River Talks

River Talks

By Cumberland River Compact
River Talks is an educational series presented by the Cumberland River Compact. River Talks feature experts, artists, researchers, professionals, and characters from around the Cumberland River Basin sharing their knowledge and experience. Each week we dive into a new topic related to the Cumberland River region; from innovations and solutions to today's water challenges, to historic explorations and uses of the river, to the incredible biodiversity that calls the Cumberland River basin home. Join us during our Spring, Fall, and Winter talks recorded live in Nashville, TN.
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Tennessee’s Historic Bridges: TDOT’s Historic Preservation Successes
DONATE: https://crc.kindful.com/?campaign=1038309 Follow along with the presentation slides referenced in this talk: https://drive.google.com/file/d/1filwmHq24B8uqAV4HqaA14W8nzGltNUx/view Did you know that TDOT historians work to save historic bridges on the state’s roadway network?  Tammy Sellers, a historian with the Tennessee Department of Transportation, will discuss historic bridge preservation in Tennessee by telling the stories of several of the historic bridges throughout the state that have been preserved by TDOT.  These preservation successes range from the only Baltimore-Petit Truss bridge remaining in the southeast to an early concrete arch bridge built by the state highway department.  Learn the stories of these bridges and the efforts TDOT has made in preserving these unique pieces of history that we drive over daily.
47:20
November 15, 2019
Tennessee's Sustainable Spirits, with Jackalope Brewery & Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation
DONATE: https://crc.kindful.com/?campaign=1038309 If you would like to follow along with the presentation slides, you can do so here: https://drive.google.com/file/d/0Bzf_uxReF_ioUXhBNmh1Mkx3WnVfRlNON2lDSjdzMi1WcUFB/view Tennessee is home to world-class whiskey, wine, beer, and other fine spirits. The craft spirit producer's connection to the people, land, and resources is a relationship in which sustainability plays a vital role. Tennessee Sustainable Spirits is a voluntary recognition and technical assistance program administered by TDEC which seeks to reduce operational costs and environmental impacts for wineries and winegrowers, breweries, and distilleries as well as serve as a gateway to sustainability education through popular brands. This talk covers the ways the breweries can prioritize sustainability with the help of programs like Tennessee Sustainable Spirits, from water conservation to energy, to packaging and more. Are you a homebrewer or just like local wine, brews, and spirits? This talk is for you too! Learn some tips for small scale operations, and how to buy more sustainable products.  https://cumberlandrivercompact.org/events/river-talks/
47:57
November 11, 2019
The Taming of the Cumberland: A Brief History of Floods, Locks, and Dams on the Cumberland River and its Tributaries
DONATE: https://crc.kindful.com/?campaign=1038309 If you would like to follow along with the presenter's slides you can do so here: https://drive.google.com/file/d/1iqx5oUMhiVIo0OS59zOaPl0gnfK7nYZm/view Annual flooding was a fact of life that early settlers had to contend with. As early as 1841, concerned Nashville citizens were holding meetings to develop a plan to construct a canal and a lock and dam above the city  to improve navigation, create water power for manufacturing, and decrease flooding.  The  editors of “The Nashville Daily Gazette” called for finding a way to “arrest the annual destruction of property, and the distress and misery”  caused by flooding.  The responsibility for doing this fell to the  Army Corps of Engineers.  After the Civil War,  the Corps  began to consider ways to make the channel of the river deeper for year-round navigation and prevent flooding  that included building a series of locks and dams  that could be raised and lowered as needed.  Thus began the taming of the Cumberland.
58:36
November 4, 2019
What's Up With Climate Change Denial?
