaped by a nearby supernova explosion, and we take a look at a new study suggesting the Sun may have once had a stellar companion, with whom it was born billions of years ago. Meanwhile, NASA charges batteries on the first helicopter ever headed to another planet.
23:54
August 25, 2020
Did the Sun Have a Twin? - Astronomy News with The Cosmic Companion Special Report Aug 20, 2020
A twin star of the Sun, formed billions of years ago as the Solar System took shape, might help explain movements of bodies at the outer reaches of our family of planets, researchers suggest. Astronomers from The Center for Astrophysics believe that if a ninth planet is discovered beyond the orbit of Pluto, its movements could help us better understand how the Sun and our planetary neighborhood formed billions of years in the past.
04:59
August 20, 2020
Using Hubble to Look at Earth - Allison Youngblood UC Boulder - Astronomy News w/ The Cosmic Companion 08/18/20
This week, we are joined by Dr. Allison Youngblood of the University of Colorado Boulder. She recently used the Hubble Space Telescope to look at the atmosphere of Earth during a lunar eclipse, testing methods to find life on other worlds. In addition, we talk with Professor Jane Charlton of Penn State University about last week's virtual Astrofest. Also on this episode of Astronomy News with The Cosmic Companion, we take a look at the lone dwarf planet in the inner solar system, Ceres, as new evidence comes to light revealing a vast ocean beneath its frozen surface. We will learn about a possible answer to the great mystery of why the star Betelgeuse recently dimmed for several months, and talk about the Perseid meteor shower and spotting shooting stars in the late summer skies. Video version of this episode: https://youtu.be/CjmO0vV_9_k
27:16
August 18, 2020
Interview with Steven D'Hondt on finding 100-million-year-old life - Astronomy News with The Cosmic Companion Video and Podcast Aug. 11, 2020
Hello everyone: This week, we are joined by Dr. Steven D'Hondt of the University of Rhode Island. He recently co-led a study reviving microorganisms that laid dormant under the ocean floor for over 100 million years. His work could re-write much of what we know about life.Also in this episode of Astronomy News with The Cosmic Companion, we take a look at the discovery of a world much like Saturn orbiting a nearby star, and we see how storms on Jupiter alter the atmosphere of the largest planet in our solar system. Finally, we talk about a unique study that used the Hubble Space Telescope to examine the atmosphere of Earth during a lunar eclipse, testing methods to find life on other worlds.Listen to the podcast above, or watch the video version of this episode:This podcast is also available from all major podcast providers.Coming August 18: Dr. Allison Youngblood, astronomer with the University of Colorado Boulder. We will talk about her recent study using the Hubble Space Telescope to study the atmosphere on Earth, testing methods to find life on other worlds.If you enjoyed this episode of The Cosmic Companion, please download and share the episode on YouTube, Facebook Video, or any major podcast provider.For more details on space and astronomy news, please visit: thecosmiccompanion.net or thecosmiccompanion.com.Thanks for watching, listening, and sharing!- James Get full access to The Cosmic Companion at thecosmiccompanion.substack.com/subscribe
22:44
August 11, 2020
Interview with Laurent Montesi of the University of Maryland on the Volcanoes of Venus - Astronomy News with The Cosmic Companion Video and Podcast Aug. 4, 2020
Hello everyone! This week on Astronomy News with The Cosmic Companion, we are joined by Dr. Laurent Montesi of the Department of Geology at the University of Maryland. He recently developed new models of Venus revealing recent volcanic activity on that world. We also take an up-close look at our other planetary neighbor, Mars, as new findings uncover additional secrets of The Red Planet. We watch the launch of Mars 2020, NASA's latest mission to Mars, and we also look at the potential for life under the surface of the Red Planet.My apologies that this podcast is late - technical difficulties kept us from uploading this episode until today. Work-around figured out. :) Watch the video version of this episode: This podcast is also available from all major podcast providers. Coming August 11: Dimitra Atri of New York University Abu Dhabi, talking about his study showing microbes may live beneath the surface of Mars, aided by galactic cosmic rays. If you enjoyed this episode of The Cosmic Companion, please download and share the episode on YouTube, Facebook Video, or any major podcast provider. For more details on space and astronomy news, please visit: thecosmiccompanion.net or thecosmiccompanion.com.Thanks for watching, listening, and sharing!- James Get full access to The Cosmic Companion at thecosmiccompanion.substack.com/subscribe
25:15
August 7, 2020
Interview with Lina Necib of Caltech on her discovery of Nyx stars from beyond the galaxy - Astronomy News with The Cosmic Companion Video and Podcast July 28, 2020
Hello everyone! This week, we are happy to be joined by Dr. Lina Necib of Caltech, talking about her discovery of a group of stars here in the Milky Way, that came from beyond our galaxy.But first, we learn about active volcanoes on Venus, we take a look at the first picture ever taken of a multi-planet system orbiting a Sun-like star, and we study a pair of type Ia supernovae seen erupting in flashes of ultraviolet light.Watch the video version of this episode:This podcast is also available from all major podcast providers.Coming August 4: Dr. Laurent G.J. Montesi, talking about his recent discovery of active volcanoes on Venus!If you enjoyed this episode of The Cosmic Companion, please download and share the episode on YouTube, Facebook Video, or any major podcast provider.For more details on space and astronomy news, please visit: thecosmiccompanion.net or thecosmiccompanion.com.Thanks for watching, listening, and sharing!- James Get full access to The Cosmic Companion at thecosmiccompanion.substack.com/subscribe
23:03
July 28, 2020
Interview with Kathryn Zurek of Caltech on the Search for Dark Matter - Astronomy News with The Cosmic Companion Video and Podcast July 21, 2020
Hello everyone! Hello and welcome back to The Cosmic Companion. This week, we are happy to be joined by Dr. Kathryn Zurek, Theoretical Physicist at Caltech, talking about how dark matter may be detected here on Earth by looking for subatomic particles called magnons.But first, we look up at Comet NEOWISE visiting the Earth this month, and we say hello to stars from another galaxy which moved into the Milky Way billions of years ago. We hear the story of astronomers scrambling to view a short radio burst from the ancient Universe before it disappeared, we examine the origins of water here on Earth, and look at the closest pictures ever taken of our Sun.Watch the video version of this episode:Dr. Kathryn Zurek of Caltech talks about dark matter on Astronomy News with The Cosmic Companion.This podcast is also available from all major podcast providers.Coming July 28: Dr. Lina Necib, Post-doctoral Researcher at Caltech, who recently discovered Nyx stars – visitors from outside the Milky Way.Coming August 4: Dr. Laurent G.J. Montesi, talking about his recent discovery of active volcanoes on Venus!If you enjoyed this episode of The Cosmic Companion, please download and share the episode on YouTube, Facebook Video, or any major podcast provider.For more details on space and astronomy news, please visit: thecosmiccompanion.net or thecosmiccompanion.com.Thanks for watching, listening, and sharing!- James Get full access to The Cosmic Companion at thecosmiccompanion.substack.com/subscribe
18:22
July 21, 2020
Interview with Scott Lambros of NASA, on the James Webb Space Telescope - Astronomy News with The Cosmic Companion Video and Podcast July 14, 2020
Hello everyone!This is a special episode, as it marks both the first show to begin our third season, and this installment is the first partly recorded in our new studio. Most special of all, we take an inside look at the James Webb Space Telescope. Scott Lambros, NASA's Instrument Systems Manager for this revolutionary telescope, joins us this week, giving us his first-hand story of this next-generation space telescope.We also look up at the sky at Comet NEOWISE, visiting evening skies in the northern hemisphere this week. Plus, a new finding showing high concentrations of metal on the Moon could suggest our best theories of the origin of our planetary companion may need revision. We will also look at an exposed planetary core, and we find the gravitational center of the solar system.Watch the video version of this episode:Scott Lambros of NASA, Instrument Systems Manager on the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) talks to The Cosmic Companion. This podcast is also available from all major podcast providers.Coming July 21: Dr. Kathryn Zurek, Theoretical Physicist at Caltech, talking about how dark matter may be detected here on Earth by looking for subatomic particles called magnons.  July 28: Dr. Lina Necib, Post-doctoral Researcher at Caltech, who recently discovered Nyx stars – visitors from outside the Milky Way! If you enjoyed this episode of The Cosmic Companion, please download and share the episode on YouTube, Facebook Video, or any major podcast provider.For more details on space and astronomy news, please visit: thecosmiccompanion.net or thecosmiccompanion.com.Thanks for watching, listening, and sharing!- James Get full access to The Cosmic Companion at thecosmiccompanion.substack.com/subscribe
27:13
July 14, 2020
Interview with Tyler Gorda of the University of Virginia - Astronomy News with The Cosmic Companion Video and Podcast June 23, 2020
In this week's episode of Astronomy News with The Cosmic Companion, we are pleased to be joined by Tyler Gorda from the Department of Physics at the University of Virginia, talking about his work discovering the newest state of matter – quark matter, which could make up much of the material in neutron stars. But first, we look at a new NASA study showing that oceans may be common on planets orbiting other stars, we examine a new study measuring the expansion rate of the Universe, and a mysterious repeating radio signal from space continues for more than 18 months. We will also examine how dark matter – the unseen “something” which makes up more than 80 percent of all matter in the Universe, might be detected here on Earth.Incidentally, this episode had a technical difficulty that appears me from appearing for most of the show. But, stay tuned to the end, when you’ll see the first original animation ever made for the program (animation is going to be a thing next season). Watch the video version of this episode:Dr. Tyler Gorda, physicist at the University of Virginia, talking about his work developing a theory of dark matter, and leading viewers on a dive through a neutron star. This podcast is also available from all major podcast providers.June 30 and July 7: NO EPISODES, as we move into a larger, permanent studio and upgrade equipment. SEASON THREE BEGINS JULY 14 with an inside look at the James Webb Space Telescope, with Scott Lambros, NASA’a Instrument Systems Manager for this revolutionary instrument, called the successor to Hubble. If you enjoyed this episode of The Cosmic Companion, please download and share the episode on YouTube, Facebook Video, or any major podcast provider.For more details on space and astronomy news, please visit: thecosmiccompanion.net or thecosmiccompanion.com.Thanks for watching, listening, and sharing!- James Get full access to The Cosmic Companion at thecosmiccompanion.substack.com/subscribe
20:58
June 23, 2020
Interview with Matija Cuk, research scientist at the SETI Institute - Astronomy News with The Cosmic Companion Video and Podcast June 16, 2020
In this week's episode of Astronomy News with The Cosmic Companion, we look at a new study suggesting the Universe is expanding faster than it should be, we travel to a solar system with four very different worlds, and we explore how dust on alien worlds can affect the development, as well as the discovery, of extraterrestrial life.Finally, we interview Dr. Matija Ćuk, a research scientist at the SETI Institute, discussing his recent discovery that Mars may have been accompanied, from time to time, by systems of rings.Watch the video version of this episode:Matija Ćuk, research scientist at the SETI Institute, discussing his recent discovery that Mars may have been accompanied by systems of rings in the distant past.This podcast is also available from all major podcast providers.Coming June 23: Tyler Gorda from the Department of Physics at the University of Virginia, talking about his work discovering the newest state of matter – quark matter, which could make up much of the material in neutron stars. June 30 and July 7: No shows, as we move into a larger, permanent studio and upgrade equipment. (We had technical difficulties with this week’s episode including damage to the camera a day after placing an order for a new camera). If you enjoyed this episode of The Cosmic Companion, please download and share the episode on YouTube, Facebook Video, or any major podcast provider.For more details on space and astronomy news, please visit: thecosmiccompanion.net or thecosmiccompanion.com.Thanks for watching, listening, and sharing!- James Get full access to The Cosmic Companion at thecosmiccompanion.substack.com/subscribe
20:56
June 16, 2020
Interview with Anna Ho of Caltech - Astronomy News with The Cosmic Companion Video and Podcast June 9, 2020
Hello everyone:In this week's episode of Astronomy News with The Cosmic Companion, we look at quark matter, a bizarre state of matter which could make up a large percentage of some neutron stars. We will travel out to the Kepler-160 planetary system, where we will examine a planet and star much like the Earth and Sun. Next, we find evidence that may help answer one of the mysteries of planets around other stars – if they are as common as they now seem, why do some stars travel through space alone? Then, we learn how Mars, typically known as the Red Planet, may have also once also been the ringed planet, as well.Finally, we welcome astrophysicist Anna Ho to the program, to talk about her work on discovering a previously-unknown form of supernova explosion.Watch the video version of this episode:Anna Ho of Caltech, talking about her new study of FBOT’s - a newly-discovered type of supernova explosion. This podcast is also available from all major podcast providers.Coming June 16: Dr. Matija Ćuk of the SETI Institute, on the possibility that Mars may have been orbited by rings in the distant past.  If you enjoyed this episode of The Cosmic Companion, please download and share the episode on YouTube or any major podcast provider.For more details on space and astronomy news, please visit: thecosmiccompanion.net or thecosmiccompanion.com.Thanks for watching, listening, and sharing!- James Get full access to The Cosmic Companion at thecosmiccompanion.substack.com/subscribe
19:50
June 9, 2020
Interview with Professor Seiji Sugita of the University of Tokyo - Astronomy News with The Cosmic Companion Video and Podcast June 2, 2020