DONATE:  https://crc.kindful.com/?campaign=1038309  Follow along with the presentation slides referenced in this talk: https://docs.google.com/presentation/d/e/2PACX-1vQ2qU8epHwuGs1q4vAVQd9URddEvRkyEKlXZ8QSDgpAHC0Ta-0p7pZBcgB0h-FEnw/pub?start=false&loop=false&delayms=30000&slide=id.p5 Emily shared a video during her presentation. Pause the podcast at 5:17 and follow along here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y2euBvdP28c&feature=youtu.be Why do some people readily accept the science of climate change and others do not? Why do we see such differences in climate change skepticism in the U.S. as compared to other countries? Sociologist and sustainability professor Emily Stutzman will present on the social science behind the phenomenon of climate science denial. Drawing from sociology and psychology, as well as media studies, Dr. Stutzman will present strategies for engaging in productive conversations between those who accept climate science and those who do not.
30:25
October 28, 2019
River North: A Look at Nashville's Bold Riverfront Development
DONATE: https://crc.kindful.com/?campaign=1038309 River North will reshape Nashville’s urban riverfront, ushering in a new era of connectivity between Downtown and the East Bank of the Cumberland. Just across the water from Germantown, the 125-acre River North district is the first work-shop-play-live development to incorporate the Cumberland River into a multi-faceted urban lifestyle. At this talk, Hal B. Clark, a Principal at Civil Site Design Group will give an update on the plans for the development, including preliminary designs for the community riverfront park.
48:38
October 21, 2019
Federal Rollbacks, Local Impacts: How National Policies Affect Tennessee's Clean Water
DONATE: https://crc.kindful.com/?campaign=1038309  Follow along with the presentation slides referenced in this talk: https://docs.google.com/presentation/d/e/2PACX-1vSDXg6CwDYIn_cMgyWHWzzl8PkM_fxuM3STV8PUXGomDzm3T_RmaYWuNE27gS0bCg/pub?start=false&loop=false&delayms=60000&slide=id.p1 Amanda shared two videos during her presentation. To view them, follow the links below: video one timestamp - 5:02 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yGbO_5Hwqy0 video two timestamp- 11:52 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Sce3hAOVxgI Amanda Garcia, Managing Attorney of the Nashville office of the Southern Environmental Law Center, will explain recent federal proposals from the EPA, Forest Service, and other agencies, and discuss their potential impacts on Tennessee’s clean water.
30:53
October 14, 2019
Restoring Habitat for the Eastern Hellbender on Private Lands
DONATE: https://crc.kindful.com/?campaign=1038309 If you would like to follow along with the presenter's slides you can do so here! https://drive.google.com/file/d/1-9oTYaknsUnmUwVh_f5sd-7p-Wu956Ce/view?usp=sharing Approximately 75% of the land base of the Southeastern US is devoted to farming, ranching and forestry.  Privately owned working lands play a crucial role in the provision of water quality and quantity, connectivity, and habitat availability, which are essential to the survival of many aquatic species, including the Eastern hellbender. The most serious threats to this once widespread aquatic species can be linked to unsustainable agricultural practices. Defenders of Wildlife is spearheading the Southeastern Hellbender Conservation Initiative (SEHCI); an effort to utilize Farm Bill programs to benefit both producers and hellbenders on agricultural lands in the Southeast. This partnership is a novel collaboration between conservationists, the research community, the US Department of Agriculture and the landowners themselves. Through SEHCI, funds are directed to producers who help stabilize stream banks, restore riparian vegetation, and improve soil and water health in important hellbender habitat. SEHCI provides an opportunity to address the root cause of dwindling hellbender populations to benefit both agricultural producers and wildlife.
46:38
October 7, 2019
The Importance of Water Quality and Microplastics in the Tennessee River and Beyond
DONATE: https://crc.kindful.com/?campaign=1038309 If you would like to follow along this talk with the speaker's lecture slides, check out this link! https://drive.google.com/file/d/1hbp1Bx0eBfNLOEGXRBqyHDLwPazYWqyl/view During the summer of 2017, the Tennesswim Project saw Andreas Fath set a new world record for swimming the entire 652-mile length of the Tennessee River. Together with Project Director Martin Knoll, the swim also included the most comprehensive water quality analysis ever conducted on the river. A major finding of the project was the highest concentrations of microplastics ever recorded in any river of the world. The talk will include details of the swim, as well as results and implications of the water quality study.
58:20
September 30, 2019