Hello everyone:In this week's episode of Astronomy News with The Cosmic Companion, we watch the launch of a Falcon 9 rocket, lifting a pair of astronauts to the International Space Station. We also learn about a newly-discovered type of supernova, we travel to a solar system much like our own family of stars, and we find how a world roughly the size of Earth has been confirmed around the nearest star to our solar system. Then, we travel back 66 million years, to the end of the age of dinosaurs, learning how an asteroid larger than Mount Everest changed life on Earth forever.And, in a special interview from Japan, we talk to Professor Seiji Sugita from the Department of Earth and Planetary Science at the University of Tokyo, researcher on the Hayabusa2 mission currently exploring the asteroid Ryugu.Watch the video version of this episode:This podcast is also available from all major podcast providers.Coming June 9: Anna Ho of Caltech, who studies Fast Blue Optical Transients (FBOTs), a newly-discovered type of massive explosion seen in distant galaxies. If you enjoyed this episode of The Cosmic Companion, please download and share the episode on YouTube or any major podcast provider.For more details on space and astronomy news, please visit: thecosmiccompanion.net or thecosmiccompanion.com.Thanks for watching, listening, and sharing!- James Get full access to The Cosmic Companion at thecosmiccompanion.substack.com/subscribe
22:40
June 2, 2020
Interview with Dr. Alejandro Soto of the Southwest Research Institute - Astronomy News with The Cosmic Companion Video and Podcast May 26, 2020
Hello everyone:In this week's episode of Astronomy News with The Cosmic Companion, we look at volcanoes of mud on Mars. We also see how life on Earth may have been shaped, at the genetic level, by cosmic rays from space. We explore collisions between black holes and ultra-dense neutron stars, and we take a look at the Wolfe Disc, an ancient galaxy that grew much faster than expected. Finally, we look at a pair of findings about galaxies, each from the same network of radio telescopes. Plus, in a fun, informative interview, we talk to Dr. Alejandro Soto of the Southwest Research Institute, who recently released a study showing how microscopic lifeforms may be affected by salty deposits of water on Mars.Watch the video version of this episode:This podcast is also available from all major podcast providers.Coming June 2: Professor Seiji Sugita from the Department of Earth and Planetary Science at the University of Tokyo, researcher on the Hayabusa2 mission currently exploring the asteroid Ryugu.  If you enjoyed this episode of The Cosmic Companion, please download and share the episode on YouTube or any major podcast provider.For more details on space and astronomy news, please visit: thecosmiccompanion.net or thecosmiccompanion.com.Thanks for watching, listening, and sharing!- James Get full access to The Cosmic Companion at thecosmiccompanion.substack.com/subscribe
19:26
May 26, 2020
Interview with Dr. Thea Kozakis of the Carl Sagan Institute - Astronomy News with The Cosmic Companion Video and Podcast May 19, 2020
Hello everyone:In this week's episode of Astronomy News with The Cosmic Companion, we talk about Comet SWAN, which could soon grace our skies as the brightest comet in years. We will delve deep into small pockets of water, trapped in the crust of Mars, where salty water may be too harsh for life. And, finally, we will learn about the rhythms of stars, and what it can teach us about the nature of these thermonuclear furnaces.And, in her first interview since earning her doctorate in astrophysics and astrobiology last week, we talk with Dr. Thea Kozakis, who recently led a study exploring planets around dead stars, looking for life.Watch the video version of this episode:This podcast is also available from all major podcast providers. Coming May 26: Alejandro Soto of the Southwest Research Institute, talking about water on Mars, and how salty conditions there could affect exploration of the Red Planet.  If you enjoyed this episode of The Cosmic Companion, please download and share the episode on YouTube or any major podcast provider. For more details on space and astronomy news, please visit: thecosmiccompanion.net or thecosmiccompanion.com.Thanks for watching, listening, and sharing!- James Get full access to The Cosmic Companion at thecosmiccompanion.substack.com/subscribe
19:01
May 19, 2020
Astronomy News with The Cosmic Companion Video and Podcast May 12, 2020
Hello everyone: In this week's episode of Astronomy News with The Cosmic Companion, we take a look at a new idea about dark matter, we learn about new images of the asteroid Ryugu taken by the Hayabusa2 spacecraft, and we delve deep under the atmosphere of Jupiter, studying one of that world's most familiar features, the Great Red Spot.Watch the video version of this episode:On May 19, we will talk with Thea Kozakis, a graduate student at the Carl Sagan Institute at Cornell University. Ms. Kozakis is a pioneering researcher on how to study the atmospheres of worlds around other stars, looking for signs of life.If you enjoyed this episode of The Cosmic Companion, please download and share the episode on YouTube or any major podcast provider. For more details on space and astronomy news, please visit thecosmiccompanion.net or thecosmiccompanion.com.Thanks for watching, listening, and sharing!- James Get full access to The Cosmic Companion at thecosmiccompanion.substack.com/subscribe
04:28
May 12, 2020
Interview with Dr. Ann Virkki of Arecibo Observatory - Astronomy News with The Cosmic Companion Video and Podcast April 28, 2020
Hello everyone:This week on Astronomy News with The Cosmic Companion, we welcome a very special video guest as Dr. Ann Virkki, head of planetary radar studies for Arecibo Observatory, joins us on the show. She is an astronomer who recently made the news with her discovery of an unusual “face mask” on the asteroid 1998 OR2. Join us as we talk about asteroids, and the dangers our planet faces from near-Earth Objects.In this week's episode of Astronomy News with The Cosmic Companion, we also learn about the unfortunate fate of Comet Atlas, which recently shattered as it approached the Sun, quashing dreams of what could have been a magnificent celestial spectacle. Next, we will learn how temperatures seen on worlds orbiting alien stars are, often, lower than theories predict, and we will discuss a new model that could, potentially, explain these strange findings. We also take a look at how a new range of instruments, both on Earth and in space, could help us search for life around white dwarfs – the corpses of dead stars that were once the size of the Sun.Watch the video version of this episode:On May 19, we will talk with Thea Kozakis, a graduate student at the Carl Sagan Institute at Cornell University. Ms. Kozakis is a pioneering researcher on how to study the atmospheres of worlds around other stars, looking for signs of life. If you enjoyed this episode of The Cosmic Companion, please download and share the episode on YouTube or any major podcast provider. For more details on space and astronomy news, please visit thecosmiccompanion.net or thecosmiccompanion.com.Thanks for watching, listening, and sharing!- James Get full access to The Cosmic Companion at thecosmiccompanion.substack.com/subscribe
17:51
May 5, 2020
Astronomy News with The Cosmic Companion Video and Podcast - Interview with Dr. Steven D'Hondt April 28, 2020
Hello everyone:This is a very special week for Astronomy News with The Cosmic Companion, as we welcome out first-ever video guest to the show. To kick things off, we have a special guest, as I interview Dr. Steven D’Hondt, of the University of Rhode Island. He led the first two drilling expeditions ever designed specifically to search for life under the ocean floor. A new study suggests his work could show us what to look for in the search for life on Mars. In this week's episode of Astronomy News with The Cosmic Companion, we also learn that Earth will soon be visited by an asteroid the size on Manhattan – but don't worry – it's wearing a face mask! Next, we solve the mystery of a missing planet, and we learn how studying oceans on alien worlds would make for a high-pressure environment.Watch the video version of this episode:Next week (May 5), we are fortunate enough to talk to Dr. Anne Virkki, head of Planetary Radar at the Arecibo Observatory. This accomplished astronomer discovered the “face mask” on asteroid 1998 OR2, which will safely pass Earth on April 29.If you enjoyed this episode of The Cosmic Companion, please download and share the episode on YouTube or any major podcast provider. For more details on space and astronomy news, please visit thecosmiccompanion.net or thecosmiccompanion.com.Thanks for watching, listening, and sharing!- James Get full access to The Cosmic Companion at thecosmiccompanion.substack.com/subscribe
17:17
April 28, 2020
Astronomy News with The Cosmic Companion Podcast - Interview with Dr. Nahum Arav April 21, 2020
Hello everyone:In this week's episode of Astronomy News with The Cosmic Companion, we discuss the birth of a giant space cigar, and look at a planet that may look like home but which is found in dangerous territory. We will examine a pair of satellite galaxies orbiting the Milky Way, and learn what they can teach us about dark matter. Finally, we will see how astronomers can learn about the history of exoplanets through resonances in planetary orbits..I also interview Dr. Nahum Arav, astronomer at Virginia Tech, who discovered the most powerful quasar tsunamis ever seen anywhere in the Cosmos. Watch the video version of this episode (interview in podcast only):Next week (April 21), The Cosmic Companion talks to Dr. Steven D’Hondt, geomicrobiologist from the University of Rhode Island, who led a 2010 expedition collecting core samples from beneath the seafloor of the South Pacific, research that could help researchers today, looking for signs of life on Mars.If you enjoyed this episode of The Cosmic Companion, please download and share the episode on YouTube or any major podcast provider. For more details on space and astronomy news, please visit thecosmiccompanion.net or thecosmiccompanion.com. Thanks for watching, listening, and sharing!- James Get full access to The Cosmic Companion at thecosmiccompanion.substack.com/subscribe
13:02
April 21, 2020
Astronomy News with The Cosmic Companion Podcast - Interview with inventor Alan Adler
Hello everyone:In this week's episode of Astronomy News with The Cosmic Companion, we dive deep beneath the Pacific Ocean, and see how bacteria living inside rocks could change our studies of life on Mars. We will undertake an immense journey through the Universe, looking at jets emanating from distant quasars, and we will feel the wind of failed stars. Finally, we will look back 50 years ago, when the world watched transfixed as the crew of Apollo 13 struggled for survival.I also interview Alan Adler, inventor of the Aerobie flying ring and disk, as well as the Aeropress coffee maker. We talk about the science of flight as well as the science of brewing coffee. Watch the video version of this episode (interview in podcast only):Next week (April 21), The Cosmic Companion talks to Dr. Nahum Arav of Virginia Tech, talking about his new discovery of quasar tsunamis – the most energetic outpouring of material of this type in the Cosmos. If you enjoyed this episode of The Cosmic Companion, please download and share the episode on YouTube or any major podcast provider. For more details on space and astronomy news, please visit thecosmiccompanion.net.Thanks for watching, listening, and sharing!- James Get full access to The Cosmic Companion at thecosmiccompanion.substack.com/subscribe
29:02
April 14, 2020
Astronomy News with The Cosmic Companion Podcast - Interview with Pedro Bernardinelli April 7, 2020
Hello everyone!This week's episode of Astronomy News with The Cosmic Companion features a new method of imaging black holes, and we discuss how lunar and Martian colonies could be constructed from human urine. Finally, we will journey back 14 centuries to ancient Japan, when a giant, glowing, red pheasant was seen hovering in the skies above that island nation.I also interview Dr. Pedro Bernardinelli of The University of Pennsylvania, lead researcher on a study which found 316 minor planets beyond Neptune.  Recently, 316 minor planets were discovered beyond Neptune. The Cosmic Companion talks to the astronomer that headed this historic study. Image credit: Martynan/Adobe Stock. Watch the video version of this episode (full interview in podcast only):Next week on Astronomy News with The Cosmic Companion, we talk to Alan Adler, Inventor of Aerobie flying discs, and the Aeropress coffee maker. (Watch his interview on Good Morning America). If you enjoyed this episode of The Cosmic Companion, please download and share the episode on YouTube or any major podcast provider. For more details on space and astronomy news, please visit thecosmiccompanion.net.Thanks for watching, listening, and sharing! - James Get full access to The Cosmic Companion at thecosmiccompanion.substack.com/subscribe
16:52
April 8, 2020
Astronomy News with The Cosmic Companion Podcast - What is Comet Atlas? March 31, 2020
This week's podcast episode of Astronomy News with The Cosmic Companion is a special look at Comet Atlas, which is shaping up to (potentially) become the greatest comet seen from the northern hemisphere in over two decades. We will discuss everything we know (so far) about Comet Atlas, and learn when and where to look for this new visitor from the outer solar system. We also interview Dr. Joe Burchett of the University of California Santa Crux about his work modeling ribbons between galaxies, using yellow slime mold. Learn how —and why— his team developed and carried out this unique study. Comet Atlas could, possibly, become as bright as Comet Hale-Bopp in 1997. Image credit: Giuseppe Donatiello. Watch the video version of this episode (full interview in podcast only):On next week's podcast episode of Astronomy News with the Cosmic Companion (April 7), I interview Dr. Pedro Bernardinelli of The University of Pennsylvania, lead researcher on a study which found 316 minor planets beyond Neptune.  .If you enjoyed this episode of The Cosmic Companion, please download and share the episode on YouTube or any major podcast provider. For more details on space and astronomy news, please visit thecosmiccompanion.net. Get full access to The Cosmic Companion at thecosmiccompanion.substack.com/subscribe
22:57
April 1, 2020
Astronomy News with The Cosmic Companion Podcast March 17, 2020
In this week's podcast episode of Astronomy News with The Cosmic Companion, we look at new findings concerning the physics of stars, and we look in on a newly-discovered exoplanet where it rains iron. Next, we will examine a new method of learning about massive ribbons of galaxies by examining humble slime molds. Finally, a group of researchers believe they may have found a method by which the intense heat of Mercury could help form ice on the innermost planet in the Solar System.We also interview Dr. Emily Levesque of the University of Washington. She is one of the lead researchers on the study examining the possibility that a massive cloud of dust surrounding Betelgeuse may be responsible for dimming seen around that star at the end of 2019. Phenomenon seen on the surface of stars may be explained by new findings about the behavior of plasma beneath their luminous shells. Image credit: NASA/GSFCThe behavior of plasma in stars, including the Sun, is still largely a mystery, despite hundreds of years of study. One question perplexing astronomers is how much the movement of plasma in stars is affected by currents rising up from beneath, compared to the effects of rotation of the star. A new study of a diverse group of more than 200 stars shows convection, like the bubbles of boiling water, plays a far greater role than rotation in shaping stellar activity.Astronomers recently discovered a distant exoplanet called WASP-76B, continually scorched by its local star on one hemisphere, while the other half of the world is pelted with iron rain. Metals are vaporized on the hot side of the planet, and these vapors are transported to the other side of the planet, where it condenses before falling as a metallic rain. This world, 390 light-years from Earth, was discovered with the ESPRESSO instrument connected to the European Space Observatory’s Very Large Telescope.Researchers at the University of California Santa Cruz have recently modeled massive ribbons between galaxies using a common slime mold. Networks created between the unicellular members of Physarum polycephalum are similar to massive ribbons of gas which tie strings of galaxies together over hundreds of millions of light years. In an earlier experiment, researchers placed food in positions reminiscent of cities around Tokyo, and the slime mold grew into a pattern similar to the Japanese railway system.|Mercury is the closest planet to the Sun, and temperatures on that world can run hotter than an oven. But, a new study from Georgia Tech suggests this intense heat could help form ice. As protons stream out of the Sun, some are drawn to the surface of Mercury by the weak magnetic field of that world. These particles may hit hydroxyls, molecules of one atom each of hydrogen and oxygen, forming water. Intense heating from the Sun can then drive these molecules off the surface, and some of these land in craters that never see light, creating deposits of water ice which persevere despite scorching temperatures.Watch the video version of this episode (full interview in podcast only
15:27
March 17, 2020
Astronomy News with The Cosmic Companion Podcast March 10, 2020
In this week's episode of Astronomy News with The Cosmic Companion, we look at a massive white dwarf that may be the product of an ancient collision between stars. We also examine a new idea of dark matter – the mysterious mass holding galaxies together – before heading to Mars for a new discovery – as well as a stunning image of the Martian landscape – from the Curiosity rover. Finally, we wrap up the show with a look at Betelgeuse, and new studies looking at whether or not this red giant star is on the verge of exploding as a supernova.The Curiosity rover recently returned its most-detailed panorama ever of the Martian landscape (click here for full photo). Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS A team of astronomers from the University of Warwick have discovered an ultramassive white dwarf surrounded by a carbon-rich atmosphere. The star was first found in data from the Gaia space telescope, and the atmosphere was examined using the William Herschel Telescope in the Canary Islands.This behemoth of a white dwarf, they determined, is the product of the collision of a pair of smaller white dwarf stars. This finding could lead to a new understanding of white dwarfs and how they form and evolve over time.Dark matter cannot be seen, but it makes up a far larger portion of the Universe than all stars, planets, gas clouds, and black holes combined. It is because of dark matter that galaxies do not fly apart as they spin. Still, astronomers know little about the ultimate nature of this mysterious mass. A new study from the University of York suggests strange subatomic particles called d-star hexaquarks may have formed in the early Universe as it cooled, and is now affecting objects in a manner that we interpret as dark matter. Protons and neutrons which make up the nucleus of atoms are each composed to three quarks. This newly-postulated particle would consist of six quarks, providing its unusual properties.The Curiosity rover on Mars has found organic materials on the Martian surface which may have been produced by ancient lifeforms. The material, called thiophenes, are usually produced by life on Earth. This is not proof of ancient life on Mars, as further studies must still be carried out to determine if these thiophenes are the product of biological or chemical processes.NASA also recently released a new image of Mars, as seen by Curiosity. This stunning Martian landscape is composed of 1,000 separate images of Mars taken by the eight-year-old Martian laboratory.Betelgeuse, one of the best-known stars in the sky, dimmed significantly over several months at the end of 2019, leading to speculation as to whether or not the star is about to explode as a supernova. Several astronomers and astrophysicists are studying the star, attempting to determine if Betelgeuse is on the verge of a massive eruption. One of these new studies shows the star is warmer than would be expected prior to a supernova, suggesting a cloud of dust coming off the star may be the
04:29
March 10, 2020
Astronomy News with The Cosmic Companion Podcast March 3, 2020
In this week's episode of Astronomy News with The Cosmic Companion, we examine findings from the InSight lander, which has returned its first data from Mars. We will also learn about 2020 CD3, an asteroid that recently entered orbit around the Earth as a second moon, and we talk about the composition of exoplanet K2 18b and what that means for the possibility of life on that world. This week’s stories end with a bang as evidence for the largest explosion since the Big Bang is seen by astronomers.PLUS - This week’s podcast features a full interview with Sofia Sheikh of Penn State University, a graduate student leading a new study searching for extraterrestrial civilizations who may have already found life on Earth. Video version of this podcast (full interview in podcast only):After almost 10 months since landing, the InSight lander on Mars sent its first findings to Earth. The spacecraft revealed that tremors are common on Mars, although they are not severe. The Martian laboratory has also found a greater degree of magnetization of the crust than was expected, and sent a report on wind conditions to researchers on Earth. The robotic laboratory was designed to study the interior of Mars, attempting to understand the history of that planet and other worlds in our solar system, including our home world.An asteroid as large as a car has just been discovered orbiting the Earth. This object, dubbed 2020 CD3, was captured by the gravitational field of the Earth, and entered orbit around our world roughly three years ago. This second Moon is far to dim to see with the naked eye, however, and is located in an unstable orbit that will likely fling CD3 back into interplanetary space in April of this year.In the fall of 2019, astronomers announced the discovery of water vapor in the atmosphere of the exoplanet K2 18b. This world is located in the habitable zone around its cool, dim star, where water could accumulate into ponds, lakes, and oceans. This new study shows K2 18b is likely either a water world covered in ice, or a gaseous planet like Neptune, where temperatures would be too hot for life as we know it to exist.Astronomers have found evidence of the largest-known explosion since the Big Bang. Triggered by a supermassive black hole in the Ophiuchus galaxy cluster, this eruption produced a crater 15 times wider than the Milky Way Galaxy in a plasma cloud surrounding the cluster. This event took place at a safe distance of 390 million light years from Earth, and hundreds of millions of years in the past.Did you like this episode? Subscribe to The Cosmic Companion Newsletter! Astronomy News with The Cosmic Companion is also available as a weekly video series. Or, add this show to your flash briefings on Amazon Alexa.See you around the Cosmos!- James Get full access to The Cosmic Companion at thecosmiccompanion.substack.com/subscribe
13:03
March 3, 2020
Astronomy News with The Cosmic Companion Podcast February 25, 2020
In this week's episode of Astronomy News with The Cosmic Companion, we take a look at aurora seen around a star for the first time, a new super-Earth is discovered just 100 light years from Earth, and Penn State researchers search for alien civilizations that may have already found life on our own world. Video version of this podcast:Aurora on Earth are best known on as northern and southern lights, but they can also occur between a pair of planetary bodies, such as Jupiter and its innermost large moon, Io. Now, for the first time, astronomers have detected aurora taking place between a star and planet. The star, known as GJ 1151, is closely orbited by an earth-sized world. Interactions between that planet and the star create changes in the magnetic field of GJ 1151, producing an aurora. The system sits just 27 light years from Earth.The discovery of an exoplanet in a star system less than 100 light years from our home planet has now been confirmed by astronomers using the Habitable-zone Planet Finder in Texas. This super-Earth, dubbed G 9-40b, is roughly twice as large as our home planet, and significantly more massive. The world orbits close to its cool red parent star, orbiting that body once every six days. First found by the Kepler spacecraft as the planet passed in front of its star as seen from Earth, this is the second-closest planet yet found using this technique.A new search for alien civilizations is looking at planets which may be able to find life on our own world. As planets orbit their sun, some of these exoplanets can be seen passing in front of their parent star as seen from Earth. Astronomers are able to deduce significant information about such exoplanets, including evidence of life. A new study from the Breakthrough Initiative is searching worlds that would see the Earth pass in front of the Sun as seen from the perspective of an extraterrestrial. After examining 20 such worlds, no radio signals were detected, but the search is only beginning in the hunt for extraterrestrial civilizations.On Tuesday, March 3rd, I will interview Sofia Sheikh of Penn State University, lead researcher on this study. A preview of the interview will be available on the video version of Astronomy News with The Cosmic Companion that week, and the full interview will be available on the podcast version of this show, available wherever you get your podcasts.Did you like this episode? Subscribe to The Cosmic Companion Newsletter! Astronomy News with The Cosmic Companion is also available as a podcast from all major podcast providers. Or, add this show to your flash briefings on Amazon Alexa.See you around the Cosmos!- James Get full access to The Cosmic Companion at thecosmiccompanion.substack.com/subscribe
04:25
February 25, 2020
Astronomy News with The Cosmic Companion Podcast February 18, 2020
In this week's episode of Astronomy News with The Cosmic Companion, we meet the first European space telescope designed to study the Sun, and a massive young world is found in our galactic neighborhood. We also take a look up at Betelgeuse as one of the most familiar stars in the night sky may be preparing to explode, and we examine an odd radio signal from space which repeats every 16 days, leaving astronomers baffled.I also interview Dr. Gillian Wilson of the University of California, Riverside about her discovery of XMM-2599, a galaxy that lived fast and died young in the early Universe. Full interview in podcast only. Video version of this podcast:On February 10, the Solar Orbiter from the European Space Agency lifted off from Cape Canaveral on a mission to explore the Sun. This vehicle carries 10 instruments, each designed to study a different characteristic of our parent star. This is Europe's first mission to the Sun, and the spacecraft will work with NASA's Parker Solar Probe, attempting to understand solar activity which produces space weather that can affect Earth.A massive young planet has been discovered by astronomers just 330 light years from Earth. This world, known as 2MASS 1155–7919 b, is roughly 10 times larger than Jupiter, and orbits its parent star at a distance 600 times greater than the distance between the Earth and Sun. Just a handful of planets this size are known to astronomers, and this world is the closest yet found to our home world.On February 25th, I will interview Annie Dickson Vandevelde of the Rochester Institute of Technology about her discovery of this unusual planet. Listen to this full interview next week on the Astronomy News with the Cosmic Companion podcast.For several months, the normally bright star, Betelgeuse, seen in the constellation of Orion, has been noticeably dimming. This has led many astronomers, both professional and amateur, to speculate that this massive red giant star may be about to explode as a supernova. New observations by astronomers at the European Southern Observatory show this star is also changing shape, becoming more elongated. It is uncertain what is causing this, or if the star will be seen erupting in the immediate future, although chances of such an eruption seem slim at this time.Radio astronomers in Canada have recently discovered a source of radio waves from space which turns on and off on a 16-day cycle. Roughly once an hour for four days, the source emits a radio signal, which is then followed by twelve days of silence. Astronomers are uncertain what could be causing this unusual phenomenon, but the CHIME radio telescope in Canada which found the source uses technology which could help uncover its nature. This signal appears to be a unique type of fast radio burst, which were first discovered in 2007. Remember to rune in next week when I interview Dorothy Dickson-Vandervelde of the Rochester Institute of Technology about her discovery of 2MASS 1155–7919 b, the massive young exoplanet in our galactic neighborhood. Did you like this episode? Subscribe to The Cosmic Companion Newsletter! Astronomy News with The Cosmic Companion is also available as a podcast from all major podcast providers. Or, add this show to your flash briefings on Amazon Alexa.See you around the Cosmos!- James Get full access to The Cosmic Companion at thecosmiccompanion.substack.com/subscribe
14:02
February 18, 2020
Astronomy News with The Cosmic Companion Podcast February 11, 2020
In this week's episode of The Cosmic Companion, we look at how the smallest subatomic particles could be responsible for all the matter in the Universe, the icy heart of Pluto could control the climate on that world, an ancient galaxy is discovered that lived fast and died young, The CHEOPS Space Telescope takes its first image, and the Cocoon Galaxy is found to have a rare double core.Video version of this podcast:When matter first formed in the early Universe, theories suggest antimatter should have been created in the same, identical proportions. These two families of particles should have completely annihilated each other long ago, according to current theories. However, the Universe consists almost entirely of matter.This may be explained if neutrinos, which only rarely interact with matter, changed just one in a billion particles of antimatter into matter, a new study suggests. This process may have produced gravitational waves which could be visible to a new generation of observatories. Finding such waves could prove this new theory, researchers suggest.---An artist's impression of CHEOPS in space. Image credit: ESA/ATG Media LabThe first space telescope from the European Space Agency dedicated to studying planets around other stars has returned its first image. The CHaracterising ExOPlanet Satellite, or CHEOPS, was launched on December 18th, on a mission to study exoplanets discovered by other telescopes. This first image was created to test systems on the spacecraft and on the ground, and further testing on the orbiting observatory will the carried out over the course of the next two months.---A giant heart-shaped feature on Pluto, named Tombaugh Regio, may play a significant role in driving climate on that world, a new study reveals. As the Heart of Pluto warms during the day, nitrogen is driven into the atmosphere. At night, this gas cools, falling back to Pluto as frozen nitrogen, in a regular cycle similar to a heartbeat, altering the climate of the dwarf planet.---Astronomers believe the cocoon galaxy and its smaller companion galaxy, called NGC 4485, are the products of an ancient collision between a pair of small spiral galaxies. Now, Iowa State astronomers have recognized a second galactic core within the larger galaxy. One of the cores is seen in visible light and has long been known to astronomers, while the newly-recognized second core is obscured by clouds, and is only visible in radio wavelengths.---An ancient galaxy recently discovered by astronomers apparently lived fast and died young. This family of stars thrived just one billion years after the Big Bang, experiencing a period of active star formation. Just 800 million years later, star production had ceased, leaving behind a dead galaxy. Researchers are uncertain why this galaxy, known as XMM-2599, died so quickly or what became of this stellar grouping after star production ceased. ---On February 18th, I will interview Dr. Gillian Wilson of the University of California Riverside, about her work on the recent discovery of this fast-living galaxy. Ma
05:07
February 11, 2020
Astronomy News with The Cosmic Companion Podcast February 4, 2020
In this installment of Astronomy News with The Cosmic Companion, we examine the opening of two new observatories — one on the ground, and the other in space. We will also learn about a new study showing how artificial intelligence can be fooled in the search for extraterrestrial life, and we will remember the crew of the space shuttle Columbia, lost 17 years ago when their vehicle disintegrated on re-entry while returning home to Earth.An artist’s impression of the CHEOPS observatory in space. Image credit: ESA/ATG Media LabThe first public video of the Sun taken by the new Daniel K. Inouye Solar Telescope in Hawaii reveals the solar surface in unprecedented detail. The groundbreaking telescope features a primary mirror measuring four meters in diameter, as well as design capabilities capable of observing our parent star with stunning clarity.Solar activities drive space weather, which can adversely affect electronic devices on Earth, hindering communications. By better understanding activities on the Sun, researchers hope to better refine predictions of weather in space.Astronomers searching for signs of extraterrestrial life need to comb through vast amounts of data in order to find patterns in seemingly chaotic data. Over the last few years, many researchers are starting to use artificial intelligence to examine data, looking for patterns that could reveal the presence of life.However, a new study shows that artificial intelligence will sometimes recognize patterns where none exist. Images of a bright spot of ice and salt on the dwarf planet Ceres show a bright white marking, shaped like a square, but computerized analysis also reported a dark triangle surrounding that feature, where no such structure exists. This study suggests that both human and computerized analysis of data will be needed in the search for a life on other worlds.The CHEOPS space telescope from the European Space Agency is now in orbit, and ready to study planets around other stars. The orbiting observatory was launched December 18th and a cover protecting the optics has now been retracted.The infrared telescope will search other star systems known to have at least one planet, gathering detailed information on the target. Mission planners expect to release the first images from CHEOPS in the next two weeks.February 1st marked 17 years since the space shuttle Columbia disintegrated on reentry into the atmosphere of the Earth.The first-ever reusable crewed spacecraft broke up over the southwestern United States, killing all seven crew members. The work the astronauts carried out on this mission helped to develop the skills of long-term habitation of space, but the accident was one of the major events responsible for ending the space shuttle program.Video version of this podcast available at: http://bit.ly/Astronomy-News-Cosmic-Companion-Feb-4-2020Did you like this episode? Subscribe to The Cosmic Companion Newsletter! Astronomy News with The Cosmic Companion is also available as a podcast from all
04:34
February 4, 2020
Astronomy News with The Cosmic Companion Podcast January 28, 2020
Hello everyone! This week, we look at the origins of the building blocks of life on Earth, as well as how an ancient impact may have set the stage for the proliferation of life on our world. The origin of complex chemistry on one of the moons of Saturn is uncovered, and Mars may have one been home to salty oceans like those found on Earth, new data reveals.Follow Astronomy News with The Cosmic Companion on any major podcast provider! Get full access to The Cosmic Companion at thecosmiccompanion.substack.com/subscribe
05:49
January 28, 2020
Astronomy News with The Cosmic Companion Podcast January 21, 2020
Hello everyone! This week, we look at a new theory which could explain a mysterious glow of gamma radiation from deep space, and we will see how the Solar System may have once been divided by a barrier, altering the formation of planets. We will also examine new findings about dark matter, while the discovery of strange objects near the core of the Milky Way perplexes astronomers. New simulations provide evidence that a massive asteroid was the major factor leading to the extinction of dinosaurs 66 million years ago, and dead galaxies from the early age of our Universe provides clues about the evolution of families of stars like The Milky Way.Follow Astronomy News with The Cosmic Companion on any major podcast provider! Get full access to The Cosmic Companion at thecosmiccompanion.substack.com/subscribe
05:10
January 21, 2020
Astronomy News with the Cosmic Companion Podcast January 14, 2020
Happy New Year! For the first podcast of 2020, we will discuss how astronomers may find life on distant exoplanets, and we examine the deaths of stars and the formation of black holes. One black hole may not be as large as was originally measured, while another may not be there at all. The TESS spacecraft finds a planet orbiting a pair of stars, and a massive exoplanet is seen spiraling toward its sun. Water is seen leaving Mars at a far greater rate than expected, and new calculations shed new light on the deaths of stars. Follow the Cosmic Companion on any major podcast provider!James Get full access to The Cosmic Companion at thecosmiccompanion.substack.com/subscribe
09:29
January 14, 2020
Astronomy News with The Cosmic Companion December 10, 2019
Welcome to the latest episode of Astronomy News with The Cosmic Companion!This week, we look at a new method for determining whether or not planets orbiting other stars have atmospheres, we see how starquakes could help us determine the age of the Milky Way, and a new guide to atmospheres of exoplanets could assist in the search for life on other worlds.My apologies for the crackling noise - I was trying new equipment and couldn’t get it to work just perfectly, exactly right. :) An artist’s concept of what the surface of Proxima b may look like, although details are uncertain. Image credit: ESO/M. KornmesserKeep checking back at: thecosmiccompanion.com for more space and astronomy news, and add Astronomy News with The Cosmic Companion to your flash briefing on Amazon Alexa!View the video version of each week’s episode on my YouTube channel, or get advance copies of the video episodes with any paid subscription.Give a gift subscription starting at just $5 a month or $50 a year!Or, if you enjoyed this episode, you can buy me a cup of coffee - I LOVE coffee!Thanks!James Get full access to The Cosmic Companion at thecosmiccompanion.substack.com/subscribe
04:29
December 10, 2019
Astronomy News with The Cosmic Companion Dec. 3, 2019
This is black hole week on The Cosmic Companion, featuring discussion of the first serious ideas of planets orbiting black holes, we hear how astronomers may have uncovered the secrets of powerful regions of radiation around these objects, and the largest stellar-mass black hole ever seen is spotted in our home galaxy. An artist’s conception of a black hole, surrounded by gas. Image credit: Gerd Altmann | PixabayKeep checking back at: thecosmiccompanion.com for more space and astronomy news, and add Astronomy News with The Cosmic Companion to your flash briefing on Amazon Alexa!View the video version of each week’s episode on my YouTube channel, or get advance copies of the video episodes with any paid subscription. Give a gift subscription starting at just $5 a month or $50 a year! Or, if you enjoyed this episode, you can buy me a cup of coffee - I LOVE coffee!Thanks!James Get full access to The Cosmic Companion at thecosmiccompanion.substack.com/subscribe
04:01
December 3, 2019
Astronomy News with The Cosmic Companion Nov. 26, 2019
This week, we take a look at how astronomers and astrophysicists are perplexed by different values obtained when measuring the expansion rate of the Universe, one of the most important numbers needed to determine the past and present behavior of the Cosmos. We also examine how the angle at which planets spin could affect their chances of developing life, and the discovery of a complex sugar inside an asteroid may help explain how life developed on Earth. Dr. Lucy Ziurys, professor of astronomy at the University of Arizona, and Dr. Tom Zega of the Lunar and Planetary LaboratoryIn addition, on this podcast of Astronomy News with The Cosmic Companion, I also interview Dr. Lucy Ziurys, professor of astronomy at the University of Arizona, and Dr. Tom Zega of the Lunar and Planetary Laboratory about their recent discovery showing how C60, or buckyballs, can form in space. Hear them tell the story about how they used a microscope to simulate conditions around a dying star, and what it could mean for the search for life around other stars.Keep checking back at: thecosmiccompanion.com for more space and astronomy news, including my new video series of this podcast!Watch each episode of Astronomy News with The Cosmic Companion on YouTube, or get advance copies of the video episodes with any paid subscription. Just $5 a month or $50 a year.Or, if you enjoyed this episode, you can buy me a cup of coffee - I LOVE coffee!Thanks!James Get full access to The Cosmic Companion at thecosmiccompanion.substack.com/subscribe
22:42
November 26, 2019
Astronomy News with The Cosmic Companion Nov. 19, 2019
In this episode of Astronomy News with The Cosmic Companion, we take a look at NASA’s planned Artemis program, designed to bring humans to the Moon, and see how the new technology compares to Apollo. We will also look at new research showing how complex structures called C60, or buckyballs, can form in space around dying stars. Next week, The Cosmic Companion interviews Dr. Lucy Ziurys, professor of astronomy at the University of Arizona, and Dr. Tom Zega of the Lunar and Planetary Laboratory about their recent discovery showing how these odd spheres of carbon can form in space.Hear them tell the story about how they used a microscope to simulate conditions around a dying star, and what it could mean for the search for life around other stars. Keep checking back at: thecosmiccompanion.com for more space and astronomy news, including my new weekly podcast!View the video version of each week’s episode on my YouTube channel, or get advance copies of the video episodes with any paid subscription. Just $5 a month or $50 a year.Or, if you enjoyed this episode, you can buy me a cup of coffee - I LOVE coffee!Thanks!James Get full access to The Cosmic Companion at thecosmiccompanion.substack.com/subscribe
02:54
November 20, 2019
Astronomy News with The Cosmic Companion Nov. 11, 2019
In this episode of Astronomy News with The Cosmic Companion, we examine what hydrothermal vents on Earth can teach us about alien life, questions are raised about a spherical Universe, and NASA opens Apollo rock samples preparing to return humans, once more, to the lunar surface.Keep checking back at: thecosmiccompanion.com for more space and astronomy news, including my new weekly podcast!View the video version of each week’s episode on my YouTube channel, or get advance copies of the video episodes with any paid subscription. Just $5 a month or $50 a year.Or, if you enjoyed this episode, you can buy me a cup of coffee - I LOVE coffee!Thanks!James Get full access to The Cosmic Companion at thecosmiccompanion.substack.com/subscribe
03:05
November 11, 2019
Astronomy News with The Cosmic Companion November 4, 2019
In this episode of Astronomy News with The Cosmic Companion, we examine new ideas about the magnetic field of the Sun, look at how massive worlds orbiting near their sun interact and collide with each other, and the discovery of a new exoplanet was due to an amateur astronomer and Albert Einstein.Keep checking back at: thecosmiccompanion.com for more space and astronomy news, including my new weekly podcast!View the video version of each week’s episode on my YouTube channel, or get advance copies of the video episodes with any paid subscription. Just $5 a month or $50 a year. Or, if you enjoyed this episode, you can buy me a cup of coffee - I LOVE coffee! Thanks! James Get full access to The Cosmic Companion at thecosmiccompanion.substack.com/subscribe
02:57
November 4, 2019
Astronomy News with The Cosmic Companion Oct. 28, 2019
Hello everyone! Here’s the second (and newest) episode of the new podcast, Astronomy News with The Cosmic Companion. This week, we explore evidence that Mars was once home to large salty lakes, take a new look at the expansion rate of the Universe, and consider the idea that an asteroid broke up before hitting Earth 12,800 years ago, triggering the Younger Dryas extinction.Sneak previews of the video version of this show are available to all paid subscribers! Let’s take off! - James Get full access to The Cosmic Companion at thecosmiccompanion.substack.com/subscribe
02:36
October 28, 2019
Astronomy News with The Cosmic Companion
October 20, 2019In this first-ever Cosmic Companion podcast, we look at yhe first all-female spacewalk, a new look at the search for life on Mars by the Viking landers, growing crops in space, and searching for rocky planets in alien solar systems by looking at the corpses of dead stars!Keep checking back at: thecosmiccompanion.com for more space and astronomy news, including my new weekly podcast! Get full access to The Cosmic Companion at thecosmiccompanion.substack.com/subscribe
03:02
October 23, 2